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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, October 07, 1906, Sunday star, Image 15

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1906-10-07/ed-1/seq-15/

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EDUCATIONAL.
<t Bp?. It..60r 8t.tl.a0 I w* . >2 51. I ?*.. tT.Jfc
W WABHDtGTOW.
? ? ?? ? ???????? ?
| Washington Cc
? > SYDNEY LLOYD WRIOHTi
* > CORNELIUS R
;; THE COLLEGE OF MU
" , It Offers a Thorousl
A Course for Teachers, Three Years.
> CAI I TDDM
d I flL,L< Lwi\m
t Pupils Can Bntc
J | BOMB OP TH
, , Ruhner. Wrlghtson. Fabian.
,, Garxlglia. Smith. McKee.
, > Holt. Wolfstelner. O-wst.
4 > Scftoenfeld. Burroughs. Haramo
?i LJebschuts. Mott.
? > MUSIC. DRAMA. HARMO
I f FREE MUSIO
$ NEXT YEAR FOUR OF THE ^
1 '> Nordica, Rosenthal, Schur
;; FREB TO s
t +
' JL Important acquisitions to Faculty Ind
J( Hn. as Violin Teacher?Pupil of Hollaendc
I'htIb. in the Piano Department. EDGAH
A Organ.
v 2? Free Sdhoiar
<5 COLLEGE BUILDING, 1218-1220 F ST
Phone Main 3M0.
HECKMAN
DRAMATIC
sphooi
\/ vy i i v \/ u
?
Third Successful Year.
Under the direction of ROBERT HICKMAN, late
?f Charles Frohnmv's companies, from the Empire
Theater, Now York dtj; William Gillette. Annie
Russell, Maud Adams, etc.
STAGE TRAINING, ELOCUTION. EXPRESSION.
ORATORY. RECITATION. VOICE CULTURE.
SHAKESPEARE READING, TIIK
TRAINING OF ELOCUTION TEACHERS (With
Certificate).
Pupils prepared for the professional stage and
platform. Public jierformanceH. Catalogue contains
list of Washington pupils now open t ie stag?.
Pru>AC \AyifViir? RpocIi nf All j
A A IV. V O ? ? illllu uvuvn v?* * ?
CHILDREN'S CLASSES.
Call or write. 1413 G St. N.W.
oc7-Su-4t
International
{ rman. French, Spanish, etc. Native teacher#.
Free hectares an European travel, literature, etc.
1307 II st. n.w. Dr. K. FORGER, Prin.
* ' BELMONT
Arademy. Collet and nnlvecslty preparation;
complete college courses; anj ago or sex; enter any
day and evening classes; children half price;
convenient to all cars; loftuion highest and healthiest
In Washington; twenty scholarships worth $60
annually; tnitlon payable monthly; drawing and
lettering taught by expert.
'Phone North 3149. 1321 Columbia road.
ART STUDIO.
Illustrating, painting In water color, oils, mineral.
SHORT-STORY writing. Address CENTRAL
ARTIST. Star oflke.
FMmt School of Music
(VIOLIN AND PIANO). 141.1 Q ST. N.W.
Prlrat* I*euon? at Uonnerrmtorx ITlce?."
Termi KI per month. Including theory.
F.t'BOPKA3 UBADL'ATK TEACI11EK3.
Opposite 1,nstlt"tr vrrtnri
home school for girls and young
the ladies, embracing all courses, in- j
__ _n . rinding college preparation. A
WOBltft personal call from those desiring
to place their daughters nuder
HmifiA wholesome influence Is earnestly
1 11UU5C* solicited. oc7-Su>ttt.thtode31
PRIVATE TUTORING ? PROFESSIONAL ? KNQJlsh
branrbea. mathematics. Latin, German, etc.;
oItJI aerrloe and college preparatory coaching;
beginners and advanced pupils; soecial attention
to backward students. Address TUTOR, Star office.
MADAME MBRCIBR,
Ne'e Parret.
llan resumed her French clauses and private lessons.
2129 N at. n.w. oc7-7t.theuocl4f21.28*
EXPERIENCED TEACHER WILL EXCHANGE
letwouH In shorthand for conversation with native
Spaniard or German. Box 21V, Star office.
oc6-3t*
HALL=NOYES, Day&Night
< ol le?*- I'rejiara tnrj. Grammar and Primary Claaafa
now formtnjf. Sperlal coaching. Catalo*ura. 'Phone
Slain 3KT7 K. FRANCES MANN HALL. A.M..
iK-S-Od 221 E at. P-W.
M M. C. k INSTITUTE
\ / An eTenlng school for Employed Men
11 _ ami Youths. 378 different stndeats last
U U year?662 class enrollments. Class
work under personal instruction of
twenty practical teachers, all men of ripe experience.
Classes In Stenography (Ben Pitman). Typewriting.
Bookkeeping opened Monday. September
L?. t.oi M**t? rrt-pam lor.T, ifnin*'i??*r.
Muth ma tics ibI Language Courses opened Monday
October 1. lne INSiiiL'TK <? t>ue oi the uiuuy
adrantnges of membership In the Waahtngton
Yuan# Mon'i Christian Association to which any
elf-respecting man la eligible. For bulletin of
courses, terms, etc.. applj to
Director of Education.
'Phone M. 48tf0. Y. M. C. A. Building.
se4 40t _
ARCHITECTURE AND STRUCTURAL ENGIneerlng;
evening classes in design, detail and
structural engineering. Including mathematics.
Call or addreas 1330 13th at. n.w., citj. oc5-7t*
YOUNG W <>MK.VS CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION
EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT.
Par and evening classes N?giu Oct. 15. English,
Frem-h, Orman, Arithmetic, Domestic Science
nd Domestic Art.
GYMNASIUM.
New P4itilpra<*nt. locker*, shower hatha. Classes
for l?ui?iitet?? and professional women. Private and
ejierlal claaaes.
For information concerning coupes, terms, etc.,
nply at the office?
*rbon?? M. 5121#. S.E. cor. 12th and P 8ts. n.w.
oc4-30t.lH
WIMODAFCHSIS CLASSES?1319 NEW YORK
are. Literature. French, German. Millinery and
Drefutmnkuifc. Office open from :l to 7. ?
selfl-30t-4 *lisa EVA C. NORCROSS. Sopt.
24th year of success in Wusblnffton.
The BerUtz School
of Languages.
Recent awarda: St. Loula Kxpoaltlon, 1904. Grand
Prize. I.lex** Kxpoaition, 1905. Grand Prize.
French. tierman, Spanish. Italian. English, etc.
Native teachers. Trial leaaon free.
723 14th st. n.w.
o<~2-tf
Wood's Commercial Schoofi
311 EAST CAPITOL ST.
Twrnty wconO year began Tuesday. Sept. 4. Six
!ni*tni<*torrt an?! fifty-five machines In typewriting
departuiejr. Catalogue free.
oc4 tf t'Ol-'HT h\ WOOD. LL.M.. Principal.
STRAY ER'S
DAY AM) NIGHT SCHOOL. OPRN ALL THK
YKAR 11TH AND F STS. N.W.
Beat Instn.? tl??n In Shorthand. Typewriting, fitter
Writing. S|?el!iitg. lt?n>kk? eplng. Arithmetic.
K'enmans i?it?. It.iphI Calculntiona. Commercial Uw
nd Civil S4-rrlre preparation. Situations guaranteed
all graduate* or money refunded. Write, call
or 'phone Valt 3430 for catalogue. One month's
trial. oc4tfl2
MISS UPriNCOTT and
MISS BAKER S SCHOOL.
KlndergnM? n Preparatory an:l Academic Departmenta.
Jlir. California ave.. curner of Conn. Coach
call* for cl 'kiren.
CI?Lr.MniA KINPKROARTBN.
I raining renooi.
2115 Cal. tp.. cor. of i ouncctlcut an.
oc4 :mt* 10
ti TT 7 J A S|>encerian Hostages ?5oIVw
ipflftp
V V 11 11 for free Booklets Illustrated
with beautiful
Spencerian IVnnmnsh'p
tor Self-Instruction. College ot?en from 8 a.m. to *
p.m. for callers ami students. Unlimited demands
tor Spcm ??rian graduates ever since 1864. ocS-lf
Mrs. Flint's
KNU1JSH AND KKKNCII
I>?jr Si-hoot for Girls.
1731 1 st.
(Katabllsbed 18S3.)
Will Keoprti Montlaj. October 8. 1908.
orI7t
Washington Heights Art School,
MISS 8. W. KHJ.f INSTRUCTOR.
2481 18tb. cor. Columbia rd.; 3 lines of cars. Upto-date
instruction la all branches. ool-7t*5
Shorthand & Typewriting
We teach Pitman, Graham, Gregg. Bamaa and
the Syllabic aysteina. 75 to 100 word* par minute
In 190 bonra guaranteed.
STKNtMiRAPUlC ACADEMY. Colorado bldg.
aeSO-tf.e
EDUCATIONAL
I ?h?.?t?0e. i wfc..??.n. 1 ?BUl
lit W/UH1WqTOH.
liege of Music. |
SON. President and Director.
UBNER, Dean. 6
SIC OF THE SOUTH. X
i Musical education. Y
Course tor Artists, Four Team T
NOW OPEN. I
? at Anv Time. X
E FACULTY: | *
Elsenberg. Drew. , ,
Priest Koehler. , ,
Jaeger. McCoy. < >
nd. Coda. ChlaventonL < >
Bentler. ? >
(NT. OPERA. LANGUAGES. <
\LES ?W,Bwins ~1
WORLD'S GREATEST ARTISTS. < >
nann-Heink, Peppercorn. 3J
ITUDENTS.
?i 1
lude HAROLD EISBNBERG from Ber- 6
>r and Sevcik. FELIX GARZ1GLIA, from \?
I PRIEST, from London, to teach Pipe y
ships Offered. |
DfCT V W XV A QITT M flTHV Ti P V
Send for Catalogue. Y
GEORGETOWN
UNIVERSITY
(FOUNDED IN 1T89)
SCHOOL OP LAW.
FACULTY.
BET. DAVID n. BUF.L. S. J?
President of the UnlTers'ty.
HON. Li A K1CV M. GLABAUGH. I.U D. .
(Chief Justice Sujrera* Court, District of OlM
bis).
Dean of the Family sua Lecturer en CbanM
Lsvr Plenrtltij nod Practice ami E^ultj
Pleading and Practice.
GEORG13 B, HAMILTON, LL. D.,
Lecturer on the Law of Wills.
HON. bETH SIIKFARD. LL. D.
(Chief Justice of the Court of Appeal* of tk*
District of Columbia),
Lecture* op Constitutional Law. tM U? of Corporation*
:.nd Equity Jurisprudence.
HON ASHLEY M. GOULD
(Associate Justice Supreme Court of tb* District
of Columbia),
Lecturer on the Law of Contract*. Criminal Law
and Domestic Relations.
HON. DANIEL THEW WEIGHT
(Associate Justice Supreme Court of tb* District
of Columbia).
Lecturer ou the Law of Insurance.
HON. WENDELL PHILLIPS STAFFORD
(Associate Justice Supreme Court of (b* District
of Columbia).
Lecturer on the Law of Aceucr.
CHARLES A. DOUGLASS. A. B.. LL. B.,
Lecturer oti th. Law of Tort?. Negotiate Piper
mod Elemental? Law.
MICHAEL J. COLBERT. A. M., LL. M..
Lecturer on the Law of Personal Property ud
Partnership.
HON. D. W. BAKER. A. M.. LL. II.
(United State* Attorney for the District at OelumbU),
Lecturer on tie Law of Real Estate and the Law
of Evidence.
Jnflfe of t&e Circuit Coort:
DANIEL tit. O-DONOGHDS. A. 11.. Ph.D.. IL. JL
Conrt of Appeal: MESSRS. LEIGH ROBINSON.
I. HOLDSWORTH GORDON snd J. NOTA McGtLL.
Qnls Maaters: CLARENCE R. WILSON, A. B..
LL. M.; DANIEL W. O'DOXOGHPE. A. M-. Pfc
D.. LL. M., and JAMES S. BASBT-SM2ZH. A. M.,
LL. M.
R. J. WATKINS,
FRANK ETcrmNiNGHAM.
Assistant Secretary.
ADDITIONAL LECTURERS IN THE FOCRT*
TEAR OR POST-aRAnrTATH miiuss
HON. HOLMES OONRAD
(Late Solicitor Onml of the I'slted State*),
On the History of the Development at Law and
Comparative Jurisprudence and on the History of
the KnclUh Law.
HON. 8ETH 8HEPARD. LL. D.
(Chief Jnstlce Court of Appeals of the District of
Columbia),
Oa the History of Constant tonal Law tad the
Foundation of Civil Liberty.
REV. JOHN COM WAT, 8. J.
On Katnrtf Law and Canon Lav.
MONBOH SMITH. LL. D.
(Profeeaor In the School of Political Science ?C
Colombia University, New York City).
On aril Law.
HON. LOUIS B. McCOMAS, LL. D.
(Associate Justice of the Conrt of Appeals of the
District of Col a is bilk
On International Law and Foreign Belatlona of
tb* UnlMI StitM.
RALEIGH C. MINOR. LL. D.
(Ptofesssr of Law 1a the nnlrersttr of Virginia),
On the Conflict of Uwt.
HON. JOHN W. TERKK8. U. !>..
Ob Railroad Accident Law, Mnnlclpal Corporations.
3. NO FA McGILL. LL. U.,
Ob Patent Lav.
ALDTS B. BROWNS, LL. B?
Ob Jorlillctloa and Practice of Tlnltad State*
Oonrta.
WILLIAM C. WOODWARD. M. D.. Lfc. SI.,
Ob Statical Jurisprudence.
GEORGE E. HAMILTON. LL. D..
On I tft Ethics.
HON. D. W BAKER. A. M.. LL M.
(United States Attorney for the District of Colombia),
Ob General Practice and F.ierrlsei In Pleading aad
Evidence.
FREDERICK VAN DYNE. U-M.
(Assistant Solicitor. Sta1^ Department),
On Citizenship.
The thlrtT-derenth annual pension opens on Wednesday,
October 3. 1906. at 6:30 p.m.. In the Law
School RnlMlne. BOH and 809 E street northwest,
at which time annonncementa will be made for
fK* Atlttlln* #A*n> All IntAMatail bm MM|IiI1v
fDTltWl to he present*
TUITION $100.00.
The Secretary will b? at bis office 1b tbe Law
building during tbe day and evening* from 8 to S
for Information, enrollment, payment of faea, etc.
Students proposing to connect themselves with
tbe school are earnestly requested to enroll beturs
tbe opening night.
seS.tf a. J. WATKINS. Secretary.
Miss Wallace's School
For Boys and Girls,
170T P ST. N.W.,
Gives special training to pupils who from rations
causes are unable to keep np with the grade work
of public schools. Number limited. Opens Wedneadsy.
October 3. sel4 30t,8
8T ROSE'S INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL WILL RBepen
on September 6, 1906. when wo will ha
prepared to fill orders for ladles' and misses'
gonna, coat aalta, wraps, etc. Leaaons gives
m ratting sad fitting. For farther Information
apply to 2023 a at. n.w. aoSO-tf
m 11. TT?fT a 3 M V M
JVlMtUiy IIJICHCII L*CCJlCt
TEACHER OP SINGING.
STUDIO. 1214 F ST. N.W. 'PHONE M. 5690.
?fM-tf _
Cooking, Dressmaking, Tailoring,
ALL WORK PRACTICAL.
NATIONAL SCHOOL DOMESTIC ARTS,
Conn. are. and M d.w. Claaaea limited.
a**2R-30t _
Physical Culture.
MRS. M. LANDON REED.
Evening Classy for Business Women.
Poise. Relaxation. Deep Breathing.
No special costume or apparatus.
1004 K st. TeL Mala 4754 T.
s<-28-30r?8
LAISE = PHILLIPS
SELKCT 8CHOOL.
Appeals to CAREPUL PARRNTS and WELL
BKK[> QIRIJ3 who Hint really correct cnrlroament
end the best school can rUe. All grades.
Preparatory and two years of college work. Art.
Music and Kiocution. Small classes. Special care
gi?en to eacb pupil. Native teachers of French.
German and Spanish. Pupils received for special
work. Mrs. J. SYI.VKSTKK PU1I.I.IPS. Prla..
sel0-30t?l2 1621 Conn, are.
* THE
WASHINGTON SCHOOL
FOR BOYS
With its Boarding and Day Deoartments.
with it?* Tnnior and
Senior Schools, with its modern
buildings and its extensive athletic
grounds, with its able Faculty and
its thorough course of study, offers
unusual advantages for the education
of a boy from the time he
leaves the kindergarten until he
enters college.
A Year-Book m?7 b* obtained at the Mlu book
tore* and bot?U or of ttM FWd JIuter LOUIS
LKVKHKTT KOOI-EK. MOM Wlacomln Aiaw,
wrt-tt ,
Bliss Electrical School
Offer* Regular (dart Count la tkrentlcil and
applied riKlridtf. ronplrtt ti ow rear, toiali
actually con*tract drname* motor* Me., aad m
trained for good position* In Hw isertrlral lottostrie*.
Foartfnth rear upi? September X
Call or aead for catalocae. tit O M. m.?.
a*:!i-tf .
Three of the seven children In the family
of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Vanier of Portland.
Me., were burned to death Friday In a
tire caused by the explosion of a lamp,
which had been accidentally overturned.
The children were fourteen, eight and six
years old. Three other of the children were
saved with difficulty.
EwrcATiomi.
National
University
Law School.
UXB SESSION OPBC8 OCXDBSR 1. tM
(Rnmtmg aaatfaaa oclMtntr.)
Compute tbna | ? com Degiea at LL.& CM
to xent it al ot aacoot m M fntati
practice coma* of tortfcilnl Intnete laaillt to
M J Mr u decn* of UJL
Ft* catalog applr to aaeretarr. US1 T at. I.W,
or. attar Oct. lat. at Law School lnilHIlm (1MM
1?U at. a.w. 'FVw M. Mat. ael-SM
GUNSTON HALL,
1906 FLOUDA. A.V*, WASHINGTON. D. O.
A boarding and day aefcoei for girl* and roans
1*41m. New bnlMlay. completdy I Ijii1p>?fl PS
rnarr, academic and eollactate daoartomta. F.lertl?a
camn. Opesa October 3. The aebool vehicle
... VWB'CT VIWICM tlUV iQC IKHW/ W 4.UVIIIM
Circle to and from tb* dual dill jr.
Mr. and MM. BEYEBLBY B. MASON, Principals.
ae2l-tt.!0
THE STUART SCHOOL,
184W848-184T C STREET S.ff.
Day and Boarding Scfcool lor Girl* and Too at
Ladle*. UUl CLAUDIA STB A ST. Principal.
MflHOt .8
ptm MoauS and daxcino clam?-finb
ball at lBOt 14th at. n.w. Special low rate* for
morning and ifteaooa. AnpV to 8. T. SMITH,
211 Colorado Ud? ael2-lm
' FAIRMONT, *
Home and Day School for Girls,
14TH AND FAIRMONT BT8.
Primary. Intermediate, College Preparatory and
Mrtiary Coartea.
kfnale, Art. ffl?atln AU department* la ebarg*
of colley* eradaatea.
New build In* for Primary and Intermediate DepartaMnta.
PniHeHw patroM hrrlted to call Seaatoo betla.
Octohe* 8. ARTHUR RAMSAY. PHn.
in&ITD WMI * ?>? r*-i_ ?? - -
Miss Madeira's School
m ore us.
HOMB AMD DAT SCHOOL.
1S26 and 1328 lttfc ?t. (tot below Dopant OtreleK
Frimiix, nil* School and Gimdnat#
P??
College Prrpwilw u< General Oohm.
Koala In Char** of FraoMi Marie ma Unachuld.
Art la chare* <* Mn. W. H. Holmes.
Oiosirioa and Taenia.
School aeaetoa beglna Oct. 3.
LUCY MADEIRA. Principal.
aell-d&a-lai-ltt
WALTER T. HOLT,
Mandolin, Guitar, Banio Teacher.
Clob Advantage* to Pnplla Free.
Studio. Watt. College of Hnatc. 123? T Street.
a#ll30t.e
Hniv C.maai &rs<1<M*>?
Wft Vtf0 * KMAUVllIJa
IdMt ?cb oot for young Mln ud children.
Academic and Preparatory Departments.
Complete cooraea la Mnslc aad Art
Becpena Sept. IT. (ae?-tf) 181? Mtaa.
TUB MISSES KHBB'S BOMB SCHOOL
FOB GIBLS.
1438 N STREET,
WILL REOPEN OCTOBBB 1.
A CLASS or BOYS WILL BB RECEIVED.
ael?-80t-a
PRIVATE LESSONS IN MATHEMATICS. Science.
Latin. German, English, music; university
graduate; 10 years' experience. Literary work revised
and criticised. Prof. J.. Station G. Box 2518.
city. ae25-30t*
Washington Seminary
3103-00 S ST. N.W.
An earnest school for earnest girl*.
16th year begins Oct. 3, 1800.
The only prlvata auhuul In Washington admitting
on certificate to all fonr colleges: Wellealey. Mt.
Wftlfnlt#. Vauar and finfth. Pfsnnwl ' Hum*
wfco Mrt tkoronah inatructioa and tin upiiniMlnx
ot cfcaracter amid beautiful wiiiiiiiihIIiih aad rateed
mocUtlonik
Aeadanic Collet* Preparatory and tpectal
Conraa* Primary aad Pnpantory Departments
node* a Normal School Teacher. Claaaea inatrnctad
br collcao sradoatea. Grmaaalnm. tennis. Call
for eatiTagaa.
Mr. aad lira. a. T. SUALL.WOOD. maclpaia.
ai ll Tm
Spanish Language School.
K. T. are, law OOMAH. Prla. mIMU
Misses Eastman's
BOARDING AND DAT SCHOOL FOB GIBXjS.
1305 17th it. Bora' Department, lflM Maaa are.
ao31-72t.* .
E?fl VWM'C BUSINESS COIXEGE.
rLInl" *-> Ktb & K. EatabUafaed 187*.
Poaltluna to gradoatea or money_ retondad.
Bat mtrucuoa. umy ? min, iu
Morthand, TjpewrHIne and all acbooi aabject*.
Preparation fo tlTll aerrioa laminations.
au4-3ra.?
MARTHA WASHINGTON
SEMINARY
For roans women. Special and general atones.
Two year*' course for high arbooi graduates. Musis
art. etc. Also primary department for limited ntmher.
Reopen# October 3. EDWARD W. THOMPSON,
Principal. Hth at. near Thoinaa Circle. aelT-tf.10
PIANO STUDIO?SIRS. OI.IVB D. JONAS,
1400 Hopkins at., near 20th and P n.w.
T? rras. $1 per boar: half hours for children. Ua>
sons at pnplls' borne If desirable. 'Phone N. 1408 R.
ae6-?Ot?4
The
AMia AND NAVT PREPARATORY SCHOOL
4101 Conn. ate.. Washington, D. 0.
A arleet hoarding : id day school for yoimg me*
a ad bojrt. Two departments?academic and pedal.
Academic Depsrtincnt?Thorough preparation tot
colleges. scientific scboola awl business; also tor tk*
government academies. Certificates accepted at all
colleges. Special Department?l*reparatlon of candidate*
for comiulisions in the Tariona lirancbea of
the military and naval services. Special class
rooms snd Instructors. Fine athletic field. baa*
ball, foot ball, track teams. Catalogs es at tk*
various book stores. K. SWAVELT. Principal.
an? tf.l?
EMERSON IISTITUTE
For Boys and Young Men.
014 14TH ST. N.W.
College Preparatory School, with Primary Department.
Special Department Preparatory for tk*
Aims and Navv. Fifty-fifth consecutive session.
WIN8LOW H. RANDOLPH, Principal.
?e!8-tf
P!?1IMA!?Y department o? Emeraoo laI
atitute. under charge of tba
principal and a lady university graduate. Ternia
for the session. according to age. $80 to (123.
W1N8LOW H. RANDOLPH, Principal. aelS-tf
BRISTOL SCHOOL.
English and French Church School.
Separate French residence with advantages equal
to tbose of a refined Parisian home. The school
la characterized for its training for home making
and for aoclal life; for Its high scholastic standing
and for lta strong attitude against extravagant
expenditure, and agalnat catering to the
loxory-loTlng tendencies of the time*.
ALICE A. BRISTOL. Principal.
Mlntwood place and 19th at.
ae?-S.jn.thta-2m-14
ILJnor! /-v?wi y-H c /-? n
11 U tt^klHULO OVUJlUUJIg
COEDUCATIONAL,
Begins Its Twenty=ffourth
Year Septemlber 24.
Primary, Intermediate and
High School Departments,
It his prepared students for more than twenty
colleges. ?nd Is accredited to those which admit
OB certificate. Small clauses under thorough and
experienced teachers. High moral and Intellectual
standards, with almple ami direct methods.
Three buildings, designed for school purposes.
The equipment Includes- new laboratories, art and
manual training departments, library, and study
ball, lunch room, gymnasium and playground.
Catalogues at tba book starss or from the principal,
THOMAS W. SIDWKIX,
se1?-tf 180H81T 1 street northwest.
Cleveland Park Schoo1
2MO Newark Stmt.
WASHINGTON. D. O.
Head Matter, H. P. CARTER. M. A.,
Trinity College, Oxford.
Exceptionally thorough education (or boys of *11
age*. Preparation (or Grotoo. St. Mark*!, etc..
and (or college. Conversational Prencb. Art and
Untie part of regular school course.
flames and athletics under Mr. Carter's personal
tope rr Is Ion. Private gronnd close to school.
The school is on high ground la the country, yet
can be reached from the city in a few minutes by
trolley csr. Arrangements (or boarders soeh ss to
secure as far as possible the adTaatagea of borne
Ufp. Lunch for day bora at the school. Particulars
and references on application. selS-tf
Private Lessons.
Preparatory. Special equipment for the tescfclag at
yeonr children. Mis* S. BAKER. 1718 CM. rd.
sel8-30t?4
Miss Dorsey's School,
1153 Eighteenth Street.
FACING ON CONNECTICUT ArBNU?.
Primary, Academic. College Preparatory, rally
equipped Athletic Coart with laetraeter. 4-tf-t
Automobile* as common carriers have
been placed under the official ban in Hagerstown.
Md. The city council has passed
a prohibitive ordinance requiring persons
desiring to run autos on the streets for the
purpose of hauling passengers to pay from
430 to $100 license for the privilege, accordteg
to the size of the oar.
FALL BES0BT8.
Mttmm, lUtOc.
hiw nanx.
Mount Vernon
5eminaiy.
Eleven Hnndred M Street.
Boardine And Dav School
for Young Ladles. .
EatabllaM to 18TS, tfcia achnd iniitfM tfc*
carefal training ut ttonnfc l?lim Mm la atmj
?2?rt*mfer wWefc It ham hitherto ban m favorably
known. It to modera and umiln to
sa "cS&n ^jsb. s
2SSaf.'tSS.^^S?k-~'
^TUrty-aecood year t*?ln? on Taaaday. Octaker
Far iotornittoii apply to
Mia. KUZABBTK I. BOKRS,
Mia. ADELIA QA.TKS HKNSLKT,
lKOOt.M Principal*.
T MR DRMMHI1D-6T
a lib a L)Mii aa ui\,u li
Ocean end Michigan are. Rooms en rottv, with
baths; lone distance 'phones In rooma; elevator to
*treet^S|>ecial tall and winter rates. W1L a. HOOD.
Hotel Traymore, t?t*T1?
Overlooking tk* ocean. Open an year.
TBAXMOBB HOTEL CO*
CHAB. O. MARQUIMTH. D. 8. WHITE.
oclt??aMlne Manager. PtesMwrt.
HOTEL JACKSON
FIREPROOF.
Virginia Ave. and Beach.
Special fall rates. *12.80 per week op, $2.50 per
tar tip. American plan. Refurnished throughout.
Flaeat cafe in the city.
oci-3?t-10 JOHN CHOSE.
Berkshire Inn, StS
Special winter rates. Pfcyskriaa sad diet kitchen
for conralescenta. J. C. t J. E. DICKINSON.
aai-BOt.4
QALEN HALL.
HOTED AND SANATORIUM.
Atlantic City.
One of th* neweat atone, brick and steel buildings,
with erery comfort. Always ope^ always
ready. always baiy. an36-dOt.IO
F1EEPBOOF BIO QBANDB,
New York are. and Beach.
Rot the cheapest, bat ths best, still within reach
of the most modest parse. Write (or winter rates
and booklet. 1. PAUL KILPATBICK.
snl7-8Bt.a
hji _ B 5 _
iniQitea irmgimons.
Ocean end So. Carolina are., midst of an attractions.
Capacity. 400. Large noma, private
bat ha; elevator, etc. Orchestra. Special fall
rates. 110 op weakly. Open all rear. Booklet.
W. F. SHAW. Prop'r. D. A. RAHTEX, Kfr.
sc8-80t
THE ST. CHARLES.
Host select location on tbe Ocean Front*
Atlantic Cltj, N. J.
DlaMnctlre for Its rtegaBC*. exelnshreness. blafcelass
patronage and liberal management. Sea water
In aU baths. Orchestra of soloists. Booklet, rate*,
reservations, etc.. apalr to Washington representative.
H RALPH BURTON, Bond building. 'Phone
Main 2700. NEWLuTBAINBS.
sriT-30t.l0
Hotel Rudolf, 8S3kT?Sr 225:
lean and Sanpcaa pins*. Bm ??l?t batba: prinU
'pboact; osckcttn.
jylTtf.6 CBA*. B. MTtM. Itfrmrr
PEirxmrAinA.
CHAPMAN MANOlC
Bio* Bids* Summit, Pa.
Open (taring Fall and Winter.
e30-Sn.w.aa.8t M. L. C. McOOMA8.
HILL TOP HOUSE,
BABFER'B VKBBZ^ W. YA.
gllKM *? .
NBABINO COMPLETION.
??? \
New Building to Contain Steamboat
Company's Offices.
The new building which ia being: erected
at the Toot of 8th street for the office*
of the Washington and Potomac
Steamboat Company Is neart&g completion,
only the painting of the interior remaining
to be done before it can be occupied.
The building Is a handsome twostory
frame structure and occupies ground
on ?Wch a big ice-storage house formerly
stood. Within the next week or ten days
Af thft atMmhoAt nnmnanr. and
of the Colonial Beach and r River View
excursion presorts, will be transferred to
the new building'. The latter has eight
rooms. It will be heated by steam, the
boiler house being located on the wharf
in the rear of the building.
On the ground floor is a wide hall in the
center of the building, running' through
It, which is to be used as a passenger
entrance. The office of the general agent,
the -freight office, a waiting room and a
store room are also on the first floor. The
office of the general manager and of the
clerks and bookkeepers, a meeting room
for the board of directors and a store
room are located on the second floor.
The' work of removing the heavy machinery
from the old side-wheel steamer
Samuel J. Pentz ig progressing slowly,
as she lies on the souQi side of the Eastern
branch near old Buena Vista wharf.
The hull of the ferry steamer Columbia,
which was burned at her slip here about
three years ago, has been brought up
from Alexandria and is lying alongside
the Pentz and will be used to receive
the walking beam, shaft and boiler when
they are taken out of the boat. It is said
that Mr. Joe Heath, who now owns the
Pent*, has had numerous applications for
small parts of the old boat by persons in
this city who want them as mementoes of
the many pleasant days they spent aboard
the old boat when she was employed in
the excursion business on the river, from
this city.
Arrived: Schooner J. R. Dixon, canned
goods from Nomini creek for dealers;
schooner Silver Star, cord wood from
Aquia creek; J. D. Bell, cord wood from
a river poini; lug wmiam n. i ernes,
towing tank barge No. 77. laden with oil
in bulk for Georgetown; schooner Went*
Roberts, cord wood from a PotomAc
point; schooners Minnie Estelle, Kirby,
E. P. Evans and Fannie Shepherd, oysters
from Potomac beds; schooner Oakland,
cord wood from Occoquan creek;
scow Sea King, lumber from Piscataway
creek, Md.
Sailed: Schooner R. Mason, for a point
on the lower river to load cord wood
back to this city; schooner C. C. Wheeler,
street sweepings for Norfolk; tug Wm. H.
Yerkes. towing barges Roundout, Saugerties
and No. 77 light for Baltimore;
?I, P.ron. n DannnM kmV.. ...
BUIIUUIICI VJ' i-zi.iniv.vv, Hi v?ou OIUUC
from Georgetown for Portsmouth, Va.:
W. H. French, light for Norfolk to load
a cargo of lumber; Mary Eldridge, for a
river point to load.
Memoranda: Schooner C. C. Wheeler
has been chartered to load shingles at
Norfolk tor this city; schooner F. R. McNamara
has sailed from Norfolk for this
city with a cargo of shingles; schooner
John E. Devlin has been chartered to load
phosphate rock at Port Tampa for Baltimore
or Alexandria; tug Bohemia has
sailed from Baltimore towing the barges
Roanoke. Minerva and E. A. Souder. laden
with hard coal for Georgetown; schooner
Richard Unthcome has gone to Baltimore
to load for a bay port.
The littlt. Ashing schooner George W.
irikku r o *_ v
xviuuiu, vaj/v. naisuit, vruiuu IUUI UUOI1 employed
li: summer fishing: on the James
river and about the capes of the Chesapeake,
came into port yesterday to overhaul
and refit In preparation for winter
hunting and fishing on Chesapeake bay.
Capt. Watson reports having had a very
successful season.
The power schooner Sea Bird, which .has
been lying at this port for several days
having het engine overhauled a ad being
made ready for a fishing trip t? the Carolina
sounds, is now ready for that service,
and is expected to leave here for the
fishing grounds tomorrow morning. Capt.
Dave Fauribe of this city will have command
of the vessel on the cruise.
Visit of Marquise de Wentworth.
The Marquise de Wentworth. an American
painter, is a guest of the Sisters of
Mercy at St. Catherine's, 101 North Carolina
avenue southeast. She possesses the
distinction of having been at the bedside of
Pop* Leo XIII when he died, and has
since made a painting of the scene. This
painting has just arrived tn New York,
where It will be exhibited in the Catholic
Club.
Decree Or anting Divorce.
Pauline Holmes has been granted a divorce
from James Holmes In the District
Supreme Court. The decree was signed by
Chief Justice Clab&ugb
OPIllOIBTMcNAMMA
Action of Board of Education
is Held to Be Legal.
DISMISSALS OF TEACHERS
Sight to Discharge an Employe Without
a Trial.
SUPREME GOVERNING POWER
Control of the Schools?Dissatisfaction
With Procedure ? Most
Guard Welfare of Students.
Mrs. A. J. Cooper, John L. Love and
James B. Clark, the three colored school
employes who were dismissed summarily
by the board ot education recently, intend,
it is understood, to test their claims for reinstatement
in the courts if the possibility
is offered. Therefore, the opinion of Attorney
McNamara on the question of their dismissals
is regarded as of only passing interest.
The opinion, however, as it upholds
the action of the board, is considered as
addtne much to the feeling on the Dart of
the members of the board that they were
within thetr legal rights.
The full text of Mr. McNamara'a opinion
as follows:
"You have referred to me the petitions of
Mrs. A. J. Cooper and Messrs. John L. Love
and James B. Clark, wherein the petitioners
protest against their dismissals from the
schools of the District, of which they acj
knowledge notice, by orders of your board
; dated the 14th ult. The notification Is set
out In the petitions that 'at a recent meeting
of the board, upon the recommendation
j of the superintendent, you are. dismissed
from the public schools of the District of
Columbia for the good of the service.'
I Teachers' Statements.
"Mm r!ooi>er avers that at the date afore
said she was principal of the M Street
. High School, and had been such since 1901,
and contends that she "now holds the position
by legal right, and that the board is
without power to thus summarily eject her
from it,' and that the action of the board
is a great legal wrong. Mr. Clark and Mr.
Love represent that at the time of the
action of the board they were, respectively,
supervising principal of the tentii division,
and a teacher in the M Street High School,
and charge that they cannot be thus removed
from the service of the public schools
without 'charge or trial' other than the
vague statement, for good of the service.'
but are protected in the enjoyment of their
positions, or lomg ouicr immuuia, u/
sort of existing law analogous to the principles
of the 'merit system' or civil service
law. What peculiar branch of law this is
the petitions omit to cite. Ail three petitions
state that no charges had been made
to their knowledge or. if made, could not
be sustained. The boas* is urged to rescind
its action in the premises which the petitioners
thus conceive to be without warrant
of law.
Grounds for Dismissals.
"Nothing in this reference indicates that
any technical charges were preferred
against these petitioners, and It to admitted
that no trial was bad. Th? only statement
made by the board is that the dismissals
were ordered Rursuant to the
recommendation of the superintendent because
deemed necessary for the good Of the
service. The only question raised for me
to consider Is the power of the board in
this behalf. Has, then, the board, when
acting upon the recommendation of the superintendent,
and when actuated by Its and
his joint conception of the highest interests
and good of the school system, the power,
express or implied, to dismiss an employe
without first affording him a trial and opportunity
to be heard?
"The board of education is the supreme
governing power of the schools. An Intermediary
authority Is pyramidal to this apex
of command. Section 2 of the act of June
20. 1900, vests the control of the public
schools In the board, and by the same section
It Is farther provided that the board
'shall determine all questions of general
policy relating to the schools.' It Is granted
the power to appoint the directors, supervising
principals, principals, heads of departments,
teachers and other employes,
and all such are in Its employ. Has it the
power to dismiss those whom it thus employs?
Although no express power should
be given, it would enjoy the implied power
to dismiss any of those whom It had the
authority to employ.
Powers Defined.
"Where there is no reference to the subject,
the power to dismiss is commensurate
with the power to appoint. As said by the
Supreme Court of the United States, 'in
the absence of specific provision to the contrary,
the power of removal from office is
IllVlUCIll IU UIC 1111UUU I.
(Keim v. U. S., 177 U. S., 290; In re Hennen,
13 Pet., 230; Parsons v. U. 8., 167 U. S., 324;
People v. Robb, 128 N. Y.. 180).
"In the act of June 20, 1906, creating
your board and conferring: upan It its
powers and duties, the only reference to the
subject of dismissal Is to be found in section
two. It Is provided therein that: 'No
'appointment, promotion, transfer or dismissal
of any director, etc., or any other
subordinate to the superintendent of schools,
shall be made by the board of education
except upon the written recommendation of
the superintendent of schools.'
"Further on the same section announces
the methods in which the appointments
shall be made by these two agencies. A
similar direction is also contained In section
6 as to the mode to be followed by
the superintendent and board in the matter
of promotions. But with regard to dismissals
the section Is silent as to procedure,
and has no utterance other than that the
Doarrt snail not dismiss except upon the
written recommendation of the superintendent.
Kay Be Bemoved for Cause.
"The superintendent himself, the act provides
In section 8, may be removed by the
board at any time for adequate cause
affecting his character and efficiency as
superintendent, but when any one under
him Is concerned the law requires his concurrence
before the board may order a dismissal.
It will thus be seen that the act
has expressly prescribed the written
recommendation of the superintendent as a
condition both precedent and sufficient to
dismissals by the board. The board is not
compelled to accept his recommendation
and act upon It, but it cannot act without
It. Under the act of June 6, 1900. under
which the former board was organized,
power was granted to the board to dismiss
on its own motion. The present act obviously
curtails such previous power by re
??re wuvui ?<cuv^; VI VUC BU|ICl ia"
tendent. But when this concurrence is
present the power to dismiss becomes complete.
The law as such has been affirmed
elsewhere under similar states of facts.
(People agt. Hyde. 80 N. Y? 11; in re Gleese,
SO Super. Ct N. Y., 473).
Provisions of Section 10.
"In section 10 the act provides: 'When a
teacher is on trial or bdnf investigated,
he or she shall have the right to be attended
by counsel and by at least one
friend of his or her selection.'
"Does this section operate a limitation
upon the power of dismissal conferred by
' action 2? In other words, admitting the
existence of the power to dismiss, is the
exercise of that power a valid one if the
party dismissed be not first put upon trial
and be given the benefit of attendance of
friend and counsel? As an ordinary rule of
construction, a power previously given Is
not to be diminished by a subsequent pro
toion unless such provision explicitly, or
by reasonable intendment, relates to and
curtails such previous power. In its terms
section 10 refers to the pendency of a trial
or investigation. It is silent, as te the act
elsewhere. As to when such a .trial shall
be had, aa to whether iaok a trial shall
precede action by the board advert* to th?
party concerned, or whether It Is guaranteed
to the employes aa a matter of right.
The power of dismissal, aa we have seen,
la conferred upon the board when the superintendent
makes his written recommendation
to that'effect.
"Section 10 becomes Influential only when
A teacher has been put "on trial or is being
investigated.'.' The naked issue now presented
is th? power of the board, wHh its
superintendent concurring, of Its own Initiative
to discontinue, by dismissal, the em
ryment of * principal or teacher becaure.
their united judgments. such act promotes
the good of the service. Of that
power the act in Its present shape presents
ntfedoubt. Aa I have stated above, the control
of the schools resides In the board.
?nd Its powers are proportionately ample.
Its decisions shape the policy of the government
of the schools.
Duty of the Board.
"When the board surveys a certain condition
or situation la the schools from the
viewpoint of the settlors proper policy and
finds that the judgment of the superintendent
reinforces its own judgment that
the connection of a certain teacher with
the schools no longer aids or is required,
but contravenes the best Interests of the
service, it Is not alone its right, but it
becomes its immediate duty to discontinue
his employment and remove such teacher.
Such removal, under the present act, must
tkA moi^a ? ? ? .a - ? * *
uuuo uj mi oruer or aismtssaJ. This
is a harsh term as understood in its ordinary
sense; but its present use does not
necessarily indicate more than a mere discontinuance
of employment.
"What construction compels a denial of
this power? Section 10 does not state that
a trial must be had before a dismissal may
be made. That section re'ates to the procedure
at a trial or investigation. Nothing
can be implied from It to e*ifr>ive ?*<?
view that a trial must pre-exist before the
power to dismiss is exercised. Under the
old board, trial and Investigation were not
provided for by law: nor, indeed, in the
history of the schools has there been i
definite provision requiring this procedure
I to be followed before the board could re,
move an employe. The power to ordr a
I trial or investigation for the purpose of
sifting charges wlilota?may be preferred
against a teacher, whether from oiltslde
or within the sctiooI service, and to establish
and carry out proper discipline In the
schools, is undoubtedly inherent in the
board, and regulations governing such
trials and Investigations should be found
In your by-laws. If such regulation existed
under the old board, as I am Informed
Is a fact, an appropriate by-law
should be enacted at once that this important
subject may be defined.
Result of Dissatisfaction.
"Tne former board authorized a trial and
Investigation In certain cases last spring.
Section 10 was inserted in the act as a result
of those proceedings, owing to the
dissatisfaction of certain teachers wit*
the procedure adopted by the board at
these trials and Investigations. The reason
of Its origin, then, as the scope
of Its effect to regulate the procedure
at trials and investigations In
the futufe. It goes no further. It does not
precede dismissals. As to this require
uciii, 11 leaves me law in me same state
as heretofore.
"The petitioners charge that they hold
their position* by a legal rlgnt. and that
this right has been invaded by the ooard's
action In terminating their tmjdoynient. It
19 plain, however, that this Is not the case.
To a large extent, a teacher Is a public officer,
or at least is one serving the public,
and being remunerated therefore out of the
public funds. Such public employment does
not carry with It the muniment of contract
right which obtains in private affair* A
teacher's employment Is merely the state <rt
being employed by a board of education,
which. In the last analysis, is a governmental
agency. Obviously, a person In the
employ of such agency, has no contract
which that agency la unable to avoid.
(Crenshaw vs. United States. 104 U. 8., 96;
Butler vs. Pennsylvania, 10 Ho>w., 402 )
Merely Cassation of Employment.
"It is, therefore, held that the dismissal
(at ttnf a In<^ls4a1 4*# Kmt
a equation of the employment by the employer.
Of course, a dismissal may be made
by tbe board when a teacher haa been tried
or investigated and found rullty of charges
which render him unfit to remain a teacher.
When such a trial or investigation is being
had section 10 would apply. In that
case the board would bass its action upon
the result of the trial or investigation; but
that la not the case at bar. We have here
the question of the initiative and power Itself
of the board to discontinue, by dismissal.
the services of those in its employ.
The provisions of section 10 do not reduce
this power. From aught that appears In the
act, the abrogation of this power could not
have been the intent of Congress. As has
been said by the New York Supreme Court
when considering dismissals Iflbe these in
question: *To convert these proceedings into
machinery for the formal trial of issuable
mutations of fact would not. we think, be
carrying out th? policy or intent of the law,
and would be disastrous t<* the well being
and good administration of\th? schools.'
People vs. The Board, 3 Hun.. 177. 181;
School District vs. McCoy, 30 Kan., 268. 276.
Within Board Power.
"It Is my opinion that imd?r the act in Its
present shape your action in regard to the
petitioners was within your power and the
dismissals were validly made. Undoubtedly
the power you have exercised is large. It
is a solemn trust. The discretion thus
vouchsafed is as considerable as the responsibility
which attends it. The board1 must
guard the welfare of all of the students of
the District, besides.having the stewardship
of a vast amount of public property,
and these two fiduciary burdens alone
necessitate a full measure of discretion and
authority. II tne nign piciutamcs
abused, the board la answerable to Congress
and the public."
FUNERAL OF STATESMAN.
\
Remains of Judg? T. T. Fauntleroy
Interred at Winchester.
Special Correspondence of The Stsr.
WINCHESTER, Va.. October 6. 1906.
The remains of Thomas Turner Fauntleroy,
one of the most conspicuous statesmen
of Virginia, were laid to rest in Mount Heb??
nonutnrv nf Winchester Friday, after
1 VII WIMWfcW J ?? J ? . .
the reading: of the simple burial service of
the Protestant Episcopal Church by Rev.
William D. Smith, rector of Christ Church
of this city, assisted by Rev. Dr. James R.
Graham, pastor emeritus of the Presbyterian
Church in Winchester. The pallbearers
were Intimate friends and former
associates of the distinguished jurist.
Judge Fauntleroy died at the residence of
his son, Thomas T. Fauntleroy. jr., 4149
Delmar boulevard, St. Louis, Mo., early
last Tuesday morning, after an illness of
heart disease of less than half an hour. He
had suffered frequent collapses rrom nam- |
enlng of the heart tissues.
He was born In Winchester In December.
1824, and was, therefore. In the eighty-third
year of his age.
Judge Fauntleroy's ancestry is traced
from the family of Staunton (Staurton) of
England, prior to the Norman conquest.
His grandfather. Griffin Fauntleroy, was a
captain In the American revolutionary
army, and was killed In the battle of Monmouth.
The Judge's father. Col. Thomas
T. Fauntleroy, was commissioned by President
Andrew Jackson as a lieutenant la
the war of 1812. Judge Fauntleroy was allied
with the confederate cause in an executive
capacity. Lunsford L. Lewis, now
United States attorney for the western disA-?1
v??a>(n<a woa nradflan t a# tKa ota to.
U iCL UL f uftju>a, K*
supreme court when the deceased was a
member of that tribunal.
Judge Fauntleroy went to St. Louis In
1896 to spend his declining years with his
son and namesake, who Is a member of the
law firm of Barclay. Shields ft Fauntleroy.
Deceased was married twice, his first wife
being a daughter of the late Philip Williams.
a Winchester lawyer. His second
wife was Miss Bettle Hite of this county.
Boyd* and Vicinity.
Special Correspondence of Tte Star.
BOYDB. Md? October 8, 1968.
Justice Jacob W. Dutrow to confined to
his bed. having suffered a stroke of paralysis.
More than on* hundred and twenty-five '
farmers attended the raising of a hui?
barn frame on the farm of Mr. H. XugiM
Wad* near Boyd* yesterday. The attendance
of the fanners yesterday was In se- 1
cordanoe with eastern in such occasions.
Mr. andMra. Gerald Tstten of MeaUla. N.
M.. are rlsltln* Mt. Totters mother. Mm <
Mary Howe Totted. <
GREETINGSEXCHUNGED
Address at the Presentation of
Sennr Panas
WVIWI ? MWMVa >
GRATEFUL FOR MEDIATION
Expresses Thanks for President's Action
as Peacemaker.
POLICY IN THE FUTUEE
Salvador and Honduras Will Strive
for Peace, Industry and Guarantee
of Bight*.
Gratification is expressed at the State Department
lhat Salvador has again resumed
diplomatic relations with this roTrmm?nt
For many years neither Salvador nor Hon
duras has been represented In Washington,
although th? United Slates has rimiinued
its representative to thos? Central American
countries.
Thi> speeches exchanged between Pres der?t
Roosevelt and Senor Joso Rosa Paras,
the new minister from Salvador and Honduras.
at the latter's preservation at the
White House Friday afternoon, were of
more than ordinary significance.
In presenting his credentials Serxvr Paca-s
addressed the President In part as follows:
Gratitude for mediation.
"One of the main objects of the mission
with which I have been intrusted la that of
reiterating to you the profound gratitude
of both peoples and governments for the
nobio interest wtth which you endeavored
to conciliate the republics of K1 Salvador.
Honduras and Guatemala, then unhappily
at war, and stopped the further shedding of
the blood of brothers and the waate of energies
which should be exclusively applied
to the peaceful and fruitful labors of progress.
"For causes that I shall not mention here,
we had already taken up arm* and entered
upon the dire struggle, when, actuated by
especiaj sympathy toward" the pei?ple of
Central America, vmi vouchsafed tout
powerful mediation, brought forth th? moat
weighty arguments in behalf of reconciliation
and paved the way for the honorable
conclusion effected by the peace convention
signed on board the American cruiser Marblehead.
which you go generously placed at
our disposal.
"Thus have you. sir. once more fulfilled
the lofty purpose of your wise policy In the
sole Interest of the peace of the world. In
pointing out this praiseworthy course you
have served the great omnipresent interests
of the American people; you have fulfilled
the mission that becomes the ruler of one
of the most powerful nations of the earth.
iuu graiutfu me aim 01 a Rreai
who exerts his best efforts In the cause of
universal brotherhood.
To Increase Friendship.
"The other object of my mission is to
draw closer. If that were possible, the ties
of friendship that bind El Salvador and
Honduras to the United States of America
and to do everything that can promote their
commercial relations.
"As you well know, those republics come
dally into closer contact with your great
country; mutual interests are created that
demand a better knowledge of the respective
agencies that will make them more
fmit #iil anil normonant
A* uuiui CWIVB
"The governments I represent, always
mindful of the welfare of their cltiaens and
se&lous In the cause of national progress,
desire, and on this point I have received
my most earnest Instructions, that the
American nation acquire a true knowledge
of El Salvador and Honduras, their Industry
and energy, of the untouched wealth In
which they abound, in spite of the smalt
sl*e of Salvadorean territory; of their Institutions,
of their opportnnltles. always
open to Immigrants, and of the conditions
of security and guaranty offered to Incoming
capital; for we believe that only this
nuu v* itmgc tuiu iiic ruiuiuciiu'e uuiii inn cui,
strengthened by the firm establishment of a
lasting peace with the other Central American
states, there will be a large and secure
Influx of money from abroad which will at
once afford profitable Investment for huge
capitals and promote the progress of taose
nationalities.
"The motto of the present rulers of these
countries Is peace, industry,* order and a
guarantee of rights, and tt is their most unswerving
purpose to exert every possible effort
toward the maintenance of these inestimable
treasures, with the support now
given them by the power of public opinion
and the co-operation of all well-disposed
and patriotic citizens.
"I am confident, sir, that I may rely. In
the discharge of the Important duties of the
legations that have been Intrusted to me.
on the powerful ai<J of your excellency. If I
may judge from all the acts of true International
cordiality and of benevolent deference
that govern your humanitarian policy.
"In conclusion, most excellent sir, permit
me to express the sincerity of the wishes
made by the governments and the peoples
of El Salvador and Honduras for the success
of the American people and for the
personal health and prosperity of your excellency."
The President's Beply.
The President replied to the minister as
//\11
"It gives me pleasure to receive from
your hands the letters whereby you are
accredited the diplomatic representative of
the republics of Salvador and Honduras
near this government. Especlaiiy gratifying
is it to learn that in your person the
government of Honduras re-establishes Its
long discontinued diplomatic representation
aP this capital.
"I thank you for the courteous terms in
which you express the gratitude of the
people and governments of the two republics
at the friendly and advisory co-operation
which it was m.v pleasure to give, con
Jointly with the President of Mexico, in me
cause of peace between Salvador and Honduras
on the one hand and Guatemala on
the other. Actuated by a desire for the
welfare and happiness of these states, it
was to me a matter of felicitation to be
able to be of some service to them by way
of friendly good offices iu ihe settlement of
their difficulties. It Is my sincere hope and
trust that the honorable and satisfactory
result of the peace conference on the Marblehead
will insure continued and enduring
friendship among art the peoples of Central
America.
"I have no doubt that your best efforts
will be put forward 10 pruuiuic ?.nu
strengthen the best and closest relations
between Salvador and Honduras and the
United States, and to this beneflclal end It
will be my sincere pleasure to give you my
hearty co-operation.
"I ask you to be so good as to convey to
the presidents of Salvador and Honduras
my cordial wishes for their personal welfare
and for the peace and prosperity of
the Salvadorean and Honduranean peoples,
the maintenance of which is assured by the
noble purpose of their excellencies which
you make known to me.
"To you. Mr. Minister, I give a hearty
welcome and trust that your residence at
this capital will prove an agreeable one."
Koekvill* and Vicinity.
- - " Tk> Mtar.
ROCKVILLE. Md.. October 6. 1906.
Mr. J. Arthur Brtggs. a young farmer,
who resides near Avery, three miles from
this place, was bitten by a dog supposed to
be mad yesterday afternoon, and la now In
Pasteur Institute, Baltimore, undergoing
treatment.
The members of the Young People's Society
of the Rockville Baptist Church were
entertained last evening by Miss Mabel
Shaw at ber home near Rodrvtlle. About
i dosen members of the organisation eaKed
a straw ride to and from the Shaw
ne.
For the past few days the condition of
Mr. Stephen B. Lyddane, who has been ill
tor the past four weeks of typhoid fever
h&j been extremal jr critical.
plana have been completed for the laying
?f the corner stone of St. Agnes' Catholic
Church at Oten Echo Sunday afternoon.

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