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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, November 10, 1906, Image 17

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THE EVENING STAR
WITH SUNDAY MORNING EDITION.
tv*la*M Ofic*, 11th tad PeiujlTMu4 Arena*.
The Evening Star Newspaper Company.
THEODORE W NOTES. PrxUcat.
Few York 08o?: tribune Bsliding.
fMftffil flffiM* Vint Iffttinre.] Rtr.V Rni!^inir
The Kr^nln* Star, with the Sunday morning edi
Uon. Is delivered by carriers, on their own account,
within the cltj at 50 cent* per month; without the
unday morning edition at 44 cent* per month.
Ft n.all. nodtapre prepaid:
ally. Sunday included, one month, (ID cect?.
ally. Sunday excepted, one montb, 00 cent**
Saturday Star, one year, fl.OO.
Sunday Star, one year, $1.50
J H. R. How*
% 13114 F
1*
f ~~r VI See t
*??
% $1111,000.
X ELEGANT CORNER HOUSE
LOT 43x91.
jg A very handsome corner house on
the Heights; beautifully located:
every room has southern exposure; 10
; rooms, bath; cellar; hot-water heat.
You won't find a better houso for
^ near this price.
$7,600.
A DOWNTOWN HOUSE.
HANDSOME FRONT OF
B ROWNSTONE.
This Is an elegantly located, well
built ami handsomely finished house
of the modern type; 10 rooms, bath,
hot water hv?t; It wouJd not sell for
such a low price, but the owner has
permanently left the city.
A BEAUTIFUL HOME.
In a very select location, a spot
where property la steadily enhancing
In value. This is a house to buy,
because you won't find a better one
at the price; 10 rooms; bath; cellar;
steam heat; double back porches;
rear stairs; easy terms'. ^
$4,400.
A PPRFKfT UriMF
One of the best-flnlsheJ houses on
the market today at such a price.
It is better than many that are sell
ing for $5,000. The location is good:
lettered street in n.w.: house has 7
rooms, bath, cellar, furnace.
$3,975.
VERY SUPERIOR HOMES.
They surpass all other houses In
the city at the price. You want to
see them before they are gone. 6
pretty rooms: large closets; modern
bath: concrete cellar: guaranteed
furnace: very deep lots to alley.
VERY EASY TERMS.
$3,300.
BIG VALUE NORTHEAST
- A co*y lit tie ft-room house, with
good bath, cellar and furnace, at a
remarkably low figure.
32,25 O.
4? A COTTAGE HOUSE N.W.
?4? Very cheap: ."i rooms and bath. Will
sell to colored family.
%
t
$6,2 0?.
RENTED FOR $<;o.
A CORNER ON 9TH ST.
Not many corner stores on 9th st.
n.w. that you can buy for such a low
price. This is a good corner and an
excellent renter.
*
4*
f
f 1314
H.R.How
It
"T-T ? *f ?fM$l
%
J Open Sunday.
f SUPERIOR
! HOU
| Nos. 2717, 2719, :
Bet. Fairmont and Uirar
Astonishin
$8,(
$1,500 Cash. Bal;
Nine interestingly arranged r<
HEAT; superior mantels and gs
dry ; servants' toilet. Delightful!}
sive Colonial porches across the <
WILLIGE, GIBE
| 603 and 605 1
^ W>lO-2t
$4,450. |
Columbia Heights. ?
1003-5-7-11 Irving St. N.W. g
(2 SOM> 1001. 1<H0> g
NEW HOISKS. II'TODATE, JIST 5
FINISH Kl). 9
20 ft. r??| brick auti atone front; S
scut teem exposure. *5
6 room* ami bath; all rooms are ar
ranged to tn? iua.lv private or comrunni
? atlng. and are bright and well heated;
gas range in kitchen; china closers, cab
inet mantels; houses trimmed In hard
wood; polished floors; large mirrors In
hnll. etc. Cellar nnder entire house;
foil in furnace ft?r hot water lu win
ter; ga* attachment for summer. Open
every daj; only Vmlnute walk to 11th
st car. and 3 V. minutes to 14th at. lloe.
ao?-3t.28
I
?r>> jk A
pages 11-5.
r ^?) J -1?ft?ft?ft?ft
T^ ^TTr v^flnSr TTTTT
3nstein Co.,
Street. * ?
'?at (Mfers.*
$7,750.
9
DLONIAL HOME IN
MT. PLEASANT.
BRICK HOUSE. 32 FEET FRONT;
olonlal porch across entire front,
the largest new house ever offered
section at such a low price. 14
tiled bath; large cellar; steam heat.
i regular old-fashioned home, with
nning through the center. 5 rooms
t floor: hardwood finish.
his at once.
$7,750.
ON COLUMBIA ROAD.
This is the kind of house you want,
20-foot front, built by day labor,
fronting on one of the best streets
In the city; 9 rooms, 3 modern bath,
rooms, double back porches, large
plastered cellar. Hot water heat.
$8,500.
HANDSOME NEW HOUSE.
This attractive new house Is In one
of the best blocks on the entire
Heights, most of the houses Belling
from 112,000 to J30.000. Let us show
you this before it is decorated, and
you can select your decorations. 11
rooms, 4 on first floor; rear stairs;
double back porches; hot-water heat;
first floor finished In solid oak. This
Is a houso worth buying.
FULL 20-FOOT FRONT.
"West of 10th st. n.w.
Don't think about this too long; but
come and see It. Worth your while
to Investigate; 6 rooms; tiled bath;
cellar; furnace; reasonable term*.
$5,730.
TENNESSEE AVE. N.E.,
Just a few doors above
LINCOLN PARK
The prettiest spot on Capitol Hill, g 9
Look at this house, It will please
you; eight rooms on two floors; every * *
room trimmed in hardwood; elegant # 9
tiled bath; large cellar; A1 steam ^
heater: laundry tuba. <1 ?
Decorations to Suit Purchaser. M
> V ?
$4,350. ; *
A GREAT BARGAIN. T
This Is one of the prettiest houses
In the Bloomingdale section, and It ? ?
certainly Is the be?t one ever offered
tii 9uvii a iliw price, it nas su many "y
features not found In other homes
In this section. 6 rooms, bath, cellar, ?
furnace. "*
$4,000.
CENTRAL NORTHWEST.
South of 8 St., west of 9th. A 2
story brick; south front; 6 rooms;
bath; ce'-lar; good lot to alley.
Kt.\ 1 llU 1-UK $24.
Near 5th and S n.w.; two-story
brick; eight rooms and bath.
$3,
RENTED FOR $26.
A good 2-story brick near East Pap.
st. n.e.; 8 rooms, 2 baths; back
porches.
msteinCo.
4
r\rta*4 C ? *? si # ? r
v/[/^u ouuua^. y
fLY BUILT|
SES. I
' x
2121 113th Street, |
d Sts., ColymlbDaL Heights, f
ig Value at
500.
ance on Easy Terms.
)oms; tiled bath; HOT-WATER
<s fixtures of unique design; laun
r located on terrace, with mas
;ntire front.
1ST DANIEL
3th St. N. W.
>?X~
1 FOR RENT=?
"The Juniata,"
11424 W St. N. W.
1 Only 3 Apartments Left.
'& New building, large outside
rooms. 5 and 6 rooms and bath.
? Rent very cheap at V40.00 and
* $tr>.oo.
d A * ? .1
.11 II
v/yru iui uiBprtuun an limes. ^
B. F. SAUL CO., I
7th and L Sts. N. W. *
nol0-3t W
it
WASHINGTON, ]
v. Headquarters for
are authorized to offer tills eleg
near Dupont Circle, at tlie very 1
$11, s
mis is an opportunity 10 secure a o
cation, at a moderate cost.
Also in the same neighborhood an $
chaser.
Examine and compare our Fire Insu
terms.
flARTlN
| Real Estate, Loan
t 1925-27 Pa.
4 it
I-M Il I III 1 I I 1' ! '! I' M"I 1 M M-I-H
Prlest'8 New Explosive.
From the London Mail.
For a Portuguese priest, Padre Manuel
Hyjnalaya, I* claimed the credit of having
invented a new explosive, which la destined
to aupplaut dynamite and otner explosives
used for mining and other purposes.
"Hymalaylte, aa the explosive ^s called, Is
made chiefly from chlorate of potash, and
there Is no danger in its manufacture. As
It creates smoke It is unlikely to be used
for war purposes.
Padre Hymalaya Invented his explosive
while In North America, where he devoted
himself to scientific study. The first ex
periments were made at Frankfort, Phila
delphia. with such startling results that
the Secretary for War would not give per
mission for further trials unless Padre
Himalaya would accept responsibllty for
any damage done.
Padre Hymalaya refused handsome offers
for his explosive in America, returning to
Portugal, where he placed it at his coun
; try's service. '
f
k
lUTOUJ
[). C., SATURDAY, NOV
f t f-t-t-t-t-J
Attractive Homes
nt Properties.
u? price vi
eautiful house of 11 rooms, in a fine lo
8,000 house for $7,000, to a quick pur
rance Companies and let us quote you
BROS.,
b anu insurance, t
Ave* N. W. |
t-H 4-H-H-M-fr 4"l"l"l"l..l-l"H"I"i"I"I"I"I"l
^ t
:S5nn cash. S9S Monthly.;;
- ^ i
3 11746-62 T St. N.W.I
Only $7,500 Each. ?
Why go to the outskirts *
of the city when you can I!
locate in this fine section?
just off New Hampshire
ave., near 18th st. and the
main car line? Location
counts for a great deal, you
must remember.
WeIE=BuiJt Houses.
Parlor, library, dining room. panir/
3d kitchen on lit floor. Four bed
rooms and an elaborate bath on 21
door. Two bed rooms on 3d floor. Con
creted cellar. Guaranteed Uentcr.
Servants' toilet. Back stairway. Hack
2-ator/ porch. ..
i - I;
Blundon, O'Brien $ Belt,
Incorporated,
1990 R St. HI W
gjj w vii in in
M4I1 I t !"H"M 1' I I I I I 1 I l'l I I I I
Widows.
From Life.
Widows exist in all countries, thus coun
terbalancing the matrimonial decadence
which might otherwise result from timid
men. "VVldwws are clinging by <*emper?unent
and attach themselves readily to any ob
ject that can't help Itself. It Is generally
considered unlucky to meet a widow on a
dark plazaa by the light of the moon. In
many countries to be kissed by a widow
means endless trouble. Widows are fre
quently accompanied by children, whose
number ia constantly .liable to Increase.
They roam at large orer the principal sec
tions, and no man Is safe when they are
near. All the perfect men now dead have
married widows, thus forming' a continu
ous contrast to the miserable specimens
irho still live. It has been said "Beware of
widows," but this is unnecessary, for no
man can really help himself.
The Customer?"How about this breakfast
food? Is it all right?"
The Grocer?"Sure! There's nothing else in
it. uui Mnuu?i ? a. uunci a oiaicoiiHiiii
I
EMBER 10, 1906.
I SHANNON & LUCHS1
A NEW SELECTION
OF
ATTRACTIVE* UIOIUIC*Q
AT
ATTRACTIVE PRICES
Excellent Locations.
LOOK THEM OVER.
$0,'.I50.
SPECIAL ATTENTION!
West of 14th St. n.w.
10 rooms, two baths; a fine, well
Y arranged i-story
^ residence.
brick ana stone
LOCATED
in a very desirable section, where
houses for sale are hard to find.
YOU SHOULD SEE IT.
SHANNON & LUCHS.
$6,8 =;o.
WASHINGTON' HEIGHTS.
A DECIDED BARGAIN.
Overlooking the entire city and a
luuttiiun unequaiea in me nortnwear.
Nine large rooms, bath, HOT
WATER HEAT. The special design
of this grand home adds greatly to
Its value.
SHANNON & LUCHS.
A PERFECT HOME.
REDUCED TO $3,500.
Positively one of the best finished
in the Northwest; 9 large, bright
rooms; bath; large back porches.
HARDWOOD INLAID FLOORS.
One square of 14th st., south of
i<ia. ave.
EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY.
SHANNON & LUC1IS.
$5.450.
AN UNUSUAL, OFFER.
8 large spacious rooms, tiled bath,
furnace heat; perfect condition.
LOCATED
west of 13th st. n.w. in a very desir
able section.
NOTE THIS.
8 rooms on two floors; side light;
as good as a corner hous*.
Greatly reduced for quick sale.
SHANNON & LUCHS.
$5,200.
DOWNTOWN HOME,
Near 6th and O sts. n.w.
A fine home property in a most con
venient location; 6 very large rooms
and bath.
Special feature?2-story brick stable. *
Better see this one.
SHANNON & I,UCHS.
A GENUINE HOME
AT A SACRIFICE.
REDUCED TO $5,150.
8 large, bright, cheerful rooms on
two floors, beautiful tiled bath, fur- &
nace heat. In addition to the at- ?
tractive arrangement and perfect *
condition of this very desirable home,
there are many things which add
greatly to its value?namely:
LARGE ATTIC, BACK STAIR
WAY. CORNER of an alley. SIDE
LIGHT, unusually large kitchen, gas
logs and range. Just the house that
will make you a comfortable homo
and an opportunity to buy a BAR
OA IN
SHANNON & L.UCHS.
AN ATTRACTIVE OFFER.
WILL SELL QUICK.
COLUMBIA HEIGHTS.
ONLY $4,650.
Just one square of 14th. st. n.w.
and located in a very fine residential
section. There is excellent future
value, as well as exceptional present
value, In this attractive home.
DESCRIPTION:
8 large rooms, tiled bath, furnace
heat, good condition.
A SACRIFICE.
SHANNON & LUCHS.
HOW IS THIS ONE?
$4,55o.
0 large, bright, airy rooms; beau
tiful tiled bath; heated by an excel
iVilt i ui iiuv-bi a. mo gianu I1UUSO VV d3
planned and built especially for the
owner, and is out of the ordinary on
account of its many SPECIAL fea
tures?
LOT 17x140.
EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY.
SHANNON & LUCHS.
r.APTTOT HTT T
ONLY $4,200.
A ST. S.E.
6 rooms, bath; furnace heat; per
fect condition. The location of this
grand, cozy home speaks for ltse'lf.
Lot nearly 18x100. You will know Jjfe
that this is an unusual offer, there
fore you should see It.
SHANNON & LUCHS.
$4,000.
A neat northwest home.
West of 11th st. n.w.
SOUTHERN EXPOSURE.
0 rooms (well arranged); bath; per
fect condition.
CHEAP.
SHANNON & LUCHS.
$3,500
COLUMBIA HEIGHTS.
One square of 14th st. n.w. Here
jvui wiij/uj luiut.; tu aeuure a. oar
gain..
6 rooms, bath; furnace heat; per
fect condition.
SHANNON & LUCHS.
DECIDEDLY GOOD.
ONLY $3,500.
One of the most attractive 6-room
homes in the Northwest; good con
dition. Well arranged.
LOCATED
% square of North Capitol and Q 3f
sts. n.w.; surrounded by homes of X
much higher valuation. Easy terms. &
LOT 17x90. afe
SHANNON & LUCHS. /
SHANNON^ LUCHS, 1
704 13TH ST. N. W. |
"Look for our Green-and-White Sign." ?
Black Walnut.
From the Southwest.
Black -walnut Is produced in thla coun
try at an annual rate of about 33,000,000
feet. The larger portion of It now cornea
from southwestern Missouri, Arkansas,
Oklahoma and Indian territory, although
there is some scattering growth still picked
up in IndiaMt, Ohio, Tennessee and West
Virginia. The most considerable stand of
the wood remaining east of the Mississippi
river is on the upper waters of the Guay
andotte rtver In West Virginia. The home
demand tor black walnut Is only for com
paratively small quantities. Its use Is
largely oonflnied to gun stocks, novelties,
electrical work, etc. The chief demand for
walnut comes from Germany arud Ham
burg to the commercial center of the mar
ket.
.a*. Any young man or woman who
flrtC wants work can get It through The
" Star. One cent
Part 2.
<K^^X">4~M~X-X~C"> -X-X-X-X^V
| Cars Running Sunday.
>
t r* i. t i
rasmonaoi
Saul's
X
?
i
most ciesiraiuiie u
Columbia 1
14th Street
X with all the advantages
I'S service. Rapid rise in va
11 Take Your Wife
I These Fine 1
|
j WILLIGE, GIBE
603=5 Thirteei
x
? Branch Office: Saul s Addition.
nolO-2t
x~x~:~xkk~x~:~x~x~x~x~> x~x~> *
a 1345=47 aod 49 %
The only THROUGH STREET
between Columbia Hts.
and Washington Hta.
A WIDE THOR
OUGHFARE.
UP-TO-DATE
HOUSES,
COLUMRIA HEIGHTS.
Hot Water Heat.
Beautifully Finished.
All T atpct Trlpac
Arrangements?4 rooms on 1st
floor; C bed rooms and 2 tiled
bath rooms on 2d and 3d
floors; ttrst-class hot-water
heating plant: rear porches;
back stairways.
Carefully built under the su
pervision of one of the best
builders in the city. 1347 open
for inspection. Look at these
today and consult us about
prices and terms.
Don't decide on your future
home until you have made a
thorough Inspection of these
modern
1 Thos. J. Fisher & Co., I
^ Incorporated. j^.
1 14E4 F Street N. W. 1
3 it *
'WW######## #### ##^jf
"JETTING" LACE."
A 'Mow anH Plpncino- Or?rn na +i r?r? fnr
Women.
Jetting lace is a practical kind of decora
tive needlework that many women have
recently taken up, both as a pastime and an
occupation, since the revival of Jet has
created a great demand for pailleted laces
of all descriptions.
The manufactured product is very stun
ning, but that Jetted by hand possesses
the advantage not only of durability but
originality of design, as in the lace bought
In the shops the work Is superficially done
and one break of the thread results In the
loosening of all the other jets, so that fre
quently the pattern is spoiled. Developing
original designs also gives the hand-made
product an air that the stereotyped designs
In the shops lack, for by the addition of a
few beads or spangles a pattern may be
completely transformed, and by this process
it Is possible to renovate the lace on an old
frock so that tne gown win iook line new.
Jetting plain net is as effective, if not
more so, than spangling lace, for in the
former Instance a woman has an oppor
tunity to work out either a simple or elabo
rate scheme of decoration that is entirely
original, or one that matches a figure In
the material of which tlie irock is made.
Jetting is ens of tli?. simplest kinds of
fancy work, though us a woman who is
an enthusiast said: "It is tedious, because
if carefully and properly done It takes a
long time.
"In jetting net every p5ece must be se
curely sewed to the mu?h?s and the thread
tied. If not fastened in this way the work
is practically useless, for once the thread
is broken or begins to unravel all the beads
and spangles will drop off, and not only
spoil the pattern, but the jets will more
than likely be lost, and matching these tiny
ornaments is not always an easy task.
"I prefer jetting Brussels net," she says,
"because then I can have any pattern I
stnmnpfl on tViA material. whioh_ of
course, Is impossible in decorating lace,
where a definite design must be followed
more or less perfectly.
"I have already Jetted and spangled many
yards of lace and net, and I find that in
working a large pattern on a big piece of
material that the easiest way to do the
jetting is on embroidery frames, either the
round or square kind?the size to be de
termined by the number of yards and width
it-- ?~ ?- Ann.oa <t In
UI lllo idl e ui iici. >-uuj ?3c, 11 10 iiccuicoa
of me to caution against pulling the sheer
material when fitting it into a frame, for,
while the meshes must be smooth, bo no
mistakes will be made In the design, yet
they should not be stretched or pulled, or
the beauty of the lace or net will be im
paired.
"Sew each piece of jet, or each spangle,
to the net meshes, fastening through two
of them. -Then break oft the threads and
tie in a secure knot on the under side. Cut
off the ends of the threads so they will not
n Vi Am Tn tV\l? txt a v nrltVi oo r?V? Kno A ? n /? ?
Oil+J TT ??? ? | " - VUVli L/VU U ?1IU'
vidually secured, only one piece of Jet Is
lost If the threads break, as It would be if
many spangles were put on one thread, as
la the case In the manufactured article.
"Don't use silk In sewing on Jet, etc., for
the edges will quickly cut It, and the span
gles may then be lost. I always use a com
paratively coarse cotton thread. No. 36 in
black for Jet, or for spangles any shade
that shows the least.
"The only time I do not sew spangles
on separately is when I want a cluster or
wish to make an overlapping line, with
each piece of Jet resting on the next one
in fish-scale pattern; then I use the old
fashioned chain stitch, which knots and
holds each bead so that the result is really
the same as knotting the thread and cut
ting oft the ends after fastening each piece
in place.
"With these two stitches and the tftigJe,
round or diamond-cut Jets, any pattern de
sired may be worked out on net, whether
a simple one of occasional pieces or an
elaborate floral or scroll design.
"In jetting lace the same stitches are
used, only when there is a solid pattern
the putting on of the pieces is less tedious,
because the chain stitch is brought into ef
fect more frequently, for only the spangles
need to b* tied."
A Merchant Recently Remarked I
"The men who go to work
at 8 o'clock in the morning ;
get up at 7; those at 9 get up f '
at 8, and so on; and it is my / ,J
observation that men do not
have time to read advertise
ments in the morning." <
v
t
Cars Rianraing Sunday.
e Homes in |
iddition.f
*
ocation north off
Heights on
L Extended.
of that admirable car |
Junes assured. *
Sunday to View f
Productions. |
IS & DANIEL, |
nth St. N. W. ?
?*
('Phone North 3975.) $
TRAVELING WITHOUT TIPS.
Result of an Experiment Made by a
German Hotel Keeper.
From the London I>?ily Mall.
Herr Qrauer, a wealthy German hotel
proprietor, has carried out an experiment
with amusing results on the tipping system.
He had a theory that kA hotel employe*
Jlh/lllM ho -no 1/1 a ?"> ?? " !??* ?i*>
?v, ? ? n0 n nftC aim 111(11 lip
ping: should be abolished In hotels.
So he started, accompanied by his wife
anddaughter (the Lausanne correspondent
writes), on a three weeks' tour of the chief
German and Swiss hotels, determined not
to spend a sou on tips, in order to test
his opinions.
One week's experience of the conse
quences was enough for his wife and
daughter, who returned home disappointed
and indignant with Herr Grauer for the
discomfort and Insults to which he had led
them.
Mvstorinna hJprnplvrVilpo and co^rnt ulo~no
- ' -n-v
?known only to hotel employes?announced
the arrival of the Grauers?"the non-tlp
pers"?at the various resorts they visited.
The result was always the same?nobody
seemed to want them.
At the stations they were told that the
particular hotel they wished to stay at wa*
full; the hotel omnibus was merely, "wait
ing: for a few old clients to depart." When
they Insisted on entering the omnibus there
was nobody to carry their luggage and
railway porters had to be employed and
paid. Arriving at the hotel their heavy
luggage was unceremoniously thrown on
the ground and the boxes were damaged.
The maid took half an hour to answer
the bell, and the "hot water," when it did
arrive, was cold. At table d'hote the
Grauers were alwavs served with the last
portion. The conciergre "did not know" of
any interesting trips in the neighborhood,
and was generally "busy" when they de
scended to the hall. 'Complaints to the
manager were futile.
Herr Grauer, who persevered with his
three weeks' tour to the end, sums up his
experience as including the following:
Lost three trains; luggage unable to ne
found.
Had four pairs of boots, two being new,
ruined; "cause unknown."
Two suits of clothes, one dress, three
blouses mysteriously contracted Ink stains.
Herr Grauer now believes that tipping ia
a necessary evil, with still a long life.
Antique Bracelets.
Written for The Star.
In these days of display a wrist guiltless
of ornament Is to confess oneself oblivious
of fashion. The bracelet fad. so long dor
mant, has come to life with morey than old
time vigor, and it appears to have come to
stay.
The newest bracelets are, paradoxically,
exceedingly old. That is to say, the designs
most in favor are nearly all modeled after
the antique, some of tliem even after the
barbaric. There are, for Instance, brace
lets whose Egyptian prototypes were found
In the sarcophagi unearthed at Thebes, and
there are others of Roman pattern which
are perfect replicas of ornaments discovered
among the ruins of Pompeii. The orient,
too. has been ransacked for models. Most
of these are armlets rather than bracelet#?
heavy, bangle-shaped gewgaws that might
have come direct frum the brown arm of
some Indian Maharani. Some of them are
beautified with 'precious and semi-precious
stones, while others are exquisite speci
mens of filigree work and beaten metal.
quaint beauty. The oriental jade bracelets,
mounted in gold or silver filigree, are at
once curious and costly.
The snake bracelet is one of the most pop
ular of the new models, and, incidentally.
It is one of the most becoming. So flexible
that it adapts itself to every movement oj
the arm. It is a veritable marvel of the
goldsmith's art. Occasionally it is studded
with gems, but ofternr it displays simply
a pair of jeweled eyes, usually diamonds,
sapphires or emeralds. These bracelets are
especially useful for keeping in place the
elbow-length gloves.
Some of the most beautiful bracelets aro
those made of carved rose coral, set in gold
filigree mountings. The best examples are
quite expensive, the workmanship being of
fine quality and executed entirely by hand.
The displays of cameos and Intaglios sug
gest a use for the semi-antique brooches
and eardrops worn by our grand-mothers In
ante-bellum days. In Etruscan mountings
of dull gold, held together by slender golden
links, hese make charming bracelets for the
ivvtriiueiii u\ziic.
Among fashionable women to whom
money is no object there is a marked fanoy
for bracelets of original and exclusive de
sign. A woman artist who has a genius
for working In metals has seized the op
portunity thus afforded, and now gives her
time almost entirely to the making of odd
and beautiful bracelets, often using over
discarded pieces of Jewelry brought to her
by her patrons.
Character in CurtainB.
A woman who has been hunting for the
characters of housemaids who had replied
to her advertisement for a servant says
she knew as soon as she saw the front of
a house whether the girl would answer the
purpose* or not.
There were houses with dirty curtains of
cheap lace, looped hack with soiled and
tangled strings; houses with tllthy win
dow pones and no curtains at all; houses
where the curtains made a feeble effort to
keep up a tawdry style, and houses where
tl.e glass was clear and the curtains poor
hut spotless.
In all cases, the mistress avers, the
lamAtM bore out the first impression.

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