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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, November 18, 1903, Image 17

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WASHINGTON, D. C., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1903-TWENTY PAGES,
THE fcVMrNQ 8TAR
ruDLisasr ca^ly asoEP*) muscat.
Saiioe^ Ofiic* Utt ?ti*. >oc f?*9t?*?iiii? 17ft
The livening 8ia Newspaper Oomptny.
* h tfcWfUAjifc
Hm Tort Ottc? Tubui Buutiiog.
Cbjccgi 'Jfilet rrliKui> Bu?d!af.
The Even In* Stat in served to aubtrrlbers In th*
City by < arrW'is, on their own account. at 10 cent*
per week, or 44 cents per month Copies f-t th#
counter, 2 cent* each By mall- anywhere In tb?* U.
?. or Canada postage prepaid?00 root? per m< ntB, \
Sat unlay Star. 32 paees $1 per vear: with for* j
?Ign postage added $3.flO
(Entered at the Poat Office at WasnlnKton, D. 9?t
A* secmid-claa* mall matter.)
Kir All mail subscriptions mast be paid in advaaefe
Rates oi advertising made nuown 03 application
EDUCATIONAL.
i* n i
The Lawrence Vocaj ScihcoH
027 <1 Breathing for weak voices. lungs. Trial free,
pupil* prepared for Bcci'al. Choir, Opera, Stage.
Elocut iou. Piano, \ iolin by experts. Terms moderate.
oc7-4<>t ? _
Saltsmian=d2 Ford Studios
Music and Drama. 7oQ 13th Bt. n.w. Tiano, \ lo
lin. Slnglag, Dramatic Expression. nol4-l'2t*-4
Dupont "femanary.
A home and day school f??r young ladies and llt
tle girls, i I a itti rj and advanced studies. Ex
cellent advantage* in music, drawing and lan
guages. Careful attention given to social accom
plishments. I*ai iit s < ?>rdiaily Invited to call* or
to address the principal. _ ^
17M . . Q <\ REET nol4-2gt^l0
11438 N~Street N. W.
TIIK MIS.SKS KERU'S SCHOOL, Ft IB GIHLS.
A limited rminl..-r < f b.-ys received.
S. I . I el;s (!? t. 1. ?olHK
Spanish Language School.
Spanish ,?!<;.!>? learned. Specialty In speak in--',
reading ?>n I tr iusbM ing. Kiavonahle rates. Trial
I,. ?>. SK.NOIil-< iOM AIL BKOS . natives, 11131
N Y e. .Ms ? lessons at PUPILS' residences.
im 11 Ht'.t ? ?;
HISS ADELA VERNON, TEACHER OF SINO
ing. It?:isan me! !???.!. (iern.an songs. oratorio,
etc.; also classes iu \o< :il culture tor the speak
ing voire: special method. Studio: The Farra
gut Farragut <juare. ncll-lm*
S iSliXGTON DRAMATIC* CONSERVATORY?
Training for the stage and platform. M. Al; -
RKIIA BARIdMITnN. dmlriM. lllO I st.
n.w.. M?-tzerott Bldg. Booklet sent on application.
noll-26t*
Chevy Cihase School a5S.
French the language of the house. Bays admitted
to Kindergarten, Primary and Intermediate Depart
ments. Lt'th st.. n?'ar Baltimore st.. Washington,
1>. 0. MPe. Ij. M. BOULKjINY, Principal.
no4-w,m,i-;"9t.7
TANNER'S Loan ITtrust Bldg.,
BUSINESS Cor. F and 9th.
COLLEGE. 21st Year.
Pay and Ltgh* sessions. Instruction private?Indi
vidual. '.he principal hHH had over 20 years" experi
I'D' e as ??I!i' ;::l eourt ? t? nogiapher. bookkeeper and
teacher of l?u i*iess methods. oc24-s.ni..v.tf-10
Emerson iTHstaliiate.
Select Classical and Scientific
School for young men and boys.
914 14th St.
PREPARES FOR ALL I'MVKRSITIKS. WEST
POINT. ANNAPOLIS. AND F??K THE \R.MY AND
NA\Y. SPECIAL DEPAKTMPNT FOB YOP.NiS
BOYS. UYMNASH M AND \THI.ETIC FIELD.
< HAS. B VtH Nti. A M . Ph.D .
Principal nrd Proprietor.
?r;0. H. SENSNER. B.S., Head Master.
m 1'1-tf
Wood's K.wt Capltol St.
Commerc?a2 ?;;;^ooa.
Coltege, ?1"'"3,1 ,ke rear
oc21 w.s.m.tf-3
MRS Arthur W. Porter,
VOCAL TEACHERS.
Pupils pre?#ared for oratorio, concert, church.
oelSO- 116t* t)41 F st. n.w.. Rooin 10.
Ladies' QymnasJunni.
Aft.MUMm gild Night Classes. Proper Pbrsfrnl
Training A<Mress for circular. Prof. MAI'RICE
A. JOYCE. Carroll Institute. oclT-tf-o
PIANO, VIOLIN, VOICE, & c
COM MBIA CONSERVATtiliY OF MFSIC, 8i?2 MT.
\ h lt\oN PLACE. Edwin Hart. Prin. ocl4-34t*
MISS KATIE V. WILSON,
VEACHER OF SINGING.
has resumeil lessons for the season. Studio. 1320 |
loth st. n.w.; phone Main 27*>3-A. selO-78t*.5
Mandolin, (Guitar, Bamjo.
('orr*1.'! nu'tbwl. Sixth Bpfl?on. GERTRUDE
BUCKINGHAM THOM %8.133$ I'rliif.'ton s.2''.-tf,4
W ImThTa!'.iHS1S CLAgSffi, 1408 NEW YORK
u?e.?Knj;li h. K'l'n.'li, Spanish, stenoffraphr.
arithmetic, tjpewritlng, etocatkm, chorus, physi
cal trainii!!.*. ilam-ing, ilr<ssii>akInK. Ternm: $1 a
nu>. to members; membership, SI n year.
scL'i tf Mis- ANNA E. MnelKtN.VI.il. Supt.
KlAVAKil ?' ToWNSESn.
Miss ADA LOl'ISK TI1WNSKND.
FI.O< I'THIN. i-:\rUKSSU?N. VOK.'K I Tl.TT'RE.
The < ilyin'il'i, < or 14th and Uuauoke stn. n.w.
Holy cross academy.
Select sch?>el f<?r young ladies and children.
A? ademic and Preparatory Departments.
Complete courses in Music and Art. Opens Sept. 21.
1t? t f 1312 Mass. ave.
art school,
1113 17TH ST.. BETWEEN L AND M STS.
Pp-to-d.it*' ustructiou in freehand drawing and
painting from objects, antique and life?'lils. water
?-olors pe i and ink ?wash and charcoal?wood burn
ing. car*, ing class on Saturday for teaclie.s and
?M-liivd eMIdn-ii Circulars on applicath n at Studio.
IU till 12 a.m. Miss S. W. KELLY.
? i 261
TiiE OLNEY SCHOOL,
11Ti2 Eicbteenth Street.
Prlina V Al :ni i:ii* . t".-11 k** I'r..|i?r*t?.ry.
CatahiKUM. Mt-? VIRGINIA M I SON DORSET.
,1 Mlas I.AI'ISA LEE IKHtsKV.
FRIENDS' SELECT
SCHOOL,
1S11 1 ST. N.W.
A school of all grades for hoys
and girls. Has prepared students
for twenty different colleges and
technical schools.
Certificate privilege to Lehigh,
Dartmouth. Swarthmore, George
town, Columbian, Vassar, Smith
and Welleslcy.
Excellent Gymnasium and Play
Grounds. Also the use of the Y. M.
C. A. Field for teams.
Catalogues on application.
se3-tf THOMAS W. SI DWELL. Principal.
Education for Real Liffa
18t>4. For Sons and Daughters, at 1JKM-4.
Spencerian Business College,
Academy ? f Music huildlng, 0tl? and I? n.w.
Beautiful, spacious hall *. Entrance, 4U!l 0th st.
Day and Night Sessaoras.
F>.r New AiiwiuiiepBe'at nr full Inforuntion ns to
course ami terms '-all st etii <? or aii ircss
Mrs. SARA A. SI'KNfF.R,
Tel Main. ?12" M Principal ami Proprietor,
ljcuiiartl OirltU Sp lie. r. Beeretiy. ? lU-tf
MR. B. FRANK QEBEST.
PIANO. IIIttlAN AMI Ml .SH'Al, THEORY.
?rlB-tf.4 Stadln. 1881 Hth at. ??*.
FLYNN'S ,?t?.
li'i A YEAR DAY OR NIGHT SESSION.
PENMANSHIP.
liil AMJI A it. S2S
arithmetic, ?
l'K"km.Ym!T a Year.
in it IK K EEPINi 1.
SHOKTil AND.
TYPKWRI11X0. &c.
? \K!.H I.. INDlVIlil Al, INSTRUCTION.
angi 'St.12
Aetaal ability in tnnwtag antl translating rap
Itlij acquired iu
German,
FRENCH. SPANISH, etc.
y.. th.sl aW'ir.lcii 4 r'l'l ni.-.lais: bra icl-es: aii
tcal attctiiiance. .Viiaiii. Estal.iiaheit 1S7H 1 rl
\-it. or ela ? . Da? and ev.-ui.nt. At ?-.???! or
i-.'sid.-1-.ce. SPANISH AT RKDI i i;i> RATES. Scml
t. r . ircuiar. Trial free.
UERL1TZ SCHOOL.
7-J3 14th st. Prof. A. GON ARH. Priuc pal.
o?*2-tf -
Mrs. i<cutt=Jo!hrasor81
Manoforte and Theory. Pupils now hoi din* re
? lonsit.le p<.sltlona as teachers. Residence. studio.
Jo Iowa circle. .n-2-S sAw tf
jrw.Jeudw]neKe!;??
ah* Teachers' Association. 1002-04. I'iano, Theory,
Choir and Chorus Conducting. Studio, The I nnce
ton, 14^0 V ?t. no4-2tff
" GKItM AN-AME1UC4N
K1NDEROAR 1 EN, noARDlNO
8,-hool. 1011 New llanipalilre ave. Mliaea L1PPIN
Cl/rr A BAKER, l'rlm Ipaii. Coach calls for pupils,
soi 26f
EDUCATIONAL.
IN WASHINGTON.
Washington School
For Boys
PfOl WISCONSIN AVE. (Tennallytown Road.)
I.ul IS LEVERETT HOOPER. A.M., llea<l Master.
Advisory Foard: Jus. Brewer. Mr. C. C. Glover,
Ren. Hoar, Com. Macfarland, Col. Wright. Splen
did location. Country advantages. Very accessible
from all part* of the city. Experienced Faculty.
One teacher for every five boys. Special course
rnr.pjcd out for each puidl. Commodious building,
i.ew and well equipped. The boys' health a subject
of special attention. Every facility for exercise
and wport. Splendid gymnasium and athletic
giornd of many acres. Private golf links. Day
ami l>oardlng departments. Pupils of any age re
ceived. Parents cordially invited to visit the
school. Year Book at leading book stores and
hotels. sel2-tf
Washington 5emanary
An earnest school for earnest girls,
Connecticut and Florida Avenues.
Mr. and Mrs. (i. T. SMALLWOOD. Principals.
Planned for parents whq desire the best iK>ssible
tra'ning for their daughters; who wish for and will
hi predate a beautiful home, refined associations,
a! I ? and conscientious instruction, and the develop
ment of womanly character. se5-78t-12
I IIENCI 1 LANGUAGE !SCIIOOlT"
Fasy. attractive courses; all grades; classes,
morning. aftern-on, evening; 20 lessons or mnre.
MI.LE. V. PRUDIIOMME (opp. 4th St.). 314 Ind.
iti e.v. au22-7st
Dr. E. S. Kimball,
TEACHER OF SINGING.
1010 F ST. N.W., TIU-: WALTER BUILDING.
noT-tf
Columbia Kindergarten Training
SCHOOL. 1011 NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE.
Misses LIPPINCOTT and BAKER, Principals.
cjc16 tf
W~F. DALES, PH. I>.. 1212 12TII N.W., CLAS
sical teacher. Pupils thoroughly prepared for
college or other rxaminations in Greek. Latin and
other studies. Fifteen years' experience. se23-52i
Mr. J ?Bum Tfineopltnill,
TEACHER of PIANO, ORGAN AND HARMONY.
Studio, 930 Pennsylvania avenue northwest,
Tuesdays and Fridays. sel9-tf
A MODERN BUSINESS TRAINING SCHOOL.
THE WASHINGTON COLLEGE OF COMMERCE,
I>. F. CLARK, Business Manager.
Harper building. 467 C street n.w.
DAY AND NIGHT SESSIONS.
cciP-2fit* Students enter any time.
hedrillery:
J100 NEW YORK AVENUE.
Shorthand, Typewriting, Book
keeping. Telegraphy, Business
and Civil Service Preparations,
Rough Drafts, Tabulation. Day
and evening. Speed dictation,
80 to 140 words per minute.
oc 28-tf
Bliss Electrical School
Offers n practical course in applied Electricity
<?< n i lete in one year. Students fitted for good po
sit lens in the electrical industries. Graduates
hi_r' ly successful.
Day and evening courses now open. Call or send
for Catalog. 211) G st. n.w. 'Phone East 437-Y.
oc28-tf
PHYSICAL CULTURE.
Elocution and English. Class and private work.
Fo ? circular and terms apply to CARRIE MARIE
DOUGLASS, 1110 F st. n.w., Metzerott Hall.
oc24-26t*
ART SCHOOL"
The SALMAGUNDI ART SCHOOL, 1420 New
York ave. n.w. All branches taught. Terms $5
per month. oc22-26t*
ARMY AND NAVY
Preparatory School,
1347 Roanoke St. N.W.
Select School for Young Men and
Boys. Fall term opens October I.
Successfully fits young men for all
universities. Offers special training
to candidates for Military and Naval
Academies, and prepares for direct
Commissions in the Army, Navy
and Marine Corps.
Catalogues at principal book stores.
Address E. SWAVELY, Headmaeter.
oc21-2mo,28d
MEDICAL.
?DR. CZARRA?
The Well known German Specialist,
817 ?TH ST N.W.
10 years permanently located in Washington city.
His success in treating old and so-called incurable
eases Is acknowledged by the public and profession.
See testimonials at his office.
RUPTUItE permanently cured without pain or
loss of time. X-RAY for examination, diagnosis
and treatment. CURES cancer. Impoteney, stric
ture. varicocele, hydrocele, skin, blood poison,
syphilis and private diseases quickly for lifetime,
dell tf Consultation free.
W.T. Saunas, M.D., Plh.B.,
Specialist in all Chronic, Neivous and Special
Diseases. Consultation free. * Phone East 31-M.
S. E. cur. 0th and F n.w. Hours 10 to 1, 4 to 0.
ik?2 28t * .
~DR. LEATHER MAN,
Exiert Specialist in the eure of all special dis
eases. Hydrocele, Varicocele. Stricture. Impoteney
and Blood diseases cured for life. Consultation
free. W02 F st. n.w. apl7-tf,6
Or. WrEgIht,^7'SthLJtSTbet. F & o.
Tel. day or nlglit. M. 3765 F.
Treatment tor Wasting Diseases, Nervous Dis
eases; men and women; new cure for catarrh.
Daily ofiice hrs.: S to 10:30, 12 to 2, Tt to 7, Sun
day 8 to 10:30. Consultation free. oc20-tf.7
STATIC ELECTRICITY
Violet and X-Ray.
German specialists for diseases of male and fe
mule. Cures eruption, discharge**, strict ure^, ner
vousness. kidney, bladder troubles, uterine and
ovarian troubles, diseases of throat and mouth and
all private diseases. Consultation free.
Office hours. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Tuesdays and
Saturdays till 8 p.m.; Sundays, 10 a.m. to 12.
U. S. Medical loistotiuite,
Je4 1f, 11 1233 I'A. AVK. N.W.
DR. FISK ELGIN,
Office hours 9 to 1, 3 to 0, 7 to 9, 824 12th st n.w.
Specialist in Chronic Diseases of l>oth sexes and
any 11alure, professional matters strictly confiden
tial. Medh lue furnished. Prices moderate.Main 776-Y.
t?6-7tst\C
RAILROADS.
Chesapeake <& Ohio Ry.
Schedule Effective November 10, 1003.
Trains leave Pennsylvania Station.
2:30 P.M. Dally CHICAGO AND ST. LOUIS SPE
CIAL. Solid vestibule, electric-lighted Dining
Car train to Cincinnati. Reaches Cincinnati
8:00 a.m., Louisville 11:00 a.m., St. Louis 6:45
p.m., Chicago 5:30 p.m. Pullman Sleepers to
Louisville, Cincinnati, Indianapolis and St.
Louis. Arrives Virginia Hot Springs 10:20 p.m.
central time. Parlor Cars Cincinnati to Chi
cago. Dining Car from Washington; meals a
11:10 1\M? Daily- F. F. V. LIMITED. Solid ves
tibule, electric-lighted Dining Car train to Cin
cinnati. Pullman Sleepers to Cincinnati, I Lex
ington and Louisville, without change. Com
partment Sleeper to Virginia Hot Springs daily
except Sunday. Observation Car Hinton to Cin
cinnati. Sleepers Cincinnati to Chicago and St.
Louis. Dining Car serving meals a la carte.
Reservation and tickets at Chesapeake and Ohio
office, ft 13 Pennsylvania aveuue; Fourteenth
street, near F, and at the station. Telephone call
1640 for Peuusylvania R. R. Cab Service.
H. W. FULLER.
Telephone Main 1006. General Passenger Agent.
SEABOARO AIR LANE RY.
LEAVE PENNA K R. STATION.
For rvter.burg. Kmlcleb. Wilmington. Columbia.
?avaonah. Jacksonville, Tampa. Tallabasae*. At
lanta Ulrnilngham. MublU'. Pensatoia and New
Orlcaue.
10:46 AM. Dally.-SEABOARD 11 AIL-Throoffb
Pullman Sleepers to Jacksonville. connecting at
Hamlet with Vullma" 81**eper to Atlanta.
T.OO P.M. Datlj.-SEABOARD EXPRESS?Solid
train to Jackaonrllle and Tampa, with Pullman
(levprr, and cafe dining car. Through alerpera
to AtUnta.
Ticket OOce: 1U1 Praia, are.
RAILROADS.
Pmm
kae?t^?as>
STATION CORNER OF SIXTH AND B STREW*.
7:60 A.M. dally. PITT6BORG EXPRESS AMD
FAST HAIL.?Parlor #nd Dining Can Oarrla
burg to Plttaburg. Connecta for Chicago. !?
dlaoapolls and Louisville. Buffet Broiler Parlor
Car to Harrlaborg.
10:80 A.M. dally. PENNSYLVANIA LIMITED.?
Pullman Sleeping, Dining," Smoking and Obaervl
tlon Cara llarrlsburg tu Chicago, Cleveland. To
ledo auil Detroit. Bullet Parlor Car to Harris
burg.
10:50 A.M. dally. ST. LOC1S LIMITED.?Sle*^
lug, Dining, Smoking and Observation cara Oar
ritburg to Cincinnati, ludlanapolla and fit. Louia.
Bullet Parlor Car to Uarrisburg.
10:60 A.M. daily. PAST LI.NE.?Pullman Buffat
Parlor Car tu llarrlaburg. Buffet Parlor Car
llarrlsl.urg to Plttaburg.
3.JO P.M. dally. CHICAGO AND ST. LOUIS EX
PItfcSS. Sleeping and Dining Cara Harrlsburg to
Indianapolis, St. Luula, Louisville (via Ciacla
tati), aud Chicago. Parlor Car to Harrlsburg.
7:15 P.M. daily. ST. LOUIS EXPRESS.?Puilujin
Sleeping Car llariisburg to St. Loula.
7:45 P.M. dally. WESTERN EXPRBSS.-Pullman
Sleeping Car to Plttaburg aud Chicago. Dining
Car to Cblcaga.
7:45 P.M. daily. CLEVELAND AND CINCINNATI
EXPULSS. ? Pullman Sleeping Cara Waahlngton
to Plttaburg, and Harrlsburg to Clevelaid and
Cincitua tl. Dining Car. Connects tor St. Loula.
10.40 P.M. dally. PACIFIC EXPRESS.?Pullman
Sleeping Car to Plttaburg.
7:50 A.M. dally. BUFFALO DAT EXPRESJ.
with through Brollar Buffet Parlor Car an J
Coacbea to 'Buffalo, via Emporium junction.
7:60 A.M. for Kane. Canandalgua, Rocheater and
Niagara Falla dally, except Sunday.
10:6o A.M. for Elmlra and Uenovo dally, except
Suuday. For Wlliiamsport dally. 3:30 P.M.
7:15 P.M. daily. BUFFALO N1UUI EXPRESd
with through Buffet S.ceping Car aud Coacbea to
Buffalo, via Emporium Junction.
? :45 P.M. dally for Erie; for Rocheater, Buffalo
aud Niagara Falla dally, except Saturday, with
bleeping Car Washington to Rocheater.
10:40 P.M. for Erie, Canandalgua, Rocheater. Buf
falo aud Niagara Falla dally. Pullmau Sleeping
Car Waahlngton to Rocheater Saturdaya oniy.
FOR PHILADELPHIA, NEW SUlUi AND TUB
EAST.
4:00 P.M. "CONGRESSIONAL LIMITED," dally.
all Parlor Cara. with Dining Car from Baltimore.
Expreas. 7:00 (Dining Car), 8:10 (Dining Car). 9:00.
10:00 (Dining Car), 10:23 and 11:00 (Dlulog Car)
A.M., 12:45, 3:19, 4:45 (Dlulng Car from Balll
more), 8: jo, 10:00 P.M.. 12:10 night. On Sun
daya. 7:00 (Dlulng Car). 8:Jd (Dining Car), ?:00.
10:25, 11:00 (Dlulng Car) A.M.. 12:16, 8:13, 4:44
(Dlulng Car ?roic Baltimore), 8:30, 10:00 P.M.,
12:10 night.
For Philadelphia only, Expreea. 7:48 A.M., 12:11
P.M. week daya, 2:00, 4:10 aud 8:40 P.M. dally;
7:00 A.M. Sunday!.
For Boston, without change, 7:48 A.M. week daya
and 6:33 P.M. dally.
For Baltimore, 6:00, 6:18, 7:00, 7:48. 7:80. 8:10.
8:00. 10:00, 10:25, 10:80. 11:00 A.M.. 12:18.
12:45. 1:23, 2:00, 3:18. 8:30 (4:00 Limited), 4:10.
4:20, 4:46, 4:48. 6:36, 8:40. 8:18, 8:80, 7:18,
7:43. 10:00, 10:40, 11:33 P.M. and 18:10 night,
week days. On Sundays, 7:00, 7:60, 8:10, 0:00,
8:03, 10:23, 10:50, 11:00 A.M.. 12:16, 1:13, 2:00.
8:15,3:30. (4:00 Limited), 4:10, 4:20, 4:46. 8:33,
6:40, 6:10, 6:60. 7:16. 7:43, 10:00, 10:40 P.M.
and 12:10 night.
For Pope's Creek Line, 7:80 A.M. and 4:48 P.M.
week daya. Sundaya, 8:08 A.M.
For Annapolis, 7:48 A.M., 12:18 and 8:40 P.M.
week daya. Sundaya, 8:00 A.M. and 8:40 P.M.
Ticket offices, corner Fifteenth and Q Streets,
and at the atatlon. Sixth and B Streeta, where
orders can be left for the checking of baggage te
destination from hotela and residences.
Telephone call "1640" for Pennsylvania Railroad
Cab Service.
W. W. ATTERnDRY. J. B. WOOD.
General Manager. Paaa'r Traffic Manager.
GEO. W. BOYD,
? General Passenger Agent
OUTHERN RAILWAY.
Schedule effective November 1, 1903.
Trains leave from Pennsylvania Station.
7:30 a.m. Daily. Local for Harrisonburg, War
renton, Danville and way stations.
10:51 a.m. Daily. Washington and Florida Lim
ited. First-class coaches and drawing-room sleeper
to Jacksonville, Fla. Dining car service.
11:15 a.m. Daily. United States Fast Mail.
First-class coaches and drawing-room sleeper to
New Orleans. Dining car service.
4:01 p.m. Week Days, Local for Harrisonburg
and way stations en Manassas branch.
4:40 p.m. Daily. Local for Warrenton and Char
lottesville.
7:10 p.m. Daily. New York and Atlanta Ex
press. First-class coach, sleeper to Columbus via
Atlanta Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays,
Sunset Route. Tourists' sleeper Washington
to San Francisco. Pullman buffet service.
9:00 p.m. Daily. Through ?lecj?er and coach
Washington to Charlotte, making connection for
Columbia, Augusta and Savannah.
0:50 p.m. Daily. New York and Memphis IJm?
ited (via Lynchburg). First-class coach and sleep*
ing car to Itoanoke, Knoxville. Chattanooga and
Memphis; sleeper to New Orleans. Dining car
service.
10:45 p.m. DaPy. Washington and Southwestern
Limited. All Pullman train club and observation
cars to Atlanta and Macon; sleepers to Augusta,
Nashville. Atlanta Macon. Memphis, New Orleans.
D.ning car service.
TRAIN'S ON BLl'BMONT BRANCH.
Leave Washington 8:10 a.m., 1:00 p.m., 4:30
p.m.. 5:00 p.m., week days for Bluemont. 4:35
p.m. and *>:25 p.m. week days for Leesburg only.
Sunday trains for Hluemont, 9:10 a.m., <1:25 p.m.
Through trains for the South arrive Washington
6:42 a.m.. 6:52 a ra.. 10:15 a.m., 10:35 a.m., 3:30
p.m., 9:30 p.m. and 9:50 p.m., daily. Ixjcal trains
from Harrisonburg. 11:55 a.m. week days and 9:10
p in. daily. From Charlottesville. 8:25 a.m. and
9:10 p.m. daily.
Tickets, sleeping car reservations and detailed !n
f.irmutMn can be had at tieket offices. 705 15th
street. 511 Pennsylvania avenue and Pennsylvania
Station. Baggage checked through from hotela and
residences.
'Phone 1640 P. R. R. Cab Servelce.
C. 11. ACKKRT, General Manager.
S. H. IIARDWICK, General Pass'r Agent.
L. S. BROWN. General Agent.
Baltimore ainid Ottnio R. R.
Leave Washington, Sew Jersey ave. and C at.
Chicago anil Nortbweat, *11:00 a.m., *U:20 p.m.
Cincinnati, St. Loula aud UHlisville, *10:00 a.m..
?4:10 p.ui., *1.10 night.
Plttaburg and Clevelurd. *11:00 ?.m., *8:43 p.m.
au<l *1:00 night.
Columbus and Wheeling, *8:20 p.m.
Ului-beatei. 18:35 a.m., t4:16, 15:30, t?:20 p.m.
Luray, *4:15 p.m.
AliUHiM'lta, i ? :20, ?8:30, tl2:00 noon, *5:20 p m.
I rederlck, 18:35. J0:13. tll:00a.iu., |1:15, f4:S0.
16:20 p.m.
Hageiatown. tl0:05 a.m. and 15:30 p.m.
iioyd anil way points, 18:35, |J:15 a.m.. 11-18
t4 30 15:30. 110:15. 111:30 p.m. *
Galtheisburg and way polnta. 18:35, |0:18 a m
112.50, 8115,13:30. 14:30, *5:00, t5:30, t?:oi!
17 20 f10:15. 111:30 p.m.
Washington Junction anil way polnta, t8:33. ?8 ls
a ui., ?1:15. t4:30. t5:30 p.m. * ? *
Baitlmoie, week daya, *3:00, 5:00, 6:30. x7*0ft
x7:2o. ib:00. xS:30, 8:35, lb 00, 18:30, ' xliiSS'
ill.oo a.m.. xl2:00 noon, 12:05, xl:00, x2'00
13:00, xt 00, x4:30, 4:40, x5:00, x5:20, XB:00. 6:30
li.oo, x8:uo, 110 00 x11:30, 11:35 p.m. sundaya,
x3:ou, x"i:uo. 7:2o, 8:30, x9:00 a.m., xl:uo. 1:13
x.3.00, x25:30, x5:00, 6:20, 6:30, x8:oo, HO.iA/'
ill :30, II :3d p.m.
HOYAL BLUE LINE.
All ta-alns illuminated with Pintsch light.
Baltimore Philadelphia, New York. Boston and
(he Kast, *3:00 *7:00 (Diner), f8:30 (Buffet), fd:0u
(Dluei), 110.00 (Diner) a.m., *l:uo (Diner., *3:00
(?Royal Limited," Diner), t4:00 (Phlla. oaij).
?5:00 (Diner), *8:00 and *11:30 p.m. (Sleeping Car
open at 10:00 oVlock.)
Atlantic Oily. t7:00, fl0:00 a.m., fl:00. ?3:00
p m.
* Dally. t Except Sunday. | Sunday only,
x Express trains.
Baggage called to' and checked from hotels and
residences by Onlou Transfer Co. on ordera left at
ticket otBces. 619 Pennsylvania ave. n.w.. New
1 York ave. and 15th St.. and at station. _
8. B. HEUK. Dlatrlct Passenjer Agent.
D. B. M AUXIN. Manager P?sse nger Xratkc. .
FOR INVALIDS AND CONVALESCENTS.
Forest Glen Md. Open all the year. Baths, elec
tricity, auu parlor, covered verandas, hot-water heat,
open flres. Pure spring water piped through the
buildings. Its convenience to Washington especially
recommends it. Send for illustrated booklet.
J.v6-tf,10 Address G. H. WRIGHT, M. D.
HOTEL Ti^AYMOlRE,
Atlantic City, N. J. Remains open throughout the
year. hvery known comfort and convenience. Golf
privileges. Running water in bed rooms. Travmore
Hotel C o._j8el5 78t-6> 1>. 8. WHITK. President
LEGAL NOTICES
SUPREME UOUltT (IK THE HISTHICT OF Co
lumbia, Iitdding- n Probate J'o .t. No. 110*4, Ad
uiinlstrH 1 ton. This is to give notice that the sub
scriber. wlio ?#s by the Supreme Court of the Ills
trlrt of <Columbia granted letters testamentary on
the estate of Mary M. Brajian, deceased, has, with
the approval of the Supreme Court of the District
"f/i'?,uu,ya? holding a Probate Court, appointed
hriday, the 4tli day of I)eccmln r, li*03, at 11
4 i ns time, and said court room as
the place, fur making payment and distribution
from said estate under tiie court's direction and
control, when artd where-all Creditors and persons
entitled to distributive shares'or legacies or a resi
due. are unfitted to attend, in person or by agent
or attorney duly, authorized, with their claims
against the-estate jjroperljr vouched. Given under
L, 4,1 day- "t November, 1003. The
1 ' ? i>N l'!l*N AND TRl'ST O >. Ry RRI< 'B
J. MttsP.s, As?t. rreasurer. Hv JOHN B. LAKNEft.
tt.?rney, Attest: JOH\ u. rfoUKKR. Deputy Ren
ter f?.r t&e District of Columbia. Clerk
the I rnbate ( ourt. noll-law,3t
SCl'itKMi: fNjf UT MF TH'fc DISTRICT OF CO
I'l! A JiJi l*roijate Court; No. 11130. Ad
a? . V1'* ?* lo notice that the sub
scriber. who was by the Supreme Court of the
District ot ? oliimhia grafted letters testamentary
on the estate of Julia .K. iain. deceased, has, with
th,e^ approval y>( ^he Supreme Court of the District
of Columbia, holding ? Probate Court, appointed
Wednesday, the -..5th day of November, 1903, at 10
o clock a.m.. as the time, and said court room as
the place, for making payment and distribution
from said estate, under the court'* direction and
control, when and where all creditors and persous
entitled to distributive shares or legacies, or a resi
due, are notified to attend, in person or by agent
or uttorney duly authorized, with their claims
against the estate properly Vvouehed. Given under
2yi ??&25? <lay of Soffcmber. 1903. By JOHN
T * ^lumipu l^Jf?'?tor aid At torne.v. At test: W.
J- F}V\ of Wills for the
District of Columbia, (ler? vf the Probate Court.
no4-law,3t
FOREIGN POSTAL SERVICE.
WASHINGTON, D. C.. PWSt OFFICE NOTICE.
Should be read dally, a? changea may occur at
>ny time.
rFOREIGN MAILS ARE 'W8P*TCHED to the
ta of aaillng dally, and tb? achedale of closinga
?.?!r?n*ed .on ,h* P?*snnptl?i of their nnlnter
222? traM't. For the week endins
November 21, urns. the Ust eonnectlng cloaea will
be made from the MAIN OFFICE aa follow*:
tt>?*,ITRAN'?ATI-AKT,C MAILS.
New viit^MARQ0EZ, per s.s. La Savoie. from
EIlRnPW*' "?"? J"?? 'or Other parts of
u-n?APvmOBt *? dlfected "Per a.a. \m SaTole."
ner i ? vl~W At 12 M-for A?>RES ISLANDS.
hr IHtf Iv<^0W' tma ie> At 8:06 I' M.
tor IRELAND, per ?.?. Umhrta. from New York.
via (jiiwD?t(iwn. Mail for other parta of EUROPE
???? directed "Per a.a. Umbrla." (a) At 715
York w/K'15, r*r *?*; ,Ne.w York, from New
BFLGIIIW 8out*r>l*o?- ?y. At 11:25 I'.M. for
Ynrt ?, ii d|rect, per ?.s, Kroonland, from New
I, ,U111 ",u?t be direeted "Per s.?. Kroonland."
A( 11:26 P.M. for ITALY direct wr a a
Inn ?'n\?ork.\ Ma" be dl
ie< ieu i or s.s. IIobenzollern.,, (c) At ll -2n P \f
York Man 'mn V7Hek,n' from NeW
\f i ii o i"l? ust ,M> directed "Per s.s. Hekla."
MAILS FOR SOUTH AND CENTRAL AN11* RICA
?.ITr^ WEST INDIBB. S5TC 1
WEDNESDAY?(c) At 11 ;2T. P.M.' for jifxICO
per s.s. Kspernaza, from New York, via Proereso'
Campeehe ami Voia Crn?. Mall mist he 3,-ted
Per .... hgpernaza." H') At 11-5 l'.M f." mex
"'t' BA,1AMAS
I ivn ?PA3f~<,?) At 0:05 P M ''?? NEWFOUND
I from Philadelphia. <c) At
fi?n , 1 'V- for NORTIliHN BRAZIL ner ? s
FllhiyITi aV\t^iKk'i.ri.? K"T" ;""1 ' '
for CURACAO and VENEZUELA, pr,z?|?
'r',';., v?V Y"rk. Mal1 '"<? SAVAn'illA Ind CA?:
II ok i> wmu8t directed "Per s.s Zulia " <c) At
v 5 l- M, for PORTO RlOb, per s.s. Coamo fn^m
New York, via San Juan (e) At 11 *2T? P \f fr?r
FORTUNE ISLAND JAMAICA l I I
CARTAGENA and (JltEYTOWN, per k.V AHeghanv*
,n''m, /"'.,)ork- Mall for COSTA RICA must he
directed I er s.s. Alleghany." (c) At 11-2T? I'm
!?* ',?mT A" prince, put it (^oavr" ii'x
JACM,':L' I",r * ?? Prlua Wlllem IV
M-'1,1 'or other parts of HAITI, CURACAO VPN
rfVfI'*' T",N:,r>AI) BIOTISH and f)UTOa
,v f ,A. 'nust be directed "Per s.?. prlna Wlll-m
IV." (c) At 11:25 P.M. for IN AQUA and Haiti
per s.s. Bolivia, from New York. HAITI.
CF?A JIA1LS close here at 3:00 P.M. dallv ei.
cept Sundays and Mondays via Port Tampa Kla
the connecting closes helnt on Wednesdays and
via Miami', Kia *' 3:00 P M Sunda)" Mondayi
MEXICO, overland, unless specially addressed for
dispatch by steamers sailing from New York close
here dally at 10:05 A.M. (fj and 10 (hi P \t ihi
Malls for NEWFOUNDLAND, by rail to North
Sydney and thence via steamer, close here daiiv
""'P' '2:00 M. <d), and on Sundays
?? A..M; ,k>; the connecting closes being on
Mondays, \\ ednesdays and Saturdays.
Malls for JAMAICA, by rail to Boston and thence
v a steamer, close here every Tuesdav at 12 no M
1 : a,*o by rail to Philadelphia, mails closing here
every Wednesday .t 11:35 PM (c)
Malls for MIQUEI.ON. IV rail to Boston and
thence via steamer, close here dally, excent S?n
^ 12:011 M. (d), and on Sundays at 11:30
Mails for BELIZE, fcmRTO CORTEZ nnrt
GUATEMALA by rail to New Orleans and thence
via steamer, close here dally at 10:05 A M If) and
Mondays' "" the cou,,?Mn* closes bein'g on
Malls for COSTA RICA, by rail to New Orleans
and thence via steamer, cloae here dallv at 10 05
A.M. If) and 10:00 P.M. (b), the connecting close,
being on Tuesdays. 6
TRANSPACIFIC MAII.S.
CHINA. JAPAN, HAWAII and the PHILIPPIVF
ISLANDS, via San Franclafo, close here daily 'at
6:30 P.M. up to November 20, inclusive for dis
patch per s.s. Gaelic. <o)
HAWAII, via San Kra:jciaco. close here dallv at
6:30 P.M. up to November 23, inclusive for'dls
patch per s.s. Alameda. <o>
CHINA and JAPAN, via Vancouver and Vic
toria,. IJ. C close here dally at 6:30 P.M up to
Xovemlier 24. Inclusive, for dispatch per V. Kin
press Of China. Merchandise for the United States
Postal Agency a. Shanghai, China, cannot be for
warded via Canada .(o)
CHINA and JAPAN, via Seattle, close here dallv
at 6:30 P.M. up to November 25, inclusive, for dls
patch per s.s. Rlojun Maru.v (o)
PHILIPPINE ISI.ANDS, via Saa Francisco, close
her- daily at 6:30 P.M. np to November 26 in
elusive, for dispatch per U. S. tran?p<.rt. (o) '
TAHITI and MARQUESAS-- ISLANDS via San
Francisco, close here dally at G:30 I' M np to
N. vein her 26. inclusive, for dispatch per s g Marl
posa. (o>
. CHINA. JAPAN. HAWAII and PHILIPPINE IS
LANDS, via San Francisco, close here daily at 6 30
P.M. up to November 2S. inclusive, for dispatch
per s.s. Hong Kong Maru. (?)
AUSTRALIA (except malls for West Australia)
NEW ZEALAND. NEW CALEDONIA. FIJI
SAMOA and HAW All. via San Francisco clos?
here dally at 6:30 P.M. up, to December 6 !n^
elusive, for dispatch per s.s. Ventura. (o>
AUSTRALIA (except mails for West Australia)
[ FIJI ISLANDS and NEW CALEDONIA (specially
addressed only), via Vancouver and Victoria B C
close here dally at 6:30 P.M. up to December 6*
inclusive, for dispatch per s.a. Moana. (o) '
CHINA and JAPAN, via Tacoma. cloae here dallv
at 6:30 P.M. lip to December 22, inclusive for
dispatch per s.s. Shawmut. <o)
NOTE Malls for COCHIN CHINA are dispatched
I to New \ork. N. Y? for connection with Eurouean
steamers. r
Unless otherwise addreased, WEST AUSTRALIA
MAII*S will be dispatched via Europe, and thnge
I r.r?^'.:W ZEALAND anil the PHILIPPINE IS
LANDS, via .San Francisco. Cal. the quickest
routes Mails f..r the PHILIPPINE ISLANDS
specially addressed "Via Europe," or "Via Can
ada," must be prepaid at the foreign rate of
postage. Mails for II AW AH are dispatched'via
Sat. Francisco. ( al.. exclusively.
m^;,ST1";K,Pl> MA,,-S '-lose at the MAIN OV
.""./'li1'.?"1 ,U1 At 0:30 P.M. same day:
, r v , !aSe ,l:'y: M 8=? P M. mint
o.j , mi at o..A? A.M. same dav; Ce'? at r? 45 PM
same day; (fiat 9:35 A.M. same day: (hi at 1:15
r t o!?o ,k' P M. previous day;
(o) at 2:30 A.M. same day.
-""u JOHN A. MERR 1T1\ Postmaster.
FALL AND WINTER RESORTS.
SEASIDE HOUSE,
OCEAN FRONT. ATLANTIC CITY. N. J.
Inis well-known bouse will remain open through
out the .teal. Every comfort, including sea water
baths, elevator; sun parlorii; golf privileges, Ac.
. o nn. P P. COOK (t SON,
_noJ..6t-10 Formerly of 11m- Hotel Senate.
NEW BRICK
ATLANTIC
CITY. N. J.
< oinpletel'. remodeled and enlarged. Every known
comfort: and luxury. Illustrated l>ooklet mailed on
application. Rooms en suite with batb. Elevator
to street level. A. E. MARION. no2-26f
HOTEL DENNIS,
ATLANTIC CITJ, N. J.
Directly facing the ocean; hot and cold sea water
In private baths; golf lluk privilege..
..C20-26I-1II WALTER J. BUZBY.
"WE WILL DIG CANAL"
Prophetic Utterance of Sec
retary Shaw.
ADDRESS AT NEW ^ORK
ANNUAL DINNER OF THE CHAM
BER OF COMMERCE.
President Roosevelt Sends Letter?
Bishop Doane and Senator
Allison Speak.
In its report of the 135th annual dinner of
the New York chamber of commerce, held
last night at Delmonieo's, the Tribune says:
Leslie M. Shaw, Secretary of the Treas
ury, made a strong appeal for a merchant
marine, criticising the "supine indifference"
which had resulted in the lack of colliers
and transports in case of war, and suffi
cient freight vessels in peace times.
The nation was suffering from lack of
ships to widen its commercial relations
with South American countries, he de
clared, and he indicated fully his approval
of the stand the United States was taking
In regard to the Panama canal.
He longed for the day when the first
shovelful of earth would be taken out. By
this canal the United States would gain in
finitely in commercial relations, and not the
United States alone, but all nations.
This country would protect the canal and
police it for the commerce of the world.
Secretary Shaw declared that lie did not
advocate ship subsidies if any more feasible
course could be devised, but a merchant
irurine should be obtained, by any means.
Greeted by Cheers.
Cheers and prolonged applause greeted
the telling reference to the Panama canal,
and when the Secretary declared that the
merchant marine must be obtained by some
means or other, this applause was renewed.
Equally favorable was the reception ac
corded to Bishop Doane's speech on "Cap
ital and Labor," in which he declared that
capital, as it was commonly understood,
was only the result of the hardest kind ot
labor, while the ability to labor was ??
Itself a readily available form of capital.
The conjunction always used in ihe
phrase, he said, had only recently as
sumed its proper meaning; it had formerly
teen used as if the two were offensive in
stead of co-ordinate.
There were only two classes of men In tne
world, laborers and idlers, whether the
iOlers "were fQund in clubs or corner gio
ceries. Of the laborers, the brainworkers
were by far the harder worked class, and
their work was for the advancement of the
race, whether in morals or manners or com
merce.
Speeches Unusually Good.
The speeches were unusually good. The
list of speakers was fully up to the usual
high standard of the chamber of commerce
?Secretary Shaw, Senator Allison, Bishop
Doane, the Rev. Donal<J Sage Mackay, Ad
miral Rogers and Thomas Barclay, ex
president of the British chamber of com
merce in Paris.
The large dining hall at Delmonlco s was
filled with tables, ranged at right angles to
the President's table, at which sat Leslie
M. Shaw, Secretary of the Treasury;
Henry C. Pavne, Postmaster General: Sen
I ator William B. Allison. Senator Chauneey
M Depew, Lieutenant General Samuel B.
M. Young, U. S. A.; Major General Henry
C. Corbin, U. S. A.; Rear Admiral Fred
erick Rodgers, U. S. N.; Governor Odell.
Chief Judge Alton B. Parker, Carl Schurz
| and Whitelaw Reid, honorary member of
the chamber of commerce; President Mor
ris K. Jesup, ex-Presidents Charles S.
Smith. Alexander E. Orr and Thomas
Barclay, Bishop Potter, Bishop Doane. the
Rev. Dr. Donald Sage Mackay, Albert Bal
lin, Charles R. Miller, John Foord, William
Dodswortli. St. Clair McKelway, Samuel S.
Fontaine and Chauneey S. S. Miller.
President Roosevelt's Letter.
The following letter from President
Roosevelt was read:
"WHITE HOUSE, October Ifi. 1903.
'Gentlemen:?It is with sincere regret
that I find myself unable to accept your
Invitation. If I could leave Washington
for any such purpose it would be to at
tend your banquet. But Congress meets
| in special session on November 9, and it
will then be out of the question for me
to get away.
"The chamber of commerce of the state
t of New York occupies a unique position,
j It is distinguished not only by its long
history and by the vast importance of
the business interests which it repre
I sents, but also for the high type of pub
lic and business morality which it repre
sents. I pay you no idle compliment.
"The record of the men you have chosen
as presidents; the record of the causes
1 with which the chamber of commerce has
| from time to time been identified, and,
I above all, the standard of business integ
I rity which the chamber of commerce has
| consistently represented and which it has
demanded among those for whom it has
in any way stood sponsor, shows the
truth of what I say.
"It is surely unnecessary to add that no
! body of men can render a greater serv
ice, not only to the American business
! world, but to the American body politic,
than has thus been rendered by the
chamber of commerce. The true ideal of
this country is that hand in hand with
its material development there shall go a
high and line sense of responsibility to
the public on the part of those whose
power and ability enable them to take
the lead in this material development.
"It Is the good fortune not only of the
state of New York, but of all our people,
that we can conscientiously say of the
| chamber of commerce that among its
members we have {ound to an unusually
high degree this combination of great
business ability with the spirit which
practices and demands Integrity in pub
lic and private affairs alike.
"I congratulate you upon this banquet
on the one hundred and thirty-fifth anni
versary of the chamber s foundation, and
I profoundly regret my inability to be
present with you.
"Sincerely yours.
"THEODORE ROOSEVELT."
Secretary Shaw, when introduced, spoke
as follows:
Secretary Shaw's Address.
"The only unprotected American indus
try is its merchant marine. An act of Con
gress, approved by George Washington, and
never repealed, though frequently assailed,
gives the American shipbuilder, the Ameri
can shipwright, the American shipowner
and the American flag a monopoly in our
coastwise trade, and we have not only the
most etllcient service, but the cheapest
coastwise ra?es in the world.
"By acts of Congress, non-partisanly
passed, transcontinental railways have oeen
I granted liberal subsidies of moneys and
! lands until we have the best railway sys
tem In existence, and the cheapest ratas en
joyed by any people, not excepting coun
tries where the roads are owned by the
government.
"Through government encouragement and
protection our factories turn out more man
ufactured products than any other two
countries on the map by more than three
thousand millions per annum. By reserv
Ing the public domain for homestead settle
ment, and by government encouragement
through subsidized transcontinental rail
ways and subsidized rivers and harbors, our
agricultural Interests are more valuable
than those of any other country.
"The annual output of our 6.000.000 farm*
exceeds $4,?<10.000,000. The development of
our mining industries has been encouraged
by many direct congressional enactments,
and because thereof, and because of tiie
unequaled railway and coastwise facilities
to which I have referred, our mineral out
put has passed the billion-dollar line
Coastwise vessels unload upon the shores
of a single state more Iron ore than any
foreign nation produces.
Some Comparisons.
"Without attempting to give the reasons
therefor. I content myself with stating the
fact that forty years ago we had only one
fourth as much foreign commerce to trans
port as we have now, yet we actually car
ried in American bottoms, forty years ag >.
three times as much foreign coram :ve as
we carry today. These conditions may We
satisfactory to you. Tliey seem to 1> ? sit
isfactory to many. Hut tliey are not sat
isfactory to me.
"1 am not ignorant of (he argument that
if foreign countries are willing to sub- d /.
ships to carry our freight, it inures to ir.t:
advantage. This might !>? a sufli ? ent ex
cuse for our supine indifference if tteie
were no other consideration involved tiia i
merely carrying our freight a-ross the At
lantic ocean lit times of leue fnfo t i
nately, however, there are many other ami
weightier considerations.
"During the Span sii war. which las; <1
less than 120 days, we purchased or char
tered forty fore.gn vessels. In the mean
time every city on tne Atlantic and gull
coasts was appreheiwrive of an unwarned
attack, and every fev/ hours the peopl ? 4'
Mole St. Nicholas and Monte Christo imag
ined they could hear firing off to the south
west.
"If war were to be declared 1 etween any
two of the great powers of Europe, out
foreign commerce woulcl be not only help
less, but hopeless. 1 forbear reference t??
our military and naval condition, in tie
absence of available colliers and trans
ports, were the Un ted States to be in
volved in such a conflict. The proudest
navy in the world is utterly worthless
without coal.
"As certain as the world revo'ves tlv
time will come when our prople will give ?
more heed to securing a respectable share !
of the trade of South American republics.
South Africa, the islands south of the
equator and the countries washed by the
Pacific ocean. And there are no such agents
of commerce as representatives of trans
portation companies.
"Suppose we now had regular lines of
steamship communication between our
ports and the countries 1 have mentioned,
the government paying the loss until out
trade should be established. Whit would
be the result?
Ship Subsidies.
"A representative of these l.nes would
wait at the door of every factory in th?
land, begging for the production of goods
specially designed to meet the peculiar
needs, desires and whims of the countries
for which they were intended. And, m Ik
you, gentlemen, a foreign market for a
million dollars of manufactured products
means a domestic market for at least
000 of labor.
"Nor would this be all. The establish
ment of trade in those countries would be
followed by American warehouses, the
American branch oifices, and the American
banks. The conflict between the great pow
ers of the world Is no longer military, but
commercial.
"Europe is not seeking to establish naval
stations in the direction I have indicated,
but she 1ms already established commercial
stations there, and out of tUe.se are liable
to rise complications fully as intricate and
vastly more delicate. Fortunately the
Venezuelan matter is being settled by arbi
tration.
"God grant that all difficulties of this
character that may hereafter arise on the
western hemisphere rr.ay be solved In the
same way. If we had our share of the com
merce to the south and west of us. instead
of a paltry 10 per cent, we would be in a
position to insist that they should be so set
tled.
"I am not contending for ship subsidies,
if any more feasible course can be devist-d.
But if ship subsidies will insure us a mer
chant marne. then 1 am for ship subsidies.
If some other measure wil insure a mer
chant marine, then I am for some other
measure. If several measures combined will
insure a merchant marine, then I am for
ail such measures."
"We Will Dig Canal."'
Secretary Shaw had carefully prepared
his speecli. but toward Its end he departed
from it. In part he said.
"We are going to dig the Panama canal.
Do you realize that this is equal to our
voting a subsidy to the commerce of all the
countries of Europe. It will benefit them
all, but we believe it will benefit us still
more.
"Your shipping men know that if two
vessels started from Liverpool for San
Francisco, one by the Suez canal and one
by Cape Horn, they would both beat a ves
sel sailing from New York to San Fran
cisco around the horn. That's one of the
reasons why we must have the canal.
"We must have the ships to carry the
trade. We could dig a Panama canal
every day without hurting anybody's pock
et. Hence if we must raise money to help
merchant marine it will not be hard."
GENERAL ATTACK EXPECTED.
1 Situation in Santo Domingo is Des
I perate.
A belated cablegram from Santo Do
mingo, dated Monday, says.
The political situation here is serious. The
insurgents are bombarding the city. Gen
erals Wenceslao Flguero and Juan Fran
cisco Sanchez are refugees in the foreign
legations. The city is completely invested
by 4,(XM) men under Pichardo and four other
! generals.
A general attack is expected within the
next few days, Ge:i. Wos y Gil refuses to
j capitulate, and it Is believed that the fight
ing will be severe. The situation is des
j perate, and fighting in the streets is likely
to occur at any moment.
The United States cruiser Baltimore has
' been compelled to leave to reeoal. United
States Minister Powell is endeavoring to
[ protect American interests with the limited
' means at his disposal. A German naval
vessel is ready to land troops at a mo- i
ment's notice.
The insurgents endeavored to have Min
ister Powell recognize them, but this tne
minister refused to do.
The revolutionists fired on the Clyde line
steamer New York as she was entering the
port of Samana. The vessel was uninjured.
The Dominican government has appointed
Minister of Foreign Relations Galvan and
Judge George Gray of Delaware as com
missioners to arbitrate the Santo Domingo
improvement matter, as the result c.f Min
ister Powell's effort to compel the carrying
out of the terms of the protocol. Commis
sioner Galvan will leave for the United
States tomorrow. It is possible that the
insui gents may endeavor to capture him.
Will Control Powder Trade.
R. S. Pennitnan of Dover, Del., a promi
nent official of the Dupont powder
combine, is in San Francisco to take
over the several powder companies on
that coast which were recently merged
Into the eastern combine. It Is said that
there will be a centralization of manage
ment with its headquarters In that city and
this will result in the retirement of the
higher officials of the local companies. The
coast territory of the combine is to extend
as far east as Colorado, and Is expected to
control the powder trade of this section of
th? United States.
Enterprising and ad
vertising are almost
synonymous terms.
PANAMA IS OBDURATE
Conference Aboard Mayflower
at Colon in Vain.
LISTENS ATTENTIVELY
TO COLOMBIAN COMMISSIONERS,
BUT THAT IS ALL.
President Roosevelt Toasted at Cere
monies at Junta in Panama
?Late News.
A dispat. li fiorn Colon las! night gives
1"r! I ? ? r ????.1iI. tij tli** conference alM.ard
the Mayflower v < sf erday.
luring- the conference N'icanor Insig
nares. a broth?*r of tin- ^nvt<rnor of (Ii6
state ?.f Hollvar. who wis the spokesman
o4 the ( olombians. ninde a strong iippetl
t<> the Panamlans not to disrupt the re
public of Colombia, and he supplemented
lis appeal by tin- solemn assuranc3 that
Colombia would grant all the rights de
n.anded by tie Isthmiar.s and eventually
carry out their grand project of building
the canal.
Hi plying to Senor Inslgnares. Senor Turn
as Arias. representing tie junta. Bald that
the Bogota ioviiriiUMat and the Coiom
bians generally .lid not appear to grasp
tlie actual conditions pr. vailing 0:1 tlio
isthmus.
The revolution, Senor Arias said, wag
' rn absolutely of the unanimous drsira
of the entire people of Panama. and w.'ia
irrevocable li was , |,e ,|ow
dependent government already thoroughly
organized and formally r<cgnlzed by tho
tnlted Stat* s government .11 receiving its
i.')ln!iCnNative. Senor M Philippe llnniu
\aiilla. as well as by the governments of
France and Italy.
Ties of Affection.
Continuing. Senor Arias said:
"Colombia will always tind in this coun
try the most sincere brotherly feeling.
The political ties binding tlie isthmus to
Colombia have been broken, but the fault
is not that of the isthmus The ties of
affection, aowever. i;e\ei can he broken"
Seiy.r Insignan s. in his answer, expressed
Ins deep sorrow at finding tint the hopes
of reconciliation were impossible of reali
zation and that the actions of the peoplo
01 the Isthmus of Panama were Irrevocable
He declared that all the people of Colom
bia would unite in an effort to enforce tha
lights of the republic 011 the Isthmus of
1 .mama, even at the < ost of great s icri
flees.
I he threat of Senor Insignares that tha
rt public of < olombia would eifforce its
alleged rights in isthmian territory did
not cause apprehension to the Panama
ian commission, rs. who received it with
equanimity and did not give it any seri
ous consideration.
It was unofficially announced by the
Colombian commissioners that Gen. itejes.
representing the Bogota government, waa
coming to tlie Isthmus to confer wih tlio
provisional government of Panama.
Colombians Depart.
The peace commissioners left the May*
flower at J o clock in the afternoon, accom
panied by a number of officers of the ves
sel. On reaching the landing of the Koyal
Mail dock the commisioners walked by tha
side of the naval officers to the steamer
Trent, only a few yards distant. They pre
sented every appearance of being prison
ers, though It was understood they were
not in any way to be considered as such
Panamaian soldiers guarded tlie landing
and dock, refusing entrance to the natives.
I'nited States marines also guarded tha
dock entrance. Soon after the commission
ers embarked the Trent sailed for Sava
nilla.
The Associated Press correspondent
learns that the governor of the state of
Bolivar has assumed responsibility for tha
appointment of the commissioners who to
day, on tlie Mayflower, discussed the pres
ent relations of the republic of Panama
and the republic of Colombia with mem
bers of the junta.
Both tlie governor and t/ie commissioners
are without credentials or direct instruc
tions from tlie Colombian government. Tlio
correspondent further luirns that the com
missioners did not represent themselves
to the members of the Junta as [logotan
commissioners, but spoke in their capacity
as citizens of the stale of Hollvar.
Marines as Signal Men.
A dozen marines from the United States
steamship Dixie have been ordered to re
main ashore to act as signal men for tha
communication of routine messages be
tween the shore and the United States
fleet.
Eleven irreconcilables of the common
class were arrested 011 the streets of Colon
today and shipped on the steamer Trent to
Cartagena without l>eing given time to go
home for their clothing or to say farewell
to tlielr families.
The steamer Seguranca Is the first ship
to leave the harbor of Colon with the flag
of tlie new republic at Its peak.
Commander Delano of the I'nited States
steamer Dixie sailed for New York on tha
Seguranca. The cruiser Atlanta has re
turned to Colon.
Played Our National Hymn.
A cablegram from Panama last night
s.tys:
At 10 a.m. today Bear Admiral Glass,
Consul General Gndger and Commander
Phelps, accompanied by Lieuts. Philip An
drews and S. P. Trelllnwider, officially
called 011 the junta.
A military band played "The Star Span
gled Banner" on the Americans' arrival at
the palace and on their departure from
that building. They were Ived by tha
members of the junta, the cabinet minis
ters and Gens, lluertas, Jeffries, Dlas and
Yaron and their staffs. Admiral Glass said
he was glad to officially call upon the gov
ernment of the republic of Panama. it
had been a great pleasure for him to saluto
this morning the dig of the new republic,
for whose prosperity and greatness he
made the Ijesl wishes.
Senor Arango. a member of the junta,
answered, saying that In the name Of tlio
junta and the people of Panama he ex
pressed s'nccre pleasure at the presence of
the gallant fleet in Pan ima bay represent
ing the noble people and government of the
United States, to whom the isthmus .8
deeply grateful for the hand of fellowship
so generously and promptly extended to
them by its great President.
President Roosevelt Toasted.
Mr. Gudger proposed a toast to a new
Panama canal treaty, which was answered
by Gen. Varon, who toasted President
Roosevelt and the United States army with
great' cordiality.
The people of Panama are happy over tlio
official recognition of the flag and the event
is being celebrated enthusiastically. Dur
ing the ceremonies today large crowds of
people surrounded the palace of the gov
ernment. The flag of the republic of Pan
ama, which was saluted by the Marblehead
this morning was made on board of that
vessel.
The F-ench consul at Panama has noti
fied the Junta that he will open official re
lations with the government df Panama,
saying Foreign Minister Deicasse had in
formed him that France will formally r*o
ognize tlie new republic later.

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