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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 29, 1906, Image 6

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8th St. & Pa. Ave.
> "THE BUSY CORNER.
UPIM
tine new spring weaves are ready now.
These goods most women know are not surpassed in appearance or wearing qualities by any. The
name stands for best. The new line embraces a wide range of weaves that will tend to further popu
larize the already notable vogue for black. The weaves included in this early display are:
VoiEes, Shadow checks, Chevron Serges, Silk voile,
Novelty crepe, Wool crepe and Henrietta.
T Prices range 75c. a yard to 12.00, and at the prices are exceptional values when comparison with any other make is made.
Two new specialls in colors.
45=in. chiffon taffeta
mohair at $1.25 yd.
-- N-w thU ,-t.i-on and a wive that combines the durability
of mohair with thf soft finish of a taffeta weave. Choice of
+
light or da 1; g ay.
h ya rd
Entirely n^w and offered at.
$1.25
Checked suitings, 49c. yd. ::
Checks are going- to play a big part in spring fashions. The
new ones that have Just arrived have white ground with
an almost Invisible check of black, gray, blue, green and
several mixed color effects. Some stripes are also in
cluded.
A fabric that will look best with white or siik lingerie waists
?and it will al90 make up Into very stylish Eton suits.
36 inches wide. A great value at 49c. a yard.
a yard, for
' * First Kloor?Dress Goods Arc Jde?S. Kann, Sons & Co.
special clleariog=sale bargains also to be
4s - in. M.I.-wool, CREAM Qfl-,
SERGE, worth $1.00 yard. at..
52-in. WHITE SERGE, worth ?
$1.39 a yard, for w
41-in. WHITE VOILE, worth 2g
1.25
45-in. CREAM WHITE SICIL
IAN MOHAIR, worth $1.25 a rfJSf.
yard, for
44?in. BLACK VOILE-lmported?and a
very fine grade. Special, i
yard
45-In. SILKY LUSTER BLACK MO
HAIR?made in England?and
of Bradford dye and finish.
"Worth 89c. a yard, for U'J'V.
36-in. ALL-WOOL CREAM BA
TISTE. Special, a yard Jyv.
First to show what's new Ira
prams
File designers have certainly exhibited great skill and taste in making
plans for the new spring suits. There is an entirely new Eton effect
with bolero, trimmed in an effective manner with silk braid; fancy
vesting with a touch of gold gives a bright color; small velvet but
tons are also used as trimming on both jacket and skirt. The skirt
is in a new pleated effect, stitched half way. This suit only
A particularly pretty reefer
style is in black, with mili
tary silk braid trimming. The
The new "Pony' Suits are a ]
trifle longer th;in the eton and
ripple slightly in back; silk braid
forms a very pretty effect in front
and back; sleeves are elbow style.
The skirt has a series of box pleats
down the front with side pleats,
and Is stitched about half way.
There are shown in the new gray
checked effects. Only
Second floor?S. Kann. Sons & Co.
$34o7<
coat has lapels and a plain tailor
ed sleeve. The skirt is a circular
model, finished around bottom
with two wide folds. It is priced
at
T
T
t
3!
T
for men amid women
are now entered in the clearing sales at once=ffor=
reductions?the lowest we've named in
ffirst=class goods in prevailing style.
T Nothing in this store is more staple than the stock represented in the list following) , \Ve'd rather
count less stock next Wednesday, anil these prices are made solely for stock reduction purposes.
First Floor?S. Kann, Sons & Co. <
'MEN'S LETTER CASES, genuine seal
or genuine walrus, calf and seal lined
Assorted styles; worth $2.98 ? n
to $3.98. Special 3 U .7^
CARD CASES, large assortment for
both women and men; all different
leathers.
Were $2.98 $198
Were $1.98 now $1.25
Were $1.49 now 98c.
Were 98c C9c.
Were 75c. and 89c now 49c.
MEN'S DRESSING ROLLS, genuine
walrus leather, with ebony fittings,
pigskin lined. Regular value, ?-j ao
?4.98. Special W-TO
LADIES' VANITY BOOKS, of walrus
pressed leather; all colors; ir.side pock
etbook frame; fitted with mirror and
powder book. Strap on back. gEf
Regular price, 98c. Sale price.
LADIES' VANITY BOOKS. OF GEN
uine morocco leather; all colors; inside
pocketbook frame; strap back or strap
handle. Regular price, 98c.
J. Special wa*?r.
LADIES' IARGE - SIZE AVENUE
BAGS, all colors; inside frame.
Regular price. 9sc. Sj>eclal "
JAPANESE VANITY BOOKS. str*p
back and dragon clasp; im
ported. $2.50 value. Sale j
I .A DIES' CARRIAGE BAGS, made of
st-al grain leather, in black, brown and
tan; fitted with card case and purse.
Leather-covered frame; gun-metal or
gilt clasps. Regular price, ? fl /r>(tT)
$1.49. Sale price
LADIES' VANITY BOOKS, strap back:
fitted with mirror and powder puff; in
brown only. Regular price, ffi II (ft)ft)
$i.i;i Special iPH.'Uru'
GENUINE MOROCCO VANITY BAG.
large size, utrap back or handle; all
colors; has inside frame of gun metal
or gilt K.'gular price, $1.98. ^ |
LADIES' VANITY BOOKS, of genuine
walrus and genuine morocco leather,
calf and silk lined, with strap on back
or strap handle. Regular ?T) it g
$2.98 and $.?..i?8 values. Choice
IMPORTED VANITY BOOKS of suede
leather, in all colors and lizard skin.
Some fitted with mirror and powder
puff. Regular prices, $2.98 to 2|j>
$3.49. Choice.
LADIES' CARRIAGE AND VANITY
BAGS of genuine seal, walrus and liz
ard skin and Japanese leathers. Reg
ular prices, $4.98 to $5.98.
Choice
LADIES' POCKET BOOKS of genuine
morocco leather; all colore; nickel
frame. Suede pocket, leather gussets.
Regular 49c. and 69c. values. '5(0)/-.
Choice oSyi/.
MEN'S BILL ROLLS of genuine walrus
and seal calf; seal-lined; some have
memorandum book, others have extra
tuck pocket; secret pocket
in back. Regular price, $1.98. ^ |
MEN'S LEATHER CASES; genuine seal
or walrus; calf and seal
lined. Regular price, $1.98. ^ |
Belts.
TOADIES' LEATHER AND SILK
BELTS, all colors. Regular
price, 49c. Sale price
LADIES' SILK BELTS, with gold-plated
buckle and toaek ornament; all colors
Regular price, $1.25. Spe
cial ...
LADIES' GOLD BELTS, assorted styles.
Regular price, $2.98. Sale jj g"
PERFECT - FITTING DRESDEN
BELTS. Regular price, $1.49.
Special
33c.
49c.
98c.
Underselling in
11S n I n
The very kinds, too, that you
want for immediate use.
36-inch SHADOW SILKS, in
all colors and fast black. Usual
ly 12J2C. a jard.
I Jnderpriced
at
94ic,
36-inch SOFT FINISH MER
CER1 /.Fl> S A T F. E X, fast
black. A usual 35c.
grade. Under
priced at. a yard. ..
First Floor?S. Kann. Sons & Co.
Wool sweaters
and blouses.
Specially reduced prices on these.
If the promised cold weather
sets in a garment like this will
be very necessary.
C H I L L) REX' SI,
BLOUSES, in red and blue. rOD'yC.
Reduced from $1.00 to J
C 11 I L D R E X '
BLOUSES In red. white and yot,.
navy. Reduced from $1.50 to J
CHII, D R E X ' SI
AND MISSES' BLOUSES.
with roll collar; in white,
red and navy. Reduced
from $2.00 to
MISSES & CHIL-1
DREN'S SWEATERS
two-color effects. Re
duced from $1.75 to
MISSES & CHIL-1
DREN'S SWEATERS;
two-color effects; all
sizes. Reduced from
$2.2ft to
M1SSES'NOR FOLIO
:j$L25
JACKETS: two-Mkir ef
fects; with belt. Re
duced from $2.00 to
$1.50
$1.50
20 weaves of
> silks
E have never had so many high-grade silks in any sale
at the one uniform price before. There is every weave
you could possibly want for any purpose. Silks for
dresses?silks for evening gowns?silks for linings.
The range of colors is most varied, including plain colors and combinations.
Most women are beginning now to plan spring costumes. You should have one of
silk. If you select the siik from this sale NOW?and put the material in the
hands of your dressmaker?you will then be able to have the new dress to put on
when you have need of^ooking your best.
Final mark-=down on
that you'll have 2 months' use for.
Syits:
from .$14.75
Lot One?Reduced
$25.00 and $^0.00 to ?
Lot Two?Reduced from
$36.00 to...
Lot Three?Reduced from ?jg
$40.00 and $45 00 to
Lot Four?Reduced from
$50.00 and $00.00 to.
.75
.$34,75
Costumes:
Of silk and laoe. for calling or recep
tions; very handsome;
no two alike. Reduced
from
to.
k*o alike. Reduced ?
$50.00 and $00.00
Coats:
Lot One?Reduced from $12.00
and $15.00 to
Lot Two?Reduced from
$16.50 and $20.00 to
Lot Three?Reduced from
$22.50 and $25.00 to
Evening Coats:
Only four in lot; beautiful garments
very slightly soiled. All at less than
half price.
.75
.00
.75
Two at $45.
Two at
liner and tea
Certainly a big incentive for the woman who likes fine china for the table. Every
dinner or tea set which is incomplete because one or two pieces have become
broken?is included in the half-price sale.
Of most there arc but one or two. Blame yourself If the very set you would
rather have is taken before your arrival. There is reason for early selection;
$18.00 TEA SETS $9.00
$9.00 TEA SETS $4.50
$8.00 TEA SET $4.00
$7.00 TEA SET $3.50
$10.00 DIXXER SET.... $5.00
$12.00 DIXXER SET.... $6.00
Third Floor?S. Kann, Sons & Co.
$16.00 DIXXER SET.... $8.00
$35.00 DIXXER SET... .$17.50
$27.50 DINNER SET....$13.75
$22.00 DIXXER SET....$11.00
$34.00 DIXXER SET....$17.00
$13.00 DINXER SET.... $6.50
i ii n 1; 1111 i 11: h i-i i- 1 i-m-h-h-b-h : 1 in h 1 n t hih u 11 m i m mnmniinii
"Strictly rrtiabl* tjoaUtlM."
iSty^Rea&i
Store closes at 5:.-0 p.m. daily.
Rodtneed.
? We offer a flat reduction of
.13 1-3 per cent off every Fur
In the house. That means about
?half of what these qualities are
usually priced elsewhere, for our
regular prices on Furs are
notably low. You'll have lots
of wear out of them this win
ter. and they're qualities that'll
last for years and years. Better .J.
buy now. for next fall and win
tcr you'll have to pay regular a
prices for identically the same .??
Furs we now offer at one-third
off.
All Fur Neck
at One-Third
Pieces
$5.00
$7-50
$10.00
$13-50
$15-50
$18.50
$22.50
$25.00
$30.00
$3500
$40.00
$58.50
$68.50
Neck
Neck
Neck
Neck
Neck
Neck
Neck
Neck
Neck
Neck
Neck
Neck
Neck
Pieces... $3.34
Pieces... $5.00
Pieces.
Pieces.
Pieces.
Pieces.
Pieces.
Pieces.
Pieces.
Pieces.
Pieces.
Pieces.
Pieces.
$6.67
$9.00
. .$10.38
. .$12.38
. .$15.00
. .$16.68
. .$20.00
? -$23-34
. .$26.66
..$39.00
. .$45-67
?
?
y
V
*
X
*
I
at
For Muffs
Qoe=Tlh5rd
$6.50 Muffs $4.38
$10.00 Muffs... $6.67
$13.50 Muffs $9.00
$14.50 Muffs $9.67
$15.00 Muffs $10.00
$16.50 Muffs $10.50
$18.00 Muffs $12.00
$20.00 Muffs $x3-33
$30.00 Muffs $20.00
Coats
Off.
at 331/3%
Velvet Coats
t at 33VM Off.
r
| at 33%% Off.
T"
*
!
X
I
WM. H. McKNEW CO.,
Agtnts for Centemeri Gloves and Dr. Jaeger
and Ramie Fibre Underwear,
It
? CHAS. R. EDMONSTON. g?
I
f
?
5'?
s
c
s
\'X
y\;
'-k
RICH
CUT OLA;
51
s
1
3fe
Sc
5
I
8
1
*1
?a
1
i
-and Entertaining.
K should be pleased t0
have 3'ou inspect our
Incomparable collec
tion of the best Amer
ican cut glass, com
prising many rich
pieces suitable for
wedding gifts as well as for the host
ess who does much entertaining.
Rich Cut Glass Bowls, $3.50
to $50.
Elegant Cut Glass Vases,
$3.75 to $20.
Cut Glass Water Bottles,
$3-75 up
Beautiful Cut Glass Celery
Trays, $3.75 up.
And a large variety of rich designs
in cut glass decanters, wine and cor
dial glasses, punch bowls, sherbet
cups, etc.
|Chas. R. Edimonstom,!
China, Glass and Ilousefurnishings.
1120S Pa. Avemine.
i* ** si
1
s
OVER 60 YEABS ESTABLISHED. *
?TIEFF
PIANOS
IN ALL
STYLES.
THE RECOGNIZED STANDARD OK MOD
ERN PIANO MANUFACTURE
8ECOND-UAND PIANOS AT ALL PRICES,
Including our own make, but slightly ased.
.. Square Pianos, ail makes, $50 upward.
3!. Tuning and Repairing by Factory Expert!.
Clhas. M. Stieffff,
Factory Warerooma,
S2l I Ith Street N.W.
J. c.
de!8-tf,28
CONLIFF, Manager.
K~M
i
|
V
y
y
i
i
i
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y
Upon* Every
Bottle
and wrapper of the genuine Dr. Bell's Pine
Tar Honey is printed the above design. It
Is both trade mark and guarantee?a war
rant that the medicine contained in the bot
tle will cure cough*, colds and all lung,
throat and chest troubles more quickly and
effectually than any other remedy.
y
y
I
??
'S
PINE=TAR=
HONEY
is sold by ail druggists, 25c.. OOe. and
$ fl.00 i>er bottle. Manufactured by
The E. E. Sutherland
Medicine Co.,
PADITCAH, KENTUCKY,
.Jfl2 f,mAw 39t 70^ ^ ^
One Provision of Worrell's
Street Extension Bill.
WOULD OBTAIN UNIFORMITY
Heterogeneous Results of the Present
Laws.
the effect of special acts
Different Methods for Assessing Bene
fits and Damages for Improvements
?Practice in Other Cities.
Representative Morrell of Pennsylvania,
a member of th<* District of Columbia com
mittee, spoke at some length in the House
of Representatives today in advocacy of his
bill to change the present system of street
extensions and land condemnations In the
District of Columbia. Mr. Morrell has for
some time been conducting an exhaustive
inquiry into the whole subject and his re
marks showed evidence of much thought
and study. He was heard with attention by
many members of the House. The subject
of Mr. Morrell's speech is particularly time
ly. in view of the heated discussion in the
House last District day. three weeks ago,
of the street extension proposition.
The Morrell Bill.
The Morrell measure modifies and re
enacts the highway act of 1893 and pro
vides that the United States shall pay
one-third of all damages and property
taken for streets exceeding sixty
feet in width, and shall be made a party
to and be represented by its attorney for
this district in all condemnation proceed
s:
Edward Morreli.
ings relating to such streets. It also pro
vides for allowing the District to issue
bonds not exceeding $2.(XJ0,0<X) annually and
not exceeding $30,000,000 in all, in order to
provide a fund for the payment of the dam
ages awarded against it in such condemna
tion proceedings. It secures to any party
aggrieved by the final order of the Supreme
Court of the District in any such proceed
ings the right of appeal to the Court of
Appeals of the District.
As to minor streets and alleys and county
roads not exceeding sixty feet in width, it
adopts the provisions of the District code,
as amended by the act of March 3, 11*01,
which do not require the United Stales to
pay anything, the matter being considered
purely local.
Mr. Morrell believes that under the plan
he has proposed the burden of expense in
cident to the development of the.capital city
may be made to fall with reasonable im
partiality upon the parties upon whom it
justly and equitably should rest and that
his plan would save a good deal of money
to the United States by convincing the peo
ple of Washington they will be treated
fairly and thereby inducing them to act
justly toward the government of the Unit
ed States. If an attempt is made to compel
them, at their sole expense, to execute the
magnificent plans of improvement prepared
by the officers of the I'nited States for the
aggrandizement of the national capital, Mr.
Morrfil thinks, they will simply recoup by
awarding exorbitant damages against the
United States for all lands taken for its
use, and that they will also continue to at
tempt to obtain special legslation through
Congress, as they have been doing since
1888.
Mr. Morrell's object is to put an end to
abuses now existing and to control street
openings and extensions here if Jr in a sys
tematic way under fair and impartial gen
eral laws.
Weakness of the Present Law.
?"As a member of the District committee,"
said Mr. Morrell, "1 have for a long time
been impressed with the fact that the pres
ent system of street extension in the Dis
trict of Columbia is unequal and incon
gruous. Long before the discussion in the
House, January 8, 1900. over the Kalorama
avenue bill. I had begun an investigation,
not only of the system of the District, but
of the other systems of other citiCs of the
United States. The motive which led me
to do this was that I might present a bill
for a general law which would remeay
these incongruities and inequalities.
"I now desire, to present as comprehen
sively as possible the weaknesses of the
present system and to outline the principles
upon which a general bili should be drawn.
The Washington system of street extension
rests upon four distinct bodies of law.
These are: The general highway act of
1893, a series of special street extension
acts, the code of the District of Columbia
and provision of general appropriation
bills."
Mr. Morrell- then reviewed the familiar
provisions of the general highway act of
1903, under which street extensions are
now made, and which provides for the as
sessment of one-half the ensuing damages
against the benefited land and one-half
against the District.
In General Terms a Good Law.
"In general terms." said Mr. Morrell,
"this law may be raid to be a good law.
and had it been rigidly udherred to by Con
gress its effects would have been beneficial.
On account, however, of the appeal pro
vision which it contains, vigorous objec
tions were urged against it by interested
parties, and out of this grew a flourishing
body of special laws passed by Congress.
"Verv soon after the passige of the gen
eral highway act. Congress was importuned
to pass special acts for the opening of cer
tain streets, and entered upoi a career Of
street legislation which has produced
something more than twenty special acts.
After four or Ave years of experiment with
this species of legislation, an effort was
made to arrange a form which should be
come a model for all succeeding bills, and
which we have been told in this discussion
did become a model. In fact, X believe It
has been stated upon this floor that this
particular bill follows this prearranged
form word for word. The difficulty is to
ascertain which of these numerous -special
acts was the model.
Difference in Special Acts.
"As I shall show, they are all alike except
in the ten -or eleven sections which define
the court machinery and the modus oper
andi by which the decisions of the court are
carried into effect- They differ in almost
every material provision which makes for
or against wise legislation. Some of the
bills require a dedication of from two
thirds to three-fourtha of tbm laaA required
, Bottled Only
at the Spring, Neuenahr,
Germany, and Only with
Its Own Natural Gas
as an antecedent condition; one bill re
quires the payment of a money considera
tion as collateral before proceedings shall
begin; all the others require neither a dedi
cation of land nor a payment of money.
"But the main question?who shall pay
for these improvements?Is answered by
these acts in an absurdly contradictory
manner. Some of them require that all the
damages shall be assessed against other
land benefited. In other cases only 50 per
cent of the damages Is to be so assessed.
In others a discretion Is given to the Com
missioners by which an amount less than 50
per cent may be assessed.
"In arranging for the deferred assess
ments some of these acts give two equal
annual assessments and charge 10 per cent
annual interest thereon: others give Ave
years at 4 per cent annual Interest, and
still others four years at 3 per cent annual
interest.
"All of these special acts apply to one
particular part of the city and ignore all
other parts. They all up to the present
have applied to that region lying between
Tenleytown road and the Soldier*' Home
north of Bock creek, or in the neighborhood
of the National Park. It is needless to say
that this region Is the one in which the
speculative interests have predominated
since 1888."
Mr. Morrell then stated that he had in
vestigated the thirteen special acts, and
proceeds to point out the differences In
them to which he had Just called attention.
The Sixteenth Street Extension.
"In the first session of the Fifty-sixth
Congress," said Mr. Morrell, "the 16th street
extension act was passed. This required a
dedication of three-fourths of all the land
and that 50 per cent of the damages should
be assessed against abutters, but not
against the dedlcants. These dedicants gave
about fifty acres of agricultural land as the
price for the enormous exemption which
they received in the act referred to. It is a
strange commentary upon this character of
legislation that if the act requires an as
sessment of all the damages against ben
efits the Jury has no trouble in finding a
full hundred per cent of beneficiaries; and
if the act requires 50 per cent the jury ap
parently finds this with equal ease. In
other words, a jury seemed to have no dif
ficulty In finding whatever percentage of
benefits may be demanded by the act in the
property abutting, adjacent or contiguous
to the Improvement, but In the 16th street
extension the jury broke down. Although
required to find but 5 per cent of benefited
property after exempting the dedlcants. it
could find but about 13 per cent of bene
ficiaries. The damages assessed by the
jury were $729,952. The benefits were $108.
834. Although the act required that 50 per
cent of the damages should be assessed
against beneficiaries, under the discretion
ary power given the Commissioners, this
finding was approved and this balance.
96190,018, was cast one-half on the abutters
who were not dedlcants and one-half upon
the District of Columbia.
Separate Improvement Districts.
"One great difficulty in the opening of
new streets under the Washington system
is the' modus operandi of the initial pro
ceedings. Too much-has been left in the
initiative to interested parties, and the little
to the owners of the real estate of the Dis
trict to be improved. There is a system
very much in favor among American cities
very much like the provision set out in the
code, which authorizes the creation of sep
arate street improvement districts. These
districts are to be found throughout the
American Union and have contributed no
little to the solution of the vexed question
of street opening and the original or first
cost of street improvement. The citizens
of the District of Columbia, and by this I
mean those whose residence is here and
not elsewhere, are deprived of the right of
suffrage; to give them the right to form
special iinprovemen**districts, either in the
old city or in the outlying suburbs, would,
in my opinion, not only ;idd to their privi
leges as citizens, but would contribute
largely to the improvement of the streets of
the District. The provision of the code
limits the street improvement based upon
the petition of more than half the owners
of real estate to a square or black and to
minor streets. It should be enlarged to
permit a majority of the real estate owners
along any street or system of streets to so
petition and to form a special improve
ment district, whose entire expense shall be
cast upon the psoperty of that district and
assessed at not more than 2 per cent per
annum until full payment Is made. This
system has worked well elsewhere because
It to a large measure places these Improve
ments directly in "the hands of the property
owners themselves. And as they pay the
bills and Improve in harmony with plans
furnished by the Commissioners of the Dis
trict, there should be no objection to Its
enactment here."
THE YERKES ESTATE
MISS GRIGSBY TO BRING SUIT
FOR A $2,000,000 TRUST FUND.
Beports from New York Indicate that
settlement of the estate of Charles T.
Yerkes. the traction magnate and million
aire, will be held up pending the settle
ment of a suit against the executors by
Miss Emilie Grigsby for a $2,000,000 trust
fund, which she claims was decided upon
by Mr. Yerkes, although the details were
not perfected when he died.
Miss Grisgsby, who is living at her home
In New York at present, is said to be in
possession of letters, rough drafts of an
agreement relative to the establishment of
the trust fund and other documents which
she believes will give her suit legal stand
ing in the courts. Her intention of going
abroad immediately .following the death of
Yerkes has now been abandoned, and she
purposes to remain here to prosecute her
suit.
While it is known that Miss Grigsby is
in her Park avenue home, she still refuses
to be Interviewed relative to the linking of
her name with that of the dead financier.
Intimate friends of the young woman
and persons who were in the confidence
of Mr. Yerkes during his final iilnfss say
It was the expressed intention of the multi
millionaire to establish a trust fund for
Miss Grigsby; that it was to be secretly
arranged in order to avoid the unpleasant
notoriety that was bound to follow If it
became publicly known, and tliey add that
since Mr. Yerkes' death came before the
matter was perfected, she, claiming to
have the necessary proofs to establish her
claim, is now ready to go into court and
not only ask for the money, but also to
wipe away the suspicious combination of
circumstances that only her uncommunica
tiveness has made possible.
Already persons who are familiar with
the situation that was attendant upon the
Yerkes deathbed at the Waldorf-Astoria
have volunteered to give evidence in court.
There are some who .believe that the heirs
under the will which was filed recently In
Chicago will try to arrange a settlement
with Miss Grigsby, fearing that a lawsuit
might result in upsetting the present ar
rangements that Clarence S. Knight, the
Chicago lawyer, and Mrs. Yerkes, the
widow, brought about.
Dr. Henry R. Searles has been held In
$1,000 bail at Scranton. Pa., on a charge of
bigamy, preferred by Mrs- Sadie Augusta
Holcomb Searles of Worcester. Mass., who
is at Scranton with her elght-year-o'd
daughter to prosecute the oaae. Dr.
Searles In January last married Mrs. Jacob
Bryant in Binghampton. N. Y. She was
the -vfdMr at a prominent Bcrantenlao.
Hubbard Heating Co
> Tw*nty-flve tmitb' tip?rl?nc4
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Talaphona Main 441
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of Go>Ike
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Ooke.
26 Boabels Larte Coke, delivered $S 60
40 Buahela Large Coke, delivered. tt 70
60 Buahela L?arge Coke, delivered S5 80
2ft Buabels Cmahed Coke, delivered... .ftS 00
40 Buahela Croahed Coke, delivered $4 00
^ 60 Uuabela Croahed Coke. delivered . fl.AO
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Complete Outfits
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R?-Mytlh&Co.,
Ryneal's. 4J8 7th St.
j?2T28d
A Splendid Lunch
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An excellent
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Quick service.
Agreeable surrounding#.
Hotel Fritz Reuter,
Penna. Ave. and 4^ St. /
_ \
E. R. HITT TO RETIRE
WILL NOT BE A CANDIDATE FOR
RE-ELECTION.
Representative Hitt of Illinois, chairman
of the foreign affairs committee of the
House, has decided to retire from Congress
at the expiration of his present term, and
has so Informed his constituents. Continued
ill health Is assigned as the reason for this
decision. In a statement on the subject Mr.
Hitt said:
"I have at last concluded that I will re
tire from the House of Representatives at
the end of my present term. This decision
is reached solely on account of the condi
tion of my health. My health lias been good
enough to j>ermit me to attend to ail my
congressional duties during this session, but
after careful consideration of everything I
have decided not to be a candidate for re
election."
Mr. Hitt's retirement from public life will
remove from the Illinois delegation and
from the American Congress a man who.
while not active as a debater, is one of the
most influential men of the House.
Although a native of Ohio, Mr. Hitt lias
lived in Illinois since he waa three years
old, and his career has been one of extraor
dinary opportunities. He reported the de
bates between Lincoln and L?ouglas, and ha
has been associated with public affairs, one
way or another, ever since. He was the
intimate friend of James G. Blaine, and was
peculiarly trusted by Thomas B. Reed, so
that at one time, when those two men were
estranged, Mr. Hitt was .UiniWit the sole
connecting link between them.
He was the confidant of Lincoln and of
Grant,, and as one of the original stenog
raphers of the country was called upon to
report some of tiie most important congres
sional and national investigations of the
stormy days of reconstruction.
In December, 1N71. Mr. Hitt went to Paris
as secretary of legation and charge d'af
faires. This was during the second Grant
administration, and he remained there until
1881. He went into the State I>epartment
as assistant secretary in the latter year,
and in November, 1SX"J. was elected to the
Forty-seventh Congress to All the vacancy
caused by the death of Representative
Hawk. Since then he has served continu
ously.
MURDER AT LOS ANGELES.
Mrs. C. A. Canfield Shot While Sitting
on Her Front Porch.
Mrs. C. A. Canfield, wife of a millionaire
oil operator, and prominent In society cir
cles of 1,06 Angeles. Cal., was shot and al
most instantly killed Saturday night while
si:ting on the front porch of her home by
Morris Buck, a former family coachman,
who Is In custody According to his story
Buck wrote to Mrs. Cintield soliciting ait
interview and demanding the payment of a
large sum of money, which he said waa
due him.
Rtt PROOF STORAGE.
!miWN?ifi^R8ST0^ffi;
? no wt c st > .w. ? j
WC?P^J*CK1NG ,r.^
Merchants' Transfer & Storage Co
?t>-B22 K Street. Pbune Mala ?3>
An official report submitted to the diet at
Tokyo shows that the actual outlay for the
war from the beginning of hostilities to
their end. in September last, was, for tho
army. and for the navy, $00.
000,ooo
?FIRE=PROOF STORAGE.
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t effected by selecting the best. If you
, contemplate storing your household ef
fects inspect our warehouse.

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