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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, December 27, 1905, Image 13

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AUCTION SALES.
THIS AFTKRNOON.
THOS. J. OWEN 6 SON, AUCTIONEERS.
TRUSTEES* RALE OF TWO-STORY BRICK RESI
DENCE, NO 328 ELM STREET NORTHWEST.
By virtue of two certain deeds of tmst duly re
corded in Liber 2*1N. folio* 112 et seq. and 165 et
?pq.. one of the land records of the District of
Colombia, and ?t the request of fhe parties secured
thereby. the undersigned trustees will sell at pub
lic auction, in front of the premises. on WEDNE8
DAY, THE TWENTY SEVENTH DAY OF DE
CEMBER. 19<X*, AT FOUR-FIFTEEN 0*CLOCK
I' M., the following described laml and premises,
situate In the County "f Washington. District of
Columbia, koonn and distinguished as lot num
bered thirty-Are <35* in Philip T. Dodge and
Charl** E. Bsnes' subdivision of certain lots in
block numbered eight (Si in "I* Droit Park," as
per plat recorded in coiinty book 8. folio 34, of the
records f?f the office of the surveyor of the District
of Columbia, together with the improvements
thereon.
Terms: One fourth of fhe purchase money to be
paid in cash, the balance in three equal payments
In one, two and three years, with Interest at fl
per cent, to be represented by the notes of the pur
chaser and secivred by deed of trust on the prop
erty. A deposit of $100 requ!red at time of sale.
CoOTeranclnjf at cost of purchaser Terms to be
complied with within fifteen days, otherwise the
trustees will resell fhe property* at fhe risk and
coat of defaulting purchaser.
BENJAMIN F. LEIGHTON,
RICHARD E. PAIRO.
4el5-d?ds.eSo Trustees.
TOMORROW.
MARCUS NOTES, Auct.
4-*J o r 11 n.w.
Regullar Sale of
HOUSEHOLD
EFFECTS
Within my salesrooms, 426 9th st. n.w..
Thursday, December 28,
at 10 a.nro.
Elegant Piano, Brass and Enameled Beds, Fine
Walnut Bed Room Suites. Mattresses, (Hid Dress
nrs and Wash-wands, Bookcase, Wardrobes, Parlor
Furniture In suites and separate pieces. Couches,
txtension Tables, Rockers, Mission Furniture, Or
gan. quantity of Bedding and other goods. It
aF ? d ? u ? ^ w u_*x a u b\ 9
633 LOUISIANA AVE.
SALE TOMORROW. TEN A.M.. consisting of
tjl?*e lot of Household Furniture, good as new;
fhow Cases, Dining ivoom Tables, Bed Room
uites, Parlor Sets, China and Glassware.
. OMWlgmaeeti received up to hour of sale. It*
S. BENSI vQER,
Washington
Horse Carriage
9
940 La. Ave.
Regular bale of Horses and Vehicles TOMORROW
(Thursday). AT TEN A.M.
35 Good. Serviceable Horses.
10 Second-hand Carriages.
de27 w.f&m 20 S. BEN3INQER. Auctioneer.
BROWN & TOLA ON. AUCTS., 1409 II ST. N.W.
TRUSTEES SALE OF V ALT ABLE REAL ES
TATE. IMPROVED BY FRAME HOUSE NO.
13ii 6TH STREET NORTHWEST.
By virtue of a decree of the Supreme Court of
the District of Columbia, passed in Equity Oaase
No. 29654. wherein John Osslnger is complainant
ana Henry Ossinger nud others are defendants, I,
the undersigned trustee, appointed by said decree,
will ofTe.- for sale. at public auction in front of
the premises, on THURSDAY, THE TWENTY
K1GHTH DAY OF DECEMBER, A.D. 1905 AT
HAX.F PAST FOUR O CLOCK P.M., the following
described real estate, to wit: Parts original lots
numbered three <3) and four (4), In square num
bered four hundred and eighty <48u), the same
being the north six (8) feet front on 0th street
of said original lot three (3) and the south twenty
<20) feet front on said street of said original lot
four (4), the ?ald parcels of ground being con
tiguous and fronting together twenty-six (26) feet
on said 6th street and extending back with that
width to the alley In the rear of said lots, to
gether with the improvements, rights, etc.
Terms of sale: One-third of the purchase money
to be paid in cash, and the balance in two equal
Installments, payable In one and two years from
the day of sale, and to be represented by the
promissory notes of the purchaser, bearing in
terest at the rate of G per centum per annum,
payable semi-annually, and secured by deed of
trust on the property sold, or all cash, at the
option of the purchaser. A deposit of one hundred
dollars will be required of the purchaser at the
time the property is knocked down. All convey
ancing, recording and notarial fees at the cost
of the purchaser. Terms of sale tc be compiled
with within fifteen days from the day of sale,
otherwise the trustee reserves the right to resell
the property at the risk and cost of the default
in* purchaser, after five days' advertisement of
such resale in The Evening Star, a newspaper
imblished in the city of Washington, D. C.
JOSEPH N. SAUNDERS. Trustee.
del5-dAds.ede25 412 5tb at. n.w,
BROWN & TOLSON, AUCTIONEERS,
1409 H st. n.w.
BANKRUPTCY SALE OF STOCK. STATIONERY.
BLANK BOOK^. ETC., AND FIXTURES OF
FREDERIC B. NKTHOLS. TRADING AS
FRED. B. NICHOLS AND COMPANY.
The undersigned trustee of the the estate of
Frederic B. Nichols, trading as Fred. B. Nichols
and Company bankrupt, will sell the entire stock
in trade ,.f said bankrupt (except exemptions), con
sisting of an assortment of blank books, writing
paper, envelopes, inks, files and stationery, and
Stationery supplies of all kinds. horse, wagon, safe.
Shelving and other movable fixtures, used in c<>ta
nection with the business formerly conducted by
said bankrupt, at public auction, at No. 013 E
street northwest, the place of business of the said
bankrupt, on THURSDAY. THE TWENTY-EIGHTH
?I)AY OF DECEMBER, A. D. 1905, AT TEN
O'CLOCK A.M.
The assets will !>e first offered In entirety, but
the trustee reserves the right to decline the high
est bid if the price appears to him to be inade
quate. If sale is not made as a whole, the stock
and fixtures will be immediately offered for sale
at auction in detail, the sale' to continue until
the entire stock is disposed of.
Terms: All eaah.
Before the property Is offered for sale the ex
emptions to which the bankrupt is entitled ac
cording to law will l>e set off and not sold by the
undersigned trustee.
CHARLES H. BAUMAN, Trustee,
323 John Marshall place.
d-16.19,21,23.25,20.27
FITI RE DAYS.
C. O. SLOAN & CO., AUCTIONEERS, 1407 G.
TRUSTEES' SALE OF VERY VALUABLE MOD
ERN RESIDENCES IN THE BEST SECTION
OF WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, BEING PREM
ISES NOS. 2107, 21U9 AND 2111 19TH ST. N.W.
EXTENDED, AND NOS. 18U3, 1865, 1SG7, 1869,
1871. 1H73 AND 1875 V ST. NORTH, FOR
MERLY CALIFORNIA AVENUE.
Under and by virtue of the power and author
ity imposed by a certain deed of trust, bear ng
date the 20th day of May A. I>. 1904, and re
corded on the 2t>th day or May, A. D. 1904, in
Liber No. 2M4, at folio 222 et seq., of the land
records of the Dlsrict of Columbia, default having
been made in the payment of interest on the debt
secured by said deed of trust, the undersigned will
offer for sale at public auction iu from of the
Property on WEDNESDAY, THE THIRD DAY OF
ANUARY. A. D. 1906, AT THREE O'CLOCK
P.M., the following described real estate, with Lhe
Improvements, easem. nts, rights. wa>s and appur
tenances thereunto belouging, situate and lying In
the said District of Columbia, namely: Lois num
bered fifty-one <51) to sixty (OOj, both Inclusive, In
W. P. Kellogg's subdivision of lots In block num
bered four (4), "Washington Heights," as per plat
recorded in Liber County No. 17, folio i8fl, of the
records of the otiice of the surveyor of the Dis
trict of Columbia, with a perpetual right of way
for alley purposes over the following described
parts of said lota fifty-four (54), fifty-live (55),
fifty-nine I59,> and sixty (60), for the use aud
benefit of said lots fifty four (54). fifty-five (55),
fifty six (56) and flfty-nlne (59>, viz: Beginning for
the same at the northeast corner of said lot sixty
(00), and running theneo west along the north line
of said lot sixty (00) five (5) feet, thence south
thirty four (341 feet to the southeast corner of said
lot tif;y nine (59). thence west along the north lin^s
of said lots fifty-four (54) and tif y-tive"(55) thirty
one (31 > feet one and one-half CMj) Inches to the
northwest comer of said lot fifty-five (55), thence
south on the east liue of said lot fifty-five (55)
Ave (5) feet, theme east thirt3 s.x <3d> feet, one
and one-half (1V*) inebes, to tne east line of said
lot fifty-four (54), and thenee north along said east
line thirty-nine (39) feet, to the place of begin
ning, Improved by ten modern residences nearly
completed, known as premises numbered 1S&3. 1S65,
1807, w><?. 1871, 1873 and 1&75 on "V street, or
formerly known as California av?*nue, and premises
numbered 2107, 2109 and 2111 19th street n.w. ex
tended.
Terms of sale: Each house will be offered for
sale separately. A deposit of |2u0 per house must
be made with the trustee at the time of sale, sub
Ject to forfeiture if the terms of sale bo not com
plied with, and the balance of the purchase price
for each house shall be all cash, at purchaser's
option, or one-third cash and the balance in equal
portions in notes of the nurchaser, payable in one
and two years from the date of the sale, with In
terest thereon from their date until paid, st the
rate of Are per cent per annum, payable semi
annually, and secured by deed of trust on the
property sold. All conveyancing and recording at
the expense of ths purchaser.
Terms of sale must be compiled with within fif
teen days from the date of aale or the property
will be resold at the risk and co*t of ths default
ing purchaser, sfter five days' readvertisement in
*ome newspaper published In Washington, D. O.
UNION TRUST COMPANY OF THE DISTRICT OF
COLUMBIA, FORMERLY THE UNION TRUST
AND STORAGE COMPANY OF THE DISTRICT
OF COLUMBIA, Truatee.
By EDWARD J. STELLWAGEN, President,
1414 F st. O.W.
GEORGE E. FLEMING. Secretary.
delMu,llt,eSuAhoIidajs
AUCTION SALES.
future: DATS.
JAMK8 W. RATCLIFFK, AUCTIONEER.
TRUSTEES* SALE OF VALUABLE LAM), BEING
ONE THIRD UNDIVIDED INTEREST IN LOT
21. CONTAINING TEN ACRES OF LAND.
MORE OR IJSS8. A1SO PART OP LOT 1?,
WITH IMPROVEMENTS, SITUATE SEAT
PLEASANT, IN PRINCE GEORGE'S COUN
TY. MI).
By virtu# of a deed of trust, duly recorded In
Liber No. 12. folio 123 et seq., of the land record*
for the Prince Oeorge'a county, Maryland, and at
the request of the bolder of tfce notea, we will
sell, at public auction, ultbin the auction rooms
of James W. Ratcllffe, 020 Pa. are., n.w., Wash
ington. D C., on THURSDAY. JANUARY
FOURTH. A. D. 1906, AT THREE O'CLOCK
P.M., the following described real estate In Prince
George's conntj. Maryland:
One third undivided Interest in lot numbered
twenty-one (21) In s subdivision of a part of "Seat
Pleasant." the said lot containing ten acres of
land, wore or less. Also part of lot No. 16, "Seat
Pleasant" Farm. Beginning for the same at a
xtake the S.W. corner of lot 10 and running N.
' 30' 50' EI 441.3 ft. to Intersect the west right of
way line of the Chesapeake Beach railway, and
with the same 8 38 87' E. 445.4 feet to the S.B.
line of lot 16. and with the same 8. 09? 04' W.
60 5 ft. to the place of beginning, containing
13,305 square feet of land.
Terms of sale: One-third caah, balance In two
equal installments, at one and two yeara, with In
terest at 6 per cent per annum, payable semi-an
nually, from day of sale, and secured by a deed of
trust on the propeity sold; or all cash, at the op
tion of the purchaser. A deposit of $200 will be
required at time of sale. All conveyancing, record
ing, etc., at cost of purchaser. Terms of sale to
be complied with within fifteen days from day of
sale, otherwise the trustees reserve the right to
resell the property at the risk and cost of default
ing purchaser, after five days' advertisement of
such resale In some newspaper published in Wash
, ington, D. C.
DAVID WARNER. Trustee.
HENRY JOHNSON, Trustee.
.T. J. WILMARTH, Attorney for Holder Notea.
de21-d&dbs,eSu^de25&jal "
TAYLOR'S ACTION RESENTED.
Snub for an Officer Who Humiliated
a Private.
First Lieutenant Roy I. Taylor of the
125th Company, Coast Artillery, who is to
be tried by court-martial in New York this
morning, did not visit the Officers' Club on
Governor's Island yesterday, though it is
the custom of officers from a distance,
charged with minor offenses, to make their
headquarters at the club previous to their
appearance before the court-martial. Tay
lor proved the exception to tho rule.
The story among the non-commissioned
officers Is that word was sent to the lieu
tenant that his presence woy^d not be wel
comed by his brother officers, and that it
would be as well for him to spend the night
before the trial on Manhattan Island.
No commissioned officer on Governor's
Island would admit yesterday that Taylor
had been Invited to stay away, but one
non-commissioned officer, whose name can
not be used because it would mean his re
duction to the ranks, told this story:
"I don't like to be a tell-tale, but this is
no German army, and the press has the
right to know the truth. When the officers
were gathered in their club I happened to
hear them say that it would be well to noti
fy the lieutenant that his company was not
wanted on the island. I've seen many a
lieutenant here as their guest when he was
charged with some minor ofTense. like for
getting to pay his debts, or getting In a
fight. They did their best to make him for
get that he was under charges.
"When this recent case came up they
were of different mind. I'm not going to
give the name of the officer who spoke
what every other man of 'em was think
ing. He and I were In the trenahes to
gether in the Philippines. We were only
a few, and In a tight place.
"Well, to make a long story short, this
officer swore to the other officers that he
would as lief sit by me in a theater, if I
was sober, as with any officer of his com
pany. 'Why.' says he. 'we fought together,
we ate together in the trenches, we bathed
together In the rivers, and had to scamper
out when the sharpshooters got at us. He
was the tender nurse of my baby girl on a
transport. If It were not for discipline, I'd
Invite him In here now for a drink.' "
First Lieutenant Roy L. Taylor is r grad
uate of the Michigan Military Academy
and a veteran of the Spanish-American
war. At the conclusion of the war he was
commissioned a second lieutenant of artil
lery. and later got a first lieutenancv.
The charge against him is tiiat 'he hu
miliated a private soldier in a New Lon
don theater. It is alleged that, finding his
s??at next to the private, he ordered htm to
move and get another seat. This the private
refused to do, and, according to testimony
which will be offered against the officer to
day, he went to the box office and obtained
another seat. The charges against the lieu
tenant are brought by his captain R W
McMasters.
TABLETS OF TEA.
Latent Experiment of the Agricultural
Department.
The latest novel experiment to be made
by the Department of Agriculture is that
of compressing tea into tablets, one of
which will make a delicious cup of tea. Ag
a result, what would ordinarily make a big
package of tea can by this new and unique
method be placed In a space about the size
of a safety match box. The tea Is grown
at the department's experimental tea gar
dens at Summerville, S. C.
The department has been engaged in thts
experiment for some time, and last week a
large box of sample packages of tea tablets
was received by Dr. Galloway, director or
the bureau of plant Industry, for inspec
tion. Each little box of compressed tea
contains twenty tablets about the size of
a penny, but about twice as thick. They
are dark green. Dr. Galloway states that
the most favorable reports have been made
by those who have tried the tablets. The
tablets are said to contain no adulterant.
It is explained that the taste of the tea
is in no way bettered by the form of tab
lets, but the chief value lies In the fact
that it is compressed and takes up less
room.
It has been the object of the department
for some time to find means of providing
food for the army and navy, which could
be prepared In such a way as to savn
space, but so far all attempts have proved
unsatisfactory. It is now believed by the
officials of the department that these tab
lets will fill not only government require
ments, but tiiose of general merchandise
and family use.
Along the River Front.
The rebuilding of the hull of the sund and
gravel-digging machine belonging to the
National Sand Company at Dean's boat
yard. at Alexandria, Is about completed
and the house Is now being placed on the
vessel. In a few days she will be brought
up to this city and taken to the plant of
the company, on the Eastern branch, where
her machinery will be installed. This ma
chine was the one burned on the Eastern
branch several weeks ago while employed
in digging out one of the coffeedams of
the Anacostia bridge. The machine will
be ready for service long before the next
digging season opens.
Arrived: Schooner Henry R. Travers,
lumber, front the Rappahannock river for
Baltimore parties: pungy Shining Light,
oysters, from Potomac beds; tug Dixie,
towing three laden barges, one for Alexan
dria and the others for Georgetown; sloop
W. H. Mills, with lumber, from Maddox
creek for B iltlmore dealers.
Sailed: Etta, Goldle C., Edna and Nellie
and American Eagle for Potomac oys'.er
beds in tow of tug William H. Yerkes, jr.;
tug Dixie, towing three light coal barges,
for lumber ports to load for Philadelphia;
schooner A. H. Quinby and schooner John
McGlnnlss for Virginia lumber ports to
load back to this city; schooner Belmont
and scows Sea King and Bush to Potomac
river points to load cord wood for this
city.
Memoranda: Tug W. H. Yerkes will sail
I'or Norfolk to bring back the lumber-laden
barge John Qulnton, consigned to Wash
ington dealers; steam barge Louise, bound
to this city with a cargo of lumber from
the Rappahannock river, Is reported in the
Potomac bound up.
The tug D. M. Key, which was hauled
out on the marine railway at Alexandria
yesterday, to be fitted with a new wheel,
was put overboard yesterday afternoon and
returned to this city towing the launch Ed
ward. She resumed general service on the
river this morning.
The big seagoing barge Isabelle has been
berthed at the Alexandria shipyard and
will there load a large cargo of railway
ties for the Philadelphia market. The
tiarge. It Is stated, will take away about
20,000 ties.
Alex Sparks, a negro hackman, narrowly
escaped lynching at the hands of a party of
infuriated white men at Tampa, Fla., yes
terday afternoon. The negro struck James
Gafford, a white driver of a furniture
wagon, over the head with a heavy Iron rod.
Inflictinf what mar prove a fatal wound.
Proposed Association of In
spectors of Plumbing.
FIRST MEETING HERE
TO PROMOTE INSPECTION AND
UNIFORM PRACTICE.
Establishment of Standard and Uni
formity in Manufacture of Fix
tures?Chiefs to Confer.
Arrangements have practically been com
pleted for tlx; first meeting of the pro
posed National Association of Chief In
spectors of Plumbing1, which Is to be held
in this city a month hence. It has not yet
been finally determined where the meetings
will be held, but It is though* the parlors
of the W illard Hotel w:U be chosen for the
purpose. The convention will last three
days. January 29. 30 and- 31. during which
time it is certain that a permanent organ
ization of this new national body will be
effected.
The idea of forming such an organijsa
t on as a National Association of Chief In
?f Plumhin*' 'ts Inception
I f 'v, ' f' Llavls' lnsP?ctor of plumbng
for the District of Columbia, and early in
| the past summer he took steps toward
bringing together officials holding sim lar
towns'"? 'this" ?f V'e Pr,ncll?l cities and
! T?, "his en,? h ??1untr^ Canada and Cuba.
thL end he Issued a circular letter In
the course of which he said
tionnarTd<'trot<h.a^'anr plumb!n? construc
practice In th ab<>ut a more uniform
practice In the requirements of ohimblnir
Sin 'fam SS??U"tClt 69 th?ughout the
eocia^on nf J i n.* to start a national as
sociation of superintendents of plunrblmr
and sanitary enrlnp?r? ?
ton l om ? engineers. Such an assocla
vant'ae---' to ^ W?U'd be of mutual ad
?o, inspectors of plumbin<>- be
weTln,? n,a'l,ra"y t-'d to keeplh^
?eii informed through the mutt'i.? nf
?rtnharo ?rricaurs ?
Mrs hv ? I reading of scientific pa
Thw i, belfore 'he association.
cation o? H,/i r" !y a national a-sso
L.auon on ttip.se lines should not ?ro far to
iTvrinea,thaeHSht^/1 9tandard an/unlform
in the manufacture of Dlumfein^ ft*
R.rni!Sr*M'" *
Co-Operation Promised.
Copies of this letter were mailed to plumb
ng inspectors throughout the country and
Mr I)aW;,r\S??n many r^!1- Promising
fort If y co*?Perat'on in his ef
in vlei that the purpose
Hon r ,7aS t0 f?rm a natlona> ^ssocia
M-achu8^,
b^?\- ^"'^'PaTnies^n^ho^^stite^^6
other clrcularJImerIriel?ing o/Th s"'
which feemed to be assured for th 0889
i Vrtf il plumbing were least pressing
djfrinj t!eS,aS^?^CbiT^
already replies have beln rece"vld fmm
many officials who will attend J"
And it impossible To prornlse attendance0
have authorized the enrollment o^their
names as members, and still others now
flna?fed ?,3 "doubtful," are holding the?
final replies until nearer the diif nf ft
beeCr>"ese^Tf?rThdeCldlnK whether they can
i aruarsFS:
f?Pfti?n be determined until after the
initial session in this city next month
Signify Acceptance.
Among the officials who have assured Mr.
Davis that they will be present at the meet
ing are: Isaac R. Carver, chief inspector
of plumbing, and his assistant, I J Law
ler of Pittsburg. pa.; W. H. McDonald, in
spector of plumbing. Paterson. N. J.; George
Rommel. Jr., engineer in charge of sewers
and Edward F. Kane, plumbing inspector
\\ llmlngton, Del.; P. W. Campos, chief in
spector of plumbing. Savannah/ Ga ? *E A
Msher, city engineer, Buffalo, N Y- All
bert L. Webster, civil engineer, William J.
Dolan and Daniel S. Ma'honey, sanitary en
gineers. bureau of buildings, and W H
Dewar, sanitary engineer, board of educa
tion, New York city; P. Drumond, chief
inspector of plumbing, Rochester N Y *
??hlJ,Q~inn- supervisor of plumbing,' and
r . Fardwell, sewer commissioner, St.
p)uls Mo.; Perry L. Hedrick. chief sani
tary inspector, and Charles B. Ball (for
merly plumbing inspector of this city) of
the Museum of Hygiene, Chicago, 111. ?
fr.:Hlk O'Nell, inspector of plumbing
Joliet, 111.; John Webb, inspector of plumb
ing, Salisbury, X. C.; W. M. Weatherby
sewer and plumbing inspector, Greensboro,
N. C.; W. II. Mitchell, inspector of plumb
ing, Baltimore, Md.; A. W. Edens, inspector
of sewers and plumbing, Columbia, S. C.t
and J. S. Cassidy, inspector of plqmbing!
Woburn, Mass. Representatives of trade
publications who will be present include;
J. F. Brady of the Plumbers' Trade Jour-1
nal. New York: Associate Editor H. T.
buerriiT of Domestic Engineering, Chicago
and Associate Editor "Chew of the Metal
Worker, New York.
Enrollment of Members.
Those who have authorized the enroll
| ment of their names as members, whether
they attend the meeting or not, are: Fred
W. Herlng, associate plumbing Inspector,
| Jersey City. N. J.; J. H. G. Beach, inspec
tor of plumbing. Atlanta, Ga.; G. W. Hub
bard, superintendent of the water works.
Elberton, Oa.; Fmil Kulchling, civil en
gineer, New York; George W. A. Butler
inspector of plumbing, Erie. Pa.; James
A. Campbell, inspector of plumbing, El
mira, N. Y.; John Eiden, jr., sanitary In
spector, Evanston, 111.; J. R. Elliott, plumb
ing inspector, Walkervllle, Ontario, Can
ada; Herbert F. Shade, inspector of plumb
ing and sewerage Victoria, British Colum
bia; J. j O'Neil, chief plumbing inspector,
leveland, Ohio; W. B. Gerrlsh, Inspector
of plumbing, Oberlin, Ohio; John Maltland,
Inspector of plumbing and sewers, I^oraln,
Ohio: E. A. Ohaney, inspector of plumbing,
lopeka, Kans.; William C. Hassler chief
sanitary inspector, San Francisco,' Cal.;
Pompey Sarlot. sanitary Inspector, Cama
guey, tuba; Martin J. Conroy, plumbing
inspector, St. Paul, Minn.; F. W Fowers
Inspector Of plumbing, Springfield. Mass. ?
? "Y,' Wheaton. superintendent of plumb
ng, Boston. Mass.; R. E. Ivey, inspector of
plumbing, Danville, Va.; J. J. O'Donnell
??sPe<*?r ?' Plumbing, Newport New?'
in ~ x' insPector of plumbing
Nashville, Tenn.; W. P. Davis, plumbing
inspector. De_ver, Col ? W. J Leaker si if
Ljike City. L'tah; A. J. Kiernan, inspector
of plumbing, Fernandlna, Fla.; Francis H
of olumh^/ ??8,tnecr and chief Inspector
of plumbing, Helena. Ark.; A. C Shaver
&. Cal? PlUmb'ng ttnd b?ildlngsf Paasa:
In all it is assured that there will he at
least twenty-three delegates pJes'ntat the
meeting while twenty-six others w'U have
their names enrolled as members.
Death of Capt. Thomas H. Wilson.
The military secretary of the army has
been Informed of the death on Monday at
Fort Logan, Colorado, of Capt. Thomas H
Wilson. 2d Infantry, due tb an aUack of
acute croupous pneumonia. Capt. Wilson
served as private, corporal and sergeant
of Troop K, 4th Cavalry, from September
ISfcPh. t0 A"R!,Bt 18' 1882" ?n Au*U8t 19
18&J he accepted an appointment as sec
Sn?? ifu fnant' Infantry ^was promoted
(cm 'ieutenant, Pth Infantry, February 20
184)1; transferred to 2d Infantry July 2fl
JSi: Pr2mot*d captain of infantry July l'
1898, and assigned to the 2d Infantrv Jan
uary 1, 1899. Capt. Wilson was ?p&ta?ed
commissary of his regiment November 3.
1904, under which appointment he was
serving at the time of hU death.
The Logan Arrives at
The War Department la Informed that the
** with
troope and supplies from Ban Franciaoo.
A PLEA FOB FBXE& COLLECTION.
It Should Have Been Promptly Ac
cepted at the First Offer.
To the Editor of The Star:
All lovers of oriental art deeply appre
ciate President Roosevelt's decided stand In
the matter of accepting the Freer collection
of paintings, etchings and art objects for
the nation. It has seemed incredible that
the Smithsonian regents had not promptly
pursued Mr. Freer and secured a definitely
signed deed or compact at the first sugges
tion or promise of such a gift months ago.
Should these regents by any action, or
want of action, permit such a collection of
treasures to be lost to Washington, the
Smithsonian could then be termed an in
stitution for the suppression of knowledge.
Only M. de Pobedonostieff would be eligible
to sit with such reactionaries.
President Roosevelt Is the first to lay
stress upon the most unique and important
features of this great collection, I. e.. the
Chinese and Japanese paintings. No other
collection In Europe or America now equals
this of Mr. Freer, no single owner or tem
ple in Japan can rival him in the treasures
of paintings and screens which he pos
sesses. This most critical and exacting
collector has searched both the east and
the west, and at the dispersal of any great
oriental collection for many years Mr.
Freer has been the most omnivorous, re
lentless and reckless bidder for the objects
which he desired. In this way has he ac
quired a greater and more important collec
tion than the British Museum or the Bos
ton Museum of Fine Arts possesses.
Sir Richard Wallace's legacy to London,
the Musee Cernuschl. and the Musee d'En
nery in Paris, several Blmllar national gifts
at The Hague and Vienna, have furnished
those capitals with unique attractions. It
seems impassible to believe that, Washing
ton being without any national gallery or
museum of art, the regents of the Smith
sonian should not strain every nerve, ex
haust every argument to Induce an Amer
ican collector to leave his treasures In their
care for the whole people to profitably en
joy. The Freer museum, moreover, would
be a worthy memorial to James Whistler,
who stands as the first translator and
adapter of oriental art to occidental eyes
and minds?a historic figure for all time.
President Roosevelt has given the Smith
sonian regents a severe reminder of their
first duty In himself suggesting the names
of :wo universally recognized connoisseurs
who should be asked to visit the collection
In Detroit and formally report for the en
lightenment of the regents. The visit of a
committee of learned scientists to Detroit
last spring to pass upon the Importance of
Mr. Freer's art treasures was hardly In
keeping with the seriousness of his offer,
and his request for a committee of experts
to Inspect his collection. With Dr. Sturgls
Bigelow and Mr. John La Farge might be
joined that New York captain of Industry
whose roomful of Rembrandts Is well
known to the world, yet who possesses
some thirty-odd Chinese paintings that he
considers worthy to hang beside the Rem
brandts.
Besides President Roosevelt's vigorous ac
tion. the community must gratefully ac
knowledge the continuous efforts which
The Evening Star has made to secure the
Freer collection for the national capital.
ELIZA RCHAMAH SCIDMORE.
THREE GREAT PROBLEMS.
The American Farmers Concern With
the Soil.
The soil survey of the Department of
Agriculture has mapped 15,732.320 acres of
land during the past fiscal year, according
to the annua! report of the soils bureau.
Surveys were made In twenty-eight states.
The maps show the different kinds of soli
which occur in each area. Rhode Island is
the first state In the Union of which a com
plete survey has been made. The report
says that the work during the pant eight
years shows the three great agricultural
problems now are: First, the western
farmer Is now chiefly concerned with the
presence of alkali and its removal or con
trol; second, the eastern farmer Is chiefly
concerned with the study of the adaptation
of the proper crop to the proper soil, and,
third, with the maintenance or restoration
of soil fertility.
The tobacco Investigations of the bureau
have been extended. "In Texas co-opera
tive experiments have been carried on with
the farmers," the report adds, "with the
result that new varieties of filler tobacco
are being grown, that sell for from 23 to
40 cents per pound, with an average price
of 30 cents." In this manner a new indus
try is being developed in a region where
the staple crop?cotton?is being seriously
threatened by the ravages of the boll wee
vil. In the Connecticut valley work on the
production of a high-grade of wrapper to
bacco, grown under cloth tents, has been
continued.
In Ohio the new method of "bulk" fer
mentation has been thoroughly introduced,
and has resulted in the saving of thou
sands of dollars to the tobacco producers
of the state. In Virginia the improvement
of the plug wrapper tobaccos has been un
dertaken through better methods of pro
duction and handling. Under the methods
Introduced by the bureau of soils profits
have been increased from S5 per acre under
the old system to nearly $30 per acre under
the new system.
Among the Pleasure Craft.
The launches Margaret B., Trlxle and
Grace of the local fleet of pleasure craft
are among the boats hauled out on the
marine railway at Dean's boatyard at Alex
andria to be berthed there for the winter
and to be overhauled before the opening
of the next boating season.
The steam launch Ruby has been taken
from the water at the private boat house
at the foot of Oth street and will lay there
for the winter. She, too, ijrill be given an
overhauling before the opening of the next
season on the river.
The schooner-yacht Slcona Is out on the
marine railway at Bennett's boatyard to
be altered In order to be fitted with a
larger and more powerful auxiliary engine.
She will, it is understood, be ready for
service by the end o< the year. The
changes made in her are expected to make
her more fit for cruising purposes.
The schooner-yacht Mist is still lying at
anchor at the yacht anchorage in the har
bor at the foot of 14?th street, and is one of
the few pleasure boats still left swinging at
their anchors In the harbor. She will, it Is
understood, be berthed at one of the local
boatyards for the winter.
Three Killed by Dynamite.
John H. Grlnstead and Kenton Atwell
I were killed and Joseph Patrick was badly
I injured Monday night at the home of Grin
stead. near Cedar Bluff. Va., by the ex
plosion of twelve sticks of dynamite, which
they were preparing for a Christmas fusll
l lade. The sticks were frozen, and they
were laid in front of the fire to thaw them
out. The explosion demolished the house
I and set the debris on Are. cremating the
I body of Aiweil. Patrick's life was saved by
his being blown through the window. Grin
| stead's wife was visiting a neighbor and
thus escaped. Atwell was a single man.
Poisoned Candy Sent Popular Girl.
Miss Elsie Smith, who was "Queen Tl
tania." in the Altoany, N. Y., hallo>we'en
carnival of 1004, reported yes to-day to the
police that she received through the mail
Monday a box of candy containing po'son.
The chocolate drops In the box had been
opened and the poison spread within. A
druggist, who anaJylzed the contents de
clares that he candy contained enough
paris green and o>fcher poisons to kill tho
whole family. Miss Smith professes entire
ignorance of any one who would des re to
injure her. out believes the poison was sent
by & girl. The police and post office au
thorities are Investigating
"The Best Gift
of AH,"
printed on heavy paper for
framing or home decoration
purposes, may be had at The
Star office at 10 cents a copy.
LIQUOR 10 INDIANS
Question of Prohibition in
New State of Oklahoma.
PRESIDENT'S ATTITUDE
WORK OF "BOOTLEGGERS" IN DE
BAUCHING THE INDIANS.
Great Pressure to Restore the Army
Canteen?Senator Smoot's Declar
ation?W. C. T. U. Petition.
White President Roosevelt took no ac
tion on the reqifest of the leading brewers
of the Untied States that If the wise men
of the country deemed It necessary to pro
hibit the sale of intoxicants to the In
dians In tihe new state of Oklahoma, the
prohibition be not extended to beer and
other prinks containing less than 4>4 Per
cent of alcohol, he did jive partial recog
nition in his annual message to the ar- .
guments of the brewers that prohibition
would be ineffective. As a result of the
petition presented to the President by the
brewers, advancing ?ra? most interest- j
ii?g arguments, the White House has re- |
celved many letters suggesting different
courses of action on the question of pro
hibition in the proposed new state.
The petition of the brewers was submitted
to the President early in November, and in
his annual message to Congress three ,
weeks afterward he referred to the Illicit |
sale of liquor among the Ind.ana and stated. |
"I would urgently press upon the attention
of Congress the question whether some
amendment of the internal revenue lawa
might not be of aid In prosecuting those
malefactors known In the Indian country
as 'boot-leggers,' who are engaged at once
in defrauding the United States treasury
of taxes ana, what is more important, in
debauching the Indians by carrying liquors
illicitly into territory still completely tinker
federal jurisdiction."
The "Bootleggers."
The nefarious work of the "bootleggers"
in the Indian Territory has long been a men
ace to the Indians, and It was this fact that
produced one of the best arguments of the
brewers. They asserted that the Indians
were now getting the meanest and vilest
grades of whisky, while If they were per
mitted to purchase the light drinks like beer
they would not debase themselves by illicit
connection with the bootleggers, who carry
their supplies around in copiously made legs
of boots.
The House committee on territories Is now
at work hearing arguments on whether a
prohibition provision shall be incorporated
in the bill admitting Oklahoma to statehood.
The sentiment among the people of the ter
ritories is much divided. Capt. Prank
Frantz, Tarns Blxby, who has been asso
in the Indian Terltory has long been a men
elated with Indian work In the west for
many years; Delegate Maguire of Okla
homa. the national committeeman of Okla
homa and the Indian Territory, and most of
the politicians are set against the bill touch
ing upon the prohibition question in any
form, advocating the reference of the mat
ter to the people, who, they declare, under
stand the needs of the Indians living among
them as well as the general government.
The prohibitionists, on the other hand, are
making a fight for the Incorporation of pro
hibition now, not being contented to leave
the people of the new state to settle It
themselves.
It is said by those familiar with the work
in Congress that the sentiment there la op
posed to requiring prohibition in the new
state, the contention being that it would
be unconstitutional and would not be re
garded by the new state, but there la some
sentiment In favor of the insertion of a
clause forbidding the sale of Intoxicants
to Indians of the new state, this Wing
based upon the fact that the treaties with
the Indians for many years have recognized
the Importance of preventing the sale of
whisky umong them. There has been some
talk of presenting a provision prohibiting
the sale to the Indians of drinks or bever
ages of any kind containing above a certain
percentage of alcohol, this being in line
with the contention of the brewers that the
Indian would be a better citizen if he were
allowed the light drinks and forbidden the
strong ones.
The Canteen Fight.
There has been no opportunity to sound
the President as to what he would do about
a statehood bill containing provisions he
did not believe In. and so far his ideas as
to a prohibition provision in the statehood
bill are not known. The President has also
withheld an expression of his views as to
the restoration of the canteen In the army.
A good many of his callers have voiced
their opinions. Senator Reed Smoot of
Utah a short time ago declared his inten
tion to vote for the restoration of the can
teen in the army. "I am a temperance
man myself." he said, "but when practically
every officer in the United States army de
clares that the soldier Is morally degener
ating by reason of the abolition of post
canteens, I am compelled to accept what
they say in preference to the theories of
those who have had no actual experience
with the soldier."
Representative Hull of Iowa, chairman of
the House committee on military affairs,
does not believe that Congress will, at this
session, restore the sale of beer In the
army canteen, as urged by army officers.
He thinks Congress will be slow In facing
the aggregate petitions of the prohibition
ists and W. C. T. U. of the country. The
brewers are said not to be taking any part
In the fight for the canteen, believing that
It is a contest between the officers of the
army and the W. C. T. U., and that the
army will eventually win. The brewers do,
however, make the accusation in papers
friendly to them that there is an unholy un
intentional alliance between the W. C. T.
U. and the whisky distillers and wholesale
people of the country against restoring the
canteen. The brewers say that the sale of
beer In the canteen causes an Immense
diminution in the sale of whisky in saloons
situated on the outskirts of army posts, and
that the whisky Interests know this. There
fore the whisky interests oppose the res
toration of the canteen, quietly lending
their help to the work of the W. C. T. U.
It Is declared there will be some great
fig'htlng on prohibition and the canteen be
fore Congress closes its present session.
PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE ECLIPSE.
Admiral Chester Says the Observations
Were Most Important.
Hear Admiral C. M. Chester, the super
intendent of the Naval Observatory, who
went to the Mediterranean last summer as
the representative of the observatory to
witness the August eclipse of the sun, re
turned to Washington last night. He said
that while many good photographs of the
eollipse had been obtained the real results
of the observations will not be known until
these photographs are thoroughly studied.
It will be two or three months before much
can be known about what discoveries have
been made, said the admiral, and it will be
several years before the full results can
be published. Continuing, the admiral said:
"This observation should be by far the
most fruitful of any in astronomical his
tory. We are particularly hopeful that it
will throw light upon the natures of the 1
corona, which plays out Into space, with
rapidly changing shapes, for several times
the sun's diameter. So far we are able to
study the corona only during an eclipse.
We may expect some entirely new discov
eries, which will raise now questions and
open new fields for further investigation.
That has been a result of every modern
eclipse observation.
"The naval observatory stations In Spain ?
and Algiers were almost the only ones in
the shadow path to be favored with satis
factory weather. We obtained sixty or ?
seventy photographs In the three and a
half, minutes of totality, and. Including the ?
plates exposed In the first said final stages
of the eclipse, several hundred. With each ,
of our twenty-five p&incapal Instruments ,
we obtained several exposures In totality. ]
The spectroscopic plates are even more im
portant than the telescopic pictures, tor
we depend for toowtedge^oT^tbe
the vartous prominences and radiations.
Tlielr story !t will, of course, take longest
to read, for every spectrum line must be
counted and compared."
Troops Going to the Philippine?.
The military secretary Is advised that the
headquarter*, Imnd and 1st Battalion. 24th
Infantry (14 officers and 22B enlisted men),
and the 3d Battalion. 24th Infantry (12 of
ficers and 242 enlisted men), have left Forts
Harrison and Missoula, Mont., respectively,
for San Francleco, en route for the Phil
ippine Islands.
The military secretary Is also advised that
the 2d Battalion. 7th Infantry (? officers
and 184 enlisted men), have arrived at Fort
Missoula, Mont., for station.
HOTELS.
The
A
i
14th and K Sts. N.W.
Eugene S. Cochran, Pr.
OCEAN TBAVEL.
Direct to Italy]
Orally 8 Days
BY THE FLYER
DEUTSCHLAND
686 ft. long, 23*4 knota average speed.
FROM
New York for Naples
and Genoa Direct
ON FEBRUARY 6, 1906
Returning from Genoa on Fcbj 22, '08.
FIBST CABIN BATES $117.50 AND UP.
Splendid opportunity to resell the Great
Winter Resort* of the Mediterranean and
Southern Europe. Excellent connection may
be made at Naples and Brtndlat for
Al.EXANDBlA. EGYPT. The Deutach
laud's record voyage from New York to '
Naples was made in 7 days, 18 hours.
Also Regular .Sailings to Italy by the new
Twin - Screw Steamers "HAMBURG,"
"FUBST BISMARCK." "MOLTEE."
"PRINZ ADALBERT" and "PRINZ OS
KAB."
For particulars, rates, etc., apply to
Hamburg American Line, $
35-37 Broadway. N. Y. ?>
It E. F. DROOr & SONS. 925 PA. AVE. $
NORTH GERMAN LLOYD
Fast Express Service.
Fastest anil Most Luxurious of Leviathans.
PLYMOUTH?CHERBOURG?BBEMEN.
Kaiser Jsn. 4, 10 am Kalaer..?.Mar. 8^ 10 am
K. Wm. II..Jan. 23. 2 pu;
Kaiser Feb. 6. 10 am
K. Wm. II.Mar. 27. 7 am
Kronprlnx. Apr. 10, 7 am
K. Wm. II..Feb. 20. 1 pm Kaiser Apr. 17, 10 am
. Wm. II..Feb. 20. 1 pm Kaiser Apr. 17. 10
Twin-Screw Passenger Service.
BREMEN DIRECT.
Rbeln Jan. 4, 2 pmi Cassel. ... Feb 15. 10 am
Bran'b'g. .Jan. 11, 10 ami Brsn bar*.-Mar. 1, iu ?m
Neckar . ? .Jan. 25, 10 am: Brealau. ..Mar. 8. 10 a:u
Itlie 1 n eb. 8, 10 ant'Rheln Mar. 13. 10 am
Mediterranean Service.
GIBBALTAB?NAPLES?GENOA.
Barbarossa.Feb. 24. 11 am
Irene Mar. 3. 11 ani
Lulae Mar. 10. 11 am
?Neckar. ..Mar. 17. 11 am
Albert Jan. IS. 11 sm
Irene Jan. 27. 11 sm
Lulu Feb. 8. 11 sm
Albert Feb. 17. 11 sm
?Gibrsltsr sm, Naples only.
OELBICHS * CO.. NO. 5 BROADWAY, N. Y.
K. F DROOP k SONS CO., 925 PENNA. AVE
mh22-312t.eSu,29
Hamburg=Annerican Line.
Plymouth? Cherbourg?Hamburg.
?Bloecher Dec. 30 tPretorla Feb. 10
tWaldersee Jsn. 6 'Bluecber Feb. 18
tPennsylranls Jan. 13 tWaldersee Feb. 24
fAmerlka Jsn. Sft imerika Mar. 1
S. S. Amerlks, Most Luxurious and Most Modern of
Leviathans.
?Grill room and gyninaalum. ^ Elevator and a la
rsrte restaurant. tCalllng st Dover for London
and Paris.
Mediterranean Service.
TO GIBRALTAR NAPLES AND GENOA.
?Hambnrg Jsn. 6, 2:30 p.m.; Feb. 17. Msr. 31
Prlns Osfcar Jan. 13, 11 a.m.; Mar. 7. Apr. 19
Prlni Adalbert Feb. 3, noon; Mar. 22. May 8
tDeotachlsnd Feb. 6. 2:30 p.m
?Cretic (chartered from White Star Line). .Feb. 27
Rstes, 1st Class. $70. *85, *118 upward, accordlns
to steamer selected.
?Call st Gibrsltsr. tGrill room.
8. S. Moltke to Madeira, Cadiz, Gibraltar, Malaga.
Algiers and Genoa Jan. 30, 1908.
S. 5. Deutschland to Italy.
IN LESS THAN EIGHT DAYS.
HAMBUEG-AMEBICAN LINE. 37 B'WAY, N. Y.
E. F. DBOOP ? SONS. 923 Pa. svs.
de28-tf,37
AMERICAN LINE.
PLYMOUTH?CHERBOURG?SOUTHAMPTON.
PHII.ADELPHIA?QUEENSTOWN?LIVERPOOL.
ATLANTIC TRANSPORT LINE.
NEW YORK?LONDON DIRECT.
RED STAR LINE.
ANTWERP?DOVER?LONDON?PARIS.
WHITE STAR LINE.
NEW YORK?QUEENSTOWN?LIVERPOOL.
BOSTON-QUEEXSTOWN- LIVERPOOL.
tth?e MEDITERRANEAN v^res
FBOM NEW YORK:
CKLTIC (20,904 tons) Jan. 8, 2:30 p.m., Feb 17
REPUBLIC Jan. 26. 3 p.m.; Mar. 9. Apr 31
CRETIC Apr. 3, 10 a.m.; May 10
FROM BOSTON:
riANOPIO Jsn. 13. noon; Feb. 24
ROMANIC Feb. 3. 5:30 a.m.; Mar. 17
WASHINGTON OFFICE, 1306 F ST. N.W.
DAVID LINDSAY. Passenger Agent.
fc4-312t.eSu-25
French line.
COMPAGNIE GENERALE TRANSATLANTIQUE.
Direct Line to Havre?Paris (France).
Sailing avery Thursday at 10 a.m.
From Pier No. 42. North River, foot Morton St.. N.Y.
?La Lorraine Dec. 28
?La Touralne Jan. 4
La Gascogne Jan. 11
?Twin-screw steamers.
GEORGE W. MOSS.
1411 G ST. N.W,
mlil-312t.eSu.14
?La Savoie Jan. 18
La Bretagne Jan. 25
?La Touralne Feb. 1
RAILROADS.
Trains lesve from WncBy Ivania Station.
7 85 a.m. Dally. Local for Harrisonburg, War
ret! ton, Danville and way stations.
10-51 a in. Daily. Washington and Florida Lim
ited. Through coaches snd sleeper to Columbia,
Savannah and Jacksonville. Parlor car to Pine
hurst N C., week days. Dining car service.
11 IB s ml Dally. United SUtes Fast MslL
Flrst-class coaches and sleeper to Sew Orleans.
Dining car service. _
4-01 p.m. Week Dsys. Local for Harrisonburg
and way stations on Mansssas branch.
4:55 p.m. Dally Local for Warrenton and Char
lotteavllle.
\ -30 p m. dally. New York and Atlanta Express.
First-class coach to Atlanta, alee per to Columbus,
Ga ? Sunset tourist sleeper Washington to ban
Francisco Mondays Wednesdsys and Fridays.
9-50 p m. Dslly. New York snd Florida Express.
Through cosches and sleepers to Columbia, Savan
nah snd Jacksonville. Sleeper to Augusta and
Port Tamps. Dining csr service a la carte.
10-00 p.m. Daily. New York and Memphis Llm
ited (vis Lynchburg). First-class coach and sleeper
to Bosiwke, Knoxvllle, Chattanooga and Memphis;
sleeper to Birmingham and New Orleans. Dining
car service.
10-46 p m. Dslly. Washington snd Southwestern
Limited All Pullmsn train; observation car to
Atlsnts snd Macon; club car to Atlanta; sleepers
to Nashville, Atlsnts, Mscon, Birmingham. Mem
Dhls and New Orlosns. Dining car service.
TBALNS ON BLUEMONT BRANCH.
^Xeave Washington 8:10 a.m.. 1:30, 4:45. 5:05
week days, for Bluemont; 6:28 p.m. week
its for Leesburg only. On Sunday leave Wash
ington 9:10 a.m., 5:06 p.m., for Bluement.
Throush trains from the south arrive Washing
ton 6-42, 8:52, 9:40, 9:60 a.m.. S:C0, 9:30 and 9:50
om. dslly. Local trains from Harrisonburg 11:56
a.m. week days and 9:20 p.m. dally. From Chsr
lottasviUe, 8:10 a.m.; from Lynchburg, 9:20 p.m.
Tickets, sleeping car reservations and detailed
Information can be bad st ticket offices, 706 16th
st 611 Pa. ave. and Pennsylvania Station. Bag
race checked through from hotels sod residences.
^Fhcne Msin 87S0 KB. B^Csb Berries.
B. B. SPENCER, Gen. Man.
ATLANTIC COAST JJJJSE
Effective November 26, 190ft.
4:80 s.m. dslly?Sleeping Cars New York
IV-48>Dpilm.' dsfly?Sleeping Cars N'sw York to
Jacksonville, Fls.; New Tor* to Port Tains, Fls.,
via JsckaooTllls; New York (to Augusta, tfs.; New
Yosk to Obsrtostoa. g._&; Wssklmtos. P. P., to
AV^^b"n^ThWt. AND PENNSYLVANIA
i
RAILROADS.
STATION CORN til Or SIXTH AXD B STW
7:S0 A.M. dally. PITTSBURGH EXPRESS AND
CHICAGO SPECIAL ?Parlor and Dials* Car#
Harrtebonr to Ptttsbwgfc. Connects for Chlcsgw,
Cincinnati. Indlauspolla, Louisville and St. Lull.
Parlor Car and Pennaylvanls Railroad Cat* Cm
to Harrlsbnrg.
10:80 AJC dally. MAIN LINK *X PRESS.
man Buffet Parlor Car to Harrlsborg. Parlor Usi
Harrlaburg to Pittsburgh. PrMfWanla HiUMI
Cafe Car Harrlaburg to Altooaa.
1S.01 P.M. dally ST. LOUIS LIMITED.-Sleoplai.
Dining, Smoking and Obeervstlos Oara from Bar
fisbnrg. For Cincinnati. Indians polls, I/>uIst Ua
and *t Lou la. Buffet Parlor Oar to Harrtsbar*.
U.01 P.M. dally. THE PENNSYLVANIA LIMIT
ED.-Pullman Sleeping. Dining. Smoking and '*>
servstion Cara from Harrlaburg. For Chicago,
Cleveland, Toledo and Detroit. Buffet Part a*
Car to Hxrrlsborg.
4:40 P.M. dally. PENNSYLVANIA SPECIAL (IS
hour* to Chicago).?Pullman Sleeping, [ilahg,
8n?klng and Obaerratton Cara from Ilarrlabofg
for Chicago. Sleeping Car to Harrlabarg.
3:40 P.M. dally. CHIOAOO AND ST. IvOUIS EX
PRESS. Sleeping Cara Washington to St. Lrwl*.
Sleeping and Dining Cara Harrlaburg to Cfclcafa,
Indianapoila, St. Loula and Naabvllle (via Cin
cinnati and LouUt1I.?). Sleeping Car to Hani*
burg.
8:40 P.M. dally. CHICAGO LIMITED.-Sleeping
Car Waahlngtoa to Chicago and Clereland. Penn
sylvania Kallroad Cafe Car Baltimore to HrrriO
burg. Sleeping. Smoking. Dtnlng and Observance
Cara from Harrlaburg. For Chicago and Cle*" -
7:18 P.M. dally. ST. LOUIS EXPRESS. -PuJtnsa
Sleeping Car Harrlaburg to St. Loula and On
clnuaU.
T:40 P.M. dally. WESTERN EXPRESS. ?Pullmsa
Sleeping Oar to Plttaburgb and Chicago. Dining
Car to Chicago.
7:40 P.M. dally. CUCVBLAND AND CINCINNATI
EXPRESS?Pullman Sleeping Can Washington to
Harrlaburg. and Harrlaburg to Clereland awl Cin
cinnati. Dining Oar.
10:40 P.M. dally. PITTSBURGH SPECIAL.-Pall
man Sleeping Oar to Plttaburgb. Dining Car A>
toona to Plttaburgb.
10:40 P.M. dally. PACIFIC EXPRESS.?Pollmaa
Sleeping Car to Harrlaburg and Harrlaburg ta
Plttaburg. Connecta for Clereland and Tjledo.
7:50 A.M. dally. BUFFALO DAY EXPRESS, with
through Tarlor Car. Pennsylvania Railroad Oafa
Oar and Ooachea to Buffal>, via Emporium June*
7:80 A.M. for Erie dally, Canandalgua. Rk'bester.
and Niagara Falla dally, except Sunday.
10^.0 A.M. for Klmira and Renora dallj. eicepl
Sunday. For Wllllamaport dally. S:40 P.M.
7:18 P.M. dally. BUFFALO NIGHT EXPUBS3,
with through Buffet Sleeping Car and roaches ta
Buffalo, via Emporium Junction.
7:40 P.M. dally for K.ic, Rochester, Buffalo and
Niagara Falla. with Sleeping Car Waahlngton to
Roc beater.
10:40 P.M. dally for Erlt Oanandaigua, Rochester,
Buffalo and Niagara Falla.
FOR PHILADELPHIA, NEW YORK AND THB
CASK.
4:00 P.M. "CONGRESSIONAL LIMITED," for
New York only, dally, all Parlor Cara. lining
Car.
Express. 6:55, 8:50. *10:00 (N*w York only), aad
?11:00 A.M., *12:35, *3:00. 3:15, *4:45, 6:60,
10 00 P.M.. 12:30 night. On Sundays. *8:50,
*11:00 A.M.. 13:01, *3:00, S:lf, *4:45. 0:50 and
10:00 P.M.. 12:30 night.
For Philadelphia only. Express, 7:40, 10:00 A.M.,
12:01 P.M. week dsy*. 2:00. 4:00, *5:35 and 3:4?
P.M. dally: 6:55 A.M. Sundaya.
For Boston, without change. 7:40 A M week days
and *5:35 P.M. dally.
For Baltimore. 5:00, 6:15, 6:56, 7:40, 7:50. 8:80,
10:00, 10:50, 11:00 A.M., 12:01, 121:18, 2:00^
8:00, 3:18. 3:40. 4:00 (4:00 LlmltsD. 4:20, 4:48.
4:48, 6:35, 8:40. ?:10, 6:50. 7:15, 7:40, 10:<*
10:40. 11 A5 P.M., and 12:30 nlgbt week days. Oa
Sundays, 6:58, 7:50. 8:50. l>:06, 10:80. 11:00 AM..
12:01. 1:15, 2:00. S:G0, 8:15, 3:40, 4:00 (4:0#
Limited). 4:20, 4:45, 6.38, 8:40, 6:10, 6:50, 7:18,
7:40, 10:00. 10:40 P.M.. and 12:30 nlgbt.
For Annapolis. 7:40 A.M., 12:35, 4:20 and 8:40
P.M. week days. Sundays, SAO A.M., 6:40 and
10:40 P.M.
For Pope's Creek Line, 7:80 A.M. and 4:48 P.M.
week days; 9:08 A.M. Sundaya.
Ticket offices, corner Fifteenth and G streets, aad
at the station. Sixth and B atreels. where orders
can be left for the checking of baggage to destina
tion from hotela and residences.
Telephone call "Main 3730'' for Pennsylvania
Railroad Cab Service.
?Dining Car.
W. W. ATTERBCRY. J. R. WOOD.
General Manager. Paas'r Traffic Manager.
GEO. W. BOYD.
General Paaaenger Agent.
Baltimore and Ohio R.R.
LEAVE STATION, New Jersey ave. and 0 St.
ROYAL BLUE LINE
TRAINS - EVERY OTHER HOUR
ON THE ODD HOUR" Tu
pnii.ADici.piiia and new yore.
NEW TERMINAL, 23D ST.. NEW YORK.
?7.00 a.m. Diner, Pullman Parlor.
t8.U0 a.m. Buffet. Parlor. 5 Hr. Train.
69 l>0 a.m. Diner and Pullman Parlor Car.
til 00 a.m. Diner and Pullman Parlor Car.
?1.00 p.m. Diner and Pullman Parlor Car.
?8.00 p.m. "Royal Limited." All Pullman.
t4.00 p.m. Coaches to Philadelphia.
?6.00 p.m Diner and Pullman Parlor.
?8.00 p m. Coaches to Philadelphia.
?11.30 p.m. Sleepers.
*2.67 a.m. Sleei>ers.
Atlantic City, 17.00, t? 00. tll.00 a.m., ?l.Qg,
?3.00 p.m.
EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR
TO BALTIMORE WITH PULLMAN SERVICE.
Week days: 2 57. 5.00. 6.30, 7.00, 7 20. 8.00. 8. TO
9.00. 11.30. 10.00. 1100 a.m., 12.00 noon 120#'
1.00, 2.00, 3.00, 4.00, 4.4'. 5.00, 5 03, 5 30, 8 00
6.30, 7.00, 8.00, 10.00, 11.30, 11.35 p.m
Sundays: 2.67, 7.00, 7.20, 8.30. 9.00. 10.00. 11.00
a.m., 1.00, 1.15. 3.00, 3.30, 5.00. 6.3t. (J.Jo. 8.00.
10.00. 11.30. 11.36 p.m.
WESTWARD.
CHICAGO & NORTH WHi*T.*l 1.00 a m *5.30 p m
CINCINNATI. ST. LOUIS and LOI I3V ILLIf!
*10 05 a.m.. *4.05 p.m., *12.45 night.
PITTSBURG, *11.00 a.m.. *8.15 p.m. and *12.40
nlgbt.
CLEVELAND. *9.13 p.m.
COLUMBUS, *6.30 p.m.
WHEELING. *10.05 a.m., *8.30 p.m.
WINCHESTER. 8:8R a.m.. t4:0S. tB.OO p.m.
ANNAPOLIS, week days, 7.20 a.m., 1S.03 nooa,
4.48. 6.00 p.m. Sundays, 8.30 a.m. and 8.30 p.m.
LURAY and ELKTON. *4.06 p.m., through parlor
car.
FREDERICK. t8.38, {9.15, |10 06, tll.00 a.m..
?1.18, t4.0S, t6.30 p.m.
HAGERSTOWN, tlO.OC a.m. and t5.00 p.m.
BOYD and way points, t8.35, J9.15 a.m., fl.lS,
16.00, t5.35, 110.10, til-30 p.m.
OAITHERSBIJBO and way points, t8.35. 19.10
a.m.. tl2.80, I1.15Tt3.30. *5 05, t5.38. t6.50. |7.88,
?10.15, tll-30 p.m.
WASHLNOTON jrX'TION and way points, t8.8">,
?8.15 a.m., $115, t5.00. <5.30 p.m.
?Dally. tExcept Sunday. {Sunday only.
Baggage called for and checked from hotels and
residences by Union Transfer Co. on orders left
at ticket offices. 019 Pennsylvania ave. n.w , New
York ave. and 15th St., and at station.
6. B. HEGE. District Passenger Agent.
Chesapeake & Ohio Ry.
Schedule effective November 20, 1905.
(Trains leave Pennsylvania Station.)
2-30 p.m. Dally?CHICAGO AND ST. LOUIS SPE
CIAL. Solid veatlbule, electric-lighted Dining
Car train to Cincinnati. Raaches Cincinnati
8'00 a.m., Louisville 11:00 a.m., St. Louis, 6:30
p.m.. Chicago, 6:30 p.m. Pullman service to
Louisville, Cincinnati. Indianapolis. Chicago and
St. Louis. Connection for Virginia Hot Springs.
Dining Car from Wssblngton; meals a la carte.
11:10 p.m. Dally?F. F. V. Limited. Solid veatl
bule. electric lighted Dining <'ar train to Cin
cinnati. Pullman sleepers to Cincinnati, Isl
ington and I/oularl le without change. Com
partment sleeper to Vlrginls Hot Springs dally
except Sunday. Sleepers Cincinnati to Chicago
and St. Louis. Din log csr serving meals a la
carte. _
Reservation and tickets at Chesapeake and Ohio
office, 813 Pennsylvania avenue; 609 Fourteenth
street near F. sod at the atatlon. Telephone call
8730 for Pennsylvania R. R. Cab Service.
H. W. FULLER.
Telephone Mala 1066. General Passenger Agent.
Seaboard Air Line Railway.
TICKET OFFICE. 1421 PHNNA. AVE.
For Petersburg. Raleigh. Wilmington, Colombia,
6avannah. Jacksonville, Tampa. Atlanta, Birming
ham. Mobile, Peneeeola and New Orleaaa.
10.80 A.yi. DAILY ? Seaboard Mall ? Through
~ seper to Jaekeooville, Fla.. connecting
with Pullman sleeper to Blrmlaghast
car Washington to Hamlet, N. C.
DAILY?Seaboard Express?Solid trala
to JaefcsaavOl* asd Tampa, with Puliman sleeps'*.
Through sleeker to Atlanta and Btrmli ^ham. Oafo

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