OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, December 10, 1903, Image 14

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1903-12-10/ed-1/seq-14/

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JfceatSaleof
loli
W
Sold Shot/ ffimgs.
The Palais
Ouaranteed
Rings that will not blacken the fin
gers, set with gems that cannot be
detected from the real, are a fact at
last. Prices, 35c to $1?with a writ
ten guarantee with each.
Royal
Solid Gold Rings are also a feature?98c to $3.98 here for the usual $1-5? to $5 Men's, Ladies
and Children's Signet Rings, on which initial will be engraved free of charge... .48c to 98c for Baby s
and Children's Rings, some set with chips of real diamonds and other precious stones... .Note, too,
that the Jewelers' $3.50 Sterling Silver Chatelaine Watches are here at only $1.98.
The 48c Table.
The 25c Table.
At G Street Door.
Many thousands of articles are here at
~">c?go<*d. better and best. The following
best will reward early visitors:
Silk Gauze Pans, with long chain; Purses,
with chain attached: Chatelaine Books,
Match and Stamp Boxes; Silver-plated
Candlesticks. Paper Weights. Puff and
Salve Jars. Sterling Silver Manicure Pieces.
Child's Sets, Nut Pick Sets, Ash Trays, Ink
Wells, Calendars, etc, etc.
x
1904.
See the monster Cal
endars of Heartsease
or Pansy Flowers, meas
uring 44 inches in cir
cumference. Then note
the price?
HOC
Center of Store.
i
Art Nouveau Interpretations of Belts,
boxed for presentation^ Silk Garters, with
sterling- silver slides; Candlesticks, Paper
Weights, Calendars, Jewel Cases, Salve
Jars, Pin and Ash Trays, Smoking 8ets.
Whisk Brooms. Bonnet Brushes, Cloth
Brushes. Puff Jars. Stationery Set. Paper
Cutter, Blotter and Ink Well, all for 4He.
Child's Sliver-plated Knife. Fork. Spoon,
Napkin Ring and Drinking Cup, all for 48c.
118c for 25c Haodkerclhiiefs.
6 IN BOX FOR $i.
Thousands of dozens of Handkerchiefs are here at 25c apiece?
these advertised are only the importer's odd dozens and half dozens,
bought and offered at a reduced price. Enough for tomorrow's great
est demand. 18c instead of 25c, or 6 in box for $1.
5c for Various 10c Handkerchiefs.
Hurry for the Lace-trimmed Handkerchiefs?they will be first to
go. Plenty of plainer hemstitched kinds, for Ladies, Men and Chil
dren. All white, fancy color and mourning borders. Choice for only 5c.
12%c for 18c Initial Handkerchiefs.
As good as many sold at 25c?guaranteed all pure linen and hand
embroidered initials. Choice of three styles in ladies' and two styles in
men's. 12J jc for choice. Six in box for 75c. All initials here tomor
row.
25c for Hosiery Worth Up to 50c.
LADIES', MEN'S AND CHILDREN'S.
Included in this offering are the samples and oddments from Messrs. Lord & Taylor, importers
of the famous "Onyx" Hosiery. See table full to right of G street entrance. Come early tomorrow
and pick out 50c Hose for 25c. Select six pairs and box will be furnished free of extra charge. Note,
too. that attractive Silk Garters are here, in glass top boxes, for only 25c.
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69c for Skirts LookSog Worth Dollars.
THIRD FLOOR BARGAIN SPOTS.
Mercerized?with all the appearance of best silk. Made up with flounces and tuckings, as in
expensive Silk Skirts. Finished like them?note the dust ruffle and other details. See below for sam
ples of High-priced Skirts.
$4.44 $6
$6 Skirts. Si^Skirts.
$9.75
$i2j^oJ5kirtsi
$113
$18 Skirts.
Enough for tomorrow, perhaps. Safest to be a morning visitor?and secure early choice of these
fleeting bargains. Samples?mad e in a superior manner. Bought and offered cheap?samples of the
Rich Silk Skirts that are retailing everywhere at $6 to $18 for $4.44 to $13.
88c Instead of $L
Second Floor Bargaiii^ots^
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Bedwear and Table Linen?at 88c instead of $1 and more.
Boxed suitably for presentation. Note the list of suggestions:
Comforts, covered with sllk
ollne. In art designs and colors..
Blankets, looking like the
very expensive kind. Pair
Bed Spreads, in Marseilles ef
fect. Full size .
Sheets for double bed, 2
for
88c
88c
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88c
JFour Pillow Cases and one
Sheet, for.
Huck Towels, 40 inches long;
0 for
Table Linen, full width; 2
yards for
Table Napkins to match. Per
dozen
Basement Floor Bargain Spots.
PER STAIRWAY OR ELEVATOR.
The annual sale of Chinaware?when the old year surplus is off ered at considerable reductions in
prices. Christmas presents are suggested?and dollars saved you.
?r. Dinner Sets?the "Lit- S'l (Q)<J
tie Hostess." Complete for
BARGAIN TABLES.
Note Contents.
Ash Receivers, various.... 25c
Umbrella Jars, curious.... $1.19
Sugar and Cream Seta....
Tobacco Jars, various
Hanging Match Safes
Cuspidors, various
Ice Cream Sets, 13 pieces.
Fiah Sets, $5 value;...
$2.98
98c
25c
...49c
$1.33
$7.98 Decorated Porcelain
Dinner Sets, assorted dec
orations '...
$12.08 English Porcelain
Dinner Sets, art blue dec
orations
$15.96 Carlsbad China Dinner Sets,
assorted shapes and dec- CAT) <n)9
orations
$2i) Limoges China Dinner Sets,
new shape and decora- ^ J ^
$30 HavOand China Dinner Sets.
4 decorations to select $24.98
BARGAIN TABLES.
Note Contents.
Cup, Saucer and Plate..
Pepper and Salt Shakers
Fancy Plates, various...
Chocolate Pots, various..
Salad Bowls, large
Smoking Sets, Mortage ?j ?jq
^are *
Wall
the St
richly embossed
25c
8c
15c
75c
...25c
Placques, with buildings ofc
Louis exposition, 4^C
59c for $1 Screens as Illustrated.
AND OTHER FOURTH FLOOR "SPOTS."
69c for usual $i Oak Tabourettes,
Bamboo Tabourettes and Oak Cos
tumers with 6 pegs.
39c for Hassocks in artistic
shapes, covered with best velvet and
Brussels carpet. 75c kind at 39c.
49c for "yards" of Flowers, each
in gilt frame with 6-inch molding.
49c for a big dollar's worth.
10c for usual 19c Gilt Photo
Frames, 6x8 inches, with mat, glass
and rich gilt molding.
110c for choice of 1,000 Pictures?
and not one trashy. In gilt frames,
alone worth twice 10c.
for Richly Framed Pastel
Pictures by Chandler. His signa
ture is on each?a guarantee con
noisseurs will appreciate.
25c for Choice.
In the gathering are books for every one.
tail at $1. Hurry for those with specially rich
near nth street door, at only 25c for choice.
Note that usual 25c Books are 011 tables at 13c, or 2 for 25c
cloth-bound books?see table exactly at nth street entrance.
All are cloth-bound and some were published to re
covers?the presentation editions. See tables full,
As little as 10c will buv attractivelv
48c for Popular Copyright Books. Some of Them:
Farm Ballads; S Illustrations. WIU
Carleion.
Lazarre; illustrated. Mary llart
well Catherwood.
Between the Lines; illustrated.
Capt. Charles King.
Abraham Lincoln's Speeches. L. K.
Chittenden.
The Redemption of David Corson.
Charles Frederick Goss.
The Golden House; Illustrated.
Charles Dudley Warn or.
The Calif01-ntans. Gertiude Athcr
ton.
The Aristocrats. Gertrude Atherton.
Flotsam; illustrated. Henry Seton
Merriman.
A Master of Craft. W. W. Jacobs.
The Mantle of i?lijuh; Illustrated.
1. Zansrwlil.
Warwick of the Knobs; illustrated.
John L'rl Lloyd.
With Hoops of Steel; colored illus
tration:'. Florence Finch Kelly.
For Love or Crown; illustrated.
Arthur W. Manhmont.
The I?ve Affairs of An Old Maid.
1.1 liar Bell.
The Captain of tlie Janizaries.
James M Ludlow.
Illustrated,
illus
Babs the Iirpossible,
Sarah Grand.
The Black Wolfs Breed;
trated. Harris Dickson.
Wall, After All. Frankfort Moor*.
The Duk*. Author of M. d'Harkot.
J. Btorer Clouctan.
Fdrty Modern Fables. George Ade.
The Choir Invisible. James Lane
Allen.
Senator North, Gertrude F. Ather
ton.
The Maid of Maiden Lane, Amelia
K. Barr.
Tommy and Griael, J. M. Barrle.
Best Edition of the Holly Bible, 98c.
Wfrh Name in Gold Free.
f
Bibles?The comprehensive Teacher's Bible is the kest for every one, containing a selection of
new and revised Helps to Bible Study, with a ntW concordance, elementary introduction to the He
brew and Greek languages and indexed Bible Atlas. Published by J. Bagster & Sons, London. 98c
instead of $1.25 for tomorrow only?and name stamped in gold free of extra charge.
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PaflaSs Royal,'i^=. G & 11th St&
O. ASHFORD REPLIES
TAXES UP QUSflg&OH OF PIKE
PBOOF CONSTRUCTION' HEBE.
Great Care and fttligence Exercised?
The Severe^estr Applied to
Concrete Work.
Mr. Snowden Ashford, inspector of build
ings for the Dlst^kt, la a communication
to Col. John BlddlC Eikineer Commission
er, makes reply to (tn article which appear
ed in The Star recently, under the caption,
"Local J Traps," and signed by Mr.
F. W. FUzpatrick. Mr. Ashford makes his
report in order to allay any unnecessary
alarm which may have been occasioned
among residents of the city with regard to
lack of precautions on the part of the Dis
trict authorities in the matter of flreproor
buildings.
In his indorsement of the report Col. Bid
die says: "The article as it appeared in The
Star might lead residents in this city to
think that those large apartment and other
houses referred to by the writer of the ar
ticle have not been thoroughly and severely
tested by the building department. A read
ing of the report of Mr. Ashford. inspector
of buildings, will show that the regulations
in this city are strict, and that they are
carried out."
Mr. Ashford says:
"A signed communication in The Star of
Decembed 6 on the subject of fireproof
buildings in "Washington contains so many
misleading statements, especially regarding
the local inspection of buildings, that 1 feel
it is important to correct the erroneous
impression as far as it relates to the build
ing department.
"The Commissioner? realized several years
ago tTiat many fireproof buildings would be
erected in this city, and to properly prepare
for careful and effectual Inspection, directed
Capt. D. D. Gaillard, corps of engineers,
U. S. A., and myself to proceed to Phila
delphia, New York and other cities, for the
purpose of consulting with the heads of the
building departments and engineers under
their charge, with a view to formulating
further regulations to govern the erection
of such buildings in this city.
The Investigation.
"After inspecting fireproof buildings of
all kinds in the several cities above referred
to, and especially of buildings constructed
of cement or concrete material, report was
made to the Commissioners, whereupon a'
permit was issued for a large office build
ing to be constructed almost entirely of
concrete. This was in July, 1901. This being
the first building of the kind erected in
Washington it was subjected to the sever
est tests, the floors being loaded with tre
mendous weights of from five to eight
times the working load that will ever be
placed upon them, and amounting to from
400 to 800 pounds to the square foot.
"Other severe and unusual tests were ap
plied, such as dropping a great weight a
distance of six feet on arches with a span
of eight feet. The next building construct
ed was a fireproof manual training school,
with concrete Bpans of 18 feet, and follow
ing rapidly thereafter hundreds of apart
ment houses and private structures have
been constructed with concrete floors, ana
In one Instance a stable with floors of
the same material and horses stabled on
the second floor, which needs no explana
tion to show that such heavy weights and
constant stamping would test the security
of any material.
In each and every last an oe the buildings
containing concrete floors have been sub
jected to severe tests, according to the
manufacturers arid owners, than apply in
any other city. In some cases the weights
In'posed amounted to ten times the load to
be placed on the floor In actual use, anji
in all cases the test loads amounted to at
least 300 pounds to the square foot, the
test loads being limited only by the
capacity and strength of the steel beams
BurportiT.g the concrete arch, besides other
and severer tests, such us dropping or
tolling loads.
Severe Tests.
"In a great many apartment houses, be
sides the dead load "applied to arches, a
small truck, such as used ,by hardware
merchants, is loaded with a ton of iron or
sash weights and drawn over the concrete
arcfies before the wooden floors are laid.
Such a test couljl only be withstood by con
crete work, as the weight on the four
small wheels amounts to 500 pounds ap
plied on almost one point under each wheel.
"In one instance the owner of an apart
ment house agreed to permit the in
spector to break through a concrete arch
bv ramming It with a piece of timber
four Inches square and six feet long. Such
a test developed the remarkable tenacity
of cinder concrete, and an unexpected
quality or degree of elasticity not found
in any other form of flreproofing.
"Fire tests Lave also been made of thjs
material, and there is an example in the
stack of a great powerhouse in this city
which is lined with cinder concrete which
has withstood the tremendous blast from
the boilers for a year or more without
failure or disintegration.
"Fires have alsq occurred In apartment
houses constructed of this material and
have been limited to the destruction of the
contents of the room In which they origi
nated. We have never experienced an acci
dent or collapse of any concrete arch after
removal of the centers and no accident has
occurred through failure of the arch itself.
In one Instance the centering, or wooden
form, around the arch used In the process
of construction, gave way while the work
men were putting In the concrete, result
ing fatally to one of the workmen who was
standing on It.
Use of Concrete.
"Nine-tenths of the fireproof apartment
he uses in this city are constructed with
concrete floors and about one-fourth of
these apartmentB were erected under the
supervision of the same architect, who,
after the enormous and trying tests appl'.ed
In every instance by this department, con
tinues to use the same in all of his build
ings of this character. I would therefore
say that this material has passed far beyond
the experimental stage both as to strength
and fire-resisting qualities, and the stric
tures and criticisms passed by the wrter in
a recent issue of The Star are prejudicial
and erroneous, and the material which he
seems to be so deeply Interested In would
not withstand the tests applied in every
Instance to concrete floors constructed in
this city.
"These tests will continue to be applied,
and in the last few days have been applied
at the Foundry Church, where-a wolght of
22,800 pounds was placed on a concrete
span or arch eight feet wide; al30 at the
Bye, Ear and Throat Hospital, where 325
pourds to the square foot was loaded on
the floors. At a handsome college building
now under construction the enormous load
of 72,000 pounds was placed on jk concrete
flcor with a span of twenty-flvo feet.
"Many sidewalk^. en vaults under the
sidewalk, are covered by concrete arches,
and these have "been tested by moving
loads aggregating'W0 founds to the square
foot. iT o i
"These examples have been cited, not In
advocacy of one material over another, but
simply In the exeeutlew of our official du
ties as inspectors and to prevent the possi
bility of accident, for In the District gov
ernment we are not Interested in any par
ticular form of building material, but sim
ply approve or disapprove materials as they
comply or tall to .come up to the require
ments of the building regulations.
"The law on the subject of fireproof
buildings requires that they be constructed
throughout of sut% materials as the Com
missioners may designate, and after In
vestigation and report,, the Commissioners
permitted the use of concrete as a safe and
subsantial form of flreproofing. I tl)?-efore
believe that all the Interests of the public
are safeguarded, as the Inspections are very
strict und careful and the requirements
rigid. It is doubtful whether ottier forms
of ? fireproof construction will withstand
thesf severe tests which will, however, be
applied to all fcims proposed."
100 EMPLOYES STRIKE.
Great Excitement Prevails at Mills in
Norfolk.
Special Blipatcli to The Bt *t.
NORFOLK, Va., December 10.?The hun
dred men, women and children employed
at the Norfolk silk mills struck today, fol
lowing a 40 per cent reduction in wages,
which Is said to be retroaotive for two
weeks.
Oreat excitement prevails at the mills and
policemen are on duty.
&afea & (totpmtg
Pennsylvania Avenue and Seventh Street.
Interestm
We're deep into the holiday business; the
crowds are growing greater day by day. The
lines of interest to the gift-buyer are empha
sized by many special values that fortunate
circumstances render it possible to offer under
price. They, off course, require immediate at
tention, as the quantities are limited and un
dupticatable. At the same time the personal
wardrobe needs are not being overlooked?every
opportunity is being taken advantage of?and
tomorrow some big specials will be offered.
Menu's Suits amd Overcoats,
Comparable with $15 and $16.50 Values.
This $12.50 line is one of the strong lines of
the stock. It's a "Fit Reform" line?and you
know what that means in the fit and making.
Price influences no degree in them?there's one
standard?and it is the highest.
Both the lines of $12.50 Suits and $12.50
Overcoats are very varied lines?offering a wide
range of styles and patterns for selection. We
say they are comparable with $15 and $16.50
values. PLEASE COMPARE THEM. We are
perfectly content to rest upon your judgment.
If you find a Suit or Overcoat somewhere else
at $15 or $16.50 that satisfies you?we'll show
you one that will satisfy you better at $12.50.
All sizes.
Boys' Suits and Overcoats.
We offer three special grades for
tomorrow.
Boys' Double Breasted, Norfolk and
Sailor Suits, in Plain Blue and Fancy Mix
tures ; the Sailors neatly trimmed and decorated
with naval emblems; the Double Breasted and
Norfolks are manly made and properly finished.
Sizes from 4 to 17 years. Worth 5 tj .95
$3.50. Special li
Boys' Oxford Gray and Blue Reefers, with
velvet collars, Italian lining; some of them have
naval emblem on sleeve; also Oxford Gray
Overcoats, cut long and full; with velvet collars.
Reefers in sizes from 3 to 8 years. Overcoats
in sizes from 8 to 16 years. Worth $^.25
$3.50. SPECIAL Jd
Peter Thompson-like Reefers, lined with
Red flannel; emblems on sleeves and brass but
tons ; sizes 3 to 12 years; Plain Blue and Gray
Frieze Overcoats; Double Breasted, with em
blems on sleeves and brass buttons; sizes 2
to 8 years; also Navy Blue and Oxford Over
coats, all wool and fast color; cut long and full;
velvet collar, Italian linings, double - stitched
edges; sizes 7to 16 years. Worth $>(j .95
$6.50 and $7.00. SPECIAL........ tt
Holiday Haberdashery.
There are many leaders among
Haberdashery that are specially ap
propriate for holiday giving, and
specially attractive from the value
point of consideration.
Men's Silk Suspenders, plain and fancy col
ors ; with Sterling Silver mountings;
each pair in box. Worth $1.50 a pair. $ tl .
1 SPECIAL 11
A big assortment of patterns on the large
Folded English Squares. They are in White,
Light and Dark colorings; extra big;
extra fine grade of silk; worth $1.00. S/TTvC.
SPECIAL
50'
Patridge Wood Walking Sticks,
with Sterling Silver Trimmings; worth jft fl .IM)
$1.50. SPECIAL J1
Men's Japonette Silk Initial Handkerchiefs.
The man who likes a Silk Handkerchief will
like the Taponette. They are full ^)BC,
size. . SPECIAL 3 Jqj.
Men's Walking Gloves, in Dogskin, with
out-seams and spearpoint backs; Tan shades;
also genuine Gray Mocha Gloves, with pique
seams and silk-stitched backs. Worth $11.00
$1.50. SPECIAL ????????????????? 11
The Special Sale of
House Coats.
There's nothing else you can give a man
that will be quite so fully appreciated as a
House Coat. Every man wants one; very few
men will buy them for themselves. There's
nothing else into which you can put the same
amount of money to such advantage. This spe
cial comes at just the right time.
THE DOUBLE-FACED CLOTHS are all wool. In al
most a dozen different effect*. The plain side la the out
side; with the fancy reverse side forming facing and
trimming for lapels, packets and cuffs. The seams are
Bilk taped; the edges are bound with silk cord and thers
are silk frogs.
They are high-class Jackets, cut and made right, and
are worth up to $0.00.
Choice: $4-15
THE TRICOT JACKETS are all wool and fast color.
In blue, brown and garnet; faced, and pockets and cuff*
trimmed, with quilted satin; edges satin bround: silk
fr0*8, and quilted lining. They are in all sizes, and they
are fitting sixes.
These are exceptionally good Jackets at $6.00 and
96.50.
Choice: $4-95.
VELVET JACKETS are the handsomest and richest
of the House Coat effects. These are extra heavy velvet,
In two shades, Blue and Brown; lined with "American
silk" (mercerized), which has more durability than pure
silk; cut In Tuxedo shape.
You won't be able to match them anywhere under
912.90; and doubtful If ^ven for that.
Choice:
Blanket and Imported Terrv Bath Robes,
cut long and full; cord and girdle. Worth
16.60. Special
$4
45
IHIollnday Slippers.
For Hem afrad Women.
Men's Black, Tan and Red Vici Kid and
Goatskin Slippers, self and patent leather trim
med; hand turned, kid lined; soft and pliable.
In Opera, Everett and Romeo shapes, c tl
Worth up to $2.50. SPECIAL...... J1
Women's Black and Red House Slippers,
in Felt or.Quilted Satin,trimmed with fur; com
mon sense or French heels; hand turned. They
are Juliet shapeandwool lined. Worth C fl ,15
up to $2.00. SPECIAL 11
Women's Hand-crocheted Slippers, in solid
colors and combinations; trimmed with ribbon
and bows; worth $1.00 a pair. SPE-X/ThC.
CIAL ?V
Women's Turkish Boudoir Slip
pers. in oriental combinations. SPE
CIAL
45
c.
Boys' Leggans.
Here is a lot of Boys' Leggins that includes
Cloth, in all colors; Cqrduroy, in all colors, and
Light and Dark Tan Leather and Kid. Thev
are both Military and Fauntleroy cut, full
height, and worth up to $2 a pair. SPE-^ g^C,
Silk Opera Crash Hats,
A Holiday Leader.
,75o
The value of an Opera Hat is in the making
of it?and we can assure you that at $7.50 you
won't find a better made Hat in America. They
are made of ribbed silk, of heavy quality; lined
with silk; the springs are imported from Paris,
but the Hat-making has been done right here in
this country. The shapeliness shows that; the
sturdiness of the brims show it.
An Opera Crush Hat will make a splendid
present?one of these at $5.75.
00
proper blocks, a spe- $ 5
h $7.00, for
iimi" .j.i ?
Silk Hats, In &r. the
clal make of ours; worth
Children's Stocking Caps, another lot of
those Varl-colored Stocking Caps, worth up
to 88c., for -
% ? .? ? t ? ? i. t ? ? ? ? t. ? ? ? ? ?
23c
GRAND RAPIDS WATER SCANT)All
Lamoreawjx Gives Bond ? Speculation
Over Hi* Statement to Ward.
GRAND RAPIDS, Mich., December 10.?
Isaac F. Lamoreaux, former city clerk,
the only one of the last batch of respond
enta for whom warrants were issued In
connection with the water deal who had
not appeared In court, went before Judge
Haggerty today, waived examination and
was bound over to the superior court In
$2,000 ball.
Lamoreaux is lq close touch with the
proeeoutlon. He went to the office of Prose
cutor Ward before going to court today
and was closeted with him for a consider
able time.
Lamoreaux said to a reporter: "I have
made a full statement to Mr. Ward about
my connection with the water deal, and It
will all come out In due time."
Whether this statement Involved a con
fession of the charges made against him,
Lamoreaux refused to state.
John Kremer, former .keeper of the sup
ply store in the city poor department, who
was charged by Salsbury with having re
ceived money with which to buy off certain
of the Jurors la the former Balsburgr trial.
admitted today that ha received money
from Salsbury.
He said: "I do not deny that I received
money upon several occasions from Sals
bury. I got It for campaign purposes and
for other work I did for him. Po far as
attempting to bribe Jurors is concerned,
however, I say his statements are false.
He may have given me money for that pur
pose. but I never approaohed any man upon
the subject."
Formal Occupation of Ouantanamo.
QUANTANAMO, Cuba, December 10.?
Four hundred United States marines and
Q00 bluejackets were landed here today and
participated In the simple proceedings
marking the formal occupancy of this place
as a United States naval station and the
installing of the station ship. The Cuban
and American flags were saluted with
twenty-one guns.
Navy Department Notified.
The Navy Department is Informed that
the converted gunboat Vixen arrived at
Ouantanamo yesterday. Lieutenant Com
mander William H. Allen, oommanding the
Vlxeo, which is to be the station ship at
Ouantanamo, will be the first commandant
of the United State* naval station at that
port.
The monitor Amphltrlte. now At the train
ing station, Newport, will also be sent to
Guantanamo for service as a training ship.
The Amphltrlte Is an armored ship and
carries six high-power guns In her two
turrets.
The Closing Session. I
The quarterly meeting of the Confeder&t*
ed Association of Manufacturers and Job*
bers In the Plumbing Trade, after a session]
lasting the entire day. came to a close lat*
yesterday afternoon. Messrs. H. O. Schafer,
C. J. McGubbin A Co.. John Mitchell, jr^
and Thomas Somervllle A Sons, acted as
hosts at a dinner at the Raleigh last even^
Ing.
The guests were: Messrs. F. J. Knox,
president of the association; P. J. Torrance,
Jules Zimmerman. J. P. Fell, 8. P. Hunting)'
T. C. Boswell, P. H. Seaver, Henry Bteln,
"Bobby* Fielder. Gilbert Adams. F. Haver-,
stick. W. O. Mills. Frank Mills. L. W. Sum-,
ner, E. G. Cuyler. I. W. Mohler, W.
Cummins. H. B. Geddes. A. A. AlnswortbJ
H. Speakman, John Heyl. j. H. Hugg,
B. Halle tt. and W. A. Wanua

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