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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, July 28, 1904, Image 9

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-W.auer What Morts Wil Say Te4ay'
"AT THE SiGN O THB MOON."
Sts aelsa at 6 p.m. e,rq das.
Summer
Suitings
--Priced Low
--for Clearance.
This clearance is a great
treat to careful dressers. It
offers the best fabrics and
best tailoring at bargain
prices that can't be dupli
cated:
Suits worth
$15 and $S $9.45
to order.....
Suits worth
$20 and $22.50 $ 1245
-to order.......
Suits worth
$25 and more 54
to order.......
Mertz ad Mertz Co.
906 F Street.
-THE FAMOUS OLD
ASCAD O E
Eouirbon Whiskey,
r$alare type o
.hisky excellence
Aavor and buquet $
unsurpasei- u- II&
usually old bwfore j
1t's bottled---quart...
TO= KALON
WINE CO.-614 14th at.-'Phone W. Jy27-20d
"The Razor Without a Pull."
",Jubilee"
IRAZORS
-are made for men who ap
preciate the genuine pleasure
of a perfect shave. Let a
"Jubilee" accompany you when
you leave town.
Re.haned if not satisfactory. Honed
one year without charge. ls2 53
Price .........................
97Headtbuarters for Fishing Tackle,
Hammocks. Cameras. Tennis Goods,
Golf Outfits. Canoes, etc.
WALFORD'S
SPORTING AND ATHLETIC OODS.
TWO STORES, 909 AND 685 PA. AVE.
*t j " th.s.t-444
Carbonate Your
Own Beverages.
--- Get a "SPkRKLWrS" outft and you'll
--- have a veritable home soda fountain. Car
honate beverages of all kinds-water, milk,
- - wine. etc. Give them a delightful snap
- - and flavor in addition to destroying al
-- bacteria.
- - - New Syphons, price, $1.25.
W.S. Thompson Pharmacy,
703 15th at. FRANK C. HENRY. Prop.
jy27 :5hi
ISEMAN BROS
O uttters to both Men A Boys
Cor. 7th & E Sts.N.W
x
Our $L69
Children's
Et hardly seems
possible to secure a
istrictly hand - made
garment for the
young man -at such
a low price. We make
it possible by offering
our entire stock of
$3.00 and 53.50Chil
dren's Fancy Suits at
$1.69. This is our
Semi-Annual Clear
ance Sale. We want
to clean up our stock
quickly-this is our
way of doing it. All
sizes-all styles
Worsteds, Cassi
meres, Cheviots,
liomespuns, etc.
Parents, don't miss
this opportunity!I
7th & E Sts.
It ESM N BO.
"The Eberily,"
Hand-made Russet Belt, 5
lIE"" tN ijiet A 1su0 7m at. aw. cj
SClub Breakfasts,'
25c., 30c. and 35c.
Serving
I them here
iand there pronon
evy Breakfas wth us
1'est of foodsr and the beat of service.
STERNE & W ATSON,
i 508 Ninth Street.
Cae ndCotetion in Town. Mai 1022.
Crump's Celebrated Tonic
OF FRUITS AND SPICES.
SPORTS Of ALL SORTS
Senators Won and Lost With
the CleveI4ds.
PATTEN A BIG PUZZLE
MANY BT.ITANT PLAYS PULL D
OFF IN BOT GA]SS
Neil Outpoiats McGovern - Brighton
Races - High-Class Tennis at
Longwood-Base Ball Notes.
American League Games Today.
Washington vs. Piked Team.
St. Louis at New York.
National League Games Today.
New York at Brooklyn.
Philadelphia at Boston.
Cincinnati at Chicago.
St. louts at Pittaberg.
The double-header yesterday afternoon
between the Washington and CleveNind
clubs was unusually interesting, not only
on account of the locals splitting the card
with the visitors, but for the many fine
plays that cropped up In both contests. The
first game went to the Senators by the
score of 3 to 2, while the second was won
by Cleveland, 7 to 0. The fine weather and
two games for one admission drew nearly
4.500 to American League Park.
The victory of the Senators can be ascrib
ed to the magnificent pitching of Southpaw
Case Patten. When it is taken into consid
eration the batters that Patten was twirl
ing against, it is a question whether he ever
worked more accurately and successfully.
Three singles and a double were all the
safe hits registered by the Clevelands. three
of which were bunched in the fourth in
ning and scored all the runs credited to
them. In addition to being a puzzle to the
Blues. Patten had perfect control and not
a man was given a base on balls. Sizing
up the two games from start to finish,
Patten's work stood out like a chalk mark
on a blackboard.
The Clevelands went into the day's work
with over confidence, while the Senators
belong to the forlorn hope brigade. As is
usual in such cases the weaker aggrega
tion played desperately, and is a result
jumped out in front and could never be
caught. Brilliant plays were continually
cropping up and the spectators were al
most constantly cheering. The only ob
jection that can be offered on the day is
that the victory was not the last game, so
that the spectators could have gone home
in a better humor. The spectators' appe
tite for gore had been whetted in the first
game and they also wanted the visitors'
scalp in the second.
Two nice plays cropped up in the seventh
inning of the first game. Bemis hit a line
fly into left field that was ticketed for the
fence, and big Huelsman misjudged the
ball as it left the bat. But he kept backing
and backing on the ball, and just as it was
going over his head he gave a mighty
stretch toward the skies and pulled down
the sphere. Huelsman is about six feet
tall, and when he went up into the air he
appeared to be about nine feet long. He
was given a great cheer for his splendid
effort. When the Washingtons came to the
bat McCormick hit a slow bunt toward
third and at once lit out for the initial
corner. Donahue rushed over, grasped the
ball and In his haste made a wild throw,
-but Hickman made a good stretch and
held the sphere with one hand.
In the second game brilliant fielding start
ed off in the first inning. Flick had worked
around to third base, the result of his hit
and two outs, when Lajoie hit a high fly
toward short center. The sun was shining
fiercely, but McCormick backed on the
ball and, after going about fifty yards,
hauled in the ball. It was a pretty catch
and saved a run.
In the Senators' first turn at the bat,
Hill and Cassidy had torn off singles and
had worked around to third and second
with two men out when O'Neill came to the
bat. This ex-Bostonese met one of Bern
hard's slow ones on the end of his bat and
drove it into deep center. If ever a ball
looked safe that one did, but- fleet-footed
Bay put on all sail, turned his back to the
ball and dug out for the fence. After going
fully seventy-five yards Bay jumped in the
air and when he came down he had that
pesky ball and two runs for the Senators
went glimmering. It was one of the finest
catches of the season.
In the third inning, the newcomer, Hill,
had a chance to shine and he glistened like
a diamond. Lajoie hit a pop fly to short
right and, yelling for the ball. Hill started
in on a run. He evidently misjudged the
fly, but he kept coming at full speed, and,
when the ball was about to strike the
ground. he gatherrd it in. not two inches
from the grass. Once more the spectators
got up and yelled. In the same inning Joe
C iassidy got an error after making a gal
Lant run into center flid after Hickmain's
f1l'. This play is mentIoned here as Joe do.
serves credit for going after everything in
sight and pushing his record to the back
ground. In the seventh inning. Bradley
butted into the game with a stop that at
least cut off a double and saved one run.
Coughlin had doubled to left and stayed
- t second while Hill1 filed out to Hay. Cas
Isidy then came forward with a ter ritic drive
over third that Bradley dived for o 'd batted
down with one hand, the hit going as a
single and (Coughlin being stopped at third.
It is not often that reference is made to
the work of the umpires here, but Dwyer's
work yesterday appeared to be so biased as
to catll for general comment. Close tab was
kept on the close decisions in the f wo
games, and out of fourteen that came up not
one was given in Washington's favor. In
all these cases the plays were so close that
they could hav'e been given either way
without making a mistake, but the poor
misguided tailenders got none of the cream,
as it was all doled out to the strong aggre
gation from Cleveland. Dwyer is one of the
most gentlemanly fellows handling an in
dicator, but in his endeavor to do exactly
right sometimes bends over backward.
Following are the scores:
FIR$T GAME.
WASHINEVTON. AB. R. lB. PO. A. E.
('oughiin. 3b................4 0 1 3t 2 0
Hill.rt(....................3 00 0 00
Casaidy, -8.................4 1 0 2 21
Stahl. lb.................... 4 1 2 7 11
O'Neill, cf.................3 1 1 0 0 0
Mctormic'k. 2b .............. 3 0 1 1 3 0
Htue'lman. lt................ 3 0 1 3 0 0
Clarke. e...................3 0 1 11 0 0
i'atteni. p..................3 0 0 0 1 0
Totals.................. 30 3727 92
CLEVELAND. AB. R. lB. PO. A. E.
Flick. rf................... 4 0 0i 1 0 0
Hless f....................3 0 0 1 0 0
Bradlley, 3b.................4 1 - 1 1 1 0
Lajole. 2b..................4 0 0 1 31
Hickman. lb................4 1 1 6 2 0
Turner. a............. 4 0 1 4 4 0
Btay. cf...................... 3 0 1 2 0 0
Bemnis.c..................... 3 0 0 8 1 0
Donahue. p.................3 0 0 0 2'0
Totals................. 32 2 4 24 13 1
Washingto............ 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 x--3
Cleveland.........0 0 0200 0 00-2
Earned runa-Washington. 2; Cleveland, 2 First
base by errors-Washington. 1: Cleveland, 2. Ieft
on hases--washington. 4; Cleveland. 3. First base
on hllsa4 Donahue. 1. Struck out--By P'atten.
5; hy D)onahne, 6. Two-base hits--Congblin, Stahl
and iiekhman. Sacrifire hits-Hill and Hies.
S4tolen buasea--Hili. Casaidy, O'Neill and Bradley
(2i. Umpire-Mr. Dwyer. 'Timie of gamae-1 hour
and 30 minute.
SECOND GAME.
WASHINOTON. AB. R. 15. P0. A. R.
('oughlin. 3b................ 5 0 1 1 2 0
Hill1. rf..................... 5 0 1 1 0 0
('asaidy.sa................ 4 0 8 8 3 1
ittahlb6.................. 2 0 1 11 0 0
I)'Neill, cf................830 1 2 00
Mcorick. 2............. 4 01834 0
Huelsman.lf............... 1 0 0 1 0 0
Kittredge c..............4 00 5 1 0
Towsd.p9...............83 0 1 0 4 0
Donovan*................. 1 0 0 0 0 0
TotalS.................8320 27 14 1
*Batted fer Townsend In ninth inning.
OLE VELAND. AB. 5. 15. PO. A. E.
Flick, rf...................5 18300 0
Itess, l..................... 5 0 1 1 1 0
Bradley. 36................4 01 22 0
Lajoie, 2b................... 4 12831 0
Hickman, 1...............5 12 00 0
Turner, a.................. 4 121830
Bay, cf.................... 1 0 5 0 0
Abbiott e...................4 1 1 0 0 0
Biernhard,. p................8 1 2 .0 3 0
Totais.................. 3? 1327130 0
Washingtom..... ....... 00 0O*0 0 -0
Cleveland.............. 0 000 10 1 50-?
Earmed rm -COeland 4. Viet bas. by errms
-Cleveand. t. Left om ba.-e1lgm
Cleveland. T. First base laI.4W51
3;9 Ug erha. 4. Streek6-~
h. sm..h.ada 8 . amhs hWs. 'h
Hick Laise, Turuer. 1aerfee bits
Terser, ay. Stolen bass
Casasiy. Mormick (2), Flick. Bradley. Bay.
Doebe 1 a to Caeadt to stahl. Wild
Pklb--' UUSUSa. Umpree -)dr wyw. TiNne el
gae-1 hoar and 6 emtes.
OTmE aUIrAl GAKZL
Boston, 2; Chicago, 1.
Boston, playing at home yesterday. de
feated Chicago in a ten-inning game, 2 to
1. Neither team was able to get a man
across the plate until the eighth, when the
White Box scored on a three-bagger by
Dundon, followed by McFarland's single.
Parent's three-base hit and a single by
Ferris tied the score In the ninth. Collins
drew a base in the tenth and came home
on Stahl's drive to right. which Green let
go through his legs. The score:
Boston. R H O A R Chicago. R H O A B
Selbach.lf.. 0 2 4 0 0 Jones,ef... 0 3 1 0 1
Collins,3b.. 1 0 0 4 0 Green,rf... 0 1 3 0 d
Stabl.et... 0 1 0 0 0 Callahan,lf 0 1 1 0 1
Freeman.rf 0 1 0 0 1 Davis.as... 0 0 6 4 d
Parent,as.. 1 1 4 5 0 Donohue,lb 0 0 7 1 0
L'Ch'nee,1b 0 0 12 0 0 Dundon,2b. 1 1 2 2 0
Ferris,2b.. 0 1 1 3 0 Tan'hill.Sb 0 0 0 0 0
Criger.c... 0 2 9 1 0 M'Farl'd.c. 0 1 6 2 0
Youg,p... 0 1 0 5 0 Smith.p... 0 0 2 1 0
Totals... 2 0 30 18 1 Totals... 1 7*28 10 2
One out when winning run was made.
Boston.............. 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 1 1-2
Chicago............. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0-1
Earned runs-Boson. 1; Chicago. 1. Two-base
hit-Dundon. Thres-base bit-Parent. Stolen bases
-Collins and Young. Double plays-Davis and
Donohue: Smith. Davis and Donohue; McFarland
and Davis. First base on halls-Of Smith. 5.
Struck out-By Smith, 6; by Young. 7. Umpire
Mr. Connolly. Time of game-1 hour pnd 23
minutes.
Athletics, 5; Detroit, O.
Detroit was helpless before Waddell. while
the Philadelphias hit Stovall hard at times
yesterday in the Quaker city. The score:
Detroit. R H 0 A B Phila. R H 0 A B
Barrett.cf. 0 0 4 0 0 Hartsel.lf.. 2 1 2 0 0
Melntyre,if 0 1 1 0 0 Pick'ing,cf 1 2 2 0 0
Carr,lb.... 0 0 7 1 0 Davis.lb... 0 0 9 0 0
Crawf'rd.rf 0 0 2 0 0 L.Cross.3b. 0 1 0 1 0
Lowe.2h... 0 0 2 4 0 Seybold.rf. 0 2 1 0 0
Or'm'g'r,3b 0 0 2 0 0 Murphy.2b. 0 2 1 2 1
Wood.c.... 0 0 2 0 0 M.Cross.n. 0 0 0 2 0
Drill.r..... 0O 1 0 0 Schreck,c.. 1 112 1 0
Stovall.p.. 0 0 1 2 0 Waddeli,p. 1 3 0 1 0
O'Leary,ss. 0 2 210 -----
Totals... 0 324 8 0 Totals... 51227 7 1
Detroit................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0-0
Philadelphia........... 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 i-5
Earned runs-Philadelphia. 4. Two-base hits
Murphy (2). Schreck. Pickering and Waddell.
Three-basp hit-Hartsel. Left on bases-Detroit.
6; Philadelphia, 8. Struck out-By Waddell. 11
by Stovall. 3. Bases on balls-Og Waddell. 2; off
Stovall. 2. Umpires-Messrs. O'Laughlin and
King. Time of game-1 hour and 40 minutes.
Standing of American League Clubs.
W. L. Pet. W. L. Pet.
Boston..... 52 31 .026 Phil'delphia 43 38 .331
Chicago.... 51 35 .53 St. Louis... 34 42 .448
New York.. 47 33 .588 Detroit..... 33 47 .413
Cleveland.. 45 34 .570 Washington 17 61 .218
Standing of National League Clubs.
W. L. Pet. W. L. Pet.
New York.. 80 23 .723 St. Louis... 46 37 .554
Chicago.... 50 32 .610 Boston..... 31 l58 .356
Cincinnati.. 31 34 .600 Brooklyn... 31 57 .352
Pittsburg... 45 35 .563 l'hil'delphia 21 61 .256
Yesterday's National League Games.
Boston, 8; Philadelphia. 5.
New York. 11; Brooklyn. 2.
St. Louis. L; Pittsburg. 4.
Chicago-Cincinnati-Rain.
SUNDAY SCHOOL LEAGUE.
Standing of the Teams.
W. L. Pet. W. L. Pet.
Fourth..... 18 2 .900 Sixth...... 12 10 .545
Gurley..... 15 5 .750 St.Stephen'a 11 10 .524
Gunton.... 16 6 .727 Mt.PL.Meth. 8 13 .381
Mt.PI. Cong 17 7 .708 St. Alban's. 4 20 .167
Foundry.... 14 8 .636 Wesley..... 3 20 .130
Wilson..... 12 9 .571 Mt. Vernon. 3 20 .130
There are no games scheduled for today.
Mount Vernong Outplayed the Mount
Pleasant Methodists.
The first scheduled postponed game of the
season was played on the Van Ness Park
field yesterday afternoon, between the
Mount Vernon and Mount Pleasant Meth
odist Church teams, in which the former
won by a score of 6 to 2. The Mount Pleas
ant team was handicapped by the absence
of several of their best players. The Mount
Vernon boys played good ball, and conse
quently won out.
Ball was the first pitcher up for the Mount
Pleasant team and lasted but two Innings,
the Mount Vernon team having scored five
runs in the second inning. Shedd then came
in from short and succeeded him in the box.
doing much better, as but one more run
was scored. Field, the slab artist for the
"Green Stockings," pitched a good game,
keeping the five hits of the Methodist team
well scattered.
Thomas. in center for the winners, played
a good game, as did Stevenson on first.
Briggs for the losers made several good
catches in center. Woodward led with the
willow for the losers, getting two hits out
of four times up. For the Mount Vernons,
Thomas and Price each secured three hits.
The score:
MT. PL. METH. AR. B. lB. PO. A. E.
Briggs, er...................4 0 0 3 0
Shedd. ss. P-................3 1 1 0 2 1
Wooilward, 1b.............4 0 2 6 0 1
Symanoki . I ...............5 0 1 2 1 0
Brown. c ...................2 0 1 5 1 1
J. Evans, rf............4 0 0 0 1 0
Burrnghs. "b...............4 0 0 2 0
G. Evans. 2b................4 0 0 4 1 1
MT. SFINON. A . 1 B. PO. A. E.
Prie.s.............31 :1 302 1
Watin. 1)..........30 12 2 C
Stv.i,.,. b.........S0 1 12 1 0
Thonu. t............5 0 13 4 0 1
Erwn,e.............. 1 1 1 C
Sagsro.If.......... 0 1 2*: 0 0
Ricars,.1,..........4 0 0 4 2 1
Bal,p.8................4223 1 30221
Totalsr ................403 0 5 24 8C
Totile..--...............9 11271 4
tvenso. 1 ............ 05 0 0 1 2 0 0
MTha. f............... 5 0 0 0 0 -
Sh-d odad yaok.Sagrario,n......... sid Field
Richrs a .......lls .......l. 4: of Bail 2 o1
Shd.Src u-yField. 9.......... 2 by Bal 3;
Tierry,rf...................w 4 2) 0 ire-0 r.
Mt.iPly. Me..........boo0 and 20 minut0-2
hed Foodwrth Prsytrans tarar tarand ld
Fstd tae the bFlun-Off culd n:off touc. 0;of
thedd M.oHnt byPested ga-ron yesterday,
Shaedd. Srckgut-ay Fwelk-away time, theb
shcprey beige oae1un 20iavro minutleaes.
Befe Four Prensyhra pasem itbae
striden toa the speundtrs could nt ourho
the ounrtoeanan gron footng.y
haringe madeuhir Initalay toe the
leagefnst ashe spichetrs wth the Fourths
and pitched .a commendable game. Several
times It looked as though he wan going to
pieces, but he was quickly revived and
seemed to pitch harder.
Foundry's lone two runs were made in the
fifth inning on Kinney's single and Harvy
cutter's home run to left field.
"Billy" Warman played the best all.
around game of the day, both at the bat
and in the field, getting four hits out of
four times up. and in the field getting si:3
putouts and three assists. Score:
FOUNDRY. A.B. R. H. P.O. A. E.
Kinney, ss.................. 5 1 2 0 64
Harvyentter. 2........ 4 1 2 1 1 3
Bryan.lf................... 3 0 0 2 1 41
S'.rmillion. 3b............... 4 0 1 3 0 1
('lements. rf................ 4 0 1 0 1 41
Rtaodall.e0................. 3 0 2 6 1 C
McCathran, p............... 4 0 0 0 1 C
O'Brien.ce.................S3 0 0 3 0 1
Trac'y.1b.................. 4 0 0 9 1 01
Totals.................34 2 8 24 12 3
FOURITH. -A.B. It. H. P.O. A. 3.
Bradley................... 5 2 3 4 1 6
Bishop. lf................... 3 2 1 1 0 6
Atehinson.ss............... 5 1 2 2 5 1
Bielaaki.3b................ 5 0 1 5 2 41
King1.................... 4 0 1 8 0 1
MKeney. r................ 5 2 3 0 0 0]
Warman b................4 1 4 6 3 0
Rhode. u'.................. 4 0 0 1 0 a
Drlrymple............... 4 0 1 0 1 0
Totals...................3 85 16 27 12 U
Frundry............... 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0-2
Fourth..............1 41 1 00 1 0x-8
Two-base hit-Bielaaki. Home run-Harvyeutter.
Hlir by pitcee-By McCsthran. Rhodes; by Dal
ryn.ple. Bryan. First on balls-Og MicCathnran, 1;
off Dalrymple. 2. First on errora-Foundry, 2;
Pourth. 4. Left on bases-Foundry, 9: Fourth. 12.
Seeri5ce hits-Harvyetter. Bishop (2). Warman,
Rhodes. Stolen bases-Tracy. Atchinsn. Double
play-Atehinson to Warman to King. Passed balls
-Rtandall (2). Wild pitch-McCatbras (2). Umpire
-Mr. Betis. Time- 1 hour and 40 minutes.
VICTORT 7O3 UNIONS.
Defeated Hahn & Co. In Well-Played
Game.
The Union Base Ball Club play on their
grounds, North Capitol stre.et between L
and M.streets, everT Monday, Wednesday,
Friday and Batuday. They have arranged
the feneowiat schedule so ane:
Friay, -July 3, _,inhlimaan Atilos
Saturday, July -4 al>ttsvlie Athletics;
Monday, August 1, Carroll Institute; Wed- a
nesday, August gton Office; Friday,
August r, Kann . Saturiay, Aygst
6, Law Reporte-s; Monday, August 8, Tur
ner Athletics; Monda_.Angust a, Kismets. 1
All uniformed teams wishing to arra
games will pie aunidte. with e
anager, Geo. F. i. government prtat- I
lug otilce, or on 9" ds on .the above I
days.
The Unions sta Af badly with three
defeats, but have ce been playing win
ning ball, adding their fifth straight vie
tory yesterday by e tgng Hahn & Co. by
the following score
HAHN & CO. A.li. . H. P.O. A. B..
Steward. cf.........- .. " 01 0 0 "
Ger. 3b........---- -. . . 1 0 1 "
boore a.....--....---.. 3 1 0 1 2 1
Feriton. 2b............... 2 1 0 3 0 1
Bislls. rf ...........--,---... 1 110 0 0
.............~ 140 0
Doa'. lb..........-.--.. . .... 11
M,.haney. t............... 2 0 0 1 0 2
Mystes, . ................. 4 0 1 1 4 0
Ipscomb. c............... 0 0 4 1 0
Ricker. rf.................. g- 2 2 2 0 0
Glover, ............... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Totals..................33 4 7 ' 0 4
U-l9IONS. A.B. B.H.P.O.A.!.
Webb. If ................ 2 2 1 2 1 0
Dewson as.................. 8 2 0 1 0
Kappler. ef................. 4 1 2 1 1 0
Chsmbetlain. c.............. 4 0 012 1 0
Ad:ms. lb.................. 2 2 1 1 2 0
Bown. p...............-..... 4 0 0 2 3 0
Atends. rf ................... 4 0.1 0 0 0
(3'hte. 3b................... 4 0 0 4 0 1
Treadway, 2b............... 4 0 0 0,2 0.
Rider.lb...................1 0 1 5 0 0
otals ..................327 82711 1
*Chamberlain out. bit by batted bail.
Ha.&Co............00010 00 3 0-4
Unions................4 2 1 0 0 00 0 i
Earned runs-Hahn & Co.. 2; Unions. 5. First
base on errors-Hahn & Co.. 3; Unions. 4. Left on
beses-Hahn & Co., 8; Unions. 8. First base on
bells-OiR Spates. 3; off Brown, 6. Struck out-By
Spetes. 3; by Brown. 12. Two-base bits-Dove. N
Ki.ppler. 'bree-base hits-Ricker. Dawson. Stolen a
bases-Dove. Spates, Kappler. Adams (2). Bit by '
pitcher-By Spates (2): Wild pitch-Brown (1). A
Passed balls-Cbambwrlain, 1; l.ipscomb. 1. Time a
of game-1 hour and 40 minutes. Umpire-Mr. a
Feuton.
CAPITAL CITY LEAGUE.
Standing of the Clubs.
Won. Lost. Pet. N
St. Stephen's Institute......... 14 6 .737 a
Turner Athletic Club.......... 15 6 .714 a
Carroll Institute ............... 13 8 .619 a
Woodward & Lothrop.......... 7 18 .350
Gonsaga...........--------... 6 13 .315
Library of Congrefa........... 5 15 .250
Today at 5:30, White Lot. east diamond, Wood
ward & Lothrop vs. Carroll Institute.
Turners Defeated Library Team by
Good .atting.
The Library of Congress and Turner
Athletic Club teams were the contend- a
era last evening in the Capital City
League, the latter winning out by the a
score of 7 to 4. Both sides put up a good
fielding game, but the Turners took kind
ly to Burhan's pitching, and drove
enough runs over the plate to score a
victory. Downs did the best batting for
the Library team, getting two doubles
and a single. Score:
Turner. R H O A E Library. R H O A B
Lay,2b.... 1 1 4 3 0 Waters.lb. 0 014 0 1
Babson,3b. 2 2 0 4 1 Berhans,p.. 0 1 0 4- 1
Dough'ty,ss 0 0 1 0 0 Clark,8b... 2 2 0 1 1
Wilk'son,cf 0 2 2 0 0 Downs.rf... 1 8 1 0 0
(lotsb'k .f. 1 1 1 0 0 K'thm'n,2b 0 1 1 1 1
Risten,16.. 1 1 12 1 0 Catching,se 1 1 0 3 0
Orant.rf... 1 2 1 0 0 Ioss.lf.... 0 0 1 0 0
H.Beck't,c. 1 1 6 2 1 Sull'n.ef,2b 0 0 1 0 0
Brown,p.... 0 2 0 5 0 M'Der'tt,c. 0 0 6 2 0
Oyster,cf.. 0 0 0 0 0
Totals... 7 12 27 15 2
Totals... 4 8 24 11 4
Turner................2 1 0 1 0 0 3 0 x-7
Library................ 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 0-4
First base by errors-Turner. 2; Library, J. Left
on bases-Turner, 5; Library, 5. First base on
balls-Off Brown, 2. Struck out-By Brown, 7: by
Berhans, 8. Two-base hits-Downs (2), Clark,
Grant. Stolen bases-Kathman, Catching; Clark.
Downs, Lay, Baboon (2), Wilkerson. Double play
-Risten to Beckett. Umpre-Mr. Handiboe.
Time of game-1 hour and 20 minutes.
Kann's Defeat the Marines.
On Wednesday *fternoon the Kann's
team defeated the invincible Music Boys
of the marine berrheks 9 to 7. It was the
first defeat of the'season for the latter,
who had in the box the great lefty
Shields, but even wjth this handicap
Kann's boys come $t victorious.
The game was Zdiadead by the all
round snappy playing of the winners,
the pitching and battirig of P'1tes being a
feature. also the catching '6f Smith, who i
was some beans at the bat. The score:
Kann's. R H O AE %usie Boys. R H O A B
:ohn.cf.... 0 1 1 0 0 Bllm.cf.... 1 1 0 0 0
Haas.rt.... 0 1 0 0 1 Morgan.3b. 0 0 2 3 0
Dammon.lb 1 2 9 0 1 M'K'l'y,2b. 1 1 2 2 1
ilanning,lf. 3 2 1 0 0 Shields.p.. 1 2 1 4 1
Friee,3b.p. 1 2 3 3 0 King.c..... 0 2 6 2 0
Baum.u... 0 0 3 4 0 tlase.ea... 2 1 1 2 0
Smith.c.... 2 3 6 0 0 Hurl'ek.lb. 1 0 11 0 0
Palmer.2b. 0 1 2 3 0 Mller.1f... 0 1 2 1 1
Gun'el.p... 1 1 1 2 0 Coyle,rf... 1 0 2 0 1
Nicols,2b... 1 1 1 1 0
Totals... 9 14 27 13 2 Totals.... 7 8 27 14 4
Krnn's................ 0 1 0 3 0 0 1 1 3-0
Music boys............. 2 0 1 0 0 1 3 0- 0-7
Milwaukee Players Not for Sale.
A special from Chicago says that Can
tillon yesterday came down from Miu
waukee and put in the best part of the day
visiting with Charles Comiskey and. Ban B.
Johnson. Johnson had just retturned from1
the east, and in his eagerness to strengthen
the Washington team made Cantillon all
sorts of tempting offers for the star men
in the Milwaukee bunch.
John.son practically asked Cantillon to
name his own figure for the release of
Stone. Schaefer, Bateman, Clark and
Stricklett.
"I am not here to sell ball players," an
swiered Cantillon. "We need all our stars
and we want more."
St. Martin's Defeats St. Paul's.
St. Martin's added another game to its
list of victories yesterday afternoon, when I
it defeated the strong St. Paul's team. It,
was St. Martin's game from the start, the ,
boys of that team having sized up Stanley'sj
"puzzlers" in the first inning and continuing
to hit him hard throughout the game.
St. Martin's wil-l line up against the
"husky" Trinity team of Georgetown this I
afternoon at 5:34) on the grounds at 2d and
R streets northwest.
NEIL OUTPOINTS MCGOVERN.
Bantam-Weight Champion Proves That 1
He is No Counterfeit,
Frankie Neil of San Francisco, the chain
pion bantam weight boxer of the world,
made his debut in the east last at the Na
tional At'hletic Club, Philadelphia. He had
selected as his opponent Hughey McGov
ern, the reputed champion In his class4
east of the Mississippi river. Although out
pointed and practically outclassed in four
of the six rounds by Nell's ability t0 give
punishment, the Brooklyn bantam weight
deserves great credif't'r staying the six
rounds.
Neil has a peculiar -coyering style, is dif
ficult to reach when. once in action, and is
a punisher with bo1th hands. The pace he 4
set was not only a wevelation to the crowd,.
but to McGovern himself. The latter hadi
evidently heard so' much of the slow, me
thodical 21-round style of Pacific coast box-4
era and did not expe~ct to be carried along
at such a fast gait..
There were blower enough struck in the 4
six rounds to pleagk tht most critical dev-I
otee of the sport. It was action from bell I
to bell, and had noit McGovern held on I
tenacleusly in the feur-th and last rounds 1
Neil might have held snother decisive vic-1
tory added to his long Wit.
The building was erdwded to the doors. I
Long before the bout began the main en- 1
trances were close avy seat in the huge 1
arena being sold. 'er was a mnorbid cui- (
riosity to see Neil perform,. and he justilled 4
all the stories of his abiliity that have pre- I
ceded him fromt the west. His judgment J
of distance is good, his defese is r
feet and he can use both hands, stralgt I
and swinging, with good effect. Once, in t
the fourth round, and again i the fifth, it I
looked as though he was satiSfned to mer'ely I
best McGovern. The latter, was Weair, tot- I
tering and holding to escape punishment. 1
Had Neil simply stepped bacok and uset his I
beaten opponent with a straight right-band A
lead, there would. likely7 hae been no
sixth round to chropiJcie. i rte
As it was; McGdvern, likehibril,
the ex-champion fea:ther weight, r'ecuiperat'
ted quickly, And atnib0,the crowd by
being the aggresser when the boB r'ang 1
for the last round. 'Hs aanbitionWaS, howg
ever. shortlived. Nel Unet ha t a niety,
and despite his egrewgs to co0Vt, hO eset
-Masy dangerous jolts. Whlen th, -eR tin
kled, ending the siund, -e wag a
Bon Marche. .:--...
The Great Half=pri
Undermuslins Boul
Underwear Co. NoN
This Bargain Friday witnesses the sale of
resenting the "road" and "m ill" samples of the
the foremost factory of the c ountry. All styles
price garments, will be sol d at HALF PRIC]
kportunity slip.
Corset Covers, Gowns,
Worth Worth
5c. Double. 33C. Double.
Drawers, Petticoats,
r nC Worth 1 Worth
S/C.o Double. C 1 9 . Double.
All Sample Garments on I
A Remnant Sale
In Laces, Lace Veilings and Embroideries (edg
ings, insertings and all-overs). These choice
remnants are from Y to 3-yard lengths, and
worth from Igc. to $I.oo yard.
Price from 3c. to 39c. for Remnant.
Silk Petticoats Reduced.
All fine qualities; colored and
k black; worth $6.50. Choice..... $4o98
Dressing Sacque. Silk Neglige.
t One Handsome White One very beautiful Silk
Silk Dressing Sacque, B e n g a l i ne
lace trimmed. 6 98 Neglige. worth $9.98
worth $12.50..... $25.00.........
Special Corset Bargain.
We will make a sweeping clearance of Sum
mer Corsets tomorrow ; 24 to 30 in.; g .
k corsets worth 69c ................. 79Co,
Garters. Capes.
k Farcy Silk Suspender Six fine large
Garters, all col- Trolley C a p e s; 75c.
ore; worth 50c. 25c. worth $1.50..--'
k to 75c ...............
Embroidery. Jewelry.
Very desirable styles Lot Hatpir.s, Cuff But
and qualities, 1 to 3 tons. S t i c k P i n s,
inches wide; worth 5c. Brooches. Hatpins, etc.;
Close worth 25c.
At 2c. Yard.. Choice, 9c.
Untrimmed Hat Clearance.
A large lot of Tuscan and Lace Braid Hats,
Flats and large shapes ; regular 75c. n
to $1.25 hats. Your choice tomorrow I IYo
Bargain Sale Ribbons.
For Friday we will offer Fine Satin Taffeta
Ribbons, all colors, the grades that 1
sell regularly at 25c. yard-yard. .... f l
k Bon Marche, 314
er of the ring, with Neil ready to land the Wolf drew a bye. Folio
low soporific. of the contestants to da
W. L.
Bardeleben ... 5% 1% I
BRIGHTON BEACH RACES. Marco ........5 a
oladay Captured Holiday Handicap MeseI ........4 2
in Easy Style. Bder .
After losing two races with Stalwart and
uke of Kendal, both red-hot favorites. HIGH-CLASS
E. R. Thomas supplied another heavily
cked first choice in Voladay, who won w. m. Clothier Work
e Holiday stakes, for two-year-olds, five Fifth Round at L01
nd a half furlongs, at Brighton Beach William J. Clothier i
~esterday afternoon. Travers handled the fifth round of the
toladay with far better judgment than hetorebyasydfe
isplayed on the other Thomas horses. traeyght sesil estea
Voladay was full of run and went to the strit s esterayb
ront with a tremendous turn of speed asth sets othier ame
oon as the gate was raised. Brush LUp,an ovrhme hs
:hird choice, went after him, and they were aoverademedshsa
>ing great guns when Travers took hold ogrhed sokes ay
the favorite and allowed Brush Up to moundn strothes By I
>ontinue making the pace with Gold Ten,mrnn HoCler is th
cn ruhoice the end comte ubackstreth almost sure to meet I
Vhen the two front runners began to tire, the lower half.
Eravers let Voladay down, and the Faraday In the second halt Be
olt won easily by two and a half lengths Kenneth Horton, the le
1.08 over a dead track. Hildebrand was ing the match early in
cond with Gold Ten by a similar margin1 he was physically unah
In the handicap for all ages, at six fur- ing. Hoskins, the Belln,
engs, Travers made too much use of Stal- pert, was defeated by
vart in racing the Muskteeroff his feet in Harvard player, in stra
e first half mile, so that it was a com- Astartd wa merade th
nratively easy task for Hildebrand to run pesihi doesnt ceter
ver Stalwart in the stretch -t A. ndt Hathi evet. cener
!eatherstone's Ingold, 18 to 5, who won aind Haeoy ad. Aleorv
asily. Stalwart had no trouble in taking wend maeRoy an Alien
e place, but the Musketeer lost third well matchettI deeted fi
money in the last strides by a half length stadh Hacett, defeated
Bill Daly's Tol San, a 100 to 1 shot. The strintsets th nlyh
ie was 1.15-.le n eo o
Travers made a mesa of Duke of Kendal Allenugh they wor
the third race, at a mile and a sixteenth, tough tset, wern thisd
iding the horse, who was an even money Today Larned and O0
avorite, all over the track. Atwood, 20 to Ward and Wright, while
made all the running, but was tiring with ard meet LeRoy and A
very jump in the final sixteenth. Yet he ries:
managed to beat Duke of Kendal by two Eatr chamn lonshi do
engths in 1.49. The latter was six lengths A. Larned and &. 8. Canpt
efore Brooklynite, 8 to 1. and H. F. Cole 6-3. 7-5, 6-1
The betting on the handicap at a mile and W. Hi. Ward and B. C.W
furlong was limited to Rosetint, 8 to 5, man and B. 8. Prentiee 6-4,
ud Possession, backed down to 9 to 10. 0. H. Nettleton and A.
he latter received three pounds in scale "Icad andD a N. c
weight from the Hastings mare, who went and 0. 3. Keyes 6-2, 5-7,
othe front at the start, only to give way Iw. J~. Clothaier and E.
W. B. Fasig, who blew up at the three- O'Brion and L. Underwood4
uarter pole. Meanwhile Hildebrand bad jH. F. Allen ad R. Leros
oe to the front with Possession, but Red- N. P.Halll 6-2. 13-1t
n hung on with Rosetint until the home- ander beat R. . ve s
tretch was reached, where he assumed 7.,75
umand. Hildebrand went to the whip a. H. Miler and H. MWl
nd at the final sixteenth Possession came F. S. Pruyni by default.
gain. They were both whipping and on aH. 0. Bllrrand 3. Len
yen terms fifty yards from the end, where s ood0 3. Sarin6., 6.
tosetint hung, and Possession forged to mn beet L. T. Wallia 6-1
he front to win by a head in the best fin- N. P. Hallowel betA.
mh of the day. Bill Daly's llyria, 40 to 1, W. 3. Clothier beat G. A.
was third, fifteen lengths back. The time 3. W, Leonardi beet A.
was 1.56 4-5 6 .. r etH.R et
About everybody on the track be on PhWr eatd--. . Writ
ydney Paget's Trapper in the sixth race, 2-1, default.
or two-year-olds, at six furlongs, backing
n down to 1 to 2 favorite, and the Hastings GRET 4
olt came home alone in fine style. It was a
ive for the place, Black Prince, 20 to 1,
aking it from Austin Allen, 5 to 1, by three MeBturney Made em
arts of a length. The time was 1.16.
There were no falls in the steeplechase C
mn over the short course, but those who Malcom McBurney br
sade Cock Robin an odds-on favorite got a the Wyantenuck links
ard throy doWn when he reeled home 1a ton xm=, yereay 'S
bird place. 36. Chamblt's Royelle, 2 to qaiyn on ft
second choice, had to be well extende4 to ulfngrqdof1
n by a couple of lengths from Woden, a tourn.ia*lnt. hls seomeI
I)to 1. shot. The tiee was 4*.7. Three Ou....
avorites were vietoious and l5,000 people in..... s 4
The othes who qne
f munXtru'* A. G. .ki.sh
c burg, Germasy tsterdey Brnstei
:58 Bon Marche.
re Sale of Sample
Cht of the Baker
v Going On.
housands of finc Muslin Undergarments, rep
"Baker" Underwear Company, recognized as
, all grades, from the lowest to the highest
, and you cannot afford to let this rare op
High-Grade
Garments
Of every kind and style Just half
price tomorrow.
3argain Tables, 3d Floor.
Infants' and Children's Bargain
Garments.
For tomorrow only we will sell Infants' dainty
White Nainsook Slips; neck and
sleeves lace uimmed ; worth g
25c. regular...........,...... 1 e
A special lot Infants' Body Petticoats,
with deep hem; sizes 6 months to 3 i5
years........................ e
Children's White India Linen Dresses; sizes
6 months to 14 years; worth up to
$2.00. Clearance price............ 9 5 e
Children's Cambric Drawer Bodies, with gar
ter attachments; sizes 2 to 12 years;
worth 19c.......................... 9ce
Infants' Pretty Mull Caps; worth
up to 5oc. Your choice tomorrow. " C.
Great Bargains in Suits, Skirts
and Waists.
Fine Eton and Coat Cloth Suits; plain and
fancy ; worth $10.o0, $12.00 and
$15.00; no need saying more.... $ .0
Lot Fine Linen Suits; Eton and coat styles;
white, blue, jasper, natural; reg
ular-price, $io.oo to $15.00 . 45000
White Butcher's Linen Skirts;
worth $3.50 to $4.50. Choice to- $2.00
morrow ..................... e~ ~'I
White India Linen Shirt Waist Suits, in all
best styles; seven-gore flare; $4
to $6.50 values ................. $ 9
Lot Ladies' Percale Shirt Waist Suits; black
and blue ; plain and piped ; $2.98 n
suits .......................... $ O
Lot Fine Cloth Walking Skirts $ .
-plain and fancy ; worth up to $8 2
All Shirt Waists Reduced.
79c., 95c., $1.25,$1.49, $1.89.
Worth up to double the price.
=320 Seventh St.
wing are the records aett. I19: B. D. Tlena'. Wyanienurk. 1R7: T4
te. hert I.anaton. C.dlun,hla, 119k; II..ltanter. Wyante
tn uuek. 190; F. Dabney. Wyantenuck, 191; Capt.
w. L Hug I. Johnson. Wyantenn.-k. 192; Morris Brown.
4hlehter.... Wyantenuck. 19:: 0. Stanley, Wyantenuck, 194;
lelachmann .....3 4 Jamea Parker. Wyantenuck. 1946: John Sloane. Jr..
3aechting ........3 5 Lenox. 209; H. Douglans. Wyantenuck. 210: L.
'ottschall ........2 5 Stanley. Wyantenuck. 211; It. W. Byrne. Ride
fohn ............2 5 t.eId. 212; S. J. l'atterson. Crawford. 214; Dr. J.
;aro .............2 5. D. Peters. Wyantenuck. 213.
TENNIS. GRAND CIRCUIT TROTS.
Aa AintaSweet Marie, John M., D.Srn n
id His Way in the Edr o tGon ons
lgwood Tourny. Tetofaue fysedysrcn
rorked his way into tteGoePonetaknarDri,
Longwood. Mass., wr e llo' ieb ures
ting George Lyon in 111 ii12,2)-nthwyte
morning. The first esencnign okdteCnda
it in the second and codo h .1 ae hc onM
yed brilliant tennis wnesl.SetMre t$3i h
opponent by hard acin o$2 ntefed o h is
id fineiy executedraehniy
his showing in theJonMwsneetouidnth2A
strong favorite overpaealouhSerbidhmalwd
ese two experts are GlahradKn iett e era
i the semi-finals of tefns.D.Srn a pe ogv
als Wright defeated fedatrgvn ug rn h is
tter player default- at
the second set, as I h orhrc h onisii n
le to continue play- ty uoa ihSo p oda h
ant Cricket Club ex- oeiga aoie tdo h atha
Hallowell, the old * udawaouinfntn.er
ight sets.
the eastern chainmhatadwn-aiy
Safternoon. Inter
ed in the AlexanderBa.311ot.
re Lyon and Seaver
s. Ware and Hallo- NwfrtegetSna colLau
st match Alexandergae
yon and Beaver in Jaoenwlprbbypthfrheen
after their oppon- aosadWhe o h mtus
ir best for~ the win.SeatranClvadpaywoane
in straight sets,foonadisntorow
pressed in the see- et n ose hol ethona
y 13 to 11.
lie Campbell play Cs atnfrhswr etra.Wa
Clothier and Leon- DnheadTwsn hudgti o
juls,fistrond ~DSwe Mande Pattn s.,tr. otn eand
allbet 0 w iejtiEudora wn t Grohe Poant.
Hl tws guilture of stdwrka' racengh
"~ . H Wht-wed o toteDiln'semiHe--byaquartere:
F. Plle bea.L0%t rigt0i1,h eighth inn.4nthwate
L. e-.easern aondingent souked gthei aaian
4. .2. eonicealy. Sweeagt Casrid. at $h5in the
f.Leus e W Lsnuh erished $at o thdesily.wnth is
1race handily.
beat3. P War ~JUoir M.wasner tarboed in the 0
i-.pscond inninofuh e second game alwed
r'ttandF.B. le-Gaylhag he fast rolle tDird thid getunar a
6 . . yo, t. 62.Unabbedi the ball, touched Hict nootdi
f_tild andtegvng Jugew tofrat thet thes
beat 3 B. Hlll I the ourth se Cote ion tellirl en
apeint aaoritw dontelatha
.2 Rond-. Cd'brnard,$5 wh ite the eoda ay a
6-2 _ $7wa tuakign cans it big ront sinaever
Lyo, r. 6. 62.6 heetimes won sessionhesd
a god ovease Battlg ountgs. U
Jydfut aoutsie ilpoalic o the diaon
it ea K.Hoton., ashingtonhle firrn the terst.a
lorke lke admiffon t o. Casd
wasonqutsad whosrie hdew thoe bat
IOL toCae ator ut ork yelstea. Wat
sri Ove Wyn- nh wa vntl oen atu get is ot
lln hesm ag h ho.Tebgflo eieae
blUes. rrtaoud: n Donue and Paoatten ti o evr
el et .Merrilfo triethy scotng toe the late. TI
ri second anua Whit-tanc bn nth orh nin
ed.alin sigeeritbeetatatLentbot
It betJ t.Ieing hsaral aehmabgfvr
wt th loall, 6-2.
mard ere w. L. 11. ffkia' dul
'S bDt . T. ara. Tand3y isesoe ~ h ussne
is.174~~ sha~I~. leeld n the ballsafter es hd-ngle
Cassidy an Sahlsoul ge trsg

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