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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, September 17, 1903, Image 10

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CEYLON TEA
Contains no added coloring matter or adulter^
ation so often found in inferior teas. Sold only
in sealed lead packets. Black or NATURAL
GREEN. 60c. and 70c. per lb. By all grocers.
Try a ten=cent sample packet.
To avoid substitutes, watch for the name
"SALADA."
P. B. FARNSHAW & BRO.. WhS'?^H Ao-nM. O.
T. B. Reinhardt & Sons. Established
ished 1876. *
Our Personal Guarantee W ith Each Purchase.
Birthday Remnants.
We have been selling merchandise in this city for 27 years.
This week is the anniversary. In commemoration of the event
have held a great sale of seasonable merchandise at reduced rates,
termed for the time being as Birthday Bargains.
Lots of Remnants
Are left as a result of the liberal purchasing by our friends and
patrons, many of whom have attended all of our 27 annual events,
and know them as special bargain-buying opportunities.
NOTICE-FREE SOUVENIRS.
There are between 600 and 700 SI LV E*R ALUMINUM
TRAYS left. One to each purchaser. Ask young lady on the bal
cony for one.
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?ILK!
THE CORDED SILKS. Tou know
we handle only the best grade, which
will wash and wear. The colors are
beautiful, and are desirable for waist,
dress or kimona wear. The
50c. grade. Choice, Birthday
Pi ice
BLACK FRENCH PEAU DE SOIE;
full yard wide; piece dyed; extra heavy
and very lustrous. Desirable for coat
suits or skirts. Notice we say
full 36 inches wide. Worth
$3 00 per yard. Birthday
<? Sale, yard 4> 11 .7 01
BLACK TAFFETA?the Real Black
Taffeta. How many imitations are
sold under the name of Black Taffeta?
Have you been deceived? Try us. We
made our reputation by selling GOOD
SILK at moderate prices, and poor or
imitation silk NOT at all. A
real 120-inch Pure Silk Hustle
Taffeta which will wear.
Birthday Sale, yard...
!50c.
WOOLEN PLAID DRESS GOODS;
pretty brown, blue, garnet and green
plaids, for school dresses
and ladies' waists. 12V4c. Eg
kind. Birthday Sale, yard
60-INCH SUITINGS?All-wool Nov
elty and Plain Suitings, in the new
styles. Colors are black, blue, brown,
green, tan, gray, &c. This assort
ment Is superior to many _
shown here in town at $1.00
yard. Birthday Sale "
ALL-WOOL TRICO, in every color,
evening shades and black. Desirable
for waist or dress wear. Also
makes serviceable school
dresses. It is all wool. Birth
day Sale
h-22c.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
An Ali-wool Dress os Suit Pattern,
with linings and findings complete.
Choice of the season's most popular
all-wool fabrics. In black
or colors, with linings,
amount to over $6.00. For
this Birthday Sale, Dress
Pattern complete
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SUIT OFFER.
Two of the season's best styles of Ladies' Suit?one is the
long-tail jacket, the other is the N orfolk effect. Made of all-wool
melton or vicuna cheviot, in black, navy, brown, tan or gray;
trimmed with peati de soie silk piping and but- (T\\/T\\
tons; all sizes. A $15.00 Suit. Birthday Sale...
If your fit is not here
No extra charge.
we will make a suit.
$
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domestic:
SHAKER FLANNEL, double face,
heavy nap. A 6c. value.
Cut from the piece. Birth
day sale
4 54c.
FALL CI TING FLANNEL, pretty
light ground with colored stripes and
checks. Guaranteed fast
color. 10c. kind. Birth
day Sale
- 6^c.
TOWELING CRASH; heavy twilled
crash: roller toweling; no
starch filling. A great 5c.
value. Birthday Sale 7<C5
UNBLEACHED SHEETING; &-4
wide; good heavy grade. A ,
20c. value. A great bargain. II
Birthday Sale U
HOMO NEEDS.
BED SPREADS. Just 75 more of
the large Marseilles White Hemmed
Bed Spreads. They are better and
larger than the J1.00 kind. Not over
2 to a customer. See 'em ~
in the window. Birthday / Of*
Sale "
ROLLER SHADES; on best spring;
full-length Opaque Shades _. -
with fixtures. This Is the j> N
35c. quality. Birthday Sale. ^ 11 ^?
Lace Curtains, full length, fast edges
and well-selected patterns.
Th$ 50c. Curtains, per pair 2Wc.
The 75c. Curtains, per pair 65c.
The $1.00-value Curtains, per pair..75c.
The $2.00-value Curtains, per pair.$1.25
The J5.00-value Curtains, per pair.$1.08
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Prices
on A!! Medicines.
You ran always count on (fettlnpc the
bt-st drugs here for very much less than
the "combine" dealers ask>
Santol Tooth Wash Paste, 25c. size,17c.
Sanol Liquid Antiseptic, 50c. size, 35c. ?
Vin Mariana Wine, 79c.
Gude's Pepto Mangan, 75c.
J. W. Jennings,
1142 Conn. An. 113# 18th St. ?
'Ptione Main 8410. ?
Th8 Commercial
Pacific Cables
From San Francisco
to Manila
in direct connection with the land lines of the
Postal
Telegraph
Company.
Reduced Rates.
Quick Service.
sell 42d
DEATH OF ROBT. M. C0TJSAB.
Former Washingtonian' and Depart
ment Official Passes Away.
Mr. Robert M. Cousar died at Phoenix,
Arizona, yesterday at noon. Mr. Cousar
was borr; in Mississippi, but lived a number
of yoars in Somerville, Tennessee, where he
filled the poslUon of clerk of the clrc&lt
court for fifteen years, but came to Wash
ington as a clerk In the Treasury Depart
ment in 18S6. He was rapidly promoted to
be chief of division and law clerk In the of
fice of the auditor of the Treasury Depart
ment. and served during the last Cleveland
administration as deputy auditor of that
bureau, going out of office with that admin
istration. He was subsequently reinstated
as a clerk In the office of the auditor for
the War Department, but on account of
failing health went to Phoenix, Arizona, De
cember 1, 1901. (is assistant superintendent
of the large Indian school at that place.
Mr. Cousar was the author of a digest of
decisions relating to marshals, clerks of
United States courts and district attorneys,
which was printed by order of Congress. He
had a host of friends in this city and in
Tennessee. His wife survives him. 'Mr.
Cous-.ir was a Mason and member of B. B.
French Lodge of this city.
FINEZA
$1
A Pure Rye Whiskey,
that Is smooth and
mellow from agv.
A full Quart tor
CHAS.
stlT-tf-20
TS6 SEVENTH ST.
'Phone But 833.
BELIEVED TO BE INSANE.
Court Directs Inquiry Into Mental
Condition of Henry Terrell.
Henry Terrell, colored, of 1224 12th street
northwest, was named as a defendant in
the United States branch of the Police
Court today on a charge of assault and
battery preferred by his wife, Jennie. The
man's mind is said to be unbalanced, and
Judge Scott directed that his mental con
dition be inquired into before he was tried.
He was committed to jail, where the ex
amination will be made by Dr. D. K. Shute,
the Jail physician.
Terrell's wife was arrested yesterday by
Policeman Flynn at the Police Court while
she was making complaint about her hus
band. and a loaded revolver was taken
from her. She left J50 collateral for her
appearance today to answer to a charge
of carrying a concealed weapon. When
the case was called it was explained that
she had taken the revolver away from her
husband, fearing that he might shoot her.
Her explanation was satisfactory and she
was released on her personal bonds.
For a tenarkras and persistent Cough, Pise's Cure
for Consumption la an effectual remedy. 29c.
THE DESIGN ACCEPTED
Important Step Towards Se
curing High School Building
FOR BUSINESS BRANCH
ASSURANCE THAT COST WILL NOT
EXCEED APPROPRIATION.
B. Stanley Simmons of This City the
Successful Architect?Out
line of Plans.
The District Commissioners today ac
cepted the design submitted by Architect
B. Stanley Simmons of this city for tlie
new Business High School, which is to oc
cupy, with its surrounding parking, all of
the square bounded by Sth and 9th.streets,
Rhode Island avenue and R street north- i
west. The site of the new school is in the
immediate vicinity of the McKinley Manual
Training School, located at 7th street and
Rhode Island avenue, and is near the center
of population as fixed by the last United
States census.
From a series of seven sets of plans sub- |
mitted in competition by local architects |
the Jury of award, consisting of the Com
missioners and an architectural adviser, se
lected three designs, the order of excel
lence, as fixed by the Judges, being B.
Stanley Simmons, first; Julius Wenig, sec
ond, and Frank H. Jackson, third.
It was the opinion of the architectural
adviser that none of the plans could be car
ried out with the $168,000 available for the
construction of the building. The Commis
sioners, instead of rejecting all plans, how
ever. invited tlie three leading architects in
the competition to submit estimate showing
the figures upon which they had based their
calculations to bring their respective build
ings within the available appropriation.
Mr. Simmons, who was of course given
preference, has convinced the Commission
ers that his design can be carried out safe
ly within the appropriation. He has for
warded an agreement with a local firm of
contractors who have erected many of the
finest school buildings of the city, in which
thev bind themselves to construct the Busi
ness High School in strict accordance with j
Mr. Simmons' design and specifications ap- i
proved by the Commissioners for the sum |
of $104,800. Colonel Biddle, the Engineer j
Commissioner, raised a question as to style I
of brick offered by the contractor and Mr.
Simmons, but the contractor and architect
have stipulated to furnish the grade of
brick desired by the Commissioners, and
this has been written into the agreement.
Will Call for Bids.
The Commissioners will, of course, adver
tise for bids, to see If a lower figure than
that estimated by the contractors in ques
| tlon can be secured. If no lower bids are
received the contractors submitting the es
timate of $04,800 will be called upon to
erect the building.
Col. Blddle's recommendation in the mat
ter, which has been approved by Commis
sioner West, and represents complete action
by the District board. Is as follows:
"I move that in accordance with the pro
gram of competition for the Business High
School Mr. E. Stanley Simmons be paid
$000 as the first prize and that he be direct
ed to prepare all necessary detail drawings
for letting the contract. Mr. Simmons has
proven to my satisfaction, by submitting
estimates of builders who have erected a
number of school buildings for the District
of Columbia, that the building designed by
him can be constructed for the amount
available. If the contract is let within the
limit of cost I move that he be paid the
remaining $1,000 provided by the program
of competition and that he be appointed to
supervise the erection of the building in
accordance with the terms of the program.
"I further move that Mr. Jules Wenig,
who was given second place by the consult
ing architect, be notltied that in the opinion
of the Commissioners the building designed
by him cannot be constructed for the sum
stated and-that unless he has further fig
ures to submit the award cannot be made
him under terms of the program."
Rate of Compensation.
For his supervision of the structure Mr.
Simmons will receive compensation at the
rate of $7 a day during construction, but
not to exceed in any event 500 days of
service. Mr. Julius Wenig will receive $400
as second prize, and Mr. Frank H. Jack
son $300 as third prize.
The new building will have Its principal
entrance from Rhode Island avenue. There
will also be entrances from 8th and 9th
streets. A court will open on R street.
Mr. Simmons stated today ihat he expected
to have .the detailed drawings ready by
October 1, and said there was no reason
why a contract should not be entered into
and work begun within six weeks' time.
The style of architecture employed in the
design of the new structure is a type of the
English renaissance. A three-story build
ing was deemed advisable for the reasons
that it gives an elevation needed in this
class of structure, costs less to build, pro
portionately, than a two-story building, and
is more economically heated and ventilated.
The location of the building in the square
will be on the building line of Rhode Island
avenue, where the width of the parking is
twenty-five feet. The structure will recede
from the building lines of 8th and 9th
streets, so as to give a uniform parking
width, the same as the Rhode Island front.
The class rooms have been arranged
lengthwise along the front walls, that more
direct light may be had to a greater, num
ber of pupils. The gymnasium and tempo
rary drill hall Is entered from the first floor,
with dressing rooms and shower baths at
either side, immediately below cloak rooms,
the assembly hall being on the second floor!
with provisions made for a future drill hali
above It.
Material for the Walls.
The outside walls will be built of hard
burned selected red bricks, according to the
modified specifications approved by the En
gineer Commissioner and agreed to by the
architect and contractor. Gray brick and
limestone will be used In the trimmings.
The interior of the building is to be fin
ished throughout In the best quality of
short-leaf Virginia or North Carolina yel
low pine.
The building is to be for the accommoda
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uks & (Stomjramj
Pennsylvania Avenge and Seventh Street.
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Tomorrow and Saturday for the school preparations. They
be very busy days; In the natural run off business Satur
day will be busier than tomorrow. So tomorrow will be a good
day for you to do your shopping for the boys. Tlbere'Il be the
same strong offerings made tomorrow as will be made Satur
day. fit is literally impossible to surpass the values we've spe
cially prepared for this School Opening Sale. They represent
the combined effort of our superior facilities and ambitious en
ergy. It has always been an occasion of special value-giving
with us. But it is more pronounced this season than ever
bigger assortments, finer qualities, lower prices. The strength
points have been adroitly sheathed in fashionableness. Be
cause they are staunch and sturdy Suits there's nothing lack
ing in dressiness.
Boys' Brown-striped Cheviot Double-breast
ed Short Pants Suits; with securely sewed seams,
neatly taped; patent bands; stitched edges and
strong Italian linings. Every size from 8 to 16
years. Worth $3.00. Special
Boys' All-wool Plain Blue and Mixed
Cheviot Short Pants Suits; Double-breasted
and the new Norfolk style; seams sewed with
silk; patent bands and taped seams. Sizes 7 to
16 years. Worth $4.00. Special .
Bovs' All-wool Fancv Cheviot Short Pants Suits, in Double
breasted Norfolk and Three-piece styles (these
last have vests); lined with Italian cloth, silk
sewed seams, patent bands, etc. All sizes from
7 to 16 years. Worth $5.00. Special
Boys' Double-breasted, Norfolk and Three
piece Short Pants Suits, made up in neatest
Fancy Mixtures; strictly all wool and fast col
or; linings and trimmings and making of the
very best. All sizes 7 to 17 years. Worth $6.50.
Special
Separate Knee Pants.
1,500 pairs of Boys' Plain Blue
and Black and Fancy Mixed Chev
iot Knee Pants; cut in full propor
tions ; taped seams anA patent bands
?strong as Cheviot can be woven
and careful making can make them.
All sizes from 4 to 16 years. 75c.
value.
Special: ||(Q)C*
Boys' Shirts & Waists.
A big line of new patterns in Boys'
Shirts and Shirt Waists. The Shirts
are in sizes 12 to 14; the Waists to
fit ages from 5 to 13. Shirts have
detached cuffs; Waists are made
with and without collars. 75c. value.
Special:
Boys' Hose.
There isn't a Hose made for tl-e
Boys that can compare in the serv
ice it will give to the Black Cat
Hose. In the course of a season we
sell thousands of dozens pairs. Ev
ery pair is perfect; every size is cor
rect. It's the economical Hose to
buy. Sizes 5y2 to 11. 35c. value.
Special:
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iBoys' and Girls' School Shoes.
Shoes get the brunt off the wear; they are the
most frequent Item off expense in the Juvenile
wardrobe. But you'll find our Shoes will give
service. They are not iron and they will wear
out?but they'll stand the strain longest because
they're all solid leather throughout; strongly
made; properly shaped?a Shoe that fits will wear
lots longer than a Shoe that doesn't. These Shoes
are twice guaranteed?by the makers and by US.
Our "Little Trooper"?all solid leather throughout;
lace style, with heels or spring heels, and in sizes for
Boys and Girls. $1.25 value. Special
r
"The Mignon" is the leading Shoe for the Misses?Black Kid
and Box Calf; Button or Lace; solid soles; shapely and ?
comfortable. Sizes from ij]/2 to 2 sell for $1.25; sizes
8y2 to 11 sell for $1.15. Sizes 5 to 8. Special.
I"
"Kant Kick' for the boys, made
and Velour Calf; dressy, but strong.
13^. $1.75 value. Special
Kid, Box ^ jj .35
of Vici
All sizes 8^2 to
Misses' and Children's Cork Sole Button and Lace Shoes; in
visible cork sole, but strictly waterproof; dressily lasted. ? <1 .gjJ)
Sizes 113^2 to 2, worth $2.50, for $1.95. Sizes 8y2 to j[
11. $2.00 value. Special
Young Men's Suits.
There are two special lots off that expressly
cut=and - made = for - the - Young = Men- Qlothing.
That they are offered a third below the value is
an added attraction.
Plain Blue and Black and Fancy Cheviot Long Pants Suits;
with Single-breasted-cut Coats, broad shouldered d? ]r~7/ A E?
and shapely; stylish trousers?full of style, but // o u" a>
what is of more importance, full of wearableness.
All sizes 15 to 20 years. Worth $9.00. Special..
Lot of Young Men's All-wool Cheviot Single-breasted Sack
Suits, cut and made in the latest style, and de
signed especially for school service, in that TWO
PAIRS OF PANTS ARE PROVIDED WITH
EACH SUIT. All sizes from 15 to 20 years.
Worth $12.00. Special
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Boys' School Caps.
Lot of Blue Serge Golf Caps, both the new Tam
shape and the Long Visor style; extra well made, of J*
extra fine quality of Serge. 35c. value. Special
Lot of Boys' Plain Serge and Cheviot Golf Caps, Naval Caps,
with real leather visors, and the new Norfolk Golf
Caps in fancy mixtures; they are silk sewed and silk- ^(11)
braid trimmed. 69c. value. Special ^
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tion of 800 pupils, with twenty class rooms,
each about 24 by 02 feet, and an office room
25 feet square. It is planned, however, to
permit of an economical enlargement for
the ultimate accommodation of 1,2(K) pupils,
in the proportion of 4<W boys and 740 girls.
The building will also contain an assembly
hall, drill hall, gymnasium, with dressing
rooms, Bhower baths and lockers; teachers'
rooms and toilets, cloak rooms with 500
lockers, library, physical, chemical and bio
logical laboratories, map, banking, type
writing and drawing rooms, boiler, engine
and dynamo rooms, bicycle and other mod
ern equipments.
The schooner Moonlight, belonging to the
Gilchrist fleet, foundered twelve miles off
Michigan Island In Sunday's great gale on
Lake Superior. The crew was taken oft
with the greatest difficulty by the steamer
Volunteer, which had the Moonlight In tow.
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ROCKVILLE AND VICINITY.'
General and Personal News From
Montgomery County's Capital.
Special Correspondence of The Evening Star.
ROCKVIi.LE, Md:, September 10, 11)03.
Mr. Claude M. Allison and Hiss Pansy T.
Lochte, a well-known young couple of the
vicinity of Montrose, a few miles east of
here, were quietly married here last even
ing by Rev. Thomas D. Williams, pastor of
St. Mary's Catholic Church. The ceremony
was performed at the home of the minister
in the presence of a few Intimate friends
of the young lovers. After a short honey
moon trip Mr. and Mrs. Alilson will take
up their residence in Tenlevtown. The bride
THE NEW BUSINESS HIGH SCHOOL,
w??,vvyvvvwvwwvv^
is a daughter of Mr. Charles A. Lochte.
Mr. William Edward Hooper and Miss
Vlrgie Golden Shelton, young Washingto
nians, were married here Tuesday by Rev.
\V. P. Locke, pastor of the M. E. Church
South. The ceremony was performed in the
office of the clerk of the circuit court. The
young folks visited Rockvilie Sunday after
noon and made their arrangements, and
upon their arrival here yesterday the minis
ter was awaiting them at the court house.
A number of young people, who had gained
knowledge of what was to transpire, were
also awaiting them, and Immediately upon
the conclusion of the ceremony administer
ed to the hrldal couple a generous shower
of rice. The newly married couple took
everything good-naturedly and left amid
another shower of the cereal.
The proceedings of the second day of the
annual Institute of the public school teach
ers of this county, which began here Tues
day, were full of Interest and profit, and
were attended by quite a gathering. In ad
dition to the hundred or more teachers. The
opening exercises of the morning session
were conducted by Mr. P. T. Griffith, prin
cipal of the school near Potomac. The re
ligious exercises were In charge of Rev.
Thomas J. Packard, rector of Christ Epis
copal Church. Prof. T. L. Gibson of Penn
sylvania continued his lessons In vocal
music, and again the music was a pleas
ing feature of the program. State Institute
Director M. Bates Stephens delivered an ad
dress upon "What Constitutes a Good
School." Later In the session he again
spoke briefly, urging the teachers to en
deavor to work up a public sentiment in
favor of better pay for the teachers, and to
use every other honorable effort to secure
just consideration at the hands of the next
legislature. "Literature" was the topic for
a round table conducted by Miss Ida Dove,
principal of the school at Betliesda. Among
those participating were Miss Dove, Miss
Evelyn Darby, Prof. Warfleld and Mr. The
odore Benson.
Mr. Theodore Benson, principal of the
SchooJ at Boyd's, directed the opening exer
cises of the afternoon session. Prof. John
P. Fockler, public school examiner for
Washington county, gave a fine talk on
"Home Training and Teacher." Prof. Gib
son gave some further suggestions In vocal
music, and Prof. P. S. Barnes, principal of
the school at Travllah, conducted a round
table, the topic being "Art of Class Teach
ing." Among those who took part In this
discussion were Prof. Barnes, Prof. S. A.
Lehman, Miss Hattle Montgomery, John
Baker and Robert W. Stout.
Nearly all of the teachers and a number
of their friends went last evening on a trol
ley ride to Glen Echo and Cabin John
Bridge. A special car waa chartered for the
occasion, the trip being made by the way
of Washington. A number stopped off at
Glen Echo and participated in a dance, and
the others continued to the Bridge and en
Joyed the numerous amusements to be
found there as the guests of the manage
ment. This feature was in charge of Mrs.
Blanche Braddock Cramer, a former
teacher.
The funeral of Lieut. Henry P. Reich,
who died very suddenly Sunday at his hoipo
at this place, took place yesterday after- ,
noon from the late residence of the deceas
ed. The services were conducted by Rev, |
Thomas J. Packard, rector of Christ Epis
copal Church, and the interment was at .
Rockville cemetery. Only the relatives and ,
more intimate friends of the family attend- ,
ed. A detachment of sailors acted as pall
bearers, and at the grave taps were
sounded.
The Knights of Iiabor Decision. '<
To the EViltor of The Evenlne Star:
X beg leave to correct an error in your
report of the action of Justice Pritchard in
the Knights of Labor case yesterday. Your
report states as follows:
"Justice Pritchard took the view that the ,
defendants should be restrained from han- \
dling the property pending the hearing of J
the case on its merits, which will occur at
the October term of court. Burns and his
associates maintain that Hayes and his fel- '
low officers bolted the regular convention,
held sessions without giving due notice to i
the other delegates, and elected Hayes as
grand master workman. Hayes, who had
been the general secretary of the associa
tion, turned over the books and funds to
t-he new general secretary. Chamberlain,
and in this way. it is alleged, the 'illegal'
officers retained possession of the property
of the association."
Justice Pritchard's action was just the re
verse of that reported by you. The suit in
which his order was made was instituted
by Burns and others last June against my
self and five others, claiming to be lawfully
elected and installed officers of the order of
the Knights of Labor. Upon the fllii.g of
the bill and the affidavits of certain of the
complainants a temporary injunction was
granted in the usual course, without any
opportunity to the defendants to f-e heard.
The defendants filed their answer, with ac
companying affidavits and exhibits, and the
case came on for hearing before Justice
Pritchard. who. after a full hearing and
argument by counsel, dissolved the tem
porary injunction, thereby in effect holding
that the defendants, Including myself, are
the regularly and lawfully chosen and con
stituted officers of the order, whose busi
ness we are now, as such officers, adminls
tering. JNO. W. HAYES,
peneral Master Workman, K. of L.
The Ellison Bank of La Orange, Ind.,
has closed Its doors. The bank has been in
terested in projecting electric roads la Ohl?
oil territory. No figures have been given.

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