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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, September 12, 1901, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1901-09-12/ed-1/seq-5/

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??THE BUSY CORNER." | "THE SMITH BUILDING,
? ?
<H
O
ARamm. Sons & Co
o
9
ALWAYS THE BEST OF EVERYTHING FOR THE LEAST
MONEY!
> ?-?
The Busy Corner and the Smith Ani\ex is all one. Elevator
service in both buildings to take you to the proper floors.
You Will Find Our Store Closed All Day Satur*
day, But We Will Open for Business
From 6 to 9 P. il.
x
MULL REMI1N1A
Yds,
350 Yds,
Yds,
Is what gives us the prestige each Friday of every week in the year.
Every end is a magnet and the drawing power is great. It's the main
spring which helps to -move the other departments which have odds and
ends and broken assortments to sell. What we offer tomorrow are re
building values sure enough because the prices favor your side of the
purse two to one.
<fYv(fb(fb a cleaning up of several grades and pricesr
H US. goods which sold from 8c. to 20c. per yard, offered at
17sc. As tke quantity is limited, we are not responsible how long it will
last.
^ (11)0(0)^/^ ?. ?ra(les Flannel, the blue and the gray, the
(D* 9 HJaJ'HJ' H (U13? re[j^ wjjjte arK| l>lue.
This lot represents many more yards than >ve have ever had to offer
at one time, and for that reason we expect a big sale tomorrow on
these various goods.
?400 V(d]^ of All-wool Red Twilled Flanned, worth 2ic. in the
? piece; in remnants I5C
HO0 Ydl^ All-wool Medicated Scarlet Twilled Flannel; worth
in the piece 33c. pei yard; in remnants 25c.
of Anti-rheumatic All-wool Scarlet Flannel, which is
worth in the piece 45c. per yard; in remnants 35c.
IftlT) Yds ?* All-wool Blue Twilled Flannel, which is worth in
tjie pjece 21c.; in remnants 15c.
of All-wool Blue Twilled Flannel, which is worth in
the piece 29c. per yard; in remnants 20c.
of All-wool Indigo Blue Twilled Flannel, something
out of the ordinary; worth 50c. per yard in the piece;
in remnants 39c.
Q(TD(fD Ydls of Gray Twilled Flannel; the very thing for undergar
ments for both men and women; worth 16c. in the
piece; in remnants I2l/2c.
4t(fto(fl) Fine Gray Twilled Flannel; worth in the piece, 25c.;
in remnants 19c.
^00 YdS Heav>' *?ray Twilled Flannel, 90% wool; worth
0 in the piece, 39c.; in remnants 28c.
RfOjO VVfls ^ Wool Flannel; weighty and stanch for wear;
^ ? worth in the piece, x6c.; in remnants I2^c.
Yd S White Wool Flannel, which never sells for less than
m (Ui^? 25c. per yard in the piece; in remnants 18c.
100 Yds. of All-wool Plain White Flannel; worth in the piece,
? 35c.; in remnants 25c.
fl n ^4- of Unbleached Canton Flannel Remnants; the regular 5c.
11 IU<U>IL quality?for 3^c.
tl IT ^-jj- of I'nbleached Canton Flannel Remnants; heavy twilled and
^ close nap; worth 8^c 6]/2c.
H li ^blt" of'Extra-weight Unbleached Canton Flannel Remnants;
11 1LAPIL \VOrth I2^c. in the piece?for 10c.
1 (CCalicos; made of standard cloth and printed
^ the same as percale styles; worth 5c. per yard?for. .2%c.
9(Th {fhirtlO of Percales, in reds, indigo and mourning, includ
Ai\y11 dilSo a jot 0f grounds, with all the newest
designs; worth from i2l/2c. to 18c. per yard?for 8f^c.
1 ^ew Bleached Muslin; these remnants run
from 1 to 10 yards in the piece; the regular price when
cut from the piece is \2x/2z. per vard; in remnants 7^c.
IN' OI K REMNANT DEPARTMENT. THIRD FLOOR, Brsv CORNER SIDE, WHICH IS TIIK
PERM A NEXT I.< H' ATH IN.
$6.98
$7.50
From Our Suit Department. '
1 FOULARD SILK DRESS. HANDSOMELY TRIMMED WITH LACK; SIZE 38.
SOLD K(?R $2n.<M>. FOR
1 CREAM AIX-WOOL CHEVIOT SERGE. HANDSOMELY TRIMMED. AND 5
BLACK BRILLIANTINE COSTUMES. WHICH SOLD FOR $18.50, FOR
I T.\HI E OK KINK ALL-WOOL CLOTH SUITS, IN ASSORTED COLORS. MADE
WITH SILK LINED JACKETS AND FLAKE SKIRTS?SOLD FOR $12.50 AND $15.00,
-i TAN COVERT AND VENETIAN CLOTH JACKETS, EARLY FALL WEIGHT. (ffcQ
REDUCED KROM $5.U0 AND $6.00
4 KINK OXFORD GRAY WALKING SUITS, SIZES 38 AND 40 ONLY, REDUCED ?Q
FROM $1H5<> TO
8 HANDSOME WINTER JACKETS. EITHER SILK OR SATIN LINED; SOME HAVE <f*Q
Fl'R TRIMMED COLLARS; RKDIVED FROM $12.50 AND *15.UO TO
SECOND FLOOR. SMITH ANNEX.
Lnoiinig Remraarats.
5tx> yards, more or less, of Lining Remnants, in good lengths, in as
sorted colors; these goods sold off the piece at 15c.
per vard; close them out tomorrow we shall make
the price
LINING DEPARTMENT, FIRST FLOOR, SECTION G, BUSY CORNER SlOT
RSbfooiin Remnants.
A I.oT ok ODDS AND ENDS OF ALL-SILK RIBBONS. CONSISTING OF
FANCY AND PLAIN TAFFETAS. THEY RCN IN LENGTH FROM 1 TO X
YDS THEY SOLD IN THE PIECE CP To 1S.\ THE REMNANTS OUST
YOU. PER YD
RIBBON DEPARTMENT, SECTION 1, SMITH BUILDING.
the UrsdermusSin and Children's Department,
WHICH HAS PERMANENT LOCATION SECOND KLOOR. KRONT, BUSY CORNER SIDE, FOR
MERLY OCCUPIED BY THE SKIT DEPARTMENT:
4 SILK PETTICOATS: THE COLORS ARE LAVENDER. BLUET AND CERISE: MADE WITH
ACCORDION-PLEATED RUFFLES. FINISHED WITH EXTRA SMALL AND DUST RUKFLES:
WHICH HOLD FOR $4 ft* AND $5.W?; To BE SOLD AT $2.!M
I LOT OK CAMBRli CORSET COVERS. ROI'ND AND VE NECK, KRENCH AND TIGHT
KITT1NG: TRIMMED WITH VAL. LACE AND EMBROIDERY; THEY ARE ALL ODD SIZES;
SOLD FOR 3D?\; FOR JWr.
1 LOT OF NAINSOOK AND CAMBRIC CORSET COVERS. WHICH ARE MADE WITH
ROI'ND NECK. TRIMMED WITH VAL. AND TORCHON LACE. EMBROIDERY AND WASH
RIBBON; il.-ui ODD SIZES; WHICH SOI.D FOR ?8r.. 8.V. AND 7.V.; CLOSED OIT AT 48o.
7 CHILDREN'S LEGHORN HATS. TRIMMED WITH RED AND PINK MULL. LARGE POM
PON EIKJED WITH WHITE LACK AND RIBBON: SOLD FOR *1.25: FOR 4S<-.
1 IA ?T OF IN" K A NTS' KINK MIU, CAPS. TRIMMED WITH FINE LACK, EMBROIDERY AND
RIKBOX; A MONO THEM YOU'LL FIND SOME WITH VAI. LACE INSERTION AND FINE
TUCKS. HEMSTITCHED. WHICH SOLD FROM $1.80 TO $2.00; CLO8E AT 5J*\
Friday Remnants in Housefurnishing Department.
.1 CLUTIIEX HAMPERS, MADE OF ROUND WILLOW, NO COVERS, WHICH SOLD FOR $1.50.
EACH
2 PRESERVING KETTLES, ALL PKRKWT. BUT WITHOUT HANDLE-THE BEST QUALITY
I'oHCELAIM.INKD 24-QT. SIZE SOLD KOR $1.00 4<)c
1? ENAMEL CUSPIDORS. SLIGHTLY CHIPPED. REGULAR PRICE, 49c.-TO BE SOLD
Fob 25o.
2 HAMPERS, MADE oK KLNE INDIAN CHII'S. SLIGHTLY KADED, WHICH SOLD FOR $2.50
each swo*
.'{ LEMONADE OB WATER SETS. MADE OK BOHEMIAN GLASS, 2 TUMBLERS SHORT. SOLD
FOR >1 .?? FOR (?),.
? SILVER-PLATED S1HO.N HOLDERS AND CREAM JUGS-GILT-LINED-REGULAR PRICE
$1 ?K FOR j?.V.
1 BRASS RECEPTION TABLE ONYX TOP, SLIGHTLY SHOP-WORN, REGULAR PRICE
$3.fi?. FOR $2 2.1
1 DINNER SET. FLNE IMPERIAL I"oRCELAIN, GOLD-IJXED. TWO PIECES SHORT?SOLD
FOR $?".!>* FOR j 4 ,,s
2 1 ARIBBAD ? HINA DINNER SETS, VERY THIN AND DAINTY, NEAT DECORATIONS, TWO
PIECES BROKEN SOIJ) FOR J1.H.00 $11 ?8
THIRD KIjooR. BUSY < ORNER SIDE.
Pictures Among This Swarm of Remnants.
5 6c.
25c.
69c.
GENUINE STEEL ENGRAVINGS. KINE QUALITY BLACK FRAME, SIZE 14 BY IT. ? 11 {Olffe
8ol.D KOR $.'<???. FOR
GENUINE PLATINUM PRINTS. IN OVAI. AND ROUND BLACK FRAMES. SOME FEW
ARK SLIGHTLY DAMAGED BY DUST. EACH
1 LOT OK MEDALLION'S, IN GILT FLORENTINE FRAMES. SLIGHTLY DAMAGED:
ALSO COLLEGE COLORS AND GOLF GIBUS. WHICH SOLD FOR $1.00, FOR
n; INCH BY 20-INCH BLACK FRAME P!<TURKS. INCLUDING ALL POPULAR SUB
JEITS. SUCH AS MADONNA, ST CECKIJA, PRISCII.LA. ETO>
THIS DEPARTMENT IS LOCATED FOURTH FLOOR, SMITH ANNEX.
Books amid Stationery.
V TABLE FILLED WITH SLIGHTLY SOILED AND HANDLED BOOKS. ELEGANT EDI
TIONS KOLIO VOL! MKS OK DORK'S BIBLE GALLERY. 1"?' SUPERB ILLt'STRATIONS DF
8' RI1TION ON" OPPOSITE PAGE $1.00 COPY 45c'
A KEW OK THE FAMoUM TRUE STORIKS SKRIK-S. BY ELBICIDGE BROOKES; STORIES
OK WASHINGTON AND LINCOLN. UNITED STATES HISTORY $1.5n EDITION. PER VOL
1 ME 7.V.
DWIGIIT MOODY IN CLOTH. $1 <?> EDITION, PER COPY 25c.
A LOT OK HANDSOME BOARD JUVENILE BOOKS. SLIGHTLY SOILED. PICTURE ILLUS
TRATION AND PRETTY STORIES. AI-SO \T GREATLY REDUCED PRICES.
BIG BOTTLES OF CARTER S WRITING FLUID 8c
LARGE SCRATCH TABLETS. 2 KOR 5c
BOOK BAGS KROM 11*- UP.
ALL COLORS tM-' FULLrSHBET BLOTTERS 3c
AN ODD LOT oK FINE WRITING PAPER. 24 SHEETS 5o!
ODD I/OT OK HIGH-CLASS ENVELOPES KOR 5,.
ALL COIjORS OK CREPE PAPER KU1.L ROIJ-S KOR 7e'
FIRST KLOOR, ShXTlON S. SMITH ANNEX.
Women's Neckwear.
ODDS AND ENDS IN WOMEN'S NECKWEAR, INCLUDING MULL AND GRASS LINEN
?AILOR COI?LAKS, LACK TRIMMED. WINDSOR Tira IN PLAIN COLORS. AS WELL AS
I'LAlltS AND I*oLK A DOTS?ALSO BAND AND SHIKIJ* BOW S?W HI Oil SOLD FOR 3S>\ TO
??v.. KOR
ANOTHER I-oT OF ODDS AND ENDS IN WOMEN'S NECK PIECES. INCLUDING SILK AND
WASHABLE STI FFS, SUCH AS STOCK AND AUTOMOBILE TIES-SOLD FOR SOr.. FOR....Mr.
BLACK SATIN STRING TIES. THE KIND WHICH WE SOLD FOR 1 Sc.?REMNANT PRICE..lie
FIRST FLOOR. SECTION 2. SMITH ANNEX
Kann,. tSons & Co09
"The Busy Corner." 8th and Market Space.
??The Smith Building."
Naturally there's a fall flavor to these remnants. The buying has been
of the medium weights, so the breaks are among those complete lots.
ilotiiers will find much among these odds and ends that will be of serv
ice to the boys for school wear.
Sizes are broken?that, you will understand, is the sole reason for such
material reductions.
Boys' Wool Novelty Suits, in sizes 4,6, 7 and 8 years. REDUCED from $7.50 to... $2.9,
Boys' Double-breasted Wool Suits, medium weight, in sizes 7 to 15 years; RE- || VU),
DUCED from $4 and $4.50 to. H 0 ^
Bovs' Medium-weight Double-breasted Short Pants Suits, in sizes 7 to 15; RE- j
DUCED from $6 and $7.50 to <$/QJ'o 11
Y Bovs' Neglige Shirts, in sizes 12, \2l/2 and 14. good patterns; REDUCED from 75c.
? and $ 1 to nrOJ'^
Boys'Band Bows and Windsor Ties, in variety of patterns; hardly two alike; RE- || 'S/"* i
DUCED from 25c. to 11 o3'^'o 5
^ 3
<9>Co \
f i
X Men's Laundered White Shirts; sizes are badly broken, but a very superior quality *2([])?"* 2
? for 75c.; REDUCED to i
Men's Black and Tan Half Hose, fast colors, with spliced heels and toes; best of the
15c. grade; REDUCED to
Men's Fancy Percale Shirts, with stiff bosoms; broken sizes of regular $1 grade; >4] y
REDUCED to ^
? 1
Men's Windsor-end Clijb Ties, in fancy silks; a broken lot of the 50c. grade; RE- f| (Q)/^ 1
DUCED to H >^0 j
2 1
I
Boys' Fancy Golf Caps; all wool and silk lined; also some Imported Fez Caps; RE- tj (H)/^ |
DUCED from 50c. to H >^0 |
Children's Tams, Napoleon and Vassar Caps; new styles; worth up to 98c.; RE- I
DUCED to j
V Boys' Real Fur Fedoras, Derbys and Golf Hats, in proper blocks and colors for *1
2 fall; broken sizes; worth $1; REDUCED to. (!> .*<
Ladies'Black Yici Kid, Wax Calf and Enamel Leather Button and Lace Shoes; worth t] (H) S |
$3 and $3.50; REDUCED to . A <4/ 11 o j
Little Gents' Tari Vici Kid and Russet Goat Lace Shoes, also with Misses' Cloth- (Q)
top Patent Leather Shoes; worth $1.50 to $2; REDUCED to
Bovs' and Youths' Black Calf Lace Shoes; narrow widths; every pair guaranteed; 65! t|
worth $2 a pair; REDUCED to Q|/ 11 oMJALK
Photo Plates from the Anthony Fire Sale?Seeds, Cramer, Carbutt, New York^; jl
choice of any size that's in the lot 11 hJ' DoZ.
Pony Premo Cameras, Nos. 2 and 3; Pony Premos, C and D, and Ascots, No. 33; ^>1^) ^1)'^
folding and cycle; from the fire sale; worth up to $12; REDUCED to....,
Ascot Box Camera. No. 34, without lens; Ascot, Nos. 30 and 36; Premo B., from <<?* A
the fire sale; worth up to $18; REDUCED to.. ??????????????????????????? m/ It* \^J/
Lot of Box Cameras, sizes 3^x3^2 and 4x5; worth $5, $6 and $7; REDUCED to...
$11.50
AKS AND COrtPANY.
Pennsylvania Avenue and Seventh Street.
9V
"MONEY back if
you want it.
Under Odd Fellows' Hall, 423 7th St.
Mason's Qt. Fruit Jars,
with porcelain top = = =
Jelly Glasses, witlhi ^
tin tops = = = = =
This is the height of the preserving season, and we offer the
two above items in Mason's fruit jars and jelly glasses as leaders.
At these prices you buy them as low as they can be bought in car
load lots. These figures will hold good only as long as the lots
hold out, and the sooner you come the better chance you will have
to secure a good supply of them for your fall preserving. In ad
dition to these two great leaders we offer the following list of bar
gains for Friday only:
AM sizes Stone Jars,
9c. Per Gallon.
Worth 15c.
$59c. Clothes Baskets, 39c.
34-ft. Ironing Boards, 39c.
?y Regular price, 59c.
5-lb. Flat Iron, I Sc.
Worth 25c.
I9c. Washboards, 10c.
69c. 4-fold Clothes
Horses, 39c.
4-ft. Stepladders, 38c.
Made good and strong, and well worth 59c.
15c. Floor Mops, 9c.
The large nine.
? ' ?
15c. Mop Handles, 9c.
With strong clasp.
Large Wash Tubs, 48c.
Made of g:?lvauW?id iron, the regular 89c.
kind.
i
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Qal. Garbage Pails, 29c.
12-<|t. si*\ and nerer sold elsewhere for
less than 4?c.
Wire Baskets, 9c.
Made for holding flowers-, vines, etc. Reg
ular price, 25c. r
T
y
1
qJ.tHtC" lit (?>{
Big Ash Cans, $1.25.
Made of e*tra heavy jr*lvanlE?*d iron, 25
gallon capacity, and huae^Uy worth $1.98.
1
s
<
Wash Boilere, 39c.
Hare Hplcndid tin MttudL good size, and
are reaily worth 59c ***? *
? s?
25c. Parlor Brooms, 15c.
A strong, sntwtantftl vjiffee-strlng Broom.
50c. China C|Bpidor8,29c.
Made of twaatlfully decorated gold-traced
Warwick china, and vjj^uldjj&' cheap at 50c.
i
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Hudson's Variety Store,
423 7th St. N.W.
enr < r,
<7
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?
Health Drpartmeat Eatlmtca,
Dr. William C. Woodward, the health of
ficer, has submitted to the District Com
mission's a supplemental estimate for his
department for the fiscal year ending June
90, 1906. The estimates ask for oae medi- |
cal sanitary Inspector at M-40 per diem,
one assistant medical sanitary Inspector at
13 per diem, one derk at ?2 per diem and
one laborer at 11.37 per diem, all to be paid
from the appropriation to prevent the !
spread of scarlet fever, diphtheria, etc.
The supplemental estimates also include1
one engineer at 11.92 per diem and two la
borers at $1.25 per diem each, to be paid
from the appropriation for maintaining the
disinfecting service. None of the positions
Is new.
Piessirc (Tab beer?mt?i.
Articles of incorporation of "The Crecent
Pleasure Club" were today placed on rec
ord. The Incorporators are John Risao.
Charles MHler. Ristteif. Leonard. Edward
Smith, Louts Vogelsberfar.
I the I
? TT^ t, ^ ? 3*
' I
Foundation %
of home comfort right. In
$ other words, be careful in the ^
$ selectfon of your Carpets and ^
| R"gs. ? &
? We'll show you only reliable $
^ grades?in the best of the new $
patterns?and we'll surprise &
$ you with the prices? if
jr Ingrains 31K-. a yard 9*
> Tai>Pstry Brussels 55c. a yard SjJ
B<Kly Brussels $1.05 a yard v
*? Ax minsters 87Vi<*. a yard ?)?
A whole roomful of Rugs. $
^ $
Hoeke, %
"Home's Fittings," Ta. are. and 8th st. ^
" . .. 9"
"?fer 4ir '4=r "Sir "fcSrisr
$
t
$
DEATH OF MOXSIGXOR STEPHAS.
Director of Catholic Indian Mlwion
Sorcnmbi to Brief Hlneits.
Monsignor Stephan, director of the Cath
olic Indian mission, died at his residence,
615 M street northwest, at 7:.'J0 this morn
ing. after a brief illness.
Monsignor Stephan was appointed direc
tor of the Catholic Indian mission by Car
dinal Gibbons in 1884 and devoted all his
time and energy in building up the Cath
olic Indian mission. He was eminently suc
cessful in the work, as is attested by the
fact that during this brief period he se
cured for the maintenance and support of
the mission between $4.t**>,000 and ?>,UUU,OU*>
from government and private sources. He
was greatly beloved by the Indians, and
his death will be mourned by them.
Monsignor Stephan was born in Baden,
Germany, seventy-nine years ago. He was
educated at Karlsruhe and Freiburg. In
1847 he was summoned to this country by
the illness of his father, but did not arrive
until after the latter's burial. He remained
here, and completed his theological studies
in Cincinnati. Monsignor Stephan served
throughout the civil war as chaplain in the
forces of Gen. Sheridan. He wag one of the
promoters of the Catholic missionary work
among the Indians, and at the time when
he first became connected with that work
there were but eleven schools. He has
lived In this city for the past seventeen
years. He will be buried at Corn wells. Pa.,
Mother Katherine Drexel having charge
of the services.
Eleventh Cavalry Band Concert.
The following program will be rendered
by the 11th United States Cavalry Band at
the Fort Myer band stand under the direc
tion of Chief Musician A. Perweln thla
evening at 8 o'clock:
March. "The Battleship Maine" Seits
Selection, "Lucia" Donizetti
Walts. "The First Violin" Max 8. Witt
Clarinet solo. "1st Air Varie" Crahan
Principal Musician A. S. Clark.
Paraphrase on Kochat's song "Forsaken."
Kretchmcr
Medley overture. "The Wonder" ?..Mackle
Red, White and Blue.
AFFAIRS IN ALEXANDRIA
PME METBADISTS ARRANGING FOR
ANHVAL CONFERENCE.
Manx Entries for tkr Mammuii Horse
Show?Uraerkl aai Pfraosal
News Down the River.
Evening Star Bureau.
No. 701 King St..
Bell Telephone. No. \U6,
ALEXANDRIA, Va.. September 12. 1801.
The annual conference of the Free Meth
odist Church, embracing the churches of
tliat denomination In the territory extend
ing from Windsor. N. Y., to this city, will
begin Wednesday, the 18th Instant. In the
old First Presbyterian Church on South
Fairfax street. The session will last until
the evening of the following Sunday. About
forty ministers are expected and there will
probably be as many lay delegates In at
tendance. The presiding bishop will be
Rev. G. W. Cole of New York.
The usual business of assigning pastors
"to charges and looking after the various
branches of church work within the bor
ders of the conference will come before
the body. The business sessions will be
held In the mornings, commencing at ?
o'clock, and there will be preaching in the
atternoon and evening of each day during
the session. Rev. John Cavanaugh Is the
pastor in charge of the local church.
Mmmimii Hone Show.
Arrangements have been perfected for the
annual exhibit of the Prince William Horse
men's Association at Manassas next Tues
day and Wednesday, and the event prom
ises to be the best ever held at that place.
The entries are larger than ever before,
many well-known animals being Included
In the list. Courtland H. Smith of this city
has lifty-three entries. Among the exhibit
ors will be horsemen from Washington,
Baltimore, Richmond and throughout the
state. A novel feature of this year's
show will be hunt teams, polo ponies, la
dles' driving horses and unicorn teams.
romiiaar Incorporated.
Judge Norton, in the corporation court,
has granted a charter to the Columbia Sup
ply Company, the purpose of which is to
deal In patents, etc. The sum of $50,000 is
named as the capital stock. The officers
are D. S. Fletcher, president; James F.
Tufts, vice president; W. S. Matthews,
secretary, and Hiram Buckingham, treas
urer. Messrs. W. F. Warner and J. M.
McCllntock. In addition to the officers, con
stitute the board of directors. An amend
ment was made In the charter of the Kuhn
Formaldehyde Generator Company where
by the company was permitted to Increase
its capital stock to $7>00,000.
General and Personal.
Mr. Thomas Merryman, a venerable resi
dent of the third ward, died last night at
his home. No. 710 North Columbus street.
Deceased was about seventy-three years of
age. He Is survived by a widow and sev
eral grown children. The funeral will take
place Saturday afternoon.
The funeral of Mrs. Elizabeth M. Rox
bury, whose death occurred Monday morn
ing. took place this afternoon from the
family residence. No. 1107 Prince street.
The services were conducted jointly by Rev.
J. H. S. Ewell of the Methodist Protestant
Church and Rev. E. V. Regester of the M.
E. Church South. Interment was made in
the Methodist Protestant cemetery.
Judge Norton of the corporation court hag
appointed W. B. Dulaney administrator of
the estate of the late Thomas E. Dulaney.
Edward Dixon. Boyd McGee. George Nick
ens, Robert Thompson and SamuW Ross
were appointed appraisers.
Miss Hattle Selecman of Occoquan has
been appointed sponsor to represent this
district at the meeting of the State Grand
Camp. Confederate Veterans, to be held In
Petersburg October 23.
The eleventh anniversary of Alexandria
Council. No. 33, Jr. O. I'. A. M.. will be
celebrated with appropriate exercises at
Lannon's Opera House Thursday evening
next.
Commonwealth Attorney Leonard Mar
bury, who has been spending the summer
at the Sweet Chalybeate Springs, Va.. has
returned to this city.
A literary meeting under the auspices of
the Epworth League, M. E. Church South,
will be held in the lecture room of the
church tomorrow evening. Several inter
esting papers will be read.
SEEKS LEGAL SETTLEMENT.
Controversy Over a Grand Mastership
Taken to Court.
The United States of America, on the re
lation of William C. Martin, this afternoon
petitioned the Supreme Court of the Dis
trict of Columbia for writ of mandamus to
compel James W. Muse to relinquish to
the petitioner the office of District grand
master of District Grand Lodge, No. 20,
Grand United Order of Odd Fellows, which,
it Is asserted. Muse has usurped. Justice
Anderson directed that a rule to show
cause issue, returnable the 17th instant.
Martin states that the 25th of last Sep
tember he was duly elected District grand
master to serve for one year. Last Janu
ary. he says, he was informed by the grand
secretary of the subcommittee on manage
ment of the order that charges against
him had been presented by Muse, assert
ing in substance that Martin had not been
honestly elected to the office. Believing
that the subcommittee had no jurisdiction
in the premises Martin filed a demurrer,
which was overruled, and an order passed
last July declaring Muse duly elected grand
master. The next meeting of the District
Grand Lodge was held the 0th instant.
Martin says he was ready to assume the
duties of his office, but found Muse presid
j ing. Martin entered a protest, but no at
tention being paid to It he invokes the aid
of the. court.
Martin claims that the subcommittee was
without jurisdiction to entertain the
charges, and that Muse, while having no
right to the office of District grand master,
has practically ousted the petitioner from
the same. Attorneys Irving Williamson
and Fountain Peyton appear for Martin.
SENT TO ST. ELIZABETH.
Sanity of Mrs. O'Neill's Assailant to
Be Determined.
Edmund Bell, the Treasury Department
watchman, arrested yesterday for having
threatened Mrs. Rose O'Neill of 1701 Rhode
Island avenue with a revolver In Farragut
Square, was sent temporarily to St. Eliz
abeth Hospital for the Insane today. He
will be given a hearing before the Supreme
Court of the District of Columbia on the
charge of Insanity, which has been pre
ferred.
?
WELLINGTON WILL NOT TALK.
Refuses to Discuss His Expulsion
From i'nion Leaicue.
Special Dispatch to The Evening Star.
CUMBERLAND, Md? September 12.?
Senator Wellington has quit talking, and
refuses further to be Interviewed. He has
nothing to say about the Union League's
action. His friends have formed a sharp
cordon around him, and have coached him
to talk no further. He daily attends to
business at the Citizens' National Bank,
of which he Is president.
Some of his close friends express them
selves as "heart sick" because of his ex
pressions, which have brought him such
unenviable notoriety, and while they do not
doubt he used them, they think he should
not have been interviewed, knowing he Is
prone to say ugly things about McKlnley.
They think he should have been spared,
that his utterances should not have been
made public. His remarks have arous*Hl
much indignation here.
SIDEWALK BOILERS MlrST GO.
Mayor Harrison of Chicago Says They
Are Daactroas.
CHICAGO, September 12.?All steam boil
ers under sidewalks in Chicago are to be
removed. Under orders from Mayor Har
rison. Boiler Inspector Blaney has begun
serving notices. How many of these boil
ers there are is not know*, but there must
be hundreds, if not thousands. Mayor Har
rison. ija speaking about the order, said:
"Boilers under sidewalks are dangerous.
Should one explode' the damage would ha
THE WORLD OF SOCIETY
MARRIRD I* THE FMRSEW ? op
KKAR RELATIVES.
Invitation* Out (or the Narrla?r of
MIm Hill and Mr. Dnan?Kip??U
tlon Joarnrrt-IVmoBila.
Mrs. Lena Baldwin, widow of Mr. Brent
Baldwin, and Mr. George C. Hennlng, presi
dent of the Traders* National Bank, wer*
Quietly married ato'clock yesterday after
noon at the parsonage of St. Paul's Church,
corner of 15th and V streets. The cere
mony was performed bv Rev. Father Mac
kin. Only the immediate relatives of tho
contracting parties were in attendance.
After Congratulations and well wishes had
been extended Mr. and Mrs. Hennlng de
parted for a wedding trip. They will be
away several weeks. Upon their return
they will reside at 1728 2rtth street.
Miss Baldwin and Miss Hilda P. Baldwin
of ls;CJ 15th street are visiting their sister.
Mrs. C. Fred Cook, at Somerset Heights.
Md.
Mrs. Peter H. Hill has issued Invitations
v?r <narriaK* of her daughter May and
Mr. Charles Aloysius Dunn Wednesday
morning. September 25, at 9:30 o'clock at
St. Paul s Church. 15th and V streets.
Mrs. S. Rothschild has returned from
Atlantic City and has as her guent Mrs
F rank Simon of Florida.
^Mr. Thomas W. Smith and family of 61?t
Kast Capitol street have returned after a
two months' sojourn at their cottage at
Arundel-on-the-Bay, Md. Mr. and Mrs
Smith and their daughter Caroline are now
at Atlantic City.
Mr. and Mrs. Richard C. Rynex arid
daughters. Minnie Lee and Dorothy, have
returned and will be glad to see their
friends at their new home. 14tr> 1* street.
Miss Emma G. Stormont of Hyattsvllle,
Md leaves tonight for an extended visit
Mu:h "? a,,d h"r "IJ h""?
Mr. and Mrs. W. M Keeler of l.'{?>7 x
street have returned after several weeks'
sojourn In northwestern New York.
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel S. Lamont and their
family returned in their private car from
their home at Sorrento. Me., Tuesday and
brook ?N V oountr>' house at Mill
Monday evening the Rev. Francis M
Bureh of Mount Prospect Terrace. In the
Blue Ridge mountains, ga^e his guests a
straw ride to a neighboring town, where
supper was served. After returning the
party enjoyed an informal dance on the
spacious veranda, which was brilliantly 11
Z?latu h>' hundreds of Japanese lan
f" ? * rancts M. Burch chaperoned
the party which consisted of Mr. Walter J.
Moling, Miss Katherine Dunn. Mr. William
r. Dunn, Mr. and Mrs. William W Keek
Ml? Edith W. Mr.
'??? ?; Dougherty, all of Wash
nhl?0n|fi Janes. Jr , of Philadel
phia, Miss Alnie G. de l isle of New Or
leans. Miss Messle Morgan and Miss Wll
helmina Gibson, Miss Sadie Rust of
Bowles Va and Master Willie Dunn and
Miss Mary Donn of Washington.
Miss Jennie Moore of 2id and F streets
has returned from a trip to the Pan-Ameri
can and Niagara and a visit to relatives in
Rochester. N. Y.
Mrs. Lillian Brown of the dead letter
office and her sister, Miss Nellie Atherton
retu">?'d 'rom the Pan-American ex
hibition. Niagara Falls. St. Lawrence river
and Alexandria bay.
Dr. and Mrs. John W. Jennings are the
guests of Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Taylor at
ronticello Springs, near Richmond. Va.
They will leave Richmond Saturday to tako
the trip from Norfolk to Boston by sea. and
will visit Quebec. Montreal and Toronto
returning by way of Buffalo, the Pan
American, Niagara and New York city.
The marriage of Miss Blanche Devlin of
cltJ ami Mr. Walter F. Siddall of
England will take place this evening at 6
o clock at the residence of the bride's par
ents No. 4?u 6th street. The ceremony
will be performed by Rev. F W Moot
pastor of St. Paul's Lutheran Church. Im
mediately after the ceremony the couple
will start for England, where for soma
weeks they will visit relatives.
??? ?
Flnnlah Senators Removed.
ST. PETERSBURG. September 12.?Tues
day the Finnish senators Homen, Helkel
Nummelln and Ramsay were removed for
"opposing the emperor s commands." Tbfry
voted against official publication of the
n<T,im,I!tary law- Twelve senators favored
publication.
married.
FRKET- HESS. On August 31, 1901, atHnm at
the parsonage of St. Mark's I^ith.-ran Cb?ieh.
710 C street northeast, bv the pastor He* A
h ??*am*
"K?, both of i\ aehluftuD, li. C. ?
DIED.
COLLINS. Departed this life en Tuesdar. Sept"tm
j>er 10, 19ol, at 9:30 p.m., MA It* A. COLLINS
ColNns" Collin* and the late Catherine
Funeral will take place from her sister's residence.
1120 5th strvet northeast, on Fridav. September
13. at J a.ui. Friends and relatives are invited
to attend. ,
COOK. On Wednesday. September It. 1901 at
~""t4,, t1?" ^ 1U.IAJI COoK, beloved husband
. ?>' Alice (<>ok. aged sixty-four years.
Notice oi funeral hereafter. ?
DEMON'JEOT. On Wednesday. Sept elg Iter 11, 1901
8' p.m., NARCISSE, the beloved husi>and
of the late Marie I H>luoug<>ot.
Mineral from the residence of his son-in-law, I>r.
r. A. \an Rcuth, 92T> 20th street northwest
Saturday morning at !> o'clock, thence to St.
Matthew's Catholic Church. Funeral private. 2*
HILTON. Departed this life on W>-dnesday Sep
temlier 11. 19??1. at ll:3o p.m.. after a linger
ing illness, JAMES M. HILTON, beloved hus
band of 1*ranels Moffett Hilton and son of Mr*.
C. C. Hiltou.
Notice of funeral hereafter. . ?
Hl'RIJSY. On Thursday, September 12. 1901 at
10 o'clock a.m.. JOHN E.. beloved son of Ellx
abeth and *he late George Hurley, aged eigh
teen years.
Notice of funeral hereafter. ?
RIKLEY. On September 11. 1901. at 2 p.m.,
JOHN, Iteloved husband of Mary E. Itteley
Funeral private. ?
LAN*;LEY. On Tuesday. September 10, 1901, at 1
o'clock p.m.. at residence No. 1371 Half street
southwest, HARKY W. LAXO^E*.
Wc miss thee from our home, dear.
We miss thee frointhy place;
A shadow o'er our lives Is cast.
We miss the sunshine of thy face. ?
SILENCE. JOHN T., the iteloved husband of Car
oline A. Silence, dc|tarted this life, at the age
of eighty-two years and nine day*. Tuesday,
September 11, 1901, at midnight.
"Heaven is my home.'*
Funeral from* Ms late residence. No. 1430 Florida
avenue northwest. Saturday, September 14, at
1 o'clock p in. Interment ut Arliugton cem
etery. ?
8TEPHAN. On Thursday. September 12. 1901, at
7:30 a.m.. at his residence, ?iir? M street. Rt.
Rev. Monslgnor J. A. WTfaniAN, director of
the bureau of Catholic Indian missions.
Notice of funeral hereafter, ?
STEWART. On Wednesday, Septeml>er 11, 1901,
nt 7:30 a.m., BESSIK I..,-daughter of Columbus
and I.izzle C. Stewart, aginl nine years and
eight months.
Funeral from the residence of her parents. l.V)2
Kth street northwest. Friday, 13th instant, at
2:30 p.m. 2*
SULLIVAN. On W<-dnesday, Septcral>er 11, 1901,
at 9:15 p.m., MARY E., beloved wife of Eu
gene Sullivan.
Funeral from her fate residence, 1014 4th street
northeast, on Saturday, September 14, ut 9 a.m.,
thence to St. Aloysius Church, where mass will
l>e said for rc|?ose of her soul. Relatives and
friends are invitwd to attend. 2*
Prevention
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time will prevent
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Constipation, Jaundice, Torpid Liver
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