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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, August 09, 1904, Image 12

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AUCTION BALE.
-omon0ow.
WILSON & MAYERS,
AUCTIONEERS. 122 AND 1!! 0 ST. N.W.
AUCTION SALE
WEDNESDAY, io A. M.
PI RNITi'RE. GENERAL HOU'SRFURNISDLNGS.
ELECTRIC DELIVERY CAIf. ETC.
Parlor Suites; Bed Room Suites; Brass Enamel.
Wid and Folding Beds: Itureaums. CIifoniers,
Wash Stands. Sideboards: 2 Barber Chairs; Desks;
Settees and Couches; Divans; Child's Carriage;
New Single and Double Mattresses. In hair and
wool; Ext. and other Tables; 2 Sewing Machines;
2 Revoly. Offie and other odd Chairs; Ditain
('hairs; iHall Racks; Wardrobes; Mirmr-beck Was
nut Whatnot; Piano and other lamps; Dishes;
trenrkery; Tinware and Kitchen Goods; lot Paints
anil Stains: 32 Peck and 32 half-bush. Measures;
Mirrors. Pictures. Pianos; New Smyrna and other
Rugs; Jap. and China Mattings. and at
12 O'CLOCK NOON.
One nearly new Electric Delivery Car which will
ru.i 30 to 40 miles on one charge.
It WILSON & IAYIt. Auctioneers.
FVTURE DAYS.
THOS. J. OWEN & SONS. AUCTIONEERS.
TRUSTEES' SALE OF VALUABILE REAL ES
TATE. NO. 133 B STREET NORTHEAST.
By virtue of a certain deed of trust, duly re
corded In liter No. 152. folio 3A2. et seq.. of the
land records of the District of Columbia, and at
the request of the party secured thereby, the un
dersigned trustees will sell, at puttic auction. In
front of the preuises, on WEDNESDAY. THE
SEVENTEENTH DAY OF AUGUST. A.D. 1904.
AT FIVE O'CIOK I.M., the following descried
lanis and premises. situate in the city of Wash
ington. District of Columbia, and designated as
and being lot seventy-four g74) in Victor Ander
son's subdivision of lots In square ten hundred and
thirty-four (1034) as Per plat recorded In liber 19
page 101. of records of the office of the surveyor of
said District, together with the improvements, con
slating of dwelling house No. 1335 R t. n.e.
Terms of sale: One-third of the purchase mone
to be paid in cash, balance in two equal install
ments, payable in one and two years, with interest
at 6 per centum per annum, payable semi-annually.
from day of sale, secured by deed of trust upon
the property sold, or all cash. at the option of the
purchaser. A deposit of 100 wiil be required at
tinme of sale. All conveyancing. recording. etc.. at
cost of purchaser. Terms of sale to be complied
with within ten days from day of sale otherwise
the trustees reserve the right to resell the prop
erty at the risk and cost of defaulting purchaser.
after fve days' advertisement of such resale in
some newspaper published in Washington. D. C.
WILLIAM A. GORDON.
CHARLES EARLY.
aS-d?ds Trustees.
WALTER B. WILLIAMS & CO.. AUCTIONEERS.
TRI'STR.ES' SALE OP VALUABLE BRICK
RIWELLING NO. 1410 10TH STREET NORTH
WEST.
By virtie of a deed of trust, duly recorded in
Lit.er No. 2029. folio 118$ et seq.. of the land re
ords for the District of Columbia and at the re
quest of the holders of the notes, we wl'l sell at
ublic anction in front of the premises on MON
IAY. AU'GUST FIFTEENTril. A. D). 1904, AT
FIVE O'CIA)CK P.M.. the following described real
estate in the District of Columbia:
Lot numbered Twenty-eight (2). In Samuel Red
fern's suilfviision of square numbered Three Hun
dred and Thirty-eight (38). as said subdivision
is recorded in the offce of the surveyor of the
Itistilet of Columbia in book B. page 88.
Terms of Sale: One-third cash, balance in two
egnal installments, at one and two years. with
interest at 5 per centum per annum, payable
sem-annually from day of sale andl secured by a
deed of trust on the property sold: or all cash, at
the option of the purchaser. A deposit of $200 will
be required at time of sale. All conveyancing. re
cording. etc., at cost of purchaser. Terms of sale
to be compiled with within ten days from day of
sale otherwise the trustees reserve the right to
resell the property at the risk and cost of de
faulting purchaser after five days' advertisement
of such resale in some newspaper published in
Washington. D. C.
WILLIAM A. GORDON, Trustee.
au4-d&ds JOHN J. WILMARTIH. Trustee.
JAMES W. RATCLIFFE. AUCTIONFER.
TRUSTEES' SALE OF SMALL FRAME HOUSE.
NO. 1313 27TH STREET NORTHWEST.
By virtue of a certain deed of trust, duly re
corded in Liber No. 2011. folio 357 et seq., of the c
land records of the District of Columbia, and at
the request of the party secured thereby, we, the
undersigned. trustees. will sell, at public auction.
,it front of the premises. on THURSDAY, THE 0
EI.FIENTH DAY OF AUGI'ST. A.D. 1904, AT
H,LF-PAST FOUR O'CLOCK P.M.. the following
described land and premises. situate in the city of
Wi.shington. in the District of Columbia, and t
designated as and being lot numbered one hundrel
and one (101). in square numbered twelve hundred
and thirty-seven (1237). described in said deed of
trust as lot one hundred and one (101). in square
saty-seven (67). In Georgetown; said lot frontli.g
thirty feet on 27th street and extending back that t
wdth one hundred feet to a 'fteen-foot alley.
Terms of sale: All cash. A deposit of $100 will
be required of the purchaser at the time of sale. p
All c,nveyancing, recording and notarial fees at
the. cost of the purchaser. Terms of sale to be
complied with within fifteen days from day of sale
ott-- rise the trustees reserve the right to resell
the property at the risk and coat of the defaulting
purchaser. after tive days' advertisement of such
resale in The Evening Star, a newspaper published
in the city of Washington. D. C.
ASiILEY M. GOULD,
JAMES I. WOODWARD.
aul-d&ds Trustes.
JAMES W. RATCLIFFE, AUCTIONEER. 1
TR STEFN' SALE OF NOS. 14. 16 AND 18
SEATON STREET NORTHEAST, 'BLOOM.
INGI ALE." D. C.
Ity virtue of a deed of trust recorded in liber
No. 26Im, folio 17. of the land records of the Dis
trict of Columbla. and of a decree passed in
equity cause No. 24RRf. in the Supreme Court of
said District. at the request of the party thereby
secured, we, the undersigned trustees, will offer
for sale at public auction, in front of the prem
ises, on TUESDAY. TIlE SIXTEENTH DAY OF
A'GUST. 1904. AT FIVE O'CLOCK P.M., sub
lots twenty-ive, twenty-six and twenty-seven, in ]
Joseph Paul's subdivision of square No. thirteen.
as recorded in book county 16. at page 31. of the
offce of the surveyor of the District of Columbia,
being in that part of the District of Columbia
known as "Bloomningdale." each lot being im
proved by a two-story brick dwelling, and each is
sublject to two prior deeds of trust, one for $3,tO0
and one for $30t0, the latter of which, with in
terest. Is overdue. These houses will be offered
separateiy.
Terms: Cash. $100 deposit required upon each
lot upon acceptance of hid. Purchaser to pay cost
of conveyancing. Trustees reserve the right to
resell the prop'rty at the risk and cost of the de
faulting purchaser. unless terms be complied with
in ten daxe.
WHARTON E. LESTER,
J. CLAItENCE PRICF.
Trustees,
aum5-tnt Columbian buIldIng. 416 5th at. n.w.
C. 41. SIAMAN & CO., Auctioneers, 1407 0 st.
CHANCERY SALE OF VALUABLE IMPROVED
REAL ESTATE IN GEORGETOWN, SIT
C'ATED ON 341TH ST. AND) ON 0 ST.
By virtue of a dec-ree of 'the Supreme Court of
the District of Columbia passed in equity cause
No. 24500b, the undersigned trustees will offer for
sale at public auctioin In front of the premises, on
TU'ESDAY. AtGL'ST IIIXTEENTHI. 1904. AT
FiVE O'CLOCK P. M., the following real estate in
the District of Columia, namely, part of lot 931.
In square 1226. being the south 30 feet front of
said lot by the full siepth thereof, and also part of
lot 955, in the same suare, beginning on the south
aide of () at. at a point 715 feet west from the
southwest corner of 0 and ;16th mis., amid running
thence south a0 feet, and theuce west 23 feet;
thence north olI feet and thence east 23 feet to the
point of beginning.
The property wilt he sold free of all incum
brances. A deposit of $1510 on each parcel sold
will he required at the time of sate. If the terms
of sale are not complied with in fifteen days the
right is reserved to resell at the risk and cost of
the defaulting purchaser, after such readvertiae
ment as the trustees may think p roper.
Terms: 1-3 cash, and the balance in one and
two years. with interest. the deferred payments to
be secured on the property sold, or the purchaser
may pay all cash, at bis option.
All conveysncing, recording and notary feea at
the coat of the purchaser.
M. J. COLBERT. Century bldg.,
HI. T. TAGOART, Century bldg..
sant-d&dts Trustees.
W 'LTER It. WILLIAMS & CO.. AUCTIONEERS.
Till TEES' SALE OF VALUABLE HOU1SE AND)
LOT. NO. 1227 131TH STIIEET NORtTHI1VEST
WASHIINGTON, 1). C.
1t5 virtue o.f a deed of trust, recorded in Liber
No. 1733, folio 396. Of the land reco,rds of the Iis.
trIc-t uf (lumbniia, the undersigned will offer for
sale, by publisc auction, in front of the premises,
on lFRtIDAY. TilE TWEILFTHi DAY sty AUGUS-T.
115'4. AT HALF-PAST FOUR1 O'CLOCK P.M. I.t
lettered It of Ib.ivilliera et at. subdIvision of 'sub
lots 12. 13. 14 and *5 in square numsbere.d two hun
dred and eighty-une s281t, aa per piat recorded in
the office of the surveyor of the DistrIct oif Co
lon hia in Book Ci. H. B., page 227, "ith the lot
pro,vements, consIsting of a thre-e-stoiry dwelling,
containing I'd rooms. ConYeyancing at cotgg ar
chaser.
Terms: One-third caah, balance in two equal in.
stallments. at one and two years, respectively. the
prrchaser to give his negotiable promissory notes
for the credit paymenta, bearing interest. payable
semi-annually at rate of five per cent per annum,
and secured by deed of trust on the property sold.
$250 down at time of sale.
EUGENE CARUSI,
CHAS. W. HANDY,
an2 -sodhda Trust'ees.
THuOtt. J. OWEN & SON. AUCTlONEEBd.
TRUISTEE'S SALK OP VALUABLE BUILDING
tArtB IN SU'BDIVISION KNOWN AS "WHITE3.
HAVEN" AND "HARLE1i."
By virtue of a certain deed of trust, duly se
eerded in Liber No.. 1787. folio 440 et seq., of the
land! iecords of the Diatrict of Colunabia, and at
the request of the party secured thereby, the under.
signed, trustee, will seil, at pblic auction in
front of the premises, on TUt LIAY. THE Aix.
TEENTH DAY OF AUGUST. A.D. 1004. AT FIVE
O'CLOCK P.M.. the following described land and
peemiss, situate Is the county of Washington.
District of Columbia, and designated as and being
lets nun,bered nIneteen (19). twenty r20), twentr
one (21, and twenty-two 1221, in block one (I)
the subdivision made by Jacob P. Clark and Jolhn
C. Burst of parts of "Whiteharea" and "liar
lem." said subdivision being recorded in the oee
of the suirveysir of the District of Columbia in
County Subdivision Bank eight (N), page 124.
Tarms of sale: One- .blrd of the purchasemoe
to be paid in cash. balaaco is three equal install
ments, payable in one, two and three years, with
imi rest at six (6) par centum per annum, payable
semi-annually. from day of sale, secured by steed
ef- trust upon the property sold, or all cash, at the
option of the I,amtbaser. A depost of $25 on eaeh
let will be required at tieef sale. Alt coavey
aeing, recording. etc.. at coat of purchaser. Term.
ot sale to be complied wittb within ten days from
day of sale. etherwise the truatee ressrves the
right to resell the propmerty at the risk and coat of
defaulting purchaser, after bee days' adeertise
ment of such resale In some newspaper ulIsaned
A G O LAN a TRUST COMPANT,
By JYn Jn! EDman. Pr.g.a.o
AUCflOW AJiU&
VUJT'E3 DAV.
ON THURSDAY. AIGU'r [3,
er TEN A.M.. wM the setia xt
k Tlwon. 141S H st., I wil as, &
rhres. mn seds steaed In the nsfes H. M
SBle. Gee. I. Leagae, Naaale i
stead and 1Lisle Germ. .
as8 et*
C. 0. SILOAN & 00.. AUCIIOUU.
1407 0 at. S.w.
CHANCERY SALE OF VALUA1iW
REAL ESTATE. LOCATED AT 7T AWaL
STS SOUTHWEST.
Bvirtue of a decree passetn equit easse N.
M the uersgne trustee will olrfor syis
at public auction, in front of the premiss, en
rHURSDAY. AUGUST ELEVENTH. 1904, AT
PIVE O'CLOCK P.M.. lots numbered fourteen
(14) and Afteen (15). In the subdivision of square
nmbered four hundred and seventy-4ne In
the city of Washington. District of Columbia.
located at the northeast corner of 7th and L
its. s.w.
A deposit of one hundred dollars 0100.00) Will
be required at the time of sale.
Terms of Sale: One-third cash and the balance
In one and two years, with Interest at s per eent.
ar the purchaser may pay all cash, at his option.
Title to be good of record or no sale. Taxes ad
lusted to date of sale. The property will be sold
rree of all imnumbrances.
If the terms are not comnUlled with in fifteen
lays the right is reserved to resell at the risk
tnd cost of the defaulting rehaser..
Century building,
aa4-dAds Washington. D. C.
THOMAS DOWLING & CO.. AUCTIONEERM.
612 B Sr N.W.
By virtue of a decree of the Supreme Court of
he District of Columbia, In Equity 'Caue no.
4778. Mabel C. Fuller vs. Mary Clare Fuller et aL.
will dell, at public auction. In front of the prem
sea. on THURSDAY. AUGUST ELEVENTH, 1906,
1T THREE O'CLOCK P.M.. the followlus property
a the county of Washington, District of Columbia:
Lt 13 and the westerly halt of lot 14. in block
II. In Clark & Cottrell. trustees', subdivision of
part of "Whitehaven." as per plat recorded in
Cconty Book No. 7. page 93, of the records of the
>Mee of the surveyor of the District of Columbia,
in'mproved.
AND ON THE SAME DAY AT HALF-PAST
POUR O'CLOCK P.M. part of a tract called
'Friendship," being the west half of the parcel
vs'.veyed by Leanna Morris et al. to Thomas S.
Queen by deed In Liber D 7. folio 47, beginning at
a point on the north line of the Grant read 20
reet west of the bound stone marking the south
ast corner of the above mentioned parcel; running
'hence north 19% degrees west 85 feet to the north
Ine of said lot; thence south 70% degrees west 20
reet: thence south 19% degrees east 85 feet to the
'rant road: thence with said road north 70% de
trees east 20 feet to the place of beginning, im
proved by a small frame dwelling.
Terms of sale: One-third of the purchase money
'ssh. and the balance In two equal installments,
pcyable in one and two years from the day of
ale. and to be represented by the promissory
iotes of the purchasers. bearing interest at the
rat. of 6 per centum per annum, payable semi
ti.r.ually. and secured by deed of trust on the
priperty sold; or all cash, at the option of the
urchasers. $10 deposit required upon each sale.
'erms of sale to be complied with within 15 days,
>tterwise trustee reserves the right to resell at
the risk and cost of defaulting purchaser or pur
rh sers.
JESSE H. WILSON. Trustee,
jy30l-1t 317-319 John Marshall place.
DAY OF PLEASUBE.
Eany Children Given an Outing at
River View.
The orphans who are cared for at two
ocal institutions had their yearly outing
resterday as the guests of the Knights of
7olumbus on their annual excursion to
River View. These excursions are given
'or the purpose of raising funds to liqui
late the debt on the home of the order, at
06I E street northwest, but they are also
nade the occasion of a treat to the father
ess and motherless little ones of St. Vin
ent's and St. Joseph's asylums. Over two
iundred of them enjoyed the diy yester
lay, and although the threatening weather
f the morning dampened their spirits some
vhat, the absence of the sun's rays made
he day even more delightful than was an
icipated.
The children were driven to the boat in
busses, and after their arrival at the View
vere made up into parties and allowed to
vail themselves of the amusements there
or the entire aftc:noon. Capt. Randall
laced the resort at their disposal so far as
hese features went, and a happier crowd
f children would have been hard to locate.
tfter they had investigated thoroughly the
ntlre grounds they were corraled in the
lancing pavilion, and were there fed sump
uously from the substantial fare provided
'or them by a number of the business men
if the city. There were other good thigs
o eat in the way of dainties, and then The
Ittle people were again permitted to make
nerry with the flying horses, the observa
Ion wheel and the other amusements. They
vere sent home on an early boat to dream
ver the good time they had until next
'ear.
The ladies' auxiliary committee which
ad charge of the orphans, in addition to
he Sisters who accompanied them, con
isted of Mrs. P. A. Taltavull, chairman;
drs. Charles E. Welsh, vice cnairman; Miss
C. C. Maloy, secretr ry; Mrs. L. Hunt, Mrs.
H. Ryan, Mrs. W. H. Callahan, Miss
'ellle Sage. Miss Amy Coughlan, Miss
dary Fitzgibbons, Miss Loret.a Fitzgib
ions, Miss Helolse Crossfield, Miss Mae
Iweeney, Miss Rica Markey, Miss Kather
ne Fitzgerald, Miss D. Dooley. Miss Inez
daley, Miss Nellie Maley, Miss Laura
uckett. Miss Burns, Mrs. H. Davis and
le Misses Doyle.
Among the Catholic clergy who partici
ated In the outing were Rev. Father W. J.
.arroll. first assistant pastor of St. Pat
-k's Church; Rev. Father J. W. Collins of
~eoria. Ill., and Brothers Thomas, Adams,
ditchell and Francis, from the Immaculate
Ionception School. The Sisters from the
-loly Cross Academy of Alexandria, Va.,
mere also present.
The athletic sports were probably the
noist Interesting feature of the day, and
mere wItnessed by a large and enthusiastic
:rowd. The events and their winners follow:
100-yard dash (special)-Vi on by W. W.
Rohertson; prize, stick pin.
50o-yard dash-Won by Paul Moore; prize,
icarf pin.
Sack race-Won by Severn Baumer; prize,
~ountain pen.
Three-legged rac.-Won by R. Ross and
3. Howard; prize, penknives.
00 yard dash (specIal; open only to K. of
'. members)-Won by Joseph P. Feely;
rlze, K. of C. cuff ajuttons.
100-yard dash-Won by J. C. Collins;
>rize. umbrella.
The officials of the course were: Referee,
Vr. L. Fleishell; clerk of course, J. H. Pel
en; starter. H. A. Hegarty.
The base ball game scheduled to take
>lace between the teams representing St.
A~nthony's and St. Paul's churches in the
hlarquette League was won by the latter
ifter a hard-fought battle of ten Innings.
Fhe battery for St. Paul was Stanley,
utcher, and Murphy, catcher, and for St.
tnthony's Sullivan, pitcher, and Thayer,
atcher. Messrs. Hurney amid Sullivan act
d as umpires. The game was Interesting,
md the youngsters hit the ball hard and
)ften.
Two boats had been provided, and In all
sarrled down seven large crowds. The ar
-angements perfected by the Knights In
advance and carried out by efficient com
nittees precluded the slightest opportunity
'or accident. The genem al committee in
rharge of the excursion consisted of George
W. Cook, chaIrman; Dr. W. E. Pairo, vice
:hairman; H. E. Brooks. financial secre
:ary; H. A. Hegarty, recording secretary,
nd Thomas K. Galiaher, treasurer.
* C
. sliced and
Lea
Sai
SehumIiiig:...I erfanging3 the
oerhn mafc is
JAM. LOSE.,TW0,,4X1M
Happeaed In agag.eit on Poet
atth r-idth Shig -
by Snsiaa Balders.
A cablegram from St. Petersburg last
night says: Emperor Nicholas has received
the following from Viceroy Alexleff. dated
at Mukden, August 7:
"Telegrame received today from. Port
Arthur and from the commander of the
squadron (Rear Admiral Withoft) . state
that'the cruisers Bayan. Askold, Panad,
and Novik and some gunboats steamed
out of the harbor on July 26 for the pur
pose of bombarding the enemy's positions.
They were attacked by the Japanese bat
tle ship Chinyen, the protected cruisers
Chiyoda, Itsukushima and Matsishima,
and two second-class cruisers, with thirty
torpedo boats.
"An eight-inch shell from the Bayan
burst in the stern of the Itsukushima,
placing that ship out of action. There
upon all the Japanese ships steered for
the open sea, and at the same time the
Chiyoda was damaged by a Russian mine.
As the Chiyoda was sinking by the head
she steered toward Tallen bay. A shot
from battery 22 also damaged a Japanese
gunboat, which was sighted.
"On July 27, in view of the Japanese
having taken the general oftensive against
our land positions, the Bayan, Captain Reit
senstein; the battle ship Retvisan, the
Pallada, Askold and Novik, the coast-de
tense ships Gremiashchi and Otvashni,
the gunboat Giliak and twelve torpedo
boats, under the command of Rear Ad
miral Leschinsky, were orderedl to support
our right flank at the deniand of Lieut.
Gen. Stoessel (commander of the military
forces at Port Arthur).
Bombarded the Jap Positions.
"Our ships, preceded by mine dredges.
steamed toward Lungantan, from where
they bombarded the Japanese positions
until 3 o'clock in the afternoon.
"On their return, which they effected
with the same precaution, a mine ex
ploded underneath one of the dredges.
"Rear Admiral Withoft estimated that
the enemy's naval forces which were off
Port Arthur July 30 consisted of five battle
ships, four armored cruisers, ten other
cruisers and forty-eight torpedo craft."
Viceroy Alexieff's dispatch bears out the
reported loss of the Japanese protected
cruisers Itsukushima and Chiyoda, and In
dicates considerable activity on the part of
the Port Arthur squadron. The care 'er
cised in sending a dredger fleet ahead of
the squadron, both in leaving and in re
turning to the harbor, is amply vmndica e
by the loss of one of the pilot boats, arid Is
also taken as a guarantee that there will
be no further damage to the Russian bar
ships by Japanese mines.
Calchas Held at Vladivostok.
A cablegram from Vladivostok last night
says: The British steamer .Calchas, from
Tacoma for Japanese ports, which was ar
rested by -the Vladivostok squadron, thirty
miles north of Tokyo bay during the recent
cruise off the Pacific coast of Japan, arrived
here today in charge of a prise crew. She
was a week overdue, having Deen detained
by fogs.
The Calchas is the last vessel captured
by Admiral Jessen's cruisers. The papers
of the Calchas showed she was carrying
370 tons of flour, 9 tons of cottun, 215 cogs
and 125 parts of machinery, all consigned
to Yokohama. The remaining 1,500 tons of
the Calchas' cargo were consigned to Hong
kong.
The Calchas was bound fram Hongkong
to Europe and carried sufficient coal to go
to Vladivostok. Therefore, it was decided
to send her to that port in charge of Lieut.
Stackelberg and forty-one men from the
Rurik. The transfer of the prize crew to
the steamer was attended with the greatest
danger, owing to the heavy sea which was
running at the time.
The Calchas is owned by Alfred Ilolt &
Company of Liverpool, otherwise the Ocean
Steamship Company, limited, of that port.
She is a vessel of 4,279 tons, and was built
at Greenock in 1899. She was commanded
by Capt. Hannah. She left Tacoma for
Japanese ports and Hongkong on July 8.
since which time she had not been reported.
INTERESTED IN TROOPER YOUNG.
Spanish War Veterans Offer Their
Services and Sympathy.
The local Spanish War Veterans have of
fered their services and sympathies in be
half of Samuel R. Young, the youthful
trooper of the 15th Cavalry who is in jail
charged with causing the death of Police
man Smith July 4 by shooting him. The
shooting occurred on the Aqueduct bridge.
Mrs. Young of Rochester, Pa., mother of
the young soldier, in connection with mem
bers of Miles Camp, United Spanish War
Veterans. has retained Attorneys J. Lewis
Smith. the adjutant of Miles Camp, atnd
James B. Archer, jr., to look after the in
terests of Young.
A committee from Miles Camp, consisting
of Commander G. E. Rausch, Lieut. W. H.
Lawder, junior vice commander. and Mr.
A. J. Hawkins, visited the jail yesterday
and had a talk with Trooper Young. When
seen afterward they declared their belief
in the prisoner's innocence of any intention
to harm the policeman. Young is sorrow
stricken, they said, over the fatal outcome
of what they term "a- Fourth of July lark
of a young soldier who was trying to en
joy himself like others, and was firing
blank cartridges from his revolver.'
Adjutant Smith said the testhnony of
Young that he had nothing but blank car
tridges with him is borne out, and that only
blanks were found in his pistoL. Young, he
added, regrets the happening very much
and declares he is not guilty of any Inten
tional wrongdoing.
The prisoner is a fine-looking young man
and has, it is said, an excellent military
record as a soldier. A statement has been
received here, signed by leading citizens of
Rochester. Pa., Youngs birthplace, testify
ig to his good character.
Army officers under whom he served are
also preparing papers certifying to his good
conduct and record as a soldier. These
will be presented to the court when Young
is called for trial.
Alarmed by the recent activity of fed
eral officials in causing the arrest of China
men suspected of being in the United States
illegally, many scores of celestial. are leav
ing Chicago. greatly hampering business
conducted by Chinamen with the aid of
Chinese labor.
old M(eats.
- Any kind neatly
ainished. Suitable for
nd teas when accom
IVestbl salad.
Perrins'
FORETERHIRE
sle ebere&at a bottle ofzAa a,
wthin easy reach. When poured
will stimulate appetite and promote
ARRIVED OWI%IN
DODY.
Boutiae BnIe.s= Tns==t=.= at To
day's Xetng - Yavor 3equiring
Liceaines-Cammttees Named.
Upon taking the chair at today's session
of the convention of the International
Brotherhood of Stationary Firemen, Presi
dent Timothy Healy announced that the
first business would be the report of the
credentials committee on.the papers of the
delegate firemen from the strike center in
the west, who reached Washington earlier
in the day. These delegates were promptly
seated. An auditing committee was elect
ed and the report of the executive board
read, as was that of the delegation which
attended the annual convention of the
American Federation of Labor at Boston.
The convention favored the passage of
state laws and city ordinances requiring
stationary firemen to be licensed. Th:s
subject was generally discussed. President
Healy stated that such a law had been in
force with good results in Masiachusetts
for about six years. There is also a license
law in New York and other cities. Such an
enactment, he added, is necessary for the
safety of life and property. Many plants,
Mr. Healy asserted, employ incompetent
men. The licensed men should be familiar
with all parts of a boiler and know how
to operate them.
A new committee was formed on "journal
and printing," and President Healy ap
pointed as its members- James O'Donnell,
James Holewell, W. P. Kirwin, Thomas
Kelley and Ed. Kehoe.
Other committees were appointed as fol
lows:
On report of the secretary-treasurer-J.
B. Conery, Robert Schoonover, Timothy
Griffin, John Barrett, W. P. Kirwin.
On president's report-David Young, T.
P. Shirley, Charles R. Marean, Luke Smith,
James Holewell.
Report of the executive board-H. W.
Bausch, J. F. McDonough, Thomas M.
Kelly, Thomas Sullivan, Lon Judah.
Constitution-J. P. Holland, Thomas F.
Kane, P. J. Rowan, Joseph O'Donnell, Ed.
Kehoe.
Resolutions - P. J. Sheehan. Steve H.
Rice, Louis Becker, R. C. McLean, David
Conden.
Assessments and benefits-. W. Morton.
W. H. Brooks, James Donnelly, Frank
Huldone, Geo. P. Doar.
Appeals and grievances-James Carrcll,
Thomas Martin, H. W. Bousch, David
Young, Luke Smith.
Organization - P. J. Rowan, Robert
Schoonover, John Barrett, W. L. Gaynor.
J. B. Conroy.
A CompUmentaly Smoker.
The Washington delegates, Messrs. L. S.
Crown and J. R. Hartle7, invited the dele
gates on behalf of Firemen's Local No. 63
to attend a complimentary smoker this
evening at Costello's hall, 6th and G streets
northwest.
The afternoon session,of the convention
was omitted that the newly appointed com
mittees might have an opportdnity to pre
pare reports and recommendations.
The advance guard of the striking fire
men from the western meat packing house
centers reached Washington this morning
and the delegates were in attendance at
the second day's session of the convention
this forenoon.
The delegation is ~ftrn Chicago, and its
members are sObefantiaMlooking men. At
its head is Joseph W. Morton, presi
dent and business agent of Firemen's
Local No. 7 of Chicago, which body is
now much in evidence in the big meat
strike in the west. His associates are Ed
ward Kehoe and Thomas~ Martin. also of
Local No. 7. Other firemen from the strike
center are expected to reach here this even
ing or tomorrow morning.
An Interesting statement of the fight of
the packing house firemen in the west,
which has been transferred in a measure
to the convention now in session here, was
made to a Star reporter today. It appears
that some time ago the packing house fire
men organized a campaign for an eight
hour day. Before they organized they were
required to work twelve hours for $1.75 per
diem. Soon after their union had been
formed they demanded shorter hours. The
meat packers responded to this demand by
increasing the wages of the firemen, but
declining to shorten the working day.
Last year another demand for shorter
hours was made, to which the packers re
plied by repeating their action of the year
before and Increased the wages of the fire
men so that they are now receiving $3 n
$3.25 for a twelve-hour day.
When the butchers and other employcs
of the packing houses decided to go out on
the big strike which is now oni the packers
informed their firemen that they would give
them an eight-hour day and allow their
salaries to remain at the presmixt figure ($3
and $3.25 per day), provided they would
not go out on a sympathetic strike with the
meat men.
The firemen, however, decided to walk out
wttlh the other strikers and are now In the
thick of the fray. It Is said they now want
the International Brotherhood. In sessian
here, to indorse tiheir movement for a de
crease in their working period to eight
hours a day at the prevailing scale of
wages. The dclegation represents the meQt
packing house firemen in Chicago, Kansa,s
City, St. Louis, Omolha, St. Joseph and
other packing house centers.
BuEness= Session Yesterday Afternoon.
The first business session of the conven
tion was held yesterday afternoon, begin
ning at 3 o'clock. behind closed doors. The
annual report of the secretary-treasurer. C.
L. Shamnp of Omaha,Showed that the organ
ization had gained about 5.000 members
during the year. the total membership now
being 30,000 firemen in the United States,
Canada and British Columbia.
When the report of the credentials com
mittee was under, consideration, a lively
discussion ensued over the proposition to
unseat Delegate J. F. Mullahy of Wilkes
barre, Pa. A delegation from his union was
present to urge that he be not seated. The
convention decided, not to seat him because
of a technical violation of the constitutional
provisions of the union In- his election. The
matter will be investigated later.
Delegate Fox of r#'N. Y., union was
also denied a seit In te convention on
the ground that t~eSarter of his union
had been revoked: *
Delegates Bure~ of Toledo; Carroll of
Jamestown, N. Y.: and Keough of Chicago
were named as tli eOiittee on rules.
They will map oMt m11h of the business
for the conventiof"
Baptist Xbinsls' Union Meets.
The Baptist MinIE , Union, colored,
held a meeting at *blh Baptist Church,
S street between 14h and 17th streets, yes
terday. The meein wa presided over by
Rev. P. T. ClarkeWD: Dk, president of the
organisation. witIP RefW J. G. Loving, B.
D., as serear.hA ifeinber' of business
matters of impotaeto the union were
transacted. The Mtfface was good and
the outlook for tabhh cnidrdfvr
able. d~ cnidrdfvr
A recess was taken fdr' thirty days, at the
conclusion of wisich hiemorial services will
be held icr Rev. Bar'tIett L. PhilIps, D). D.,
who was pastor of the First Baptist Church
at the date of his recent death. *
Etate Usijueathed to Danghte.
By the terams of the will of Martha Ann
Burnup, dated June 15, '19S, fled fler gee
bate today, the entire estate of the testa.
trix is devised to her 4ager, Franes.
P. Burnpp________
sitst Dislaated.
Limeig NaIL eleted, three gas,s,ol, hi
Sad sete her eft- wsiat whl p6mg
the hmle afaseee: ahe,wsaim
iWe
and reW
I
CEYLON TEA "ICED" ma
refreshing drink. Sealed t
Mixed or NATURAL OREEI
e. and TJe. per
TRACK8 NEARLY READY
BAILWAY BEING BUILT ACROSS
CAPITOL PLAZA.
Temporary Construction, Which Will
Be in Use Within About
Ten Days.
Within about ten days, if the present
plans of Contractor Stewart are carried
out, there will be a full-fledged steam rail
way in operation across the plaza in front
of the Capitol.
"All aboard for the union station site,"
the conductor will announce, and the little
"dinkle" engine will puff and pull. Off it
will go, drawing its trainload of dirt from
the site of the new building for the House
of Representatives at New Jersey avenue
and B street southeast, over the Capital
Traction Company's tracks on B street
northeast and out in front of the big white
building.
Right in the shadow of the majestic dome
the impertinent little train will speed, and
when it reaches the driveway on the north
side it will turn down hill. With steam
turned off, it will coast through the Capitol
grounds to North Capitol street, into which
it will turn and continue its downward
course across the Metropolitan car tracks
on C street northeast until it comes to the
Baltimore and Ohio railroad's tracks, which
it will cross on a steel bridge a hundred
feet long and twenty-two feet high.
It will then proceed to North Capitol and
E street northeast, where its load of earth
will be dumped from a trestle into the "fill"
for which it is intended.
In this way will the 90,000 cubic yards of
earth to be excavated for the office build
ing's foundation be remQved and placed
where it is needed to build up a portion of
the new union station site.
The Tracks in Place.
The tracks are already laid in front of
the Capitol, and as soon as the two street
railways complete the work of the cross
ings the remainder will be put down and
the running of the trains begun.
A big steam shovel is running on the
office building site at present dumping the
earth into wagons, which carry it over.
Soon another shovel may be in operation at
the same place, and together they will dig
the foundation. One will fill the railroad
cars, each of which holds three cubic
yards, and the other will fill wagons.
When this time comes the wagons will
cease to haul the earth to the union station,
but will take it to the War College in the
southwest instead. The little train alone
will supply the union station.
Three engines will be used on the railroad,
and it is estimated that 1.000 feet a day will
be carried across in front of the Capitol, al
though there is considerable uncertainty as
to the exact quantity, because the con
tractors cannot tell just what effect the
grades will have on the speed of the trains.
The time table will be "every now and
then, from '7 a.m. until 11 p.m."
,Width of Right of Way.
Twelve feet is the width of the right of
way granted the builders for the tracks, and
this will be fenced in with a four-foot fence
and provided with suitable crossings for pe
destrians and vehicles.
Only at the street railway crossings will
the asphalt be disturbed. At other places
the ties are laid on the paving and the
rails and fence posts spiked to them with
out harm to the asphalt. The gauge of the
track is thirty-six inches.
Complaints Filed.
It is understood that a number of per
scns living on North Capitol street between
the Capitol grounds and C street have com
plained against the building of the rail
toad in front of their homes, but the con
tractor said this morning that the work
was authorized by elhe District Commis
sioners, who believed t-hey were acting for'
the best interests of the public. He said,
further, that the trains, as they go over
North Capitol street loaded, will be on the
down grade with all steam turned on, and
when they have the upward pull tihey will
be emnpty, so that the noise will be reduced
to a minimum. This is the only residence
block affected by the railroad.
It will be several months before the earth
is entirely removed and the running of the
trains discontinued.
METTCAN MACNISTS.
Railway Meshanies Out on Sympa
thetic Strike.
EL PASO, Tex., August-9O-Machinists
on the Mexican Central road at Chihuahua
have gone on strike in sympathy with
those at Aguas Calientes, who went out
last Saturday. The strike threatens to se
riously hamper the road.
POPE'S CORONATION.
Anniversary Observed at St. Peter's
Today--6d Messages Prom America.
Special Dispatch to The Evening Star.
NEW YORK, August 9.-A cablegram
from Rome says: The anniversary of the
coronation of Pope Pius X was celebrated
by mass in St. Peter's this morning at
which Cardinal Merry del Val officiated.
Members of the sacred college, besides two
thousand invited guests, attended the cere
mony.
Contrary to expectations, the pope did
not deliver an allocution. It is supposed
his reason for this was that his holiness
wished to avoid expression of his opinion
on the deadlock existing in the dispute be
tween France and the Vatican.
A large nun3ber of congratulatory mes
sages were received by the pontiff, among
them being 648 messages from America.
Bepublicans Organizing for Work.
NEW YORK, August 9.--The republican
executive committee met today, and de
voted most of its time to details relating to
the headquarters, such as the division of
duties among different members, and au
thorizing employes to take charge of work
of various kinds which will put the ma
ehinery'in motion.
Tragedy in Bt. Londs.
ST. LOUIS, August 9.-John P. Johnson,
a negro living at Kinloch Park, a subultb
shot his wife today, wonnga her severely,
shot and killed his brother-in-law and then
illed himself. Jealousy is said to have
rempted the erime.
Stamp CeHeeters Bleet 0nam.
PITTBBUlt, Pa. August 9.-The A:newt.
en Tilatelie Association, in m--q- bsu
-lce the fenowing oesteers today:
I Known
ikes a most delicious and
rad packets only. Black,
By .n gs.
SEVERE REPRIMAND
PUIDENT WBITES LTTEE TO
PHILADELPHIA POgTXAgTEg
Alleged Political Discrimination in
Selection of Employes-Action Re
=It of Investigation.
President Roosevelt has written a letter
to Postmaster McMichael of Philadelphia,
reprimanding that official for alleged po
litical discrimination in the selection of
employes In the Philadelphia post oftfce.
certified to the postmaster there by the
civil service commission. The letter of the
President instructs Postmaster McMichael
to govern himself henceforth in accordance
with the rules of the civil service commis
sion.
This action was the result of an Investl
gation made by the commission on charges
filed by Robert B. Jenks, secretary of the
Civil Service Reform Association of Phila
delphia. The matter was taken up imme
diately by the civil service commission.
Examiner Wanamaker of the commission
being sent to Philadelphia to make a care
ful scrutiny of the situation as outlined by
Mr. Jenks. The charges were, in effect.
that 2.i per cent of the eligibles on the
clerks' and carriers' appointments regist"r
for 1901 had been certified three times by
the commission and rejected by the post
master of Philadelphia. This charge was
found, by Examiner Wanamaker to be
sustained by the evidence adduced during
his examination of witnesscs to the num
ber of 2d, whose statements he took, and
whom he found had been rejected. He
learned that a very small proportion of
them were republicans, and that none had
secured an indorsement from any promi
nent republican which had been transmitted
to the postmaster.
Eight to Reject Eligibles.
Postmasters have the right to reject two
out of every three names certified to them
by the commission, but it was regarded
with suspicion that a much larger number
was passed over at Philadelphia than else
where.
Commissioners Cooley and Greene, on
August 2, in Philadelphia, examined those
selected, and found that out of 49 of them
selected at random, 90 per cent were either
republicans, or had secured indorsements
from prominent republican politicians, and
in nearly every case from the republican
leader of the division or ward in which
the appointee lived. Some of those re
jected, the report adds, were told by the
postmaster that their names had been
passed by because they were not known or
recommended to him.
Postmaster McMichael, when called on
by the commission, says the report, "stated
that he had appointed no man who was not
known to him or recommended to him;
that the republican ward leaders were in
the habit of calling at his office and recom
mending the appointment of various per
sons from the eligible register. He further
said, however, that he had accepted recom
mendations from any reputable citizen."
Report of Commission.
The commission, In its report, recom
mended:
1. That the postmaster at Philadelphia
should be reprimanded, and informed that
although the evidence did not conclusively
show that he had personal knowledge of
the state of affairs disclosed by the inves
tigation, it was his duty to keep himself so
Informed of matters connected with the
administration of his office as to render
Impossible anything of importance occur
ring without his knowledge.
2. That in view of the manifest injustice
done the eligibles who were certified three
times and not selected, their names should
be restored to the register and certified for
vacancies hereafter existing at the Phila
delphia post offie.
8. That the postmaster should be In
formed that while he had a right to reject
two of every three names certified, this
right was strictly limited by sections 2 and
5 of rule I, which forbid all political dis
rimination.
4. That the postmaster should be in
formed that the fact that a person had
passed a civil service examination and was
within reach of certification gave that per
son a prima facde right to the appointment.
and that his or her name should be passed
only for reasons affecting the efficiendy of
the service, and that in every case the bur
den Is on the appointing officer to show
some reason for passing over the name of
such eligible.
HAY'S COURSE JUSTIFrA-nLE.
3Metal View at Berlin Comnenmins
Course With Turkey.
BERLIN. August 9.-Secretary Hay's
ourse toward Turkey, according to the
sffieial view here, Is fully justifiable. The
samnple of France In forcing the porte to
settle claims through a fleet demonstration
is cited as an analogous case and the offi
cls here expect that the sultan will
promptly yield to the United States' de
mands before the demonstration at Smyrna
reaches a serious aspect.
Germany, unlike most European coun
tres, has no claims against Turkey, al
though Turkey still owes money to Ger
nany's shipbuilding and arms companies.
rhe very exceptional reiations Germany has
with the porte will, it Is assumed, be favor
ible to America should the sultan ask for
Germany's advice.
DBEDGE BOAT PLAYED OUT.
First Trial Trip at Norfolk a Nailure
Drowning VictIms Buried.
Special Dispatch to The Ewaing Star.
NOR1FOLK, Va., August 9.-The big
wd powerful amny dredge Benyaurd
megan at the Trlgg ship yard In Rich
iond and brought to the Norfolk navy
yard for completion after the failure of the
rrigg plant, started out on her first trial
rip this morning, but the big vessel in
some way became unmanaeable and was
only able to proceed about half a mile from
the navy yard. Several government tugs
were quickly summoned anil towed the
Benyaurd back to the navy yard, where she
was tied up pending an investigatiQn.
dohn D. Arumstrong, Walter D. Arm
strong, father ad sn, and Clay D. Puflia
wie were drowned together in Little Bay,
V.. yesterday were buried toda wth
tiple funeral from LekIes thdt
Church. Bev. Dr. C. 3. Blackwiell, who
recently waried yeoung Arsastrong, and
oer mstsameiated.
*m o-l th.e.amr New York.
seiblbwie&e th e uwubts alar.
POnTUUnT,- Vs.. Aigo 9.-TWhe
Bsnyaurd when abreast of the Bay
Uae wbart bea..- n===g=naea through
tge Mna -of-the wele to aswr to her
rdder. Sie swerved and pISughed thasugh
the water at a ase tate df had
tedie n New Teak. h at.
07ases lwwbs. t.a
A D AI L !"oi i O r1a Sa I.U
Spanish Languagse School.
m*. .mr OMan, Pals. 11-tt,5
Bliss Electrical School
e-M deq mal oeemg ease to a..ifaN 0.e
seed 4sMetretj. 08m.l.s. . . .R ata.a.
aetually d...tleet da.e, ..m... ete.. m a.
trained f.r oed peelmo an to the esect.lal ibe
brbs. TusMSb year qs...b.s.., sa
Call or Send for Catalog.
219 0 Street N. W.
aad-tt
WANTED-TO TEACH FRENCH OR GERMAN
r eaeb for esamination: reasonable teems. Ad
druw "LANGUAG'" Star oiee. a-3t*
WOOD'S COMMERCIAL
COLLEOE,
3"1 East Capitol street.
Tweetieth year. Telephooe East 38.
Day aad *veal efslsoa. al the y'ear'.
1'olifas htaaedr, ligradeates.
ene llfal toae ar.
tvwm t oughand practical.
WE TEACH
Shorthand (Gregg). Boonkesptrdg.
Shorthand (Pltman). Arlthareti.
Typewritig. Grammar.
hLetter Wrting.
MLee lw- Civel service.
Private Las---s.
Undeeerethesebdeets desired an. assi' at
mee. Special induemcsts new Tered. saiitt
Geo. Lawrence :'tudi- IaS e to
Singing .e"ceta Meods gan Masters.
au4-eod,3t"4
Civil Service Examination
in Shorthand and Typewriting this
fall. Are you going to take it? i trp pes
let. " O ,free test and pithy boek
G. EVANB PARTELLO,
4414 Sth at. a.w., Washingtoa, D. C.
The Southern Home School
(The Cary School). formerly of Baltimore. Md.
A Boarding and Day School for Young Ladis and
Little Girls. Will reopen at 1665 and 1867 Mat
wood place. Washingtoa D. C.. October I. ids4,
Rcgular and special coursra. Art. history ao. pep
aration for European travel a specialty. 'naamal
f.cilitlea for the study of Music. Catalngu,.s 0O
application to the l'rincipel at 915 N. Charl-s at
Baltimore. Md.. until September 1. After that
date the Principal may be seen at the schol.
Ill2-tM. R GRtAHA.% DUFF. Principal.
HALLNOYE SCHOOL COLLEGE-PItKPARA
tory. Graded and Special Cour-ea. Day and Nlat
Seslons throughout year. Catalogues. F. .
HAIL, A.M.. Principal. 221 i n.w. jy2;y-44t*
Strayer's Business College
Cor. 11th and F ste. Shorthand. typewriti.
bookkeeping. penmanship. arithmetic. Engl
etc. Day and night all the year. Lowest prlsees.
Biooks, etc., free. Typewriters sent to atud.enta'
homes. Situations guaranteed. 1.000 atudets
last year. Half price for full course if you easeli
now.
Call, write or 'phone Main 3430 for catalogue.
aul -78t-10
ARMY AND NAVY
Preparatory Schoole
13th and Princeton Sts. N.W.
A select boarding and day school
for Young Men and Boys. Fall
term opens October i. Successfully
fits young men for all universities.
Offers special training to candidates
for Military and Naval Academies,
and prepares for direct Commissions
in the Army, Navy and Marine
Corps.
Cataloguea at principal book stores.
Addreas ". SW.IVELY. Principal
anl-78t.28
W. F. DALES. PH.D.. 1212 12TH N.W.. CLA.
teal teacher. Pupils thoroughly prepared for eel
lege or other examinations In Greek, Latia and
other studies. Fifteen years' experience.
j)28-26t-4
WOOD'S COMMERCIAL COLLEGE, 311 E. CAP.
at. Established in 1815. seventy-he studeate
now taking our summer eouras. 21.9
THF STDi08 OF DR. KIMBALL ANID MEg.
GOODH UB -at o010 F at.. wil be a
Tuesday and Friday for the reception ot
during the sumr. J1Lf
French-Spanish-Oerman
BEMLITZ SCHOOL PRIN., A. GONARD.
T23 14TH s. OPEN ALL SUMIM.
jel-tf-4
THE COLUMBIA EINDEtGARTEN TRAINING
school. 0I1 New Hampshire avenue. Washltg
toe. D. C.. opens 8th year Oct. I, 1904.
1yI-tf uisses LIPPiNCOTT and BAKER.
O0T OF WASHINGTON.
University of Virginia
Department of Engineering.
Complete courses in Civil, Mecale4ha Electrial
and t M iin Eninern each coeif e ase
Ample fecUItlea for drafting. Geld work and aha
work in wood and meta. Fully.bqiped labera
tories for work in Strength of MaterialeSs
Engineering. Electrical Engi Aaaayi and
Mine Engineering. Gradtes seemse lucra
tie psitions in anatlasfnea catalogue,
J. M. PAGBE Chairmane
Jacob Tome Institute
BOARDING SCHOOL FOR BOTS
PORT DEPOSIT. MARYLAND,
Pri oee a elg,tehtn sbe r beiasm.
Mar.ual tang,yaleal culture, athlettcpeW
swimmingpo. tinf
Enidowment exeedn two .aill as t hee.m
cire.l.rr addre..ilueb
Director, ABRAM W. DABBIS, E. 3,
jy19-eod-2St.1d
Fauquier Institute
POR YOUNG LADIES.
15th, 1SOt. SiusduPamntage tY
e n ethern Railroad, 55 smiles born Wee
.A limited horns ="bseL Fer oat15
a GEO0. G. BUTLEB, A.M., PrIipiaL
3y12-tu.th.a-28t
CHARIR EEATL 80HOOLFOB DOTS.
aret Hall Md. (St. Maws(.
tar Academy in proimt to Baltimore a
location sf emsfoboys. Board, ashing
an d1-20tPr nc pa
ACADEMT. MDXVZ8 .. W0E DOYS; IDEAE.
P. MASON. U. S. N. A.. Vrm.116-83t
NATAZL ACCIDENT.
John Price Pound Dead in Front of Ei.
Doarding Rouse.
A fatal accident occurred this mnorning at
234 13% street southwest, the victim being
John Price, fifty-eight years old. a former
PhIladelphian, who tell from the window
of him room on the third floor. He was
dead when found in front of the house.
About 4:20 o'clock this morning Mr. and
Mrs. Cumberland, occupanta of the house,
found the dead man's body on the parking.
TI.ey concluded he had fallen froma the win
dow of his room, but the body had not been
mangled, nor had any bones hesn brokem,
eo far as they could telL.
The police were sumnd and they had
the body takes to the. morgue. Latr is
the day Acting Coroner Glaasbreok mde
an Investigation of the aEair. He was told
that Price warns aneahig ndir the In
3uence of liquor last night whim he went
te heis reoms. His bed, the destir was told,
was higher than the l of the window,
and the belief wasn expraessd that he acci
dentafly rolled out of the window. There
wasn an abrasnieS over one eye and one rib
wasn Seond to be fr'actured. Dr. Wian
brook gave a certificate of sodaammens death,
ndthe body is held at the m.orgue to
await directions from relatives.
Price had boarded at the home ot the
Cu.mberiandoshout two years. His
ter.-ln-aw, Mrs. Price, Hums atN,
Nouth 10th street.,hldawi. The de
eassed was a dater by and woureg
for leest helMets. Eis daghdues-laW has
bern notcd of Me d.th,
Rebut Murray, e od SS e
a aeuoh whie siub iNRS ms C.
au e.iansk sJar 8th and

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