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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, June 30, 1902, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1902-06-30/ed-1/seq-5/

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flcKeew's
''Strictly Reliable Qualities.
We close daily at 5 p.m.; Satudray? 1 p.m.
?Ladles'&
dren's genuine
Handker=
chiefs = = =
Another lot of those neat little A11 -
linen Handki n-biefs for every-dav use?
splendid to take with you to t&e sea
shore o.* mountains. Only 5c. each.
L"t of I-a?1 I'niaundercd Hand-em
InUmi Ijiiri.il All linen HiIHlkflThlfftl
ITh*. quality specially priced jj
b?t of Indies* 2T?\ All-linen Embroid
ered Handkerchiefs slightly 1] (Q)^
mussed -specially priced at "
?$3 Silk Mitts, 29c.
Ladies' Elbow-length Colored Silk
Mips worth $1 ? specially
pri ed at
?$1.50 Lisle Vests, 18c.
Small sizes only in ladies' Fine I>ace
trtmraed Swiss Ribbed Lisle Vests -
worth $1.30 specially priced |
V-shape Fine Lace-trimmed Lisle Vests
? medium and small sizes bSc. "S(D)<r
kind-specially priced at
A few more Parasols at
exactly half price.
White Pique Belts, 25c.
and 50c.
Gilt and Mack buckles.
Snfaots' Lace Socks
?in white, black, tan. blue aDd^g^
pink sizes 4 to at
WM. H. McKNEW,
Sole D. C. Agents for Centemeri Gloves,
933 Pa. Ave,
$6? Carriages
for $45.
AN opportunity that presents Itself once in
a lifetime enabled us to buy a fine lot of
Carriages at remarkably low prices. One
of the specials?A fine Top Buggy; carmine or
piano body; cloth, corduroy or imitation leather
trimming; end or Brewster spring: carmine or
Brewster green gear. Sold for and up.
Special price $45
S. Bensioger, fKlV'
apll-3ro.20
ImootCofferl
fl216F St.'Phone 725.1
? P
?J Store will close dally at 5 p.m.. Saturdays
^ at 1 p.m . till further notice. ^
5?f V;
| ?The Aorausil Re= |
I duction Sale is a |
| busy clearance off |
l;: seasonable and de= I
? sirable goods. Here g
I areafewofftheimany |:
genuine bargains: }?
Ladies' Tai lor=Made |
* SuIts Reduced. I
v? v<
??# L-lies* Kb-aanr Tailor-made Suits, in
J# t;?ri. gray, black and ox fori, in walk- S
ing anil dp*<?? skirt -:yle>. jackets are g
silk lined: <kirt- have seven-gore Hare or
circular fb?nn e. ^
3? All This season'" V?
I :$is.001
reduced to Vf
? ?? Vf
| "Tub" Suits Reducedf
Line of Indies' ' Tub" Suits, in blue. ^?t
Vf rose and green: new designs: splendidly Vf
?S* made aid pr? ; t ily ^ o/f>V ^
5f? trimmed; worth v**n 11 H ?'
5f? from *."? to q nj) \ll/ V(
| Ladies' Waists |
| Reduced. |
L.in?? of IjdW Fin*? White India Uncn
Waisti. t !? ke.1 l.a k /Ov /f"K
and fn.nt ?ubr.,i?I- T fl
enr trimmed: ?..nh pTy II - M 1/U U -'t
*1.3u; r^Ju.Mi to.. u " v v ?;
S? $ fl M1
|
Robes Reduced. ?5
Elegant White and Ecru French and
trimmed with yffc 4* y c=j /TK
$16.^0?
value; reduced to ? 5,
i
Thin Goods Reduced. |
Choice lite of Dimities. Batiste and
Persian Lawns, In the most ?7
iwiiabh coleca and pattens; J /TV
regular 1> ? : 29 /I (Vw,
yard. Bedaced t<
Embroideries,
N? w ami Wautiful line of White and
?1 Embroideries r~~*
edgings and insertions; J
w-.rth from 90c t.
yanl. Bedoced
)Cc
Laces Reduced.
Suj-'rb showing of fin F.dnt de Venb-e.
r.dnt ?;aze .-.nil Batiste La- .n, m h^uds,
edgings. npi'li'jue
and medallion ef
fects; white and
e< ru: worth $ 1 L\~? to
^4 per yard. Reduc
ed to
Srreoot, Coffer ?&McCa!lley a
1256 F Street.
SUMMER
COOKING
?expenses ar?- reduced to the mini
mum cost, ami you get quicker,
cleaner and more effective service
If you use a Ga? Kange instead of
a coal range for the SIMMER
COOKING. All kinds of Gas
Ranges here.
Gas Appliance Exchange,
1424 New York Ave.
MP
2Sd
AMIXG Pictures is a fine
art as practiced by us.
-All the newest ami most
- artistic frames to select
-from and the lowest factory
- prices for the best framing work.
- Est t
ft mates cheerfully flven.
S. J. VenafoJe, 6?4 9th St.
>24-1*1 -Pfccn* Malu 3099 2.
* S. KANN, SONS & CO.
S, KANN, SONS fcXO.
*> '1!
? ii p
ALWAYS THE BEST OF EVERYTHING FOR THE LEAST MONEY.
COMMENCING MONDAY, JULY 7, OUR STORE WILL CLOSE AT 5 O'CLOCK EyERY
EVENING UNTIL SEPTEMBER 15, SATURDAYS EXCEPTED.
i Our American Sale of American Goods Allows You
the Best Values
for your Fourth of July buying you have ever had. Every one more or less is, no doubt, making some
extra purchases for this glorious day of independence. The merchandise we offer for this occasion have
been selected with a conclusive idea that they would fit the time and place.
American Sale of
MUSLIN UNDERWEAR.
THESE ARE A WELL-KNOWN MANUFACTURER'S SAMPLES. SUCH AS WE USUAL
LY GET 3 OR 4 TIMES A YEAR. THEY ARE MADE OF FINE MUSLIN, CAMBRIC, NAIN
SOOK AND LAWN. THE ASSORTMENT CONSISTS OF GOWNS, LONG AND SHORT
SKIRTS. CHEMISE, DRAWERS, CORSET COVERS AND LAWN KIMONAS. THEY ARE ALL
MORE OR LESS TRIMMED WITH FINE EMBROIDERY, POINT DE PARIS AND VALEN
CIENNES LACES?WE DOUBT IF THERE'RE TWO PIECES ALIKE. THEY AVERAGE IN
VALUE FROM $1 UP TO $2.98. WE HAVE DIVIDED THEM UP INTO 3 LOTS?
98c., 68c. and
FIRST FLOOR-CF.NTER BARGAIN TABLES-OFPOSITE THE EI.EVATORS.
American Salle of Wash Goods,
FROM THE GREAT TRADE SALE OF JOHN S. GIVEEN A CO.. THROUGH THE AUCTIONEERS. FIELD. CHAPMAN ft CO.
500 PIECES OF BATISTE IN ALL THE
PREVAILING FIGURED. FLORAL. DRES
DEN AND SYMMETRICAL EFFECTS,
WHICH GIVEEN MADE TO
RETAIL AT Sc. AMERICAN
SAI.E PRICE..
700 PIECES OF AMERICAN BATISTE.
CORDED LF.NO EFFECT. IN FLORAL AND
FIGURED DESIGNS, ALL COLORINGS,
WHICH GIVEEN MADE TO
RETAIL AT AMERICAN
SALE PRICE
FINE PIQUE. IN TWO COLORS, NAVY
AND BLACK: DIFFERENT SIZE DOTS: A
VERY STANCH AND WELL-WEARING QUAL
ITY. W H I C H GIVEEN
MADE TO RETAIL FOR
15c A YARD. AMERICAN
SALE PRICE
600 PIECES OF THE PREVAILING BLACK
ON WHITE FINE SHEER INDIA LINEN EF
FECT; ALSO OTHER LIGHT COLORINGS,
WHICH GIVEEN MADE TO ~
RETAIL AT 12S,r. A YARD.
AMERICAN SALE PRICE.
1 LUljUtvlAufl,
s 8#;.
IQj^c.
NAVY AND LIGHT BLUE AND BLACK
DUCK. ALSO NAVY. BLACK AND WHITE,
WITH DOTS: THESE GIVEEN
MADE TO RETAIL AT 12'
A YARD. AMERICAN S.l
PRICE
7ft PIECES OF FINE MADRAS; T H,I S
CLOTH IS THE FINEST OK ITS KIND; IT
HAS A SATIN STRIPE. WITH BLACK ON
WHITE EFFECTS: G I V E E N
MADE HIS CLOTH TO RETAIL ?i __
FOR 25o. AMERICAN SALE I f
TRICE
00U PIECES OF FINE WASH MATERIALS.
SUCH AS RAYE BATISTE AND MOl SSELINE
BATISTE. IN A HANDSOME COLLECTION OF
PRETTY DESIGNS AND COLORINGS, WHICH
GIVEEN MADE TO RE
TAIL AT 15c A YARD.
AMERICAN SALE PRICE...
1034c.
;AUE 8^4Cc
450 PIECES OF VERY FINE SHEER
CLOTH IN CONNECTION WITH THE EN
TIRE SURPLUS OF ONE OF THE LARGEST
MANUFACTURERS OF FINE WASH GOODS;
MOSTLY POLKA DOTS ON WHITE
GROUNDS: WHICH GIVEEN
MADE TO SELL FOR 18c. ?
AMERICAN SALE PRICE... 11
? MIA!
I2%c.
WASH GOODS DEPT.?FIRST FLOOR, SEC
TION B.
100 Tailor=made Misses' and Children's Skirts.
A TREAT FOR THE LITT LE FOLKS. IN FACT, IT'S A PURCHASE WHICH IS SEL
DOM MADE. BECAUSE THIS STYLE OF GARMENT IS HARD TO FIND. THEY ARE
MADE OF DIFFERENT MATERIALS, SUCH AS HOMESPUN, SERGES AND VENETIAN
CLOTHS?ARE SHOWN IN PRETTY SHADES OF GRAY, NAVY,
ROYAL BLUE, TAN. BROWN, BLACK ?SOME ARE MADE WITH
TUCKED FLOUNCE EFFECT ?OTHERS ARE NEATLY TRIMMED
WITH SILK AND BRAID?THEY RUN IN SIZES FROM 8 TO 14 YEARS
AND AVERAGE IN VALUE FROM $3.50 UPWARDS?WE SHALL OF
FER THE CHOICE AT
American SaEe of
Laces amid Embroideries,
?
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A DECIDED BAHRAIN IN FINE VALENCIENNES
EDGE AND BEADING: * I.ARGF, COLLECTION OF BEST
PATTERNS: WORTH 5<ic. AND 60c. PER DOZEN YARDS
AMERICAN SALE PRICE
SPECIAL VALUE IN FINE I .ACE AI.L-OVF.RS: WHITE
E
36Co
SPEX1AL, VALUE IN FINE LA?'E ALE-OVERS. WHITE. ^ <->
FCIU' AND LINEN COLOR: FOR YOKE. SLEEVES ANIi P
WAIST; 4<???. AM) 50c. VALUE. AMERICAN SALE PRICE
EXCEPTIONAL SHOWING IN CAMBRIC. SWISS AND NAIN
SOOK EDO INI*. INSERTING AND HEADING; LARGE
RANGE OF SHOWY AND NEAT DESIGNS; 30c. VALUE.
AMERICAN SALE PRICE
PHENOMENAL 1SARGAIN IN FINE SHEER LAWN
CU STER TI CKING: 15 ROWS OF 5 EACH. OR T."? ROWS
TO THE YARD; WORTH 7.V. AMERICAN SALE PRICE.
FIRST FLOOR SECTIONS D AND M.
A MARVELOUS LOT OF BLACK SILK CHANTILLY, ALSO
WHITE. ECRU AND LINEN COLORED SERPENTINE LACES. IN AN
39 Cc
OVERS. 22 INCHES WIDE; CHOICE OPEN-WORK
PATTERNS; ACTUALLY WORTH FROM $1.25 TO
51.75. AMERICAN SALE PRICE - 1
ANOTHER INTERESTING ITEM IS 3<*) PIECES OF
SHOWY CAMBRIC, ALSO SWISS AND NAINSOOK
EDGING. INSERTING AND RIBBON
INSTEAD OF 18<\, 20c. AND 25c. A YARD.
ICAN SALE PRICE
WIDE,
OUR STORE WILL BE CLOSED ALL DAY JULY THE FOURTH, BUT WILL BE OPEN
SATURDAY. JULY 5. AS USUAL?FOR THE ACCOMMODATION OF OUR MANY CUSTOM
ERS. WHOM WE KNOW WILL MORE THAN APPRECIATE THIS SPECIAL ACCOMMO
DATION.
I
American Sale off
8 PIECES ONLY of THE FINEST AMERICAN
MERCERIZED STRIPED OXFORDS: A BEAUTIFUL
WEAVE IoR WASH DRESSES AND WAISTS: WORTH
37%e. A YARD -AMERICAN SALE PRICE
SPECIAL OFFERING OF VERY FINE SHEER
WHITE PERSIAN I.AWN. SILK FINISH; S2 INCHES
WIDE: REAL VALUE. 2.V?. PER YARD ? AMERICAN
SALE PRICE
?? C,
115c,
1 CASE OF 411-INCH WIDE WHITE SHEER VIC- S TT /
TOaiA LAWN; WORTH (c A YARD- AMERICAN fh\ 11 /A /H
SALE PRICE /Al^C
SPECIAL VALUE IN FANCY STRIPE SWISS /Tt. ^) /
AND LACK STRIPE LAWN: ALWAYS SE1 LING AT fl II <\/( tC
l.V. A YARD AMERICAN SALE PRICE
11
EXCEPTIONAL BARGAIN IN" VERY FINE
SHEER WHITE INDIA LINEN; FI LL 4" IN.
IN WIDTH: REAL VALUE, 20c. A YARD
AMERICAN SALE PRICE
25 PIECES OF FINE WHITE CLIPIT.D DOTTED
LAWN; POSITIVELY WORTH 25c. A YARD-AMER
ICAN SALE PRICE
A DECIDED BARGAIN IN FINE QUALITY SH1RT
ING MADRAS. IN ASSORTED SELF-COLORED
STRIPES: THE USUAL SELLING PRICE IS 30c. A
YARD-AMERICAN SALE PRICE
SUBLIME QUALITY OF FINE SHEER DRAI' DE
CHIFFON. BATISTE AND PERSIAN LAWN; 47 IN.
WIDE; ACTUAL WORTH, 35c. AND 40c.?AMERICAN
SALE PRICE
~I6c.
19c.
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FIRST FLOOR-SECTION E.
American Safle of Umbrellas.
MADE OF GOOD QUALITY UNION TAFFETAANDCOROLA CLOTH, WHICH IS MADE OF
SILK AND LINEN. THE HANDLES ARE PEARL. SILVER, HORN, DRESDEN AND NAT
URAL. THEY ARE MOUNTED ON LIGHT-WEIGHT PARAGON FRAMES AND
STEEL-TEM PERED RODS. THEY COME IN 26 AND 28 SIZE. THEY ARE WORTH W
FROM $1.50 to $2.?AMERICAN SALE PRICE <35
Americarfi Sale off
HAMHOCK:
*1.00 MACRAME CORD HAMMOCKS. MADE WITH
SPREADER AMI PILLOW; IN ASSORTED COLORS. AMER
ICAS SALE PRICE
71
>c.
$1.25 MACRAME CORK HAMMOCKS. DEEP FRINGE: ,0, (O
SPREADER AND PILLOW; IN ASSORTED COLORS. A.MER
HAN SALE PRICE
*2.00 HEAVY CLOSELY WOVEN COTTON BED /to fl /
HAMMOCKS: DF.EI' VALANC2; ALL GOOD COLORS. I ZlLvLlJ
AMERICAN SALE PRICE C+/ il o U ^
THIRD FLOOR?UPHOLSTERY DEPARTMENT.
J.1.00 EXTRA SIZE MACRAME CORD HAMMOCKS
WITH PILIjOW AND SPREADER; COLORS OF BLUE.
RED, GREEN, OR YELLOW. AMERICAN SALE PRICE!
$3.50 FANCY JACQUARD WOVEN MACRAME CORD
IIAMMOCKS; WITH FOOT, IIFw\II REST AND PIL
LOW; MADE WITH DEEP VALANCE. AMERICAN
SALE PRICE
$4.00 AND $5.00 GOLF PLAID AND NOVELTY
STRIPE MACRAME CORD HAMMOCKS. IN A CHOICE
LINE OF LIGHT COMBINATION COLORS: DEEP
FRINGE AND VALANCE. AMERICAN SALE PRICE
.98
,49
ORANGEADE.
THE VERY THING FOR FOURTH OF JULY OUTING PARTIES. WILL
MAKE A VERY DELICIOUS DRINK. EACH JAR CONTAINS SUFFICIENT
FOR 10 GLASSES. PER TAR
AT OUR DEMONSTRATING BOOTH FIRST FLOOR UNDER THE STAIRS.
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American Sale of Ribbon!s?
ico picces of Fancy Striped Ribbon?white
and blue, red, pink, lavender
and black?full 4 inches wide.
American Sale Price, per yard.
300 pieces of All-silk Taffeta Ribbon?in all
the most desirable colors?also plain satin taffetas?
plain metallic taffetas and taffetas with polka dots
of the same color?this is an elegant bargain and
very timely for rosettes and sash ends <1 /Ttv
?4 and 4^ in. wide. American Sale jj
Price, per yard
500 pieces of Plain All-silk Metallic Ribbon in
the following colors: Light blue, pink, cardinal,
nile green, navy blue, lavender, maize, il fl
white and black ? y/2 inches wide. J| j[ (^0
American Sale Price, per vard
FIRST FLOOR?SECTIONS G AND H.
Half-inch All-silk Taffeta Ribboif in the fol
lowing colors: Light blue, pink, whiter and black.
These ribbons are elegant for dress "'r;
trimming, such as running through pa
beading, etc. Full piece of 10 yards.
American Sale Price
Beautiful line of colors in Taffeta Mqkp An
tique Ribbon, 5 inches wide?just the thing for
sashes, which are so very much worn?fthe colors
are light blue, turquoise, pink, nile FjJ
green, maize, violet, white and black.
American Sale Price, per yard _ato
Six-inch-wide Sash Ribbon?in e^tfa quality
satin taffeta. There are only three
colors?light blue, pink and white.
American Sale Price, per yard
FASHIONS FOR JULY
? ?
IS READY FOR DISTRIBITION. IT JS WHAT WE CONSIDER A BEAUTIFUL MIDSUMMER HOME MAGAZINE. YOI7 WILL FIND SOME
VERY CHOICE READING MATTER, EDITORIAL COMMENTS, HOUSEHOLD HINTS AND MODISH PLATES. BRING YOUR MONTHLY CARD
AMI GET THIS *" ?
THEM TO ONE
CE HEADING MATTER, EDITORIAL HOUSEHOLD 1I1.VITS AND MODISH PLATES. BRING YOUR MONTHLY CARD
>1 IS NUMBER. OUT-OF-TOWN CUSTOMERS CAN HAVE THE SAME BY REMITTING 24c. IN STAMPS WHICH WILL ESHTLE
J\K \EAR'S SUBSCRIPTION?FREE, AT THE McCALL PATTERN COUNTER, FIRST FLOOR, SECTION F. A
KANN,
CO.,
Eighth and Market Space.
PthebEst
SUIT CASE
$6.50 Z.
?Not ? $6.80 Solt Case by any means?
?bat ? Caw that compare* with the
?beat of them at $8.00.
?Sole leather?
?Steel Frame?
?Linen Lined.
Becker's 'IDEAL'!
Trunk for $9.50
?In a tower of strength a* compared
?with any other Trunk you'll see any
?where. Fit for all sorts of constant
?nse.
I Becker's, g
SAFE
STORAGE.
This company possesses unequaled facil
ities for storing Furniture and Household
Effects of every description with the great
est degree of safety.
An ABSOLUTELY FIRE-PROOF and per
fectly equipped Storage Building, with a
capacity of 840 Separate Locked Compart
ments, renting from per month up.
BURGLAR-PROOF VAULTS for Kilter
ware, etc.. for rent at moat reasonable rales.
COLD STORAGE Compartments for Furs,
Clothing, etc.
Orders for MOVING, PACKING and SHIP
PING promptly and proiterly executed t'T
men of atdlitr and experience. LOWEST
CONSISTENT RATES.
Merchants' Transfer &
Storage Co.,
920-922 E St. 'Phone 659.
Successors to MERCHANTS' PARCEL, DELIVERY.
It CO.
SNYDER & KIDD,
2211 F St.
Ladies' New
Style Oxfords
?prfVERFECTION in Sum
^ mer Footwear is strik
ingly exemplified in our
showing of Ladies' Ox
fords, comprising the NEW
EST and most tasteful produc
tions of the leading manufac
turers. All the stylish leathers
?including kid, vici, patent
leather and russet?
$2.50, $3 and $3.50.
"COLONIAL TIES"
in Ideal, Vici and Mat Kid?
$3.50, $4 and $5.
Children's Shoes, $11.25
to $2.50. Approved styles?High and Low
in Kid, Box Calf and Patent Leather.
Snyder <& KIdd,
Successors to Hoover & Snyder,
021111 F Street.
'Things out of the ordinary."
In Correct Form.
ED DING Invitations and Announce
ments. "At Home" Cards. Visit
ing Cards. &o.. is a special fea
ture of our business.
Crests, Monograms and Ad
dress Dies cut to order. Samples
and estimates sent out of town
on request.
HARRISON'S
1313
9 F St.
FINK STATIONERY. ENGRAVING & NOVELTIES.
Je30-m,w,f-20
j To Exterminate |
?ALL THE BUGS!
? Thompson's 155$ I
l kling of THOMPSON'S X
INSECT POWDER. It's g
the only way to keep fig
your home free from $
Roaches, Water Bugs,
Ants. &c.
m*" Its fumes are sure
death to moths. 10c.,
. 15c., 25c. snd 50c. can.
i The W. S. Thompson
? Pharmacy, 70315th st.
5? FRANK C. HENRY, Prop.
' Je30-28d
B15I 1151? c^eam
?no condensed milk or syrups, onlv
PI"RE Jersey cream and FRESH
Fruits are used in making our Ice
Cream. None finer obtainable?SI
GAL. delivered.
Fine Table d'Hote Dinner, 35c.
$
as INSECT
$ POWDER
Only
$11 Gal.
Breuninger's, 720 113th St.
CAFE, DAIRY AND ICE CREAM DEPOT.
je30-m.w,f,14
JS i>:
Summer Hats |
REDUCED TO
REDUCTION that Insures a
quick clearance. They're Hough
Straws and Fedora shapes?very
stylish and comfortable?reduced
to $1.
<E7"'KNOX" STRAWS In the
latest shapes, REDUCED to S2
and $3.
fSTINEMETZ & SONj
9 HATTERS AND FURRIERS, 1237 PA. AVE.
_ Je30-m, vr,f,28
25 Ft. Best Grade
GARDEN HOSE
As a "special" we are
offering 25 feet of Best >/i
lncb Garden Hose, with
coupling aDd nozzle com
plete, for only $1.80. Lawn
Sprinklers, 25c. up. Reels,
7Bc. op. Mending Outfits,
8oc.
nPHE M. LINDSAY '
11 RUBBER CO.,
SUCCESSOR TO GOODYEAR RUBBER CO.
Je30-m,w,f,20
Complete,
Only $1.50.
As a "Summer Food
??
Hart's Brown Bread
1 Possesses a peculiar value. It Is easily dlgest
? ed aDd assimilated?does Dot heat the body
' and Is rich Id the elements required to pre
' serve health and vitality. Contains more nour
ishment than meat?highly appetizing.
CT'Sent any time. Price, 6c. Joaf.
Krafft's Bakery,
CHOICE BREAD; ROLLS, CAKES, PIES. Etc.
je30-m,w,f,2U
[death by accident
VERDICT OF CORONER S JURY IN
CASE OF VINCENT ULLHAN.
Victim Was Struck by Engine of Pas
senger Train on Pennsylvania
Railroad Crossing.
That Vincent Vllman came to his death
about 4:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon on
the Pennsylvania railroad crossing at New
Jersey avenue and I street southeast and
that his death was due to an accident was
the verdict of a Jury of six men who heard
the testimony of witnesses given today at
the sixth precinct station. Mr. Vllman was
fifty-seven year old, was an upholsterer by
trade and lived at !?17 I street southeast.
Yesterday afternoon he was out walking
with his brother. Joseph Vllman. and when
the I street crossing was reached tire gates
were down. An engine was moving west on
the tracks and when this had passed Mr.
Vllman stooped and passed under the gate.
He had evidently not noticed the moving
eastbound passenger train. Several persons
who were standing about the crossing
called to him to warn him of his danger,
but he paid no heed to them. The engine
struck him and threw him from the track.
Mr. Vllman was killed instantly and his
body was removed to the morgue.
Joseph Vllman, brother of the deceased,
was the first witness examined at the In
quest.
"My brother was on one side of the gate
and X was on the other," he informed the
jury. "The train knocked him down and
killed him."
Witness said he heard nobody speak to his
brother, warning him to keep off the tracks.
They had dined together and had started
to go to Calbin John bridge. His brother,
he stated, went under the gate and he
thought he had reached the opposite side
of th? crossing in safety.
Dead When He Reached Hospital.
Dr. Owens of Providence Hospital told
the jury that Mr. Vllman was dead when
he reached the hospital.
George Handy, yardmaster's assistant at
the New Jersey avenue yard, testified that
he was about twenty-five feet from Mr. Vll
man when the train struck him. Witness
saiil that Mr. Vllman stopped when he got
on the tracks, and motioned to his brother
to follow him. and was struck by the engine
of the outgoing train. There are two gate
men and a flagman on duty at the 1 street
crossing, the witness stated. The gatemen
do duty at the gates, while the flagman
spends most of his time about the main
tra-cks. These gates, the witness said, are
kept down, except when vehicles are cross
ing. During the fourteen years witness has
been employed there, he said, only two fatal
accidents have occurred on the crossing.
The case prior to this was that of a colored
boy, who was pursued by a policeman, and
ran against a train and was killed. The
crossing where the accident occurred, he
said, is one of the busiest parts of the road.
About fifty-two regular trains pass over
this crossing between 6 a.m. and i Pl
each day. Witness heard nobody warn the
pedestrian of his danger.
Story of the Engineers.
James Carter, engineer, informed the
jury that his engine was north of the cross
ing when the accident occurred. He said
that two men started over the crossing to
gether. One of them stopped and the en
gine of the passenger train struck him. The
body of the victim was thrown under the
tender of the engine, which was in charge
of witness. Witness said he called to the
pedestrian, as did the man who was with
him but he paid no attention to them.
James H. Downs, engineer, was in charge
of the engine drawing the passenger train.
Witness blew the alarm whistle when he
saw the man, but the latter did not get out
cf the way. His flreman was ringing the
bell at the time the train reached the cross
ing. The victim walked backward from
behind an engine to the track on which his
train was running, and witness could not
pcssib'.v have prevented the accident.
Henry P. Rizon, flagman on the crossing,
testified that he witnessed the accident. He
was on duty, and had escorted a little girl
over the crossing. When he turned he saw
Mr Vllman walk in front of the train.
Witness called to Mr. Vllman. hut he
thought the latter did not hear him. He
heard the engineer warn the pedestrian
in a tone loud enough for the man In dan
ger to hear.
James Davis, gateman at the south side
of the crossing also gave testimony. The
gates had been lowered before Mr. Vll
man reached the crossing, he said. Wit
ness saw him about the time he stepped
in front of the engine. The gates, the
witness stated, are never raised for pedes
trains. It is the practice of the flagman
to escort pedestrians over the crossing.
Deputy Coroner's Statement.
Deputy Coroner Glazebrook testified that
he examined the body and explained the
bruises found about the chest and left arm.
Several ribs had been fractured and one of
them had torn the heart. Death resulted
from hemorrhage.
James Cathell, representing the railroad,
informed the jury that the crossing on
which the accident occurred Is as wide as
Pennsylvania avenue. The gates are kept
down by order of the Commissioners.
Mr. Vllman's body was removed from
the morgue yesterday afternoon to Mitch
ell's undertaking establishment, where It
was prepared for burial. Today the body
was taken to the late home of the deceased.
Funeral services over the remains will be
conducted at St. Peter's Church, Wednes
day morning. The interment will be at
Mount Olivet cemetery.
THE ASSISTANT ASSESSORS.
Large Delegation of Applicants at th?
District Ruilding Today.
The prospect of the Commissioners decid
ing today upon the appointments to the
board of assistant assessors in compliance
with the personal tax provision in the row
District appropriation bill brought to the
District building a large delegation of those
peeking the offices. The seekers of the big
plums were not the only ones on hand, how
ever. as the applicants for clerkships and
inspectorships were present In numbers.
Commissioner Ross, who has supervision
of the tax department and who will make
the recommendations for appointments to
his associates of the District board, was
the center of the office-hunting storm area.
Mr. Ross was absent from his office Satur
day on account of illness and was prevent
ed from conferring with the other Commis
sioners about the forthcoming appoint
ments.
Mr. Ross and the other Commissioners
had expected to talk the matter over this
morning, but were prevented from doing so,
partially on account of the press of visitors
and because of the fact that they had no
notification of the signing of the District
bill by the President. Vntll the bill becomes
a law the Commissioners e?annot consider
the matter of new appointments officially.
Mr. Ross said today the matter might be
settled tomorrow or Wednesday, but not
before then.
Death of Mrs. Amelia Crosby.
Mrs. Amelia R. Crosby, wife of Mr. H. T.
Crosby, formerly of this city, died Satur
day,, June 21, at San Francisco, aged fifty
five years. Mrs. Crosby was well known In
this city, where she had a host of friends.
While living here she was a prominent
figure In church musical circles, being pos
sessed of a beautiful contralto voice. Her
amiable qualities were recognied by a very
large number of acquaintances, who will
be pained to learn of her sudden death.
Mr. Crosby was for ten years chief clerk
of the War Department. Their residence
in this city extended over a period of over
a quarter of a century.
Transfer of Insane Indians.
Preparations are being made at the Gov
ernment Hospital for the Insane for the
transfer from the asylum of the eight In
dian Inmates of the institution to Cant9n,
8. D.. where a hospital has been opened
for the care of insane Indians. It is ex
pected to effect the transfer of these pa
tients within the next few days.
The Kansas City Star says the largest
cotton mill in the world Is to be built with
in twenty miles of that clt?.
SOCIAL AND PERSONAL.
Brief Mention of Happenings t<|
Prominent Persons.
Announcement is made of the merriare
in Paris, Franc*, on Saturday, June 2?>. e*
Miss Esther Faulkner Hayden, daughter
| of Mrs. Charles R. Hayden of Host on, to
Mr. Horace Baxter Stanton, son of the
I late Dr. J. O. Stanton of Washington, IX
C. After spending the summer in Europe
Mr. and Mrs. Stanton will return to Bos
ton.
The Iris Literary and Musical Club w?e
entertained last Friday evening. Jjine 2~*
at the home of Mrs. F. G. Frederioh, Lin
den, Md. The club was met at th? Na
tion by wagons sent by the hostess, ani
all enjoyed the straw ride from the sta
tion to the house. After the business
meeting a short program was rc:id?r?d. In
cluding a piano solo by Mrs. FmbrichJ
humorous reading by Mr. Crags. ttfter
whictr refreshments were served. The
club adjourned to meet In October, the
regular meetings being omitted durli g the
heated term. Am<>ns those prtsent *ne
Miss KfTle Richardson. Mrs. Wm. <?!? nr.,
Mr. Wilton Gregory. Mr*. Irvin. M;-> Ma> -
dern. Mr. and Mrs. Wm. B. Crags. Mrs.
M. V. Heath, Mr. and Mrs. I. N H. hard
son. Miss Ulanche Richardson, the Miss? (
Petersen.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Walter TMelln have re
turned from their wedding tour end have
taken tip their residence with the groom ?
mother. Mrs. Amelia V. Kdelin. .M.'t <i;h
street southeast, where they will be j>l?as?d
to see their friends after July 1.
Miss Lillle P. Bailey has gone to
summer home of Mr. and Mrs. John M.
Bailey at Cape May. where she will remain
until the reoi>enlng of the public echovls in
the fall.
Mr. Frank C. I-arimore of the Tn asury
Department will accompany his wife and
daughter Kdl'.h to Atlantic City next Fri
day, where Mrs. l>arimore and Edith will
spend several weeks. Mr. l^ar!mor? will
return to the city the following Monday.
Mrs. John T. Appleberg and Mrs. Ildtiif
Klrkpatriek leave July 1 for Saratoga ami
the Adirondack?, where they will s;>? nd the
summir.
Representative Mi Rea of Arkansas w II
go to Atlantic City Immediately :ift<r tlie
close of Congress, where he w ill r. main
with his family for the entire season.
Assistant Attorney General Tyn? r an>l
Mrs. Tyner are at the Shelburne, Atlantic
City.
Miss C. G. Blackburn, daughter of Sen
ator Blackburn of Kentucky, Is at the
Wiltshire, Atlantic Cltv.
Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Thomas of this <-;ty
are at the Allaire, Spring Lake, N. J.
Mrs. John A. Logan, who left Wash -Kt"n
early In the season, has rented tin- eottage
of Maud Adams, in Onteoru Park. King
ston. N. Y.. In the Oatskills.
Senator Foraker's Condition Improves.
Senator Foraker. who wtis tak? n ill > es
terday at the White House with a slight
attack of peritonitis, was very much im
proved today, and was able to conn down
to liis private office.
Mr. L C. RAWI.S. Sebright. Alt writ.*:
"My little boy, five year* old. t<?>k WHOoriMJ
(XHGH I thought he e.?uld not live. The d?.
tor said his lunic" were di*?-aaed, and f*>e Mm
medicine, but It did no good. JAYNE'H K>I^*A>
TORANT CTRED HIM."
MARRIED.
GROWTH Kit M'OltAW, At Rockvllle. Md . on
Sunday. June 29, 10<?2. by Kcv. Robert I- M<
Nalr, GKOKiiE W. ?'R< tWTHEK riuI ANNA
McURAW, both of Washington. ?
XYMAX?VAN BFRC.HBW At Alexandria Va ,
June 22. 19m2, by the Rev. J. 11 s Ewell,
tiEOltCE W NYMAN and L1LL1E VAN HI It
GliEN, both of Washington. ?
DIED.
BIRCHKTT. On Sunday. Juno 20 H*.2 Nt 1
o'cloc k p.iu.. U<iKKUT A.. beloved husband of
Mary E. Birrhett and *on of the lut<? l()< hard
T. and Maria L Blwhett, ipl forty ? ijrtit
years.
Interment private. (Sandusky, OtiJo, and Rhb
rnond, Va., papers please copy.) ?
Bl'ROHE. On June 28. 1!*?2. ai 3 a.m HI XJA
MIX FKA.NKUN IU |[( UK, s..n of It., late
Samuel and Susan M. l'.urche, iu the n-viuty
eighth year of his age.
Funeral services Tuesday, July 1. at 11 o'.-hn-k
a.m., at his late residence. 1717 S street north
west. Interment private. Kindly omit flowers. ?
CHASE. On Friday. June 27. 1 f>02 nt 7 p.m.,
MARGARET 1.1N KINS. wife of William Ch:.se
and mother of Frof. ("has. Haydn ?'has
Funeral servh os at ber late residence. lTs'7 f.th
street northwest. Tuesday aftern?"<n. July 1,
at 2:30 o'clock. Friends of the family invited.
Interment at Congressional cemetery. 2*
CLANCEV. On Sunday. June 20. 1?>2. nt 11 30
p.m., at his residence, 1#?6 2T>th stre.r north
west, MICHAEL J., beloved hushand of Norali
Claneey, In his fifty-eighth j-ear.
Funeral Wednesday, July 2. at 0 a.m.. fr in St.
Stephen's <'hureh. Friends and relatives In
vited to attend. 2*
COLEMAN". Departed this life June 20 11**2. at
6 p.m., after a lingering Illness, wht>h she
bore with Christian resignation, (iOLlMK MAY,
beloved wife of Louis l!. Coleman and daugh
ter of Richard S. and the late Ell/a Boyd
Pyror.
Funeral from residence 3114 M atreet. at 3 |> iu.
July 1. Interment, Rock Creek cemetery. ?
FALVEY. On Saturday. June 28. ll*?2. at K 40
p.m., MAGGIE MAY, eldest daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Charles F. B. Falvey.
Relatives and friends are respectfully Invited to
atteud the funeral from her late resid?-nee. 1??3
6th street aoutheast, on Tuesday. July 1 at 10
o'clock a.m. Interment In Mount Olivet ifm
etery. ?
JOnNfTTOX. On Sunday. June 20, 1002. nt *:.*?>
p.m., SARAH E., beloved wife of Wm. F. John
ston, In her fifty-eighth vear.
Funeral from her late residence, S106 F street
northwest, on Tuesday, July 1, at 2:*o. Friends
and relatives Invited to attend. Interment at
Rock Creek cemetery. ?
McT>OXOFGH. On June 20, 10*2. MRMIAFL
CHAJtLE*> MdK>XOl'(fH. Ik-IutwI hushand of
Maria MeDonough, aged eighty-three years
Funeral from his late residence, 12tKi 21 ?t str?-et
northwest, Tuesday m??ming at 0 o?l?-?k;
thenee to St Stephen's Church where mass
will be aald for the repose of his ?oul. Flense
omit flowera. *
MLI.LER. On Saturday. J'ine 2S, 1002. at 12 m ,
KATHARINE L<M'ISE, l?elove<1 Infant of I?r.
and Mrs. Maurice E Miller.
Interment at Oak Hill cemetery Tuesday. July
1, at 11 a.m. *
FERRY. On Sunday. June 20. 1002. at 0 ??Vl??k
fi.m.. at 1410 tith stn*et northwest. MARY
IANOVER. wld"w "T Waldo (J. Ferry, and
mother of Mrs. Applet on F. Clark, ir.. <f tl.ln
city; Mrs. John T. K?*an <?f WtH?ns?.?ket, S. !?.,
and Ge<?. F. Perry ??f Ixnidon, England.
Funeral from ber late residence, Tuolay, July
1, 8 t 'eloek p.m. ?
ROBERT. On Suntfav, June 20 lfs-2. ? si^AU
R(IBERT?YON ULSI3N, In the wventy-tldtd
year ??f his age.
Funeral at 2 p.m. Tuesday. July 1. froiu his late
residence, 1323 loth street northwest. In'er
meut private.
ROBINSON. On June 20. 3!*i2. at the residence of
his son. J. F. Robinson. 221 I? street southwest,
MARCELIA'S RnMNSoN. Mr. Roldns<n w:.?
In his elghty-f??ur^n year, and a native ? f I??.n
aldsonville, I^a., but for the last thlrtj -eight
y?iars has n*sided in Washington. His wife,
Caroline Robinson tnee Johnston), died nearly
three years ago. He is survived by thre* sona
and four dauirtiters.
May he rest In peace.
Funeral from his late residence Wednesday morn
ing. July 2, thence to St. Augustine's <*hnreh.
where mass will be celebrated for the re|m*e of
his soul at 10 o'clock. 2
SAILER. On Monday, June 30. 1902. at S:10 a m.,
DEBORAH S. SAILEU, bt-loved wife of < l.arba
C. Sailer.
Funeral from her late residence. 8120 N street
northwest, on Wednesday. July 2. at 2 p.m.
(Woodbury, N. J^ paj?ers please copy.) 2*
ULLMAN. Suddenly, on June 20. lt*?2 YINi KNT
FLLMAX, belovtsl hushand of the late J?>| an
nah I'llman, of 017 1st atreet aoutheast.
Notice of funeral hereafter. ?
In Memori&m.
BRETTBARTH. In lorn* t>at nd reDifmt'raii'< nt
our devoted father. GEORGE BRIIITHaIITH,
?bo entered into reat ooe fear uu". June 2*.
1901.
? BY HIS DEVOTED WIFE AM) CHILDREN.
BIWH1KS. In loTinx remeir.branee of mt dear ki?
baml. JOHN II. BROOK8, who died Hire vear?
aeo today?June 30, I??7.
? FANNIE L. BIKKIKS.
HILL. Entered Into rest, four year* at" t<day ?
June an. 1SW? ROSKITER HILL, the beloto*
mother of Julia White.
? Gone, but not forfi>tten.
SAVOY. In lovlnc remembranee of J'lSPEH R.
SAVOV, who departed UiU life t?u years as*
todar.
Orer the rirer faeea we nee,
Fair an the morn In*, loakiug for me.
Free from tbelr aorrow. fricf an<! deMptiir,
Waitinc at>d watrhinj patleatly there.
? BX THE J AM1LI.

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