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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, December 17, 1905, Image 59

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In Chicago on Monday evening, the 20th,
Mm*. Sarah Bernhardt will begin an en
gagement In Washington at the Belaaco
Theater on Monday, January 1. The Amer
ican tour of the great French actress Is
wRder the direction of Messrs. 8. S. and
L*e Shubert and W. F. Connor and Messrs.
Edwards and Leclalr will be the local spon
gers for the Important dramatic event.
The repertoire for the engagement will
be as follows: Monday evening. "1a Sor
clere;" Tuesday evening. "Cam lie:" Wed
nesday matinee, "Adrlenne Lecouvreur;"
Wednesday evening, "Angelo;" Thursday
?ver.ing "Sappho;" Fritiay evening, "La
Tosca;" Saturday Tnn.nee. "Ptiedre;"
Saturday night. "Fedora."
^ . Hedda Gabler.
Hedda Gabler, for the first time In this
city since Mrs. Flske's performance of the
play, will be presented on Wednesday
evening at the Belasco Theater by Robert
Jilckman. marking the first of a series of
Ibsen plays to be given by him In this city
ThrO'fighout the winter. Wednesday even
ing's performance will be the occasion of
trie professional debut of Annie Prull,
whom Mr. Hickman has for many months
been preparing In the part of Hedda. The
sui?porting company will be strong, includ
ing Haltle llerrlot. Irene Hayward, Lizzie
Magie. Willard Robertson, Paul W. Evans
and James A. O'Shea.
"The College Widow."
When "The College Widow" returns to
the Columbia Theater next week most ol
the faces will be familiar. Miss Qulnlan
will be found in the role of Flora Wiggins.
Mr. Holt plays the Irascible Hiram Bol
ton, Frederick Burton and Stephen Maley
represent the Sciuantumvllle Hicks family,
Dan Collyer still plays the slangy trainer
and J. Bcresford Ho!lis Is retained in the
part of the post-graduate tutor. In the
so-called straight parts will be found Miss
Frances Ring in the title role and Thomas
Melghan will be the heroic halfback, Billy
Bolton.
Indoor Hippodrome.
An Indoor hippodrome performance will
be given at Convention Hall Monday. De
cember 23, and continue for the ent re week.
American and European circus and vaude
ville actors will be seen. Including Ger
trude Breton In her sensational act leap
ing the gap on a bicycle. The rider starts
from the top of a precipitous incline that
reaches to the roof of this great bu lding.
dashes down at lightning speed, flying In
midair a distance of th rty feet while seat
ed on her wheet. The original D avolo. in
his "spiral loop" act will appear. This rider
turns a complete circle on a bicycle. De
Renzo and Ladue will present their comedy
revolving pole act; and numerous other acts
will be offered.
Burr Mcintosh's Lecture.
Burr Mcintosh will deliver the second
part of his lccture, "With Secretary Taft
in the Orient" at the National Theater next
Thursday afternoon, and will cover tho
most Interesting portion of the famous trip
of the Taft party in the orient. Starting
at Jolo, Mr. Mcintosh will describe the trip
over the great Mindanao trail on horse
back, through Ct-bu. the oldest town in the
Philippines, on to Manila, and its wonder
fully Interesting historic surround ngs, and
other notable poln.s concluding with scenes
on the record-breaking voyage homeward.
"A Lamb in Wall Street."
Next week Chase's program will include
Bert Coote and company In "A Lamb in
Wall Street;" the Zazell-Vernon company
in the pantomimic comedy "The Elope
ment;" the musical skit. "Christmas on
Blackwell's Island," by Sydney Deane and
company; Howard's comedy dogs and po
nies; Frank C. Young and Kathleen l>e
Vole In "Dancing by Book;" Carlin and
Otto; Asra, the expert billlardist, and tho
motion pictures.
'?The Woman in the Case."
Blanche Walsh will appear at the New
National Theater next week In Clyde
Fitch's play. "The Woman In the Case."
The play come3 here with a record of a
four months' run at the Herald Square
Theater, New York, interrupted by the com
ing of summer, and resumed in the came
city at the Madison Square Theater in Au
gust. For the first time since her success
in Bronson Howard's ' Aristocracy" Miss
Walsh appears as a modern society woman.
The same company and elaborate scenic
1 reduction seen during the New York en
gagement comes to this city.
A Series of Modern Classics.
The following plays will be given at thi;
Belasco Theater for the benefit of the Wo
man's Army and Navy League: "The Fal
con." by Tennyson; "Pygmalion and Gala
tea." Tuesday, "Barbara," by Jerome K.
Jerome; "The Land of Heart's Desire," by
William B. Yates, and "Cinders," by Lily
Finsley. Mrs. Charles DeKay, who plays the
leading parts in "The Falcon," "Pygmalion
and Galatea" and "The Land of the Heart'9
Desire," Is the wife of Charles DeKay, the
well-known writer on art. Mrs. DeKay
will be supported by Mr. Edward Fales
Coward In "Pygmalion and Galatea" and
"The Land of the Heart's Desire." Mr.
Coward Is well known as a player, and has
been seen often with the Comedy Club ?f
New York. Among the other members ol
the company are Miss Marie Huntington of
New York; Miss Chadwick of Washington,
who has studied dramatic art with G ne
vieve Ward in London; M;ss Gilder, daugh.
ter of Richard Watson Gilder; Mr. Robert
B. Sheperd, who was for five years a popu
lar member of the late Augustin Daly's
company, but has left t?e stage, and plays
only for charities: Mr. l.angdon Geer of
New York; Miss Vernon of Washington, an
English woman w> i known one the concert
platform In London: Mr. Gilbert Miller of
Washington, son of the well-known actor.
Henry Miller; Mr. William A. Graham;
Mr. Ogle R. Singleton: Mr. Perry Averlll.
barytone, who will sing the prelude of "I
Pagllacci" as an Introduction to "The Fal
con."
'?You Never Can Tell."
Arnold Daly, the actor-manager, will pre
sent Bernard Shaw's sitire, "You Never
Can Tell," at the Columbia New Year
week Mr. Daly brings the same company
which was associated with him at the Gar
rlck Theater. New York, where ' You Never
Can Tell" was played I.'jO times last sea
son.
"Leah Kleschna."
The engagement of Mrs. Fiske and the
Manhattan Company at the Belasco next
week will bring to Washington a play and
company whose coming has beetj awaited
with Interest. During the two years since
she has played In this city Mrs. Flske has
Intrenched herself more firmly than ever
in the estimation of the theater public.
She has never had a more popular play
than 'Leah Kleschna." and the Manhattan
company?the permanent organization that
supports, her?Is said to be a notable dra
matic company. "Leah Kleschna" was
one of the few real successes of last sea
son In New York. It ran for five months
at Mrs. Flske's theater, the Manhattan,
an- has since been taken on tour to the
coast and had a supplemental season In
New York that ended only a few weeks
ago. The play Is based upon the theory
that there Is good !n every one. and for
those who have been In.iuenced by evil
reformation will come with the awakening
of the monl sense. The cast Include* John
Mason. George Arllss, Frederic de Belleville
and William B. Mack.
"No Mother to Guide Her."
"No Mother to Guide Her" Is the title
of a new melodrama written by Lillian
Mortimer. It will have Its first presenta
tion in this city at the Academy, opening
with a special Christmas day matinee with
Miss Mortimer In the star role.
"The Kirmess."
"The Kirmess," to be given at the Be- '
lasco Theater December 21, under the aus
pices of the Ladles' Aid Association, for
the benefit of the National Homeopathic
Hospital, will be a spectacular production,
combining floirer and character dances
with the "Dance of Nations." Seventy-five
children have bees carefully trained for the
\
performance, and the costumes will be
elaborate. The "American Beauty Rom
Dance," In which prominent young- ladles
will appear, is entirely new. Other spe
cially arranged numbers will be given. The
dancing is under the direction of Miss
Hawke. There will be a matinee Friday
afternoon at 2:15.
Marine and Concert.
The fourth of the series of winter con
certs by the Marine Band will be given
at the Columbia Theater this evening. So
many requests have been mp.de for an ex
tension of the concert series that Lieut.
Santelmann has decided to give three or
four more Sunday night concerts. An ex
cellent program has been arranged by
Lieut. Santelmann for tonight's concert,,
it having been oilglnally intended that this
1 concert should finish the series. The pro
gram will contain such famous productions
as Wagner's "Die Walkure," the overture
"1812." by Tsehaikowsky; "Reminiscences
of Weber." and Liszt's "Ninth Hungarian
Rhapsody."
The soloists will be Second Leader Wal
ter F. Smith, cornet, and Mr. Ole J. May,
euphonium.
Playhouse Paragraphs,
A second company Is to be organized for
'The Lion and the Mouse."
!
George W. Lederer is said to be at work
on a musical comedy entitled "The Salva
tion Lassie."
Edith Wharton, the novelist. Is consider
ing offers to dramatize her novel, 'The
House' of Mirth."
Howard Paul, the American actor and
dramatist, died last Sunday at Bourne
mouth, England.
Alexander von Mitzel is to play Charles
Brandon with Roselle Knot In when
"Knighthood Was ih Flower."
Ernest Lamson. who is playing the lead
ing part In "The Heir to the Hoorah," is to
be among the s:ars next season.
Madame Schuman-Heink has bought a
handsom# estate In New Jersey, where. It is
said, she will make her summer home. I
During her.New York engagement Hen
rlette Crosman will give several matinee
performances of "As You Like It."
james O'Xeill- says he is playing "Monte
Cristo" for positively the last time. He has
played the role of Edmund Dantes nearly
5.0(A) times.
Robert Manteil has made a pronounced
impression in New York in his Shake
spearean impersonations, of which the lat
est is "King Lear."
"The Crossing." a dramatization of Win
ston Churchill's novel, will follow Viola Al
len's engagement at Daly's Theater, New
York, opening on New Year day.
It Is said in New York that there is no
longer hope that Mrs. Charles Walcot will
return to the stage. The actress was re
cently stricken with paralysis.
Holbrook RHnn has been released from
the cast of "The Clansman" and will return
to London, where, It is said, he will become
manager of a play house.
Lillian Russell sailed from New York for
Europe last Thursday. She will be gone
about six weeks and hopes to secure a
vehicle for her appearance In musical
comedy.
William A. Brady has engaged Charlotte
Walker to play the part of Dora Leland in
the Brady^Grismer production of "As Ye
Sow" at the Garden Theater, New York, on
Christmas day.
"The Redemption of David Corson," a new
play by Lottie Blair Parker, will be seen for
the first time at the Majestic Theater, New
York, January 8. It is adapted from the
book of the same title.
I Miss Ruth Holt has been engaged to play
the role of Mary in "The Marriage of Wil
liam Ashe," in place of Miss Davenport
I Seymour, who will retire from the cast at
I the end of this week.
Henry B. Harris has released Richard
Lambert from ills engagement for "Gashel
Byron's Profession," Bernard Shaw's new
I play, in order thait he may join "A Madcap
Princess" as leading man.
James K. Hackett has just formed a busi
ness connection with Frank Curzon, the
London manager, by which plays will be
exchanged between the two for presentation
in their respective countries.
David Belnsco has been admitted to mem
bership In the Navy League of the United
States. He recently entertained In New
York forty gallant tars at a performance of
"The Girl of the Golden West."
Mr. George Le Guere Mullally, who plays
the juvenile lead in "tender Southern
Skies," has been visiting friends In this
city. He will again join the company next
week for the remainder of the season.
George Ade was given a reception in Phil
adelphia recently by the Sigma Chi fra
ternity. of which he is a member. His
"frat" occupied 400 seats and all the boxes
in the Chestnut Street Theater, where "The
College Widow" was being presented.
Frances Wilson, the daughter of Francis
Wilson, the comedian, was married recently
at her iiome to Charles Huard, a French
actor and cartoonist. Miss Wilson met him
while she was studying music In Paris.
"The Club Friend," a comedy. In four acts
by Sydney Rosenfeld, will be presented by
the students of the American Academy of
Dramatic Arts at a matinee to be given in
the Empire Theater, New York, next Thurs
day. ?
Cyril Maude, a well-known English char
| acter actor, and Winifred Emery, a well
known English actress, are to make a joint
American tour in a new play. The tour
will be under the management of the Shu
berts.
?
Katherine Grey will appear in the role of
Gloria In "You Never Can Tell" when Ar
nold Daly returns to the Grand Opera
House, New York, tomorrow night. Another
newcomer In the company is Isabella Urqu
hart, who will be seen as Mrs. Clandon.
"A Crown of Thorns." a new comedy
drama, by Hal Reld and Jay Hunt, Is to
have Its first performance In New York
Monday night. Prominent in the cast are
Miss Minnie Church, Mrs. Pauline Fielding
and Allen Doone.
"The Maid and the Mufcmy," whiah was
very successful last season, has been sold
by Charles Marks, representing the Richard
Carle Amusement Company, to Joseph M.
Galtes. Mr. Galtes will probably present
the piece at cheap prices.
The Llebler Company has not lost faith
in "The Prodigal Son" and it will resume
its tour in Hartford on Christmas day.
Edwin Arden will have Edward Morgan's
old part, and the remainder of the com
pany is almost new.
Leo Dltrlchstein. playwright and actor,
who was thrown from a horse last Sunday,
was not so seriously hurt as first reported,
and managed to limp through the first per
formance in New York of his farce, "Before
and After," last Monday night.
ElMe Janls will begin her season as a star
under the management of Liebler & Co. in
"The Vanderbilt Cup" at Parson's Theater,
Hartford, on January 5. She will begin a
long engagement in New York on January
IS. Otis Harlan is to be a member of the
company.
Without any particular ceremony veteran
Joseph Murphy will bid farewell to the
atuge Christmas week at the Murray Hill
Theater, New York. He will be seventy-one
years old then and Is considered the richest
actor in America, his wealth footing up
about an even million .cellars,
Ida Conquest won her suit against Thos.
Ryley In a New York court. Miss Conquest
would not appear In musical comedy and
Mr. Ryley could find no other Chicle for
hij star since the failure of 'The Money
Makers." A suit followed and a jury
awarded Miss Conquest a verdict of $2,000.
Negotiations are pending for a produc
tion In Vienna of "It Happened In Nord
land," the musical comedy by Victor Her
bert and Glen MacDonough. The Aus
tralian rights have already been disposed
of, and Mr. George Edwardes of the London
Gaiety Theater has an option on the Eng
lish privilege of presenting the piece.
J. Fred Zimmerman, jr., and Harry Som
mer* have completed the cast for Harry B.
Smith's dramatic version of "The Lightning
conductor," which wlli be presented tor the
first time at Trenton on Christmas day.
Herbert Kelcey ami Effle Shannon wlil star
jointly in the comedy. Mrs. C. N. William
son, the author of the novel, has arrived In
this country from London, and will remain
until after the flrst performance.
Mr. L. A. Wagenih&ls of Wagenhatls &
Kemper, who recently arrived from Europe,
sailed last Thursday for London on receipt
of a cable from his partner, Mr. Colin Kem
per, 'who has been closing negotiations III
Europe for many Important theatrical pro
ductions to be presented in New York In
the nftw Astor Theater, now toeing built for
this firm.
The many friends of Mr. Charles B. Han
ford In this city will be pleased to learn
that his tour thrcugh the south lias toeen
particularly gratifying to the popular ac- I
tor and his company from a financial j
standpoint, the box office returns having
exceeded his anticipations and beaten the
record of former tours through that sec
tion of the country. Mr. Hanfprd entered
the yellow fever territory closely follow
ing the lifting of the quarantines in many
of the cities and, being the flrst dramatic
organ ration to enter that field, his com
pany has profited handsomely thereby.
x Operatic Curiosities.
Paris Cor. London Telegraph.
Rossini's braces are not the only strange
relic In the museum of the opera. There
are other braces, whole or fragmentary:
for Instance, a piece of the pair worn by
the Due de Berry when he was assassinated
in 1820 at the door of the old Opera. He
was taken into the lodge, and the porter
eventually bequeathed the relic to the j
museum A piece of many colored ribbon
Is shown, with the notice that "Meyerbeer,
who had most of the orders of Europe,
caused a special yard of silk ribtoon to be
woven at Lyons, in which were all the
colors of his decorations. The fragment
exhibition is one of this special make,
which he wore at the time of his death.'
The only Orsinl bomb which did not ex
plode in the outrage of 1853 is "under a
glass case, minus its explosives, of course.
A few fragments of silk gauze and pink
tights arc relies of a dancer, Emma Llvry,
who whs frightfully burnpd in a fire at a
dress rehearsal in 1862, dying from her in
juries eight months later, ? after great suf
fering. A peculiarly ugly inkstand is that
used by Spontfnl. and an overornate piano
In atrocious taste is his wedding present
from the Erards on his marriage with Mile.
Erard. A still more hideous clock Is the
flrst thing bought by Rossini with his royal
ties from the production of "II Harblere"
In France, and It never left his bedroom un
til his death. A bell reduced to a shape
less lump of metal and the sword of Saint
Brls in "The Huguenots," blackened and
twisted, are mementoes of the fire which
destroyed the old Opera of tlie Rue le Pele
tier in 1873.
Sunshine and Shadow.
Written tor The Star.
Out In the sunshine, the shadows behind me.
The mists and the gloom of the pine-sheltered |
way.
Full In the sunlight of hope to remind me
That life has Its bright skies as well as Its gray.
The uathway was long and the pathway was
dreary,
And shadows fell thick where my footseps would
stray;
No flowers blooming bright, and no birds singing
cheery.
To drlTo from my lone path the shadows away.
But hone swings anew with the glow of the
morning.
And faith has rekindled Its fires In my heart;
The Sun's cheering rans the bright skies adorning |
Have banished the gloom that the shadows im
part.
Thus shadow and shine with each life Is blended.
Thus joy and despondency each has Its day;
But care's darkest hour by sweet hope attended
Will pass like the mists of the morning away.
_ C. II. DOING.
AMUSEMENTS.
MERRY MAKERS
FBESEHTIK& TWO BURL ETTAS,
Running for Mayor
aan>
The Mayor's Vacation
Introducing an All-Star Olio,
BROWN & R1BINS0N,
STROUSE & YOUNG,
SHERMAN & FULLER.
Famous Exposition Four.
20?HANDSOME YOUNG I.ADJES?20
10?COMEDIANS?10
Wort Week?WILLIAMS IDEALS.
/
Columbia Theater.
TONIGHT, 8:15.
MARINE BAND,
W. H. SANTELMANN, Conductor.
SOLOISTS! ?
Second Leader Walter F. Smith, Cornet.
Ole J. May, Euphonium.
TICKETS. 25c.. 50c., 75c. and $1.00. BOX OF
FICE OPENS. 2 P.M. 1?
P
DJ
w
(Convention Hall.)
One Entire Week.
(12 PERFORMANCESt, COMMENCING
Christmas Day Matinee.
December 25, 1905,
Presenting the
World's Greatest Ameri
can and European Circus
and Vaudeville Acts,
Headed by the Peerless. Fearless
Gertrude Bretomi,
LEAPING THE GAP ON A BICYCLE.
Starting from the top of a precipitous incline
that readies to the roof of this great building, she
dashes down at lightning speed, flying In midair a
distance of 80 feet while seated on her wheel.
10 OTHER BIO ACTS.
SANTA GLAUS RECEPTION and PRESENT to
every child attending 'Christmas Matinee.
General Admission, 25c.
Reserved seats, 50c., at Adams' Newsstand, Oth
and O sts. n.w. del7-T>t-40
BOSTON SYMPHONY
QUARTET.
Monday Evening, Dec. 18th, 8:3c.)
The New WiElard.
Program;
1. Beethoven?Quartet tot two violins, viola
violoncello in B-flat major op. 18, No. 16.
2. Slgtsmond Htojowskl -Sonata for piano and vio
lin In G major, op. IS.
(First time.)
8. Schubert?Quartet for two violins, viola and
violoncello in D minor (op. Posth.)
Assisting artist,
MR. -SIGISMOND STOJOWSKI.
Reserved-seats, *1.50. T. Arthur Smith's 1SH
r st. deijwu
A Free Lecture on
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
?BT?
Prof. Hermann S. Hering,
mm c. s. b.,
Of Boston,
NATION ALTH EATER,
Sunday Afternoon, at
3:00 O'clock.
Is ft*?, and aU ar* cordially
DAII.Y MATINEES. 2.V.
EVENINGS, 25c. AND 50c.
[L?'Tha finest, largest and m;st popular
theater, with weekly bille surpassing the
$1.60 and $2.00 theater attractions.
An Unprecedented Offering.
"nin a "The Paris?an
LrluJiA) Aquatic Mystery,
Presented and Then Exposed.
Two beautiful women apparently created out
of nothing but water, and afterward the
audience learns the illu:ory proccss.
An tbe Esprrlal Attraction.
"The Bernhardt of the Vaudeville*,?
In n New Triumph ot Theu?rl<>-Gcnlti?.
Am the 81* Fan Offering:,
tony Hart^S?"
Late of 4The.. Duke of Dniath/' Alternating
the Title Part with Nat Willi.
I}! -1 1.4.
IIEXT WEEK-Bert Coots and Co., Zazall-Vernon Co., 4c. riw only Washington Theater that dots not
advance prices Xmas Day Matinee. Reserve your seats at once.
BWfc'seatii
JSelaeco ^beatre
CFormeily the Lafayetta.)
INDEPENDENT OF THE THEATRICAL TRUST.
One Week, Beginning Monday, January 1, 1906,
FAREWELL ENGAGEMENT IN WASHINGTON
OK THE WORLD'S GREATEST ACTRESS,
Mme. SARAH
Bernhardt
YT?T1T,r, ?fr0?m th? Th?*t*r Sarah "Bernhardt, Paris.
UNDER THE DIRECTION OF 8. S. AND LEE SHUBERT AND W. F. CONNOR,
Repertoires
Monday Eve., LA SORCIERE.
Tnrsdaj Eve., CAMILLE.
Wednesday Mat., ADRIENNE LECOUVREtR.
Wednesday Eve., ANGELO.
Mail orders frcm all points will now be receir-id.
the crder of their application.
Thursday Eve., SAPPHO.
Friday Eve., LA TOSCA.
Saturday Mat., PHEDRE.
Saturday Eve., FEDORA.
They will be filled in
The sale of seats for the engagement will open at the b:i office
of the theater on Thursday, December 28, at 9 a.m. Prices S3
$2.?0, ?2, $1.50, ?1. Bo* Seats, ?4, ?3.60. * '
belasgo toots
Woman's Army and
Navy League,
Monday, December IS,
8:15.
Tuesday. Doc ember 1?, 8:15.
"Barter," "Land of Heart', IXalre," "Cinder*,**
V. 8. Eactaeer*' Bant
Matinee Tuesday. December 19. 2:30.
?Tie FaInn"Pyraa 1 ion and GjlatM."
18th V. 8. Cavalry Bind.
Percy A refill will sin# at each performs nee.
Ticket sale beftes at theatre December ML He
?erred win Me. to (l-GO.
deM?,l?.tM7,W-?%
THE BALK Or TICKETS FOB THE
Three Concerts
At th* Colombia Theater by the
PHILADELPHIA
ORCHESTRA
(80 Performers)
Is now en at Smith's, 1837 F st n.w.
DECEMBER 98, J AMI'AST
~ " for
JUAB* 27.
CAMP Arm RI
The Celebrated MetrcgoMtan Opera
eta tor Iwn Concerts, 14.00.
eta tor Slnale Goaeerta not
Jefferson Gorman & Estelle West
In the Dainty Musical Comedy, "A SPECIAL
MEETING."
Herr Saona,
Direct from the Berlin Wlnterxarten,
Famous European Impersonator of Great Men.
WASHINGTON'S ONLY
POPULAR PRICK
THEATER
MATINEES TUESDAY,
THURSDAY AND
SATURDAY
EATE^ JB |E% 11
ALL THIS WEEK
Theodore Kremer's Greatest
Success
A Desperate Chance
FOUNDED ON THE LIFE OF THE
Famous Biddle Brothers
?AND THE?
GREAT PITTSBURG TRAGEDY
NEXT WEEK . . . NO MOTHER TO GUIDE HER
TONIGHT! TONIGHT!
SheparcTs Moving Pictures!
SPECIAL FEATURE?Tea iaira, (to Favorite Swtlnra tarttoN fcrtoaatlfitl ilintritid Smj*
THE TOWER OP LONDON, THE FIRE BUG, THE YOUNG TRAMPS,
THE STEEPLE CHASE, SCENES ? INDIA AND THE GREATEST
LINE OP COMEDY EVER OFFERED
USUAL POPULAR PRICES?IS, 85, 85 and 50c.
isssiiBftssis;
Aa the Extraordinary Comedy- Act,
Ferry Corwey,
Musical Clown of the New York Hippo
drome.
AMVSEMEHTS.
f*OI I lyPIA EXTRA MATINEE CHRISTMAS.
VVLUIYIDIM SEAT SALE THURSDAY.
ONE WEEK, Beginning Christmas Day, Henry W. Savage Will
Offer the Masterpiece In Modern Comedy,
THE COLLEGE WIDOW
By GEORGE ADE.
38 WEEKS IN NEW YORK FOLLOWING ITS ORIGINAL
PRESENTATION IN THIS THEATER.
Mats. Monday, Thursday and Saturday.
EXTRA--N*ew Year's Week.
ARNOLD DALY'S COMPANY
From the Garrlck Theater, N. Y.,
. . In Bernard Shaw's Brilliant Comedy,
YOU NEVER CAN TELL"
AMUSEMENTS |
f
AMUSEMENTS
9th and Pa, Av.
MAJESTIC Tel. 5110 Main.
Direction THE LAFAYETTE AMUSEMENT CO.
Policy Will Be ToTUve the Public High-Qrade Attractions at
te^POPUL*R PRICES.-**
Positively the Last Week of the Fays, Monday, December 18,
Matinees Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday for Ladies Only.
The Fays are a Revelation to the Theater Goers
of Washington.
THE IMMENSE AUDIENCES LAST WEEK ATTEST THE PUBLIC'S
APPRECIATION OF THEIR WORK
If You Want to Know Anything on Earth Ask
5 BIG
VAUDEVILLE
ACTS
Including
Rappo Sisters,
A. P. Rostrow.
Phil. Staats,
Orisis and
Altai Mopdupd
THE
FAYS
Positively the
Finest
Vaudeville Ever
Ottered
in Washington.
Entire Change
of Program
SEE THEM UNFOLD THE MYSTERIES OF THE MIND
inTHAUMATURGY
Next week - - LIEUT. DICK, U. S. A.
(ANOTHER ARIZONA).
TONIGHT! TONIGHT!
Marsh's Electrical Concerts
MADE UP OF THE LATEST EUROPEAN MOVING PICTURE FILMS
ILLUSTRATED SONGS
BOX OFFICE OPEN ALL SAT.
POPULAR PRICES
CTjSela eco IT beatreC
(Formerly the Lafayette.)
T_ INDEPENDENT OF THE THEATRICAL TRU?.T jl
NEXT WEEK-SEATS READY THURSDAY.
MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY. j
Mrs.FISKE
and the MANHATTAN COMPANY presenting
I LEAH KLESCHNA I
By C. M. B. McLELLAN.
Prices, $2.00, $1.50, $1, 75c. and 50c.
W V Mall orders, accompanied by remittance, filed In or- 1
der of receipt.
BELASCO-ONE NIGHTONLY ^ 2E-?h^I'8:,s.
IBSEN'S POWERFUL DRAMA
HEDDA GABLER
WITH
ANNIE PRALL AND STRONG COMPANY
Under the Direction of ROBT. HICKMAN.
$1.50 $1.00, 75c., 50c. and 25c.
New National Theater
TOMORROW NIGHT
POPULAR MATINEES WEDNESDAY
AND SATURDAY.
THOMAS
JEFFERSON
IN A NEW AND ELABORATE SCENIC
PRODUCTION OF
RIP VAN WINKLE
"I saw one of the best and most nriuarkable performance* I
have seen for years."?EX-PRESIDENT GROVER CLEVELAND.
?7Produced here In the. same superb mnnner that characterised Its recea*
great success In the Boston Theater and Wallack's, New York City.
CDCPIAI DDIPCC Reserved Seats, 50e., 78c., $1.00 and $1.50. Entire Gallery, 3S?
or till AL r Hlllfco Wednesday and Saturday Matinees, 2oc., 50c. and <5e.
BEGINNING WITH CHRISTMAS MATINEE,
Blanche Walsh
Im the Clyde Fitch Play,
_ THE WOMAN IN THE CASE.
Beginning with a Happy New Year Matinee?LEW FIELDS^
Thursday
', 4
LD
Second Lecture
"With
Secretary Taft
5L Orient.
99
the
Tickets oa sale ikt T. Arthur Smith. 18S7 F St.,
to Sanders A Staymaa's. It
THUB8DAY
EVENlNGj
, 8:18 O'CLOCK.
?*Sf
DANCE OF NATIONS.
BENEFIT
NATIONAL HOMEOPATHIC HOSPITAL.
nit bos office, the
FIRST CONCEBT or THE
Bisch~ff Course.
Organ Recital
BY
MR. CLARENCE EDDY,
ASSISTED BY
MRS. W. H. SHIR-CLIFF,
AT THE
Congregational Church,
TUESDAY EVENING. DECEMBER IS.
Beeerred Seats 60 rests
For sill, at the Music Store of John F. 2311a A
Co.. U3T Pennsylvania ave. d*14-tf.2ft
EXCURSIONS, ETC.
N
orfolk & Washington
Steamboat Compeny.
roa FOBT MONBOE. NOBFOLK, NEWPORT
KKW8 AND ALL TO INTO SOUTH.
Lmts Washington dally at 0:30 y.0L
Arrif# Fort Monroe. . T:00 a.m.
AirlTe Norfolk 8:00 a.m.
Arrive Portsmouth... .8:30 a.m.
C7Fer further Information apy'
ticket office. TOO 14th St., Colorado
ul ktl VWVW, ?vw
Main 2280), or Tth et. wharf (telephone
W. H. CALLAHAN. Pen. Pais. Agt.
10 a.m.
i(ii/ at waent
hide, (teiepooot
bone Una STflW.
uolO-tMt
For Mt. Vernon, Alexandria and
Arlington, Washington, Alexandria
& Mt. Vernon Ry. Sta.,i2th & Pa.av.
TRAINS FOB MT. YEBNON (WEEK DAYS), 18.
11 A.M.. 13 NOON. 1, 2 AND 8 F.M.
TRAINS FOB ALEXANDRIA AND ARLINGTON
(DAILY) BTEBY 20 MINUTES.
Wash., Arlington, Falls Chu:
STATION CAQUEDnCT BBII
FOB ARLINGTON. FORT
HUBOB HALF HOCBLY
h ?- , t--.?
?? ?

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