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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, November 17, 1902, Image 4

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THE EVENING STAR.
WASHINGTON.
MONDAY ....... November 17, 1909.
CROSBY S. NOYES..........ditor.
THE EVENING STAR has a regular and per
manent Pamily Circulation much more
than the combiaed circulation of the other
Washington dailies. As a News and Ad
vertising Medlam it has no competitor.
IIn order to avoid delays on account of
personal absence, letters to THE STAR should
not be addressed to any Individual connected
with the ofMce, but simply to THE STAR, or
to the Editorial or Business Departients,ias
cording to tenor or purpose.
Mr. Watterson Explains.
IfenrY WVatterson, as The Star requested
and expwo'ed, has explained his recent com
plimen- to Mr. Gorman and replied to the
interrogatory respecting the state of his
own tariff pulse. And yet, with 411 defer
ence to a man who is usually very frank,
and always clear in his deliverances, It
must be said that Mr. Watterson on this
occasion is not quite up to his own high
mark.
The Star is accused of having erroneously
interpreted the compliment to Mr. Gorman.
It was not Mr. Watterson's purpose, he
says. to declare for the Maryland leader
for the democracy's standard-bearer in 1904.
Whatever his purpose may have been, if
Mr. Watterson will turn to the editorial
from which The Star quoted, and then read
the comments on It which were widely pro
voked, he will see that The Star's view was
the popular view. The Star's surprise was
very generally shared. With Mr. Bryan
down in Nebraska, Mr. Johnson down in
Ohio. Mr. Hilt down in New York, and Mr.
Pattison down in Pennsylvania, Mr. Wat
terson. upon a too hasty reading of the
Maryland election returns, which showed
that Mr. Gorman was down also, hailed the
Marylander as the hope of the party. A
little shaken maybe by the disappointing re
siAts of tho campaign, he expressed himself
with a fervor born more of discouragement
than reflection. He wanted a leader so
badly, he was virtually offering his king
dom for one.
Now as to Mr. Gorman"s tariff views, and
especially with regard to his attitude to
ward Mr. Cleveland's famous tariff mes
sage. Mr. Watterson's opinion is not the ac
cepted one in political circles where the
subject has been carefully canvassed. The
Kentucky editor would appear to believe
that when Mr. Gorman presented himself
at the St. Louis convention in 1888 with a
tariff plank repudiating the tariff message
he was acting merely as Mr. Cleveland's
representative. He was far more than that.
He had had more to do with bringing Mr.
Cleveland around to that position than any
other man in the democratic party. At that
time he was much the stronger man of the
two, and had Mr. Cleveland's entire confi
dence. That free trade tariff message had
filled Mr. Gorman, Mr. Whitney, Mr. Ran
dall and the other democrats of the pro
tecti,n school with fear and but poorly con
cealed indignation. They began at once to
break the force of it, and Mr. Gorman's
mission z- St. Louis was their last card.
That was to be played with Mr. Gorman's
conf,ssed skill, and was expected to sweep
the stak,s. But Mr. Watterson himself
trumped it, with a free trade speech of con
sistenwy and by defeating Mr. Gorman for
chairman of the Platform committee, and
so Mr. (,orman returned to Washington
empty-handed. In that way Mr. Cleveland
stood in the campaign, not where Mr. Gor
man wanted him to stand, but where Mr.
Watterson forced him to stand. Mr. Wat
terson at St. Louis defeated not only Mr.
Cleveland. who was feeling his way along,
but Mr. Gorman, then as now one of the
masterf il men in his party, and a protec
tionist in principle.
No, if the democratic party has in mind
another campaign on the free trade issue
it cannot afford to nominate Mr. Gorman
for President. because he is not in sym
pathy with that policy. It cannot afford to
take Mr. 'l veland again, because he fum
bled and stumbled and made a mess of his
two opporiinitics. it cannot afford to take
Mr. Bryan. because he is accepted by the
country as the apostle of an unsound cur
rency. N-d The Star add-and it does so
respectiflly-that the man for such a con
test do,s not live a thousand miles from
Ken:u,ky, and if nominated would give the
oppositmi a run for its money?
--- -40 0
The Handwriting Expert.
Never lfore was the ituck of the hand
writing exp.rt. so calld, at such a low
ebb as today. with the celebrated Molineux
trial elosd. Since that case was finished,
ur-ir c:reunmstnces castIng serIous reflec
tlrns ont theu value of this sort of te-stimony
in crim!l:al cases, the court of appeals of
New Y rk state has rendered a decision
which Mtill further increases the public dis
trust of th!s method of proving legal propo
sitions. The case in point turned upon the
valbliy v a wil. The signature was ad
nittd. but through it had been drawn a
series of vertical lines of cancellation. One
side rorit.rnded that the signer had himself
drawn thr-m, the other that the cancellation
had been dor.e by another without the
knowie'dge of the signer. At the first trial
expert witr:'eses swore that it- their judg
mnent these. lines were the work of another
than the signer. The will was admitted
t pirobate on this authority, and on appeal
to the t.ppellate' division of the eupreme
court the. d+ cision was sustained. Bunt one
jtdge s, pted from the judgment and de
clared thatI such testimony was not only
wortht.y. but positively dangerour. The
court of appeals has reversed the court be
low arnd sustained that dissenting judge,
hol sding rhat it is manifestly absurd for
men. howe vet- skilled in the microscopic ex
aminatinr of handwriting. to swear to the
id,nriy if th' hand which had made a
series of mere straight lines.
A nor. llpab!e ri luction of the case to
absurdityc noud nit well be had. If such
testimonv could be admitted as evidence
there unr Hit t?ocb drawn around the
field of the handwriting expert. In view of
the- ma::y proved blunders which they have
comn:nt.l their work is to be regarded to
day .. la Ic better than systematic guess
ing it. the spectacle which shakes all
pu ti :dence in them is the ranging of
expetr: .ag,ins t expert to swe-ar to dia
mnetrica"yv opposite statements. So flexible
1w the~ '-nee" that it is now possible to
pro;e ii y piropusitioni whatever from the
eamre lremise or exhibit.
Wh. 'u mi:rads have more business on
hind thi int they can comfortably handle.
it is lfilt to see why any of them
shto. t. eI the necessity of combining to
hd up ; rates. A project to increase fa
cilii s uld appear to be more in keeping
with :.' sI'uation.
The Anti-Parlor Match Causade.
New Yosrk ha.s started a crusade against
the 'parlor" match as a measure of protec
tion fronm fire. An ordinance lias been
adopted prohibiting the sale of this article
at retail after January 1. and now the deal
oe in that commodity are trying to get -rid
of their stoeks before the limit expires, or
to s4eur. an extension. The reason for the
prohibit :1 is that the easily ignited paror
match Is t.e garded as a source of grave dan
ge'. ('ases are en record to prove that it
hass eauttod the death of ma'ny persons ar.d
the destru.ction of great property values.
The wooden stemn is easily snapped and tht
heed c'f'on fliesa off. Usually it is immediate
1T found and destroyed to prevent the po3
Ubity of accidents. Often, hoirever, it is
msteoeted njed some day along comes ai foot
o wruah it into e, lase and 0, Gr rjeultz.
MS eloth of women's skirts frequaejtly
result. Again rats -tui the neglected
match heads and gnaw them Into , bias.
to communicate fire to carpets or waste,
and so start the serlow deetroetten Of t
property. Then, too, theme usatches with
their crackling ignition have a fascination
for children, who play with them with ter
rible results. A large percentage of city b
fires are from this cause, and the mortality
roll is pitifully long.
Two cases of the danger of the parlor 8
match are immediately at hand in the news v
of today. In Baltimore Mrs. Vogelsang t
stepped on 0 match and 'was burned to
death before help could reach her. In
Philadelphia little Michael Dunn found a
dozen large boxes in the kitchen where he
was playing and used them to build a toy
house. Stepping on one of th,m the child
accidentally set fire. to the large pile ad
was burned to death. These are merely ex
amples of similar fatalities constantly be
ing reported, while the authorities of all p
large cities agree that the match which will s
ignite upon slight friction is responsible
for the annual loss of millions of dollars.
For the parlor match there are two sub- c
stitutes at least, the old-fashioned sulphur <
match. with its disagreeable odor, and the d
safety match, which can be ignited only by
striking on a special composition. Each
has its disadvantages, but these are noth
ing when compVjed with the danger of
death and destruction which the uee of the
friction match involves. Doubtless the
general public, when the shocking cost
w'hich it pays for its present convenience is
made plain to it, will agree that it Is far
better to exclude the dangerous parlor
match from use. This is a reform which
the local authorities might profitably con
oider.
4 Ip
The Virginia Suffrage.
Now that the question of the constitu- n
tionality 9f the Virginia constitution has F
been taken into court let us hope for a final
settlement of the whole case strictly upon
Its ruerits and upon the broadest grounds.
It is a question in which the whole country b
is interested. No state in the. Union 'lives
to itself. Each shares in the national obit
gations and benefits, and each should be t
held to a strict accountability in all mat- t
ters relating to the national welfare as they
may be affected by its Individual action.
Virginia has disfranchised the negroes
almost to a man. The act is not denied.
That end was deliberately sought. As a
result, on the 4th instant members of Con
gress were elected in the state, with the
electorate shorn of thousands of votes
which under the Constitution of the United
States should have been accepted and t
counted. The question-raised therefore is,
was that election legal? Shall the result
stan' Shall Virginia be permitted to deny '
to a large part of her citizens the privilege
of participating in local affairs, upon the
allegation that they are incompetent to do
so intelligently, and yet count those same
citizens in her own voting strength in na
tional affairs? r
There can be no more Important question 1
than this. Nor is Virginia the only state
where it applies. The same policy has been
pursued elsewhere, and to such an extent
In one other state at least as to have robbed
election day of all interest except to a very
few of those who are permitted to vote.
The following press dispatch bears the New
Orleans date line, and was sent out on the
8th instant:
"Official returns from Mississippi and es
timates from counties which have not sent
in their returns yet show a total vote in
that state of 21.625 for Congress, or at the
rate of 2.703 votes to each congressman. X
All the votes cast there were democratic."
As this matter proceeds we shall probably 7
hear a good deal about the "bloody shirt,"
and all that trumpery gabble of local bosses (
and machine politicians. There Is of course
no "bloody shirt" about it. The proposition
is plain, and has for its object an act of
justice and common sense. If the, south
insists on materially limiting the sugrage
within her borders she should be limited to I
a like extent in her representative strength
in Congress and in the electoral college. At I
any rate, there is so much at stake, atid
things are in so unsatisfactory a state, that ]
a settlement of some kind by the highest
tribunals, legislative and judicial, should A
be pressed with all possible earnestness.
There was never a better time for settling 1
a vexed question of general interest and
national importance.
King Leopold's Assailant.
The wretch who tried to kill King Leopold
declares that during a recent stay in Eng
land he would have killed King Edward
"but for the strong feeling of the English
people in faiAor of the monarchy." This is
not the talk of a real "red," but of a boast
ful weakling. The anarchist worthy of his
infamt' never takes account of what the
people anywhere want. He assumes that
the people do not know what is good for I
them; that it is given to but a few choice
spirits to determine so Important a matter.
Their decision is that all governments are
bad and should be abolished. Accordingly 1
a red will try to put an end to a despotism,.
or to a limited monarchy, or to a republic,
by killing the head of the state. He never
takes the people into the account at all.
suppose that miscreant at Buffalo had con
sidered for a moment how well satisfied the
American people were with their govern
ment, and how deeply they loved the man
who was then at the head of it. How easily
his vile hand might have been restrained!
The stage hands of Washington have been
making considerable trouble for the man-]
agers, with the result that -some of the
comedies were considerably more original
as viewed from behind the scene^s-than* as
viewed in front.
Profesor Garner is once more trying to
interest the people in his theories of mon
key conversation. There is, however, a
deep-seated impression that even if a mon
key could talk his remarks would no.t be
worth iistening to.
A flour trust has been organized on the
Pacific coast with- a capital of $20,000,000.
The west has no longer the right to point
to monopoly as an eastern iniquity.
- I I
It is not likely that the lectures of college
professors will have any more effect in fis
couraging labor unions than they have had
in disbanding the trusts.
I I
Tom L. Johnson insists thast it was John
R. McL,ean's fault, and Mfr. McLean still de
clines to apologize.
David B. Hill's experience with the -po
litical toboggan is the usual one of a slow
climb aqd a swift slide.
Unfair Strike Methods.
The strike of the stage hands in the local
theaters last w'eek fillustrated one of the
features of the work of trades unions
which alienates the symnpathlee of many
people from those organizations. No notice
was given of the intention of the men to4
leave the theaters and no grievances had
been formulated. The managers of the vari
ous houses of en.tertainmenit e requfred
to adopt extreme emergency measures in
order to prevent the collapse of' the even
ing's performances, which would have
caused-a heavy money loss- and a serious
diminution in prestige, which is part of the
capital of every theater. Such methods are
unjustified from any poihit of view. The
tiret rulq oC fair play in business would
have required the givinlg of notice to permit
consultatiop at least,' whanter .mlght-hive
been the result. ,In moet lipes of i4d'idlt*F
workingmen. when. ja,ehing e.crlii in their
relations with' their .esployers, enish the
job ir. hand, A.lthough occaMbonally' tools
aro 'd'opyed at a 'int ,,Itce en4 the
workler, walk eut a& th the iUgsg
of the talklng Agitsat pmaiih.g it
a union would quiekirt 0ba Ei isu et,
ame elecuinstanm a- a ee eM
robably- result. Coetmcy Is a good rule
I any line of efmft and u1jsW the tr4e
ni4W adopt it fi t4alkst iv*h*ugh
Mdk an thi they W01 4ss NOW Our
orters among th clas. which are not
ow aliated with thin and the repeOt
f the more intelligent of their own m-eia
era.
Mr. Bryan continues to look On the dark
ide. Possibly he would take a more hopeful
Iew of deinotiacy's futire it he 1ad set
led down in Alabama or KsI tpi instead
f Nebraska.
The burning of ene of Armour & Co.'s
acking houses 1o calculated to make the
onsumer of, beef tremble with apprehen
ion when he next makes Inquiry as to the
rice of steak.
Times must have changed in France.
ount Castellane has fought duels and ex
ended great quantities of money and is,
till unable to atta6h himIelf to politics.
I I I
By not being too prominent, except in
ases when his. interests are directly con
erned. Mr. Gorman obviates much of the
anger of being permanently eliminated.
The fact that President Roosevelt 4ined
n a 'possum ought to permanently"solidify
he colored vote for him.
I 0 .
Rubino Is another of these kind-hearted
eople who insist on showing their philan
hroIy by killing somebody.
SHOOTING STAB,
A Profitleos Cetroversy.
"Do you think Bacon wrote Shakespeare's
ays?"
"What's the use of asking," said the
ianager. "Neither of them can collect any
yaltles now."
. Responsibilities.
"A woman should depend upon her hus
and."
"That's what Henrietta thinks," answered
Er. Meekton. "he always depends on me
) feed the bird and the cat and see that
the basement is locked at night."
Aglow.
Now comes the time of wintry snow,
Which poets sing with glad acclaim.
Then youthful cheeks will be aglow
I hope the stoves will be the same.
- A Common Impulse.
"What we want," said the spokesman for
tie delegation. "is more pay for less work."
"WelW" answered the multi-millionaire,
I can thoroughly sympathize with you.
'hat's what I am after myself."
Safer.
"Aren't you afraid to go bear hunting all
y yourself?"
"No," answered the huntsman; "I'd
ather take chances on meeting a bear sin
le handed than on being myself mistaken
)r game by an excited companion."
Material for Gratitude.
lenty to he thankful fur, if you will look
around;
ots of first-class air to breathe, the best
that can be found;
ots of good cold water, too, to stop your
thirsty pains
Valk down to the river or jes' wait until
It rains.
Syou long fur pictures you can watch the
evenin' sky,
Vith golden castles an' with crimson rivers
rollin' by;
ou sometimes get discouraged, but there's
really a lot
If satisfyin' pleasures that the trusts
ain't
got
ou may not go a-travelin' to make your
self more wise,
lut you can go a-watkin', which is splendid
exercise.
t may not be a mansion fine fur which
you're payin' rent,
lut you can look at palacei an' not be
charged a cent.
t balls an' entertainments you may never
be on view,
lut there's always the policeman who will
nod a how-dy-do.
Ln' if you're cold, the summer time next
year will make it hot.
here's lots of earthy blessin's that the
trusts
ain't
got.
0 | I
They Discredit Themselves.
'rom the New York Tribune.
Trades unions which express hostility to
xembers of the National Guard who are
ummoned to protect life and property
rhen there is danger-' of law breaking by
lotous strikers disgrace themselves in the
yes of decent people. The soldiers are
aled out by their commanders. If the
rivates failed to obey orders, even If they
et some sympathy for the strikers fn cer
am cases, the consequences to the men of
he rank and file would be serious. They
nly do their duty. They represent the
?. and the public welfare, and any organi
ation which seeks to cast a stigma upon
hem for their faithful service will be gen
rally distrusted and despised.
What Increased Wages Mean.
'ro the New York World.
The railroads alone employ 1,200,000 soule,
early all grown men, representing more
han 5,000,000 people. A general advance
or railroad employes will conasequentty
iean more daiiy comforts for as many
people as live in the state of Illinois, and
ri swell by not much less,.than $50,000,000
.year the volume of retail trade. In
reased wage., therefore, are to a great
egree the source aa well as the result of
roperity.
A Submeged Iggue,
rom the Indianapolis News.
The utter disappea.ranfce of .the imperi
dilem issue or question in the recent cam
aign was not the least of the marked
haracteristics of that; peculiar political
ontest. However confused the contest, no
uestion that had vitality failed of men
ion, while many that had nrot got more
han their share of it. But imperliism-it
ra not even "conspicuous by its absence."
twas simply unthought of. The fact Is
emarkable.
Gentle Indian Stkmmer.
romn the Phbilsjielphaia Record.
Native poets accustomed to sing paeans
o Indian summer may tune their lyres
his year with right good will. Never be
ore. perbaps, was this mil1d, belated season
o timely or so beneficent. With all kinds
if fuel at famine prices, and the supply
nexorably limited by conditions beyonid
rivate or public control, the chill blasts of
inter cannot be too long postponed. When'
empets 'rage transportation is impeded or
hecked-a portentous consideration for
he eastern public, in view of the absolute
lependence of our great manufacturing
:ommunities upon the existing enforced
iand-to-mouth system of fuel supply. The
iuge winter stocks of coal usually accumu
ated during the summer season are lack
ag, aml when the pinch shall come, lj.ter
n the stormy months, it must be patiently
.dured.
L Harmless Diversion Under the Ran.
rm the Augusta Chroniele.
France is to make the French duel a fel
ny. Ping-pong will surely come in as a
isdemeanor.
Until Rase Mall Sets In.
'roan the Baltimore Aamstiean
In a few da~ys the foot ball. sae will
n and the tatt beok will resume it.place
the collegs-currioulpma.
'oma the Atlaula Coesttteb.
It ig.vi to~ haige tie' NM's"Yged.efe.t
o !ae Hill. But if It had beenaaleitary
ow, ten?
I .'
Notice
th'
Fhy h,
=-,
9
Fit
and
-length of time
-your Irnen wears.
-You wl9find that
-in those points and
-many others our
-laundry work
--always leads.
-Let us prove it
--to you this week.
The
TolmanLaundr
Cor. 6th & C Sts.
'Phone East 637.
Call a Mutual Messenger Free.
Weather
0I
Str ip, -
ic. per ft.
-Asmall price
-to pay for so
-4 muce tection against
- eet qe alty strip
BOWEN'S -*wK0."w& tK,
oce4-m.2S 506 9th St.
Silver Wedding
Whiskey 187*
-Is the WeaVXUWQlInant a9=Sregt
s Fr a,os quare centr it
o e ic e ho d be ith
t a .uxly -
61.00 a full quart.
Colonial VWine C.
114 orders p p died. Phone 21 ,
Order thitos Now
--itendedohXmas gifts
otounts.
Smething new in artistic photography. Half
38 9 rkeht sace.
S-he lir ving rom l th Gasor Oi8
most inexp3entive.
Oil Heaters.....$4.25 up.
16-in. Gas Cylinder Heat
ers................$1.252
4Eol. Gas Radiators. $275
6-col Gas Radiators. $4.oo
-
5.S.Shedd & Bro.
432 Ninth Street. 0
12 2
EXPERT EVE
SERVICE.
Dr.. L. Hood, formerly of Bos
ton, teacher of optics at the Wagner
Institute, personally examines ,the
eyes of patients free of charge at the
optical department'at Castelberg's.
hen Gas pRratos hav e-a.$ation
Dr. A. t. ood,
AiTELO!RGS,93 Pa. Ave.
nol7-2d -
D RANDY
--tor Thanksgiving
les OKlonBray g t spcaeand de-t
TO=KalON Win Co.,
S.i Shed Bo
4 r nt lt Cases
~r)mas Gifts
tfldt? Nothing would
acceptable er -
-useful to either the
si
- ~~-ladjr gentleman friend.
~-ItY talk it over. Sale a
$345 25.
KNB 425Dhs~
Asthma _
evenuow. gu,0owrUZMIA ""*aa
Espic's Cigaretfes, 0 Powder~
Pails...J. neIee NeW l.h .a
BURCHELL'S
"SPRING LEAF" TEA. -
The -n*weying, always the samue,
able ta or rom er.ry
stw rrtry Aoc 6. 5c
N. . BUC LL
S. Kann, Sons &
RLWAYS TE B1
Dress Goods I
-and every word as true
sieces of all bright and
pleasing colorings of the i
Ind Panama Suitings to
best of all Is that every t
ippeal to, you In the sens
ition and take advaita
wise buying. All we ask
Iyard is . . . .
DaMS GOODS ARCADE-FIRST FLOOR, E
*T1
- a very prmanest i=ne with a at thin preg
rant is the Val=me of trade, We ma to do.
snat enomgh-ad out prIces low enough to mc
he 1St Special AiE ATO
JNI OF 25 PIECES OF PLAIN MOIRE VE
OUR. IN A COMPLETE SHOWING OF
TREET AND EVENING SHADES. THESE
'INA AND POPULAR WEAVES WERE IM
IORTED TO SELL FOR age. A YARD; THE
HADES ARE WHITE LIGHT BLUE, PINK,
ILE. CREAM. HELIO, OLD ROSE, NAVY.
*YAL. GRAY. BROWN, RESEDA, MYR
LE AND BLACK; 19 INCHES
VIDE. INSTEAD OF 6e. YARD,49c.
HE PRICE 18...................
CONSISTS OF 10
5pecial No. 2 PIECES OF PINE
LACK MOIRE VELOUR. FULL 27 INCHES
VIDE. THIS IS A MAGNIFICENT CLOTH
ND IS WELL ADAPTED FOR LONG
OATS. JACKETS AND OTHER WRAPS.
EVER OFFERED BEFORE FOR LESS
HAN 91 A YARD. THE WIDTH
5 27 INCHES. AND THE PRICE
New and Nob]
0
Brilliantine Waists, elaboratel
st style stock and cuffs, lined thro
md run up in sizes to 4. Price. .
Brilliantine Waists, made of t
luchess front, finished with small
>nly,. but in all sizes. Special.....
Brilliantine Waists, made of i
:luster tucking, neat hemstitched tu
)lack only, with sizes up to 44, at.
Brilliantine Waists, also made
with white dots, and white with bla
)ust, duchess front, fancy link butt
Waist Department, Second Flo
6 6f
OUR LININGS ARE THE ONLY TANCH K
HOWS A WEAKNESS OF STRENGTH IS AL
CORONATION I.USTER SATEEN WHICH WE
AVE CONTROLLED FOR WASHINGTON.
HE FINISH 18 1QUAL TO A SATIN. IN
DIORS AND BLACK. THIS MATERIAL CAN
g WAEIEQ: SFJAS EVERY
HERE AT 35e. YARD. SP!EIAL2
OMORROW AT..:..............
ALL OF OUR PLAIN AND BROCADJED SPUx
FIADOW SILK. IN BLACK AND ALL THE
LADING CODRS, IS REDUC
D-VALUE ISc.-FOR ONE
AY'S SI:2LING AT, PER YD..
20 PIECES OF NUBIAN FAST
LACK PEIRGALINE THE 15c.
ALUE. TOMORROW FOR.... * 1.c
DanIsh
EVERY WOMAN KNOWS
>UT TO-AND HOW DESIRA:
IHALL PLACE ON SALE ioo.
)F THE MOST WANTED AN:
k Rich Sale of Fre
Rich only as pertains to the quality [email protected]
nairs alike from an Importer in New York who
le emall trifling prices:
~8 PirsTAINSFUILL8%YARDS
ONG. GOOD WIDTH. ABQUT S DIFFER
NT PA1'TERNr4, WORTH $7.50. A LOT OF
.BOUT 25 SASH CURTAINS ARE ALSO
'CCLUDED IN THIS ASSORT
[ENT. SALE PRICE TOMOR
W.........................~. *9
~2Par OF RENAISSANCE CUR
TAINS. ALL SINGLE
AIRS. NO TWO ALIKE.
ALUES RANGE FROM 88 TO
12.50 PAIR. SALE PRICE... *
Salle of
THE. HOUSEKEEPER, IN PLANNING HE1
UPPLIED WITH FINE SNOWY.-WHITE TAB1
AVE MATERIALLY ON THE LINENS BY B1
SUPERIOR QUALITY OF BLEACHED IRJ
AMASK PATlN CLOTHS. NEW ELEGANT.
SPECIALLY PRICED AT A SAVING OF 25 PE
EGULAR VALUES, AS FOLLOWS:
[ZE 2 BY 2%................................
ZE 2BY &...............................
[ZE 2BY84..............................
,NAPKINS TO MATCH.....................
SNAPKINS TO MATCH.....................
72-IN. WIDE ALL-LINEN CREAM IRISH T
8K. WORTH dOe. YARD. ESPECIALLY PRICI
:ORROW AT...............---....---...----.
1S-IN. SUARE ALL-LINEN BLEACHED I
EAT PATTRNS, $1 JALUE. SPECIAL]
OZEN ...................................
Dressmakel
WW'VE PRICED THEiE L1TTLE NEEDS AT5
EEDS IN THIS DEPARTXENT TOMORROW.
A6-my,ad I,o.1 Sowin ston- 3 c.
mos for..............-+----.. ---. -
Lumu Droe SbJelfo, contain no rubber andl
'e gtaranteed odlorlees; aso 5 ilor 25c., ais 4
ri. 2a. ise S e 21e. and aime 2.1ge.
Smith &; Age Automatie Hand lewing Ma
klm we are sole agents for Weeb-Si9
gto. umplete for.....
Warer' Cotaesatherbone, per4c
ee ad.................. *
Webers 3ibro, light and durable;
,.. yare foe ISe., per rda......
.r...o........----.--..---. ----..
Buw Nook* and Eye Tape; dome
..s 31.65: per.,.a............. .
Inestratible Poi Ie $Jai; "-Sc.
men=...........................-.
Mathifle Oil, warated et to gum; 3
bottles 20..............
Ganger's Pabat Invisble me. ata,a
base ewod: 2lu deenur.............-..
Stadist Mackitn She. unadoo et
3 emne eneh-gent; * spsi
Co. 8th
ST OF EVERYTHING FOR TH
Worth up to 51
is are all statements we ni
new weaves, showing a It
eason. Theyare Broadcloi
select from. Every piece I
iread Is guaranteed strctl3
i of a big mon ' -saving pr
re of our gdjudgment
you to pay for goods worth
r. ANNE .
ie Silk Questi
est tim. It's not a attw of sat fn Sks. bee'
Me owr miamft 4&7* of d1k @@M vw IA ami
NopSh this so.
Special No. 3 I 5 PIcz OF
FINIi BLACK
MOIRE VELDUR. FULL 36 IN. WIDE, ELE
GANT RICH AND LUSTROUS BLA(. SOLD
ALL THROUGH THE P-E-T
SEASON FOR $1.50 A YARD. O.
FERED AT....................... C*
Special No. 4 Is 10 PIECES OF
Specal o.* BLACK M OIR E
VLOU4R, WITH SELF - COORED POLKA
SPOTS. SHOWING DIFERENT SIZE DOTS.
THIS CLOTH, HAS PROVEN TO BE ONE OF
THE SEASON'S MOST POPULAR STYLES.
IRA BEFN SEING RIGHT
ALONG AT $1 A YARD. OF- 79c
FERED TOMORROW AT ........... 79c,
)y Styles in Brillia
ne of Our Late Purchases
y trimmed with cluster of fine tucki
ughout. They only come in two col
he best quality material, latest styl
pearl buttons, lined throughout; sh
mported material, new yoke effect, bl
rn-over on the stock, tucked cuff
of imported material, finished with
ck dots. This garment is finished w
ons, all sizes. The price .......
or, Adjoining the Millinery.
tanch" Lining
ND FOR DRMFRE WHICH REUIRE A 901SI
.OWED ADMISSION IN THIS DEPARTMENT.
36-INCH MOTRE-FINISH PERCAUNES.
STRONG AND DURABLE QUALITY. IN FAST
BLACK AND ANY. COLOR; 7
USUALLY SOLD AT 12%e.
YARD. TOMORROW-S PRICE..
10 PIECS OF GUARANTEED
SHRUNK CANVA. IN .BLACK
ONLY. A LEADER AT ........
SILK-FINISH ON BOTH
SIDES OF A FAST BLACK
PERCALINE. A 20c. VALUE 12%c.
FOR.....................
Cloth at 10ff/
WHAT DANISH CLOTH IS-H
BLE AND SCARCE IT IS. TOMI
PIECES OF BLACK DANISH C1
D HARD-TO-GET COLORS, AT,
nch Renaissance Ct
ms and variety-very poor when prices are consit
is retiring from business. These are strictly Srsnt
SOF VEY ELEGANT RE
NAISSANCE C U Rt TAINS
WITH DEEP BORDERED EDGE, ALL SIN
GLE PAIRS. WORTH FROM
$10 TO 815. SALE PRICE TO-$85
MORROW. PER PAIR.....
18Pa s TAINS. INCHCEPT
TERNS. FULL 8%. YARpS LONG AND VERY
WORTH FROM $20 TO$2
PER PAIR. SALE PIE
Thanksgiving
L THANKSGIVING DINE, NA'TURALLY FIRIl
ZE CLOTHS AND NAPKINS THAT WILL DO CI
JING HERE.
SH DOUBLE SATIN .A XETOA
CHOICE PATTERNS. SOC AL A
Rt CENT LESS THAN TRN.(6ISWD
.................82.50 IIHHN-E
,.......... 50 LTS IE1
ABLE DAM- SZ 1B 2 PC
.".......50c. ~1CS FALL
(ISH NAPKINS, IN N.ID,FSI
- ANCXCEPIONA
..........COTCH TLIN DAM.
rsNE-D AYEIALoTs
'HELOWSTNOTH A WICH DEANDEM
Sewig Cnta 1 C0-ASE spoFLL-L
Sspolsr~..... YARD..............
VelveeenER.75c. 5
Mc;smally Priced........
Puritan P ine -nd ; boses; pere 25c.
for...................... ...
Sos e ee theag 9a1pee; s fr, ,
15e.; psr 7ard.....................
Grove Se ang Cotton, 200- r spool;
3 pol ib . ............... ...--- *
blackonly dmen ard or 60e. a. S
hMe.... ha....................2c
r*"-""e.'*'***'"''"'.. ...."7c.
gana far bse;g y 1 per e2e........
gasw.... e....... ..............*
BelMi#Wal6me;3-ne-stS
BirNe. 10. ne...a .......
St. and Pa. Ave.
E LEAST MONEY.
)c. yd. for 39c.
iake. A little job of 152
ne of the best and most
Lhs, Mascot Cords, Stripes
s 36 Inches wide, and the
all wool. Let this item
opo
and
59c.
lose we ar doing tht right along. What we
Mo8n. Ou stock 3, largs enough - our variety
Special No. 5 afSAM AL
SILK BIACK PEAU DI SOIk A MOST EX
CUL2NT QUALITY FOX TIE PRICE. THE
i.A&E IS RICH A STROUS. WE
QUA&ANTZZI EvERfPYRD
GOOD VALE AT We.; 20 INS.
WIDE, AND THE PRICE is ........ 5
Special No. 6 HAS A SHOWING
SpecialNo. 60O 10 PI10CES 0F
FINE BLACK AND WHITE CHECKED SWISS
TAFFETA. THIS LINE REPRESENTS 7 DIFr
FERENT SIZE CHECKS FROM THE POPU
LAR PIN SIZE UP. THIS SILK IS UNUSUALLY
BRIGHT AND STRONG, AND i VERY MUCH
IN DEMAND FOR SHIRT WAIST SUITS AS
WELL AS SEPARATE WAISTS.
EXCEEDINLY GOOD VALUE AT 5F9C
79c. A YARD. OFFERED AT..
SILK DEPARTMENT. FIRST FLOOR, SEC
TION B.
ntine Waists.
ag, front and back, lat
:)rs, cream and black, 2fg
e stitched pleats, Maxine effect,
:wn in black and white
ouse front, trimmed with rows of
ned throughout, in $2.95
metallic dots, navy blue and black
ith stitched pleats to the
.................... $2.95
1FOUNDATION. NOT A SINGLE YARD THAT
VFLOUR MOREEN. IN BLACK AND ALL
COIA)RS, FOR UNDERSKIRTS. AS WELL AS
SERVICEABLE ULIGS: WILL
N(yT TAKE THE DUST. bPFA14Al2
PER YARD. AT..................
'6-NH E E H ER
RlINGB)NE HAIR CIA)TH.
TO CLOSE, PER YARD 2. Y *
LUSTERED MERCERIZED SATMENS, LIGHT
WEIGHT. IN BLACK AND
AL. COLORS: THE I8e.
KIND. TOMORROW FOR.. 1
LINING DEFr.-FIRSr FIDOR--SECTION 0.
. Yard.
:W MANY USES IT CAN BE
DRROW WE
-OTH-- ONE o
PER YD.....
irtains & Bed Sets.
ered. ThIs Une embraeft a sample lot of I and I
quality goods and are new this season. Note
100 Pair-s OF FRENCH TAMBOUR
3% YARDS LONG. FROM 2 TO 5 PAIRS
ALIKE. 'WORTH FROM $3
TO 86.50 A PAIR. SA~LE
50) BOBINET NET LACE BED SETS. WITH
RENAISSANCE MEDALLION CENTER AND
LACE EDGE BOLSTER OR SH A M S.
WORTH FROM 8.50 TO*
$12.50. SALE PRICE. PER$7.5
-SET...................
UPHOLSTERY DEPT., 3D FLOOR.
L.nen.
T THINKS OF TH.E LINEN. WE ARE WELL
EDIT TO ANY ONE'S TAS'I1. -YOt WILL
SVALUTE IN EXTRA HEAVY BLEACHED
(LSK. CHOICE OF S ELEGOANT NEW PAT
I. SOLD REGULARLY AT Me. YARD. 6c
)MORROW AT........ ....... ..... ..-. **
IROIDERED HEMSTITCHED) TRAY49
28S. SPECIAL AT.................. **
[TRA HEAVY BLEACHED HEMMED4c
18 BY 38, 'TOMORROW -8 FOIR...
IRIS'"'".""CK TOWELS.12c
NEN BROWN KITOHEN TOWELING.
ELVGE 1c.VALUE. TOMORROW.,~c
NT-FIBST FIDOR, SECTION M.
'Findings
LE QUALITIES CAN BE SOLD. BUY YOUR
Cungw Soecet Garment Fastener; per c
dose...------.--*.'--'
Sprlngel Sewtig silk: per spool..*
Corticelli 100-ar Spools But Sewing4)
Silk, a. ful line of colora; per desen...e
Cortieelli 10-yard Silk Twist; U
sp~ools foer.....--.-------------------4(
0. N. T. MbCbnn Cotten. 6 spools
for................--.-.------.------*
Broo's aeMe Cttom; 6 spools1Ic
-Dter'sKnttang Ostn I hal .
/Deubl5 Semg Baltiag; gas 2f
yards, See.: wr gard.......
Daig' Bsilstmge MIa and eelone 5c
7o. asd mr.................-.--.---.
wer.m....i........ ...... .......
N-) WEAW T-FIRST VO
SaCTION *

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