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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 11, 1905, Image 18

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WARMTNGTONt D. 0- TUESDAkV IL 11, 1905-TWENTY PAGES.
TH= UNU STAR
wim SUJDAT IOUm6 DNO
larsU 0004 21t1 h bat aM lool"e . Ae.
ns lmSr J.w"spigr Cmpy.
1. E flThAN, Ii.Wt
Xaw To b11 m L a -l
The 'gi Itsr, with the umday e.lg edt
ths. is delivered earriers within the et a
ests per mauth; without the Sueday ed1
ti cn at 44 e sin p r1 m onth.
Dat, en Ay tii ae s 0 eafs.
aeily. Sseday useepted. ese mouth. N e.a
SBata y tar. us yeas
RAILROADa
STATION CORNER OF SIXTH AND B STREDIs
7:50 A.M. daily. PITTSBURG EXPRESS AND
CHICAGO SPECIAL.-Parlor and Dining Cars on
Chicago Special Harriaburg to Pittsburg. Con.
sects for Chicago. CRicinnati. Indianapolis,
Louisville and St. Louis. Buffet Broiler Parlor
Car to Harrisburg.
10:60 A.M. daLy. THE PENNSYLVANIA LIM
ITED.-Psliman Sleeping. Dining. Smoking and
Observation Cars from Harrisburg. For Chicago,
Cleveland. Toledo and Detroit. Buffet Parlor Car
to Harrisburg.
20:50 A.M. daily. ST. LOUIS LIMUD.-SlesP
ing. Dining, Smoking and Observation Cars from
Harrisburg to Cincinnati. Indianapolis. la
viule and St. Louis. Buffet Parlor Car to Harris.
burg.
10:60 A.M. daily. MAIN LINE EXPRLS.-P1ll
man Buffet Parlor Car to Harrisburg. Buffet
Parlor Car Harrisburg to Pittsburg.
8:30 P.M. daily. CHICAGO AND ST. LAUIS E
PRESS.- leeplng and Din!rg Cars Washington to
St. Louis, Harrisburg to Chicago, Indianapolia,
St. LouL and Nashville (via Cincinnati and
Louisville). Parlor Car to Harrisburg.
6:40 P.M. daily. CHICAGO IMITED.- Sleeping
Car Washington to Chicago, Sleeping. Smoking.
Dining and Observation Can from Harrisburg.
For Chicago, Toledo and Cleveland.
15 P.M. daily. ST. LOU' EXPRtESS.-Pullman
Sleeping Car Harrisburg to St. Louis and Cin
cinnati.
7:46 P.M. daily. WESTElN EXPRESS.-Pullman
leeping Car to Pittsburg and Chicago. Dining
Car to Chicago.
7:45 P.M. daily. CLEVELAND AND CINCINNATI
EXPRESS.-Pullman Sleeping Cars Washington
to Harrisburg cod Harrisburg to Cleveland and
Cincinnati. DIning Car.
1.:40 P.M. daily. PACIFIC EXPitESS.-Pullman
Sleeping Car to Pittsburg. Connects for Toledo.
'.:50 A.M. daily. BUFFALO DAY EXPRESS, with
through Cafe Car. Parlor Car and Coaches to
Buffalo, via Emporium Ju.ction.
7:50 A.M. fcr Kane, Canandalgua, Rochester and
Niagara Falla daIly, except Sunday.
10:50 A.M for Elmira and Renovo daily, except
Sunday. For Williamsport daIly, 3:30 P.M.
7:15 '.M. daily. BUFFALO NIGHT EXPRESS.
with through Buffet Sleeping Car and Coaches to
Buffalo, via Emporium Junction.
7:45 P.M. daily for Erie; for Rochester. Buffalo
and Niagara Fall.. daily, except Saturday, with
Sleeping Car Washington to Rochester.
10:40 P.M. for Erie, Canandaigua, Rochester. Buf
falo and Niagara Falls daily. Pullman Sleeping
Car Washington to Roch ster Saturdaya only.
FOIL PHILADELPH'A, NEW YORK AND TUE
EAST.
4:00 P.M. "CONGIESSIONAL LIMITED." for New
York only, dally, all Parlor Cars, Dining Car.
Express, 6:55, 8:50, *10:00 (New York only), and
*11:0.3 A.M., *12:35, 8:15, *4:45, 6:50, 10:00
P.M., 12:30 night. On Sundays, *8:60, *11:00
A.M.. 12:01, 8:,5, *4:45, 6:50 and 10:00 P.M.,
12:30 night.
For Philadelphia only, Express, 7:40. 10:00 A.M.,
12:01 P.M. week days, 2:00. 4:00, *:33 and 5:40
P.M. daily; 6:56 A.M. Sundays.
For Boston, without change, 7:40 A.M. week days
and 5:y5 P.M. dal'y.
FOR ATLANTIC CITY.
Through Pullman Drawing Room Parlor Car, 12:38
P.M. week days.
For Baltimore, 5:00, 6:15, 6:55, 7:40, 7:50, 8:50,
10:00. 10:50, 11:00 A.M.. 12:01, 12:35, 1:20, 2:00,
8:15, 8:80, 4:00 (4:00 Limited), 4:20, 4:45, 4:48,
5:35, 5:40, 6:10, 6.60, 7:15, 7:45, 10:00, 10:40.
11:35 P.M., and 12:30 night week days. On
Sundays. 6:55. 7:50. 8:30, 9:05, 10:60, 11:00
A.M., 12:01. 1:13, 2:00. 0:13, 8:30, 4:00 (4:00
LimIted), 4:20, 4:45, 3:35, 5:40, 6:10, 6:30, 1:15,
7:45., 10:00. 10:40 P.M., and 12:30 night.
For AnnapolIs, 1:40. 8:50 A.M., 12:85, 8:30 and
3:40 P.M. week days. Sundays, 8:30 A.MI., 5:40
and 10:40 P.M.
For Pope's Creek Line 7-50 A.M. and 4:48 P.M.
week Cays; 9:03 A.M. Sundays.
Tickel ofBees, cor. r Piftee'ith and 0 streets and
at the station, SIxth and B Streets, where orders
can be left for the checking of baggage to desti
nat ion from hotels and residences.
Telephone call "MaIn 1040"~ for PennsylvanIa
lIailroad Cab Service.
*Dlning Car.
W. W. A TTFIJIBURY, J. R. WOOD,
General Manager. Pass-r TrafDc Mlanager.
(.EO. W. BOYD,
Gereral P'aasenger Agent.
Trains leave from Pennsylvania Station.
7:35 a.m. DaIly. Local for 11iarrisonburg, War.
rent'n, Dansil1e and way stations.
10:51 a.m. Daily. Washlagton and Florida Urn.
itedl. Thruh coaches and sleeper to Columbia,
Sarannah an Jack.oniil!e. DinIng car service.
11:15 a.m. Daily. United States last Mail.
First. laas coachea and drawing room sk..eper to
New Orleans. Dining ear service.
4:0ii p.m. Week Days. Local for Harrise.nburg
and way stations on Manamsas branch.
4:53 p.m. Daily. Local for Warrentun and Cha.
7:30 p mn. Daily. New York and Atlanta Er
presa. Flrst.dasa coach to Atianta, sleeper to
Columbus. Ga., via Atlant Snst tourist, sleeper
WVaahington to San Franclsco Mondays, Wedne.
day.sand Fridays. Sleeper to Pinehurst weekda.
9.50 p.an. Daily. %ew York and Florida -x
preas. First-class coaches and sleepers to Clam
bia, Sav annah and JacksonvIlle. Sleeper to Au
gust. and Port Tampa. inIng car servic, a Ia
carte.
10:00 p.ma. Daily. New York sand Memphis Uim
ited (via Lynebb,urg). First-class coach and sleep
ing car to Riosnoke, Kaai'lI, Chat*am-ua and
Mempwhia; sleer to Xew (iam. Dialing ear
service.
10:46 p.m. Dal. Ws*bi"tau and Southwestra
Limited. All Pullman traia club and ehservtieu
cars to Atlanta and Maoou; sieesto Kavim
, Atlanta Macuon. Miempha,New orleans.
IA INS ON BL IONT? BRANCH.
Leae Waahi=tou 8:10 a.m., 1:3 p.m., 4:48
p.m. ueek das :45 p.m. daily. for llemont;
6:25 p.m. week days for Lseeiburg only. Sna
trains leave Washington 9:10 a.m., 8:06 .. o
Bluemont. isardays onaly for Leeaburg, 11:40 p.m.
Through traina from the South arrive Washign
6:42 a.m 6:8g a. 9:45 a.m., h:55 a.m. 1;i
a.m. (daii except ),ndyl 8:00 p.m., 9:) .m
and 9:50 p.m. daily. Local traias frum Hir~mu
burg 11:85 a.m, week da -s and 9:20 p.m. daily.
From Charlotteille, 8:'i a.m. and 9:20 p.m.
Tickets, c151m ar reservets and daae
information tene had at ticket 'm7 25th
street. 5it 14unayivauia aveem and en.lva
nia Station. Beggage checked through from hotels
and residenese.
'I'hone 1640 P. R. R. Cab Seri'e.
Hi. B. SPENI(!R, Gen. Man.
A pril 8, it H. HARDWICK. Pass. Traf. Mgr.
2905. W. U. TAYLR,Gen. Pass. Aset.
L. U, BROWN. (..Agent.
Chesapeake & Ohio Rye
Schedul,- argeetive March 27. 1905.
Turnins lesen Penpvanla Utad.
2:30 p.m. Dati-CHICAO AND ST. LOUIS SP3
CIAL. Sid vestibuis, esetrie-lghted Diniag
Car traIn to Cincinnati. Reehse Cinciabatl
5:00 a. Louisville 11:00 a.m.. St. Louis 4:30
a.m.,a 5:30 .s. Pullman service to
snd St. Lunin. Togh rior ear fe rgii
flnt Springs weekdagysrf.o
ington; meab, a Ia carte. 5 a ro ih
11:10 p.m. Daily-W. F. LIUMITED). Satid e
tibuls. electrieI-lighted blh,Car train to
einatL. Pullman eisepere Cia.toaseja
ington and Lonleville withoutet
'i.nh mei
eerie.
-tie tiWhelm at
~~ ~--~
RAMMOAD,
Seaboard Air Line Railway.
TICKET OFFICE, 1421 PENNA. AVE.
For Petersburg. Raleigh, Wlm , Columbia,
savannah. Jacksonville. Tampa Atat,Brig
bam, Mobile. Pensacola and New Orleans.
10:50 A M. DAILY- -Seaboard Mall-Through
Pullman Sleeper to Jacksonville. Fla.. connecting
at Hamlet with Pullman Sleeper to Atlanta. Oafe
Dining Car.
7:20 P.M. DAILY-Seaboard Spress-Solid train
to Jacksonville and Tampa. with through Pullman
Sleepers. Ale.) sleeper to Atlanta on this train.
Cafe Dining Car.
Baltimore and Ohio R. R.
LEAVE STATION. New Jersey ave. and 0 at.
ROYAL BLUE LINE
TRAINS "EVERY OTHER HOUR
ON THE ODD HOUR" TO
PHILADELPHIA AND NNW YORE.
47:00 a.m. Diner. Pullman Parlor.
:00 a.m. Buffet. Parlor, 5-h. Train.
9:00 am. Diner and Pullman Parlor Car.
t 1:00 a.m. Diner and Pullman Parlor Car.
*1:00 p.m. Diner and Pullman Parlor Car.
*3:00 p.m. "Royal Limited,' All Pullman.
*5:00 p.m. Diner and Puilmn Parlor.
$7:00 p.m. Coaches to Philadelpbhia.
8:00 p.m. Coaches to Pnpadepb.
"11:30 p.m. Sleepers.
'2:57 a.m. Sleepers.
Atlantic City, t":00, 19:061 911:00 a.m.. ?1:1
*3:00 p.m.
EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR
TO BALTIMORE WITH PULLMAN SERVICE.
Week days: 2:57. 5:00. 6:80. 7:00. 7:20, 8:00,
8:35. .9:00. 9:30, 10:00, 11:00 a.m.. 12:00 noon,
12:05. L;00. 2:00. 3:00, 4:00. 4:45. 5:00, 5:06, 5:30.
6:00. 6:30. 7:00. 8:00. 10:00, 11:80. 11:35 p.m.
Sundays: 2:57, 7:00. 7:20. 8:35 9:00, 11:00
a.m. 1:00 1:15. 3:00, 3:30. 5:00. 6:30. 6:30, 8:00,
10:06. 11:0, 11:35 p.m.
WESTWARD.
CHICAGO and NORTHWEST. *11:00 a.m.. *5:80
p.m.
CINCINNATI. ST. LOUIS and LOUISVILLE.
*10:05 a.m., '4:05 p.m.. '12:45 night.
PITTSBURG and CLEVELAND, *11:00 a.m.,
*9:15 p.m. and *12:40 night.
COLUM BUS. '5:30 p.m.
WHEELING. *10:0- a.m.. '5:30 p.m.
WINCHESTER, t8:35 a.m. t4:05. t6:00 p.m.
ANNAPOLIS. week days. h:00. 8:35 a.m., 12:05
noon, 4:00, 6:00 p.m. Sundays, 8:35 a.m., 5:30
and 10:00 p.m.
FREDERICK t8:35. 19:10. 110:05. 111:00 a.m.,
j1:15 f4:05, t5:35 p.mi.
HAbERSTOWN. f10:05 a.m. and 15:00 p.m.
BOYD and way points, t8:35. 59:15 a.m., 11:15,
t5:00. 15:35. 510:15. 11:30 p.m.
GAITHERSBURG and way points. 18:35. 19:15
a.m.. t12:50. 11:15. 13:30. '5:05.. 5:35. t6:50.
17:35. 110:15. t11:30 p.m.
WASHINGTON JUNCTION and way po'ate,
t8:35. 19:15 a.m., 11:15. 15:00. f5:30 p.m.
*Daily. tExcept Sunday. 1Sunday only.
Baggage cared for and checked from hotels and
residences by Union Tarnsfer Co. on orders left at
ticket otices. 619 Pennsylvania ave. n.w.. New
York ave. and 15th st. and at station.
S. B. IEGE. District Passenger Agent.
ATLANTIC COAST LINE.
F.ffettive April 8. 1905.
4:30 a.m. daily-Sleeping Cars New York to
Jacksonville. Fla.
3:45 p.m. daily-Sleeping Cars New York to Jack.
sonville, Fla., New York to Port Tampa, Fla.. via
Jacksonville; New York to Thomasville. Ga. (Tues
days and Thursdays); New York to Augusta, Ga.;
New York to Charleston. S. C.; Washington, D. C.,
to Wilmington. N. C. Connects at Petersburg for
Norfolk via N. & W. DINING CAR SERVICE on
this train.
For tickets and all information apply, at the
OFFICI5 OF THE LINE, 001 PENNSYLVANIA
AVENUE NORTWEST. AND PENNSYLVANIA
RAILROAD STATION.
A: L. REED.
District Pnssenger Agent. Washington. D. C.
W. J. CRAIG. H. M. EMERSON,
Gen. Pas. Agt. Traffic Manager.
OCEAN TRAVEL.
Delightful Sea Trip
ON ELEGANT NEW PASSENGER STEAMERS
"COMUS" AND "PROTEUS"
of Southern Pacific
BT+WEEN
NEW YORK AND NEW ORLEANS.
Leave New York every Wednesday AT NOON.
Inquire Piper :ldg.. 3altimore at.. Baltimore. Md.
Jy5-tu&s,104t,16
S4 SUMMER
CRUISES
DURING JUNE. JULY AND AUGUST
To Norway
To the North Cape
and Spitzbergen
to SCOTLAND. the ORKNEY and
SHETLAND ISLES.
NORWAY and Iceland
Around the British Isles
To the Principal Seaside Resorts of
(:ERMIANY. ENGLAND, BELGIUM,
SPAIN, FRANCE and HOLLAND.
by the Twin - Screw Steamers
"PRINZESSIN VICTORIA LUISE.''
"'MOLTKE." "IUAMBURG" and
"'METEOR."
For itineraries, rates, &c., apply
Hamburg-American Line,
35-37 BROADWAY. N. Y.
E. F. Droop & Sons, 925 Pa. Ave.
fe2S-tu,th&Sa-eo wk-tf-43
NORTH GERMAN LLOYD
Fast Express Service.
PLYMOUTH--CH ERBOURG-BEMEN.
K.Wm.II..Apr. 18. 5 al Kronpr'z..May 30, 1 pm
Kronpr'z..May 2. 5am Kaiser... June 6, 10 am
Kaiser....May 9. 10 aml K.Wm.II.June 13, noon
K.W...II..May 16, 1 pm .. Kronpr's. .Jnne 27, 11 am
Twin-Screwv Passenger SerVice.
BREMIEN DIRECT.
Rhein..Apr. 18, 10 am *Kurf'st. .May IS. 1Oami
Brand'b'g.Apr. 27. 10 am * AlIce..May 23. 10 am
*Barhiasa.May 4. l0Oam *B'fremen..June 1. 10 am
*Fried'eb..May 11. 10 aml Neckar.. ..June 3, 10 am
*Will call at Plymoth and Cherhourg.
Mediterranean Service.
GIBRA LTAR-NAPLES-OENOA.
Luise...A pr. I5, 11 am ILuaise. ...May 20, 11 am
tNeckar. ..Apr. 22. 11 sim Irene...June 3, 11 am
Irene..Ar. 29. 11 am IAlbert... .June 17. 11 am
Albert. May 13. 11 am ILuisie...June 21. 11 am
Naples only.
OELRICHS & CO., NO. 5 BROADWAY. N.Y.
U. F. DROOP A SONS CO.. 925 PENNA. AVE.
f4-312t-28-ean
FRENCH LINE,
COMPAGNIE GENERALS TRANSATLANTIQUD,
Direct Line to Hacre - Part. (France).
Sailing every Thursday at 10 a..
From Pier No. 42. North River. foot Morton at. N.Y.
el.a Touraine.. ..Aorit 131 -La Lorraine...a4
*La Savoie.... April 201 'La Touralm....May 11
La Bretagne. .. .April 271 'La Savoie. . ....May 18
EXTRA DE.PARTURESU
By the East Espress Steamer,
"LA GASCOONE"....... ..... .........April 22
"LA GIABC00NE"........ .. ........ ....May 2S
This Steamser wRil take 2d and 3ad-clams only.
*Twin-4emw steamers.
General . r 32.New York.
14110S.N
inhi-312t..eSu-19
Hamburg - American LUne.
Plymnouth-Cherbourg-Hamburg.
S. S. Deutschland
Sails AprR 27, May 25. June 22.ae
t*Bllueeber...Apr. 12j Deubad.. 27
.D...........April 15 eusIana...A I 20
tAMnausisen.... ..... t'leee . May 11
tGrill Rom,. ysasm ern bened. lYla
Dover for London adParis to Hamburg. 3Direct.
New York-Naples-Genoa.
PRINI OIIKAR. .........May 9. Jane 27, Aug. iS
PR[NZ ADALBERT..May 30, Jaly J8, Sept. 12
HAMBURG-AMERICAN LINE,I37RBWAY,N. Y.
E. 5F. DROOP & SONS. 928 Pa. ave.
mhl6-tf-20
AMERICAN LINE.
PLYMOUITH-CHERBOU N
ATA1ETCiRANSPORT LINE.
NEW YORR-LONDON DIR*0W.
RED STAR LINE.
NEW YGR- '3 En
IHTE STAR LINE
OCEAN TRAVEL
DIREOT PASSBNGER SERVICE TO
Norway, Sweden & Denmark
By the fast 10,060-ton twig-srew steams
BELLIG OLAV. from New York, May 101
UNITED STATES. " " may 17
OBOAR II, " " Jptne T
HEILIG OLAV, " " Jn 21
UNITED STATES, " " July 5
OSCAR Ii. " " July 19
Scandinavian-American Line,
No. I Broadway. New York.
mh14.18.21.25,28.ap1.4.8.11.15
E U[ROPE
THIRTY TOURS THIS SEASON.
A to Augusf, by al Routes. Separate tttiss
rely travel. Tours cover the whole of Rt,t
in;:a- $175 to $1,015
Independent Railroad and Steamship Ticketi
everywhere. Write for Booklet.
125" FOREIGN CFICE.
!sbla.b.d E years.
Thos. Cook & Son,
201 Biesdway, New York.
IS0 Chestnut at.. Pbiladelpbia.
DAVID LINDSAY. t1106 ST. N.W.
mh2l-tu&Sa-bt
Holland-America Line.
NEW YORK-ROTTERDAM. via BOULOONS.
Salling Wednesdays at 10 A.M.
Potsdam.........April 19I Ryndam.........May 10
Noordam........April 20 Rotterdam.......May 1'
Statendam.......May 3 Potadam........ May 24
HOLLAND-AMERICA LINE. 39 B'WAY. N. Y.
E. F. Droop & Sons. 92 Pa. ave.; G. W. Mom.
1411 0 at. n.w.; David Lindsay. 1306 Y n.w.
fe2-tu.th&Sa-52t-12
Q. 5. S. Co.
For April and May.
* Berm uda0
Forty-five hours by new twin screw S. S.
"Bermudian." Steamers sail weekly from New
York. For illustrated pamphlets. passages. &c.,
write to
A. E. OUTERBRIDGE & CO.,
Agts. Quebec S. S. Co., Ltd.. 39 Broadway, New
York; ARTHUR AIIERN. Secretary. Quebec, Can
ada; DAVID LINI)SAY. 1306 F at. n.w.. Washing
ton, D. C.; GEO. W. MOSS, 1411 G at. n.w., Wash
ington, D. C. mh30-th,Sn,tu,17t,20
EDUCATIONAL.
IN WASHINGTON.
PRIVATE DANCING LESSONS. SOC.; GUAR
waltz, 2-step; 5 lessons. Spl. rate to elubs. Eve
class. $1 mo. Piano. 25c. Mod. quick method
Address. with stamp envelope, Box 88, Star office
aill-5t*
FRENCH SPOKEN IN SIX MONTHS; EASY CON.
versational method; elasses $2 monthly; private
lessons by native Parisienne lady diplomee
Madame TANNER, nee de Luxembourg, 2109 F.
ap8-eod,13t*
MADAME J.
Esputa=Daly,
TEACHER OF SINGING AND PIANO.
Thorough course in note chain for reading muslc.
Five lessons, $5.00.
STUDIO, 1128 F N.E. 'PHONE E. 925 K.
ap4-tu.th.s,13t*10
FRENCH SPOKEN IN SIX MONTHS; EASY CON
versational method; classes $2 monthly, private
lessons by native Parisienne lady l plomee.
Madame rANNER. nee de Luxembourg, 2100 F.
mhl4-tu.th,s.13t*
Wood'sCommercial College
311 EAST CAPITOL STREET.
WASHINGTON'S HIGH-GRADE BUSINESS
COLLEGE.
Indorsed by Messrs. B. H. Warner, W. V. Cox.
.ohn Joy Edson and others.
Why study the Pitman system of shorthand when
you can learn the Gregg in one-half the time?
Day and evening sessions throughout the year.
Call or write for a catalog.
ab11-s.tn&th-tf-16 COURT F. WOOD. Principal.
ART SCHOOL,
MISS S. W. KELI,Y
808 17th at. n.w., Art League bldg., 2d floor.
Classes for outdoor sketching now being formed.
ap8-4t*
Spanish Language School.
Spanish rapidly learned; special rates for sum
mer classes; trial free; native teachers; hundreds
of testimonials. 1231 N. Y. ave.
ap9-tf,5-d&Su Senor GOMAR. Prin.
Piano, Violin, Vocal,Cornet,
&c., Columbia Conservatory of Music, 037 New
York ave. EDWIN HART. Prin. 'Phone 1327 F.
mh2l-27t*
SHORTHAND-WE TEACH SHORTHAND ANID
guarantee speed of 75 to 100 words per minute ir
150 hours' study or refund your money. Day and
night sessions. Typewriting, Spanish. STENO
GRAPHIC ACADEMY. 315-316 Colorado building.
mh23-d&Sa.30t*
PRIVATE LESSONS-MATHEMATICS. SCIENCE,
Languages. Music; beginners or advanced students;
20 years' experience. Also literary work criticised
or revised. Prof. J.. Station G. Box 2513, city.
mh16-30t*-4
FRENCH LANGUAGE SCHOOL - BEGINNERS'
classes forming for spring and summer term; con.
versation method. 12 private lessons. MLLE. V.
PRUD'HOMME, 314 Ind. ave. n.w. (opp. 4th).
mh27-tf.4.exS
ST. ROSE'S INDUSTitIAL SCHOOL.
Dressmaking, ladies' and misses' suits. wraps,
&c. Evening gowns a specialty.
sel7-tf,eSu.4 2023 G at. n.w.
French =German=Spanish
Italian, Russian. Latin. Greek. English. BERLITZ
SCHOOL. 723 14th st. A. GONARD. Prin. se9-tf-4
HALL=NOYES -SCHOOL.
College Preparatory. High and Grammar School.
Day and night sessions. Both sexes; all ages. Pa.
pis started any day of entire year. Modern lan
guages by best native teachers. Cataloanes.
'RANCIS MANN HALL. A.M., Principal. 1~ Il
at- n.wv. 'Phony Main 3877-K. de6i-d.eSu,i
EDWARD C. TOWNSEND.
Miss. ADA LOUISE TOWNSEND.
EL.OCUTION. EXPRESSION. VOICE CULTURE,
The Olympia, cor. 14th and Roanoke sts. n.y.
no22-tf
NATIONAL BUSINESS
COLLEGE (Inc.)
Gregg and Pitmnan Shorthand, Typewriting. Clvii
Sarvice, Practical Bookkeeping; standard books and
careful training. A month's trial free. Cor. 12t1
and F st-. 'Phone Main 1124. mh7-tt.S
STRAY ER'S
BUSINESS COLLEGE,
COR. 11TH AND F STS. N.W.
Thoroah training in shorthand, tpwriting,
bookkeeig, enmnanshuip, arithmetic, E'nglish, &c.
Day and nightrsessions all the year. New studenta
received daily. Typewriters at students' bomees
free. Books free. Ali graduates guarnteed good
situations or money reftnded. Special one mouth's
trial ofer. Terms moderate. Cl. write 'er *pas
Main 5eWis eataa.gme.
live Xonths in a Guatemnala lai1.
Passengers from Guatemala, who arrived
at San Francisco yesterday on the City ol
Syemey, say that for five months a New
York attorney named Gardner has been
confined in the prison at Guatenala City
for alleged contempt of court. All efforts
to procure his release have proved futil4,
owing. aa is alleged, to opposition of Amer
ican Minister Leslie Coomba. who is very
friendly with President Cabrera. The
American consul, Mr. Winslow, has been
striving for Gardner's release. Gardnez
went to Guatemala to press certain claims
against the government growing out of the
violation of the terms of a concession. He
had succeeded in making out a good came
in court, when he was unceremoniously, i1
Is said, thrown in jail for contempt -o
court and kept there.
Destrucetive Tornado in Pennsylvana,~
A tornado struck Jacksons, a minirag '9.
lage near Mahoney City, Pa., yesterday aft.
ernoon, causing considers,ble destruction
Houses were unrotd, trees were uprooted
ang telephea. and telegraph wires Wern
torn down. Miss MamA Keating dhi
Miss Marion Higgins were picked up b6
the storm and deposited in a 1.d Atty feel
away. Neither was bodyhurt.Wlla
Dowlng wa eaghtnth whirl and
TOLD OF WIL WAR
WOE o T I IT O 0o
Forty-Fourth AuiVlry of Muster
in of Loca1 Fittingly
Fdrty-four yaw iId 'edterday the first
company of voltsnWrI 1dt the civil war
was mustered in. Thit. *A Capt. Carring
ton's company, cot Ia gof about ninety
oficers and men, ioft 'has Company A,
2d Battalion, Nbsjert *f Columbia Volun
teers. About twenl-fv* hrvivors of the
original District et Colurtila Volunteers
met last evening,: the &rty-fourth anni
versary of the tst. asuat i at St. Joseph's
Hall, corner 5th and H Atreets northwest,
to listen to a report on the progress made
toward securing a bounty from Congress,
which is being sought by the Survivors'
Association of the District of Columbia Vol
unteers and to live over 'again the stirring
acts of that period, just at the outbreak of
the war.
Many unwritten stories of the first muster
and first guard duty were related last even
ing, and the "boys," all of whom are now
at least sixty-two years old, became boys
again.
The officers of the Survivors' Association
are: J. T. Ford, president; J. P. Seibold,
first vice president; Darius Genau, second
vice president; William H. Braund, record-,
ing secretary; James T. Parsons, financial
secretary, and L. Mundheim, treasurer. The
association has about 19J members out of
the 500 survivors now liding. * As stated by
the president, the aim of the association is
to lend aid and assistance to any comrades
in sickness or distress and to provide a de
cent burial for those that' have covered their
span of life.
One of the principal objects of the work
now is the securing of a .bounty from Con
gress of $100 to each of the survivors, to re
imburse them at a time when, enfeebled by
age and with a family dependent on them,
they most need it, for the clothing. food,
etc., which they furnished at the outbreak
of the struggle, when they were at the beck
of the government. President Ford stated
that the work for this.bounty had been
going on for three years, At first the at
torney employed by the association gave en
couraging reports, but of-late his ardor has
dampened and he has done nothing. An
other law firm has taken charge of the mat
ter, and they promise to do all in their
power to secure the proper enactment from
Congress.
"Many of the survivors who are not
members of the association are lukewarm
when approached on the subject," said
President Ford. "When seen, they ask,
'How is the bounty getting along? As
soon as you get the bounty we will join.'
If they don't come to us in the heat of the
fight they cannot participate in the fruits of
victory, and I believe the association will
keep out all such survivors."
History of the Vllunteers.
In discussing the history.of the volunteers
of the District of Columia President Ford
said: "Forty-four years ago the first troops
were mustered for the civil war by Irwin
McDowell, assistant adjutant general. Capt.
Carrington's company, Coxapany A, 2d Bat
talion, District of Columbpe:Volunteers, and
a portion of the Washingtbn Light Jnfantry
must be giver the credit Yor being the first
company to be mustered in.
"Comrades here will 'reme*nber the state
of affairs that existed then in this city
the national capital. One did not know
friend from foe. As the rfi"en stood up in
the militia companies ote did not know how
his comrades on his right and left stood on
the great question. How mhany refused to
take the oath at the- cruciaA moment and
fought on the other side! No one knew
when the enemy were= coming across the
Potomac. Arms-of conIpaniel in the south
had been turned over - to the confederacy.
In the north army offters were deserting
in large numbers. Out of the regular
troops sent here to guard the inauguration
services of 1861 not 400 remained until
March 4. The - men 1i. the possession of
the government were largely confederates.
Buchanan. the President, Wvhile not an open
rebel, was such a coevard he dared do
nothing.
"But when Abraham Lincoln was inau
gurated 2,500 boys of the District of Co
lumbia, with forty rounds of cartridges
each, and with orders to fire if trouble
broke out, marched down Pennsylvania
avenue as the chief executive's escort. If
it hadn't been for them Lincoln would
never have been inaugurated; :f it had not
been fur the District volunteers, the con
federates would have crossed the Potomac
and captured Washington. How long, then,
would it have been before England would
have recognized the southern confederacy?
Our country would now be worse than the
South American republics. It was the
District volunteers that stood for their
country, their city and their homes, and
preserved them until help from the north
arrived.
"Official records of the War Department
show the fArst call for troops issued for
the civil war and the first troops to be
mustered in under that dali were the Dis
trict volunteers, aggregating 017 men."
First Commander.
Col. Charles P. Stone, who was put in
command of the regiment, thus speaks of
their work in an address to Congress after
the war: "I have commanded many troops
in my time, but none ' more willing and
anxious to do their Vhoie duty as soldiers
than were the majority of the District of
C~olumbia volunteers of April-July, 1861. I
know that they deserye 'well .of this coun
try. I firmly believe tihat they saved the
nation from the disgrace'and calamity of
an abandonment of t.he capital by the con
stituted authorities of the time."
'Many interesting "p'rns" were swapped
by those present last night. One told of
standing guard duty at the White House,
particularly of tha Aader there. In the
cellar were barrels ofpotatoes, and nearby
was a red hot ~fmzrihe. Many a potato
went from the biarrels to the 'furnace to be
baked. And the Paident. Abraham Lin
coln, maany time en dos.n to eat -ane
of those baked ~ot os.
Another toad ad the seizure of all the
flour in the Gaeosgearn- roller mills and lts
transfer to the =pael. And 'for more than
two years bread was supplied from a
United States bahu i 1 the basement of
the Capitol.
William L. Phifl. .new member of
the association, -l bow he was one of
th-e three pickets P a thtle first two'
prisoners in the -a het adle out in
Virginia. There 'me.eerd' and praises
for Lincoln.
It was announce#.a..-evebing that the
for'ty-fourth annivglsai'*of temuster of
the troops would be - les*dby the
Survivors' Ascain; WSSan entertklin
ment to be given 1D Temple. 9tha
and- F streets no4wt Wednesday,
April 26. The co ttset of
is composed of U.L HS.,- W7
French, W, A. O'M 'a, aP. *bold, A,L.
Grhaes, A. J. Dnei Wi..uenie
secretary.
CharIeb Javette re years eld, of
New York City, a e eeto1an, walk
ed into Belevus ys,g ater
no and -amd be boa
stanty tar a um
ON THE RIVER FRONT
1*50 PLEET O WOOD AND LUX
lsE vsasaTS AMTM
Fish and Oyster larket,-Pleasure
Craft Overhauling at Boatyatds
Personal and GeneraL
A large fleet of wood and lumber-laden
vessele from the Potomac river and points
in ?Maryland and Virginia arrived in port
yesterday and went to anchor in the
stream, which presents an animated ap
pearance. In the fleet are the schooners
Walter P. Snow from the Rappahannock
river, the W. M. Moore from the James
river, the Arizona, C. V. Daiger and Joseph
Smith from ot-her Virginia ports with lumber,
and the Osceola, Jos. Willet, Blanch Hutch
inson, Emily Washington, Oakland and sev
eral smaller vessels with cord wood aboard
from points on the river. These vessels
have been detained down the river waiting
for a favoring breeze and took advantage
of the southerly winds of yesterday to sail
into port. Large additions to the lumber
fleet are looked for when the vessels now
in the river and coming here arrive.
Two hundred thousand herring and 900
shad were received by the dealers at the
wharf market from all the nets in the Po
tomac river this morning, and the demand
for them was excellent. Bunch fish from
river sources were also on sale and they
brought good prices. Herring are selling
at $4 to $5 per thousand. roe shad at 40
cents each and buck shad at 12 to 15 cents
each wholesale, on the wharf.
The supply of oysters on sale at the
wholesale oyster wharf this morning was
not large, while the demand was quite brisk.
The advance in prices, which started yes
terday, continues, and this morning they
were selling at 60 to 70 cents per bushel
for small oysters and up to $1.25 per bushel
for selected stock.
Clams are now being received in good
quantities, and the demand for them is
good. They still sell at 70 cents per hun
dred.
Hard crabs from Chesapeake bay are on
sale at $1.25 per hundred and the demand
for them is excellent.
The wharf building machine of Carter &
Clark, which has been working on the river
pier for the District fireboat and on other
work since the ice left the river, is to be
hauled out on the marine railway at Ben
nett's boatyard as soon, as the work on
the police boat Vigilant is completed and
the Vigilant is launched- The machine is
to be given a general overhauling of her
hull and will receive'other repairs.
The clinker built launch, tender to the
bugeye yacht Javelin. belonging to Dr.
Greer, was taken to Cumberland's boatyard
yesterday afternoon and taken from the
water while her gasoline engine was re
moved, td be taken 'to a machine shop for'
general repair work. When the work is
completed the launch will accompany the
Javelin on an extended cruise on the river
and on Chesapeake bay.
Vessels Undergoing Improvement.
The power launches Charlotte and Marion,
which have been overhauling at the boat
yard of Capt. Sonny Reagan for the past
two weeks, will be put overboard today
ready for service.
The engine is being installed aboard the
au:illary sIgop Grayhound at the 8th street
wharf and the little craft will be ready for
service within the next week. It is under
stood the owner of the Grayhound will
will make a long trip in her, exploring the
seldom visited tributaries of the bay during
the coming winter.
The auxiliary sloop Margaret, owned by
Dr. Prentiss, which has within the past week
been given an overhauling and has been
repainted at Cumberland's boathouse, was
put overboard again yesterday. The little
vessel is now in the best of order and is
ready for extended trips on the river.
The enlarging of the cabin on the sloop
Rover is rapidly nearing completion and
the boat will be ready for service in a week
or ten days.
The tug Spray of Alexandria, which was
given a general overhauling during the
winter months. has gone into commission
and her owners are looking for a fish
towing charter for her. At the close of
the fishing season she will be employed
in general towing in the river.
The steamer Estelle Randall of the
Randall Line made a special trip to Fort
Washington. Sunday, to take down the
property of the 119th Company of coast
artillery recently ordered from St. Louis
to the fort. There were about six or I
eight tons of the stores in the shipment.
Mr. William A. Moore, chief engineer
of the Randall Line, who has been at
Newport News for several weeks past
superintending the repairs to the steam
er Wakefield, was home for a visit yes
terday. He returned to Newport News
last night.
Mr. Michael Dugan has been made
chief engineer of the tug Spray, in serv
ice on the river.
The steam barge E. James 'T4ull is in
port with a cargo of pine lumber from
Aquia creek for the dealers.
The schooner William Cobb has arrived
at Alexandria and will complete the un
loading of a cargo of plaster at William
A. Smoot's wharf.
The two-masted schooner James B. An
derson, laden with lumber from the Rap
pahannock river, is in port.
The schooner Clara Leonard has been
taken to the Eastern branch to complete
the unloading of a cargo of cordwood.
The schooner Murray Vandiver is lying
at F'orsberg & Murray's wharf here, un
loading a cargo of lumber.
The schooner Lula Quillan, with a cargo
of glass-making sand aboard, has arrived
at Alexandria from the Severn river, Md.
The schooner -Rover is lying at Ham
mond!s wharf at Alexandria, taking
aboard a cargo of Alexandria-made glass
for Norfolk.
FATAL TRAIN WRECE.
Five Xilled in 'Bear-endM Collsion in
Kansas.
A dispatch from Kinsley. Kan., says:
Five persons, it is believed, were killed.
and many others were injured last night
in a rear-end collision of the Chicago ex
press and the returfi train of the Califor
nia limited on the Atchison, Topeka and
Santa Fe railroad. Both trains were east
bound.
Many passengers and trainmen were
buried in the debris. Flames from the
demolished locomotive set fire to the
wreck. The fire department was unable
or a long time to control the flanes and
the exaet number of dead ad injured ia
not known.
The engineer and the fireman.of the eec
*nd train have not been foundI it is
befited~ that they perished, train
crews discaim any reponsibility for the
wreck. ihe Chicago tratn crew said they
had the right of way and had no orders to
sak-wooin for the other train,
Z 4at Z. it. Tai+1ati.s.
WhAe Eeneser Runan was being in
iited ~ ther local isdge of ErntgMa of'4
Small Cash Pa t.
Take a Loo
Modest Mode
ON Q JU5T EAST 4
No. 25 lighted at ni
Handsome pressed-b
with brownstone trimi
tiled baths; porcelain ti
story back porches.
10 sold; 4
Price Oni
Small cash payment.
WILLIeE, GIBI
603 and 605 Thir
ap1046t
AT CAMP BOOSBVELT.
Bear Captured angd Caged for Pleasure
of the Hunters.
A dispatch from Newcastle, Colo., says:
he big pack traih and camp outfit for
President Roosevelt's Colorado hunting
party received hurry up orders to move yes
terday, and "Jake" Borah and John Goff,
uides, headed the procession of nearly one
tundred horses and sixty dogs, which
3tarted for the Johnson ranch, twenty miles
3outh of Newcastle, where camp will be
itched for a week or ten days.
As soon as the camp is well established
the extra men, as well as several ranchmen
and trappers, will go over the country in
search of bear tracks. They will carefully
ote all the signs and general locations. so
that when the President starts ont there
will be no delay in looking for tracks.
Citizens of Newcastle are planning a novel
reception to the President next Saturday
morning, which will be subject to his ap
roval. It is proposed that a grand parade
e held, in which President Roosevelt shall
ride so he can be seen by the citizens. At
[he head of the procession will be a large
rown bear in a cage. This animal was
recently captured, and is now at the home
Af Frank Ililliard, where he has killed at
east a dozen dogs and injured several men
who ventured too near him.
Goff and Borah will put their pack of
ounds in a corral and the bear will be
riven an hour's start for the hills. Then
the pack will be sent on the trail. and
President Roosevelt, Dr. Lambert, Philip P.
3tewart and the guides will follow in hot
pursuit. This is planned to be the official
;tart of the hunt.
PHILADELPHIA BROKERS DAZED.
itock Exchange Directors Worried
Over the Disclosures and Charges.
Directors of the Consolidated Stockasx-.
hange in Philadelphia are reported by the
papers of that city at their wits' end. How
:o answer the chargee that members are
,onnected with bucket shops and get-rich
luick frauds they do not know. And to
make matters worse they have been or
lered to remove the exchange from the
ourse by May 1.
All this was admitted yesterday by A. A.
ayden, once secretary of the concern, who
;aid that no corporation could withstand
he strain of such criticism as had been
lirected at the exchange within the last
ew days by certain newspapers.
At the conclusion of the day's business,
,onducted amid many vicissitudes. the di
ectors held a meeting behind closed doors,
ind then fled precipitately from the build
ng. None wanted to divulge the nature of
he matters discussed, referring inquirers to
he exchange's attorney, A. S. Ashbridge, jr.
GARFNELD'S KANSAS PLANS
[n the Investigation of Standard Oil
Hethods.
James R. Garfield. commissioner of cor
orations, arrived in Topeka, Kan.. yes
erday, as announced in The Star of that
late, to begin an investigation of the op
rations of the Standard Oil Company in
ansas.
"The local situation is entirely unknown
.o e aside from the knowledge I have
rained from the newspapers," said Mr.
3arfield to a newspaper reporter. "What
e want first is facts about conditions here.
expect to make preliminary inquiries
Lmong officials, oil producers and any offi
ers of the Standard Oil Company who can
urnish information that will be of assist
"The relation of the total production of
rude oil to the demand is naturally an
portant matter in this investigation.
he Standard Oil Company seems to have
aised the cry of overproduction as a de
ense a-gainst the charges, and this claim
one of the things that we shall go into
arefully. It is not our intention to take
nything for granted.
"There is one thing in~ connection with
nf investigation of tlis character that
he public seems to overlook. The tact
at the profit. resulting from a price flxed
brough an agreeinlft age m.anl is not
aterial. The mere "thxing of any price or
he attempt to fi: -any price through an
greement is in violation ii! the anti-trust
Lw.
"In the beef trust inquiry the Martin
esolution directed the department to
ake an investigation regarding the prof
ta of the. packers. This .pa only a 11ert
f the ground covere4 by the invesation,
Lnd the proot. .or laek.of proof, has no re
a.tion to a charge of violation of the law.
We same things could be true in the case
f the Standard.
JefEerson De Angefls Hatt.
Jefferson De Angelia played In "Fantana"
t the Lyric -Theater last aight trith his
ight arm in Mplnts. He . fractured his
~ight wrist on. Sunds.y at his home in Yofl
ers while trying his automobile. A lever
f the machine swung suddenly and hit his
m. It was a paiatui-tagery, end De An
-el oni .heW-s--anS .to aseit
fat he has a eampaai. ?he,aisSat
beLyicletniht wsintersed of the
Ar limee if De *nelSvg
uny as uisuaL at be was.
gi by . .il.s.. at lititbwg.I
Isub an aame' a seween
I,ma'Esa y vwgiui a theadih
a e Ali @islt l amitbs.
e,e a 4,l. Awelmabs ta
secures the mesas with
which to buy latest stys
and best good. Thai
merit and advertising are
twin sister
Balance $20 Monthly.
k at Those
rn Mansions
)F N. CAPITOL IT.
ght for inspection.
rick, boy-window fronts
nings; 6 large rooms;
abs; furnace heat; two
i unsold.
y $4,350.
Balance $20 monthly.
IS & DANIEL
teenth St. N. W.
$7,250
for
Brand-New
Houses on
Washington
Heights.
Superbly located-houses you
can't match anywhere in this
section at near the price. You
are offered houses here for
$7,250 that could not be bet
tered in architecture; construc
tion or finish at the same price,
even in a location not half
so desirable as Washington
Heights.
The houses are splendidly
built-brick work, interior work
and finish being right up to the
highest standard,while the plan
is ideal.
Nos. 2419 to 2435 i8th stre.t,
near 18th and Columbia road.
Three already sold.
Handsome fronts of Roman
brick, 3 'stories, with stone
porch and steps - splendid ar
rangement.
The first floor-Parlor, Recep
tion Hall, large, well-lighted
Dining Room, Pantry and
Kitchen.
The second floor--Four
good-sized Bed Rooms, with
very large tiled bath and porce
lain tub. -
The third floor - Two cozy
Bed R oo ms -many large
closets.
H E AT ED BY FIRST
CLASS E C O NO MICA L
HOT-WATER PLANT. Ser,
ants' stairway in the rear of the
housus-ouble rear porches.
Unusually attractive mantels
and decorations. Location high,
healthy and only a few steps
from thes two car lines-near
churches, schools and stores.
We are exclusive agents.
3t
A Charming
C~ibr Nrt ion

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