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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 05, 1907, Image 15

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LOAN COMPANIES.
? Unwi. 1?..0?V. St. *120. Iwk..*2.ft2. 1 mo.. V.M.
NOTHING TO PAY
OV THE PRINCIPAL
UNTIL APRIL 3D.
Usually pocket hooka are flat after Christmas. and
on thta account we are offering thin proposition.
<>n a*l loan* made during December and January
we will require no payment on the principal until
April :< other companies Insist on a payment on
the principal the flrat month. We ask only the Interest
until April 3. aDd tin JIM mar mif the
Drlnrlpa) In any slie payments you desire. Following
are our rates:
? t _ I _ C-.. I ten #1 an n.a mn
im umj on . |?t iuo- i <mo, ??nij |>n uiu.
2o. only $1 10 per mo. I $flo, only $1.90 per mo.
2S. only $1.23 p?*r ran. ITS. only $2.49 per mo.
$100. only $2 ftfl per mo.
Other amo^it* fn proportion from $10 .? $500.
No charges for drawing paper*. No delays. Loans
with other companies pale! up and more money ad anrrd
nt onr rntea. j
MATNMAL LOAM ? IM?. $0.,
RO?>M 41. HOME LIFE BUILDING.
srr isth&a, tastu
d**27 2M F.XTRAXCE ON O 3TREKT.
MONEY LOANED
TO SALARIED rEOPI.E AT
I,()\VKST KATES OF INTEREST.
We l.'rtri on second trust* life Insurance
polMe*. Hated or unlisted aiooks. Ac.
Tine Mutual Guarantee
Fund Association,
Rooms 23 I>avl<lson Bid?..
1413 G ST N.W. Tel. M. 633.
Ja4 tf t'-l
SUle entrance on 9th at. Private Offices.
LOANS AT 3%.
f^nT IBERAL paying l>ark term*, low rates
ill a,Hl promptneae In advancing the money I
tjii . nir iiiuiarmniiP mm .....fi /"?
when In need of a loan. Security such
n* Diamonds, Watches.
Jewelry or Household ^
ftotxfe In ntorage accepted on any JL\l /VL^ I
aino'int. Interest charged ?t the low
rate of. J
Money Loaned Salaried People.
HORNING, 9th & O,
j*4 1HI
Why Pay 110%
When vou can -S) (fjr/
get it here c$W(Q)?
for
ifoncy loaned on Watche*. Diamonds. Jewelry. Ac.
Rstahllshed 1870.
H. Ko ^oltoni's Loam Office,
814 NINTH STRRKT N.W.
r2rt ti 14
Loans on Furniture
MAY RR OBTAINED
FROM TUB
CoSi2mi!h>:a Qyararatee Co.,
013 I ST. N W.
ABSOLUTELY WITUODT
DF.LAY
If in on PUBLICITY.
IF \OU IBING TUIS AD.
Nolhiieg to Pay
Uotafl March 3d
on but loins to new customer* made Ma mon'li.
No ex'ra cbargre for the additional time. Our rates?
We can sitl?fy you that they are lower than those
Charged by nny other company. Our monthly pay
mentu? Just s* much or its little as you choose to
pay Is that fair? If you are carrying a loan now
We will pay It ofT and advance you more money on
*?ur liberal and easy terms?then yoo will have
nothing to pay back until one month after the hoi
Idat are over.
0 7/ i? |\[ ? ioan * trust
, u lJ IL ll llvJ ? t"MPAXT.
no 409 commercial bank BLDO..
N W. cor. hth AXD O.
Fn franc* to Elevator, Not. "UO-iOfl 14Ct> u
d*-24 tf.35
Money Loaned Salaried People
and others. without security; easy payments;
offlres In fl.< principal cities, save yourself money
by getting my terms first. D. U. TOLM AN,
Room BOO. 533 15th at n w. nolH-tf.fl
LDUCATIONAL.
4 line*. It rtOc 8t. $1.20. 1 wk f2 52. 1 mo.. |7.20.
^STiTOTiv:u^e,,:,,d
Established 1852.
P??lle>re Preparatory wltlj IMmary Department.
\\ in*!o\v 11. Itaud- lph, Principal, 014 14th D.w.
J>3 h.<.t tf
M H ? im ?o*m OooWl
i'uu ?7o i'uo u_w<wku uv^u <y a u Lix ^ ^ 9
physical ci i.Ti nn foe apt lt^.
New clashes January 2d. 11. 4 and 8 o'clock.
lfio# 1\ st. n.w. Tlione .'?fa:n <;?35.
d?-:n "'.ot r?
Strayer's .
BosSoess CoBlege,
11TII AND F STS. N.W.
Now open from I* a.m. to 5 p.m. dally for the
nmllment of students who Intend beginning a
course the first week in January, 1907.
Tall now. secure your books and schedule of
ttudfes, m> there wiil t>e uo waiting when you
come In the first of the year.
Heat Instruction In ail commercial branches. Including
bhorthand. typewriting and civil service,
s KXPKItlKM'KI) I.N8TKi;0TUllS.
115 TYPBWICITKKS.
.v*) st!1?f.nts last year.
Situation^ guaranteed or money refunded. Catalojgue
fre?v Phone M. 3430. de2S-tf
Wood's Commercial School,
311 East Capitol Street.
Enrollment days for the midwinter term- Monte
J. I?er 31. and Wednesday, Jan. 2. 1907.
School of Shorthand and Typewriting.
School of IiookLppnlna
School of Fngllnh Branches.
COlItT I\ WOOD. IX. M..
de27 tf Principal.
j*RIVATl DANCING LB8SONS. 75c.; Gl-'AR.
Waltz and 2 step in f? lessons. <.'lasf, $1 per mo.;
Piano 29 Dan lug hall for rent. Add., with
stamped envelope. A.. Substation 22.
del >. * fitksrii
i.A.vcit m;tTsriTooT
BKOINNFHS' CLASHES AT NOON AND 7 P.M..
Ibar -lassos and privita Imobi: -nay, thorcuvh
iiih- MI UL V. PttUD'HOMMB, 314
Iii.i ave. ti ar lines) de3 tf.eSu
Washington Heights Art School,
MISS S. W. KKI.LY. INSTRUCTOR.
24ftl ISth, r.?r Columbia nl.; 'I lines of earn, fpto
datf Instruction in all branches. d*'8-30f
HALI- I;OYES SCHOOL.
Pay and nisrht; h?>th s?'X<g; all acourses, college-preparatory,
technical and traded; alto pri at?
?,.M.-hin}f ('a taioguc*. FKANCK8 MANN
BALL > M Pritt.. 221 Bl.v.; *DhotM Main 3877 K.
n.?2T??d
Mandolin, Guitar, Banjo.
GKRTRt'DK BrCKlNlallAM THOMAS.
1231 < .Irani at. n.w. 'Phone N. 3006-F.
? >??* to . *
international LANOUAOE Sch??'~
SPANISH, French. Carman. Italian. Natlyea.
Fre?- .v on Boropetn tm?el. literature, etc.
1307 H at. n w I>r F. FCR<iKB. Trln.
?x 7 tf.ft
Shorthand <& Typewriting.
We teach IMtman. Graham. (ir+gf?. Barnca and
the Syllable *y*t**m* 75 to 100 words j?er minute
Jn 1JV? hours guaranteed. S[ie<ial afternoon ses iona
for u?>v?-rnment employea.
STKN<H;HAl'IlIC ACADEMY. Colorado bldf.
ItSO f 6
fir RORi S i.xnrsTRfAi S s 25 <; wF.
D.w . conducted by the Slaters of Charity. Dreaainakln^r
In lta various branche*. Special attentinfi
?rt rt>n fn fallnr.mai<a miltn wKlla ?? o?n !
promise entire Mt is faction. you will l*? aiding a
g ?i 'MMM' in ; m .nl/jng our institution. oolO-tf
"TT y OA Call or iS..-n<? Spen
\\ X\ / fto tl cerlon Buslne** College,
V/VV II nil *t. nw for
V V 11 II fn-.- Hookl?>f* illustrated
wifh beautiful IVnman*hip
lessons, Shorthand,
Bookkeeping, Typewriting, Civil Service Informa
lion, etc. nol4 tf ,7
fp>n ftfNN'S BriUXBS COLLEGE " 8 A K.
ItiL Pool! obo for graduates. I>ay.
Ij ? Civil Service preparation. Sight.
U Shorthand, Ty pew ritiug, Bookkeeping, Ac.
poH-tf.4
^TTempSe ^cfoooL
^ ypewrating ^horthamd
1421 G St. N.YV. 'Phone Main 3258.
nol0 l>nt o ~
HoSv Cross AcflKdenrnv.
Select school for young ladle* and children.
Academic and Preparatory Departments
Complete courses In Music aud Art.
Reopens Sept. 17 <se3 lf> 1312 Mass aye.
The Berlitz School
4 of Languages.
723 14th st. n.w.
French. German, Spanish, Italian, English, etc.
Native teachers, ihrlal lesson free.
24th year of success In Washington.
Recent awards: 8t. Umls Exposition. 19<?4. Grand
Prise Liege Exposition, 1006, Grand Prize.
*o? tf
EDUCATIONAL.
OUT OF WASHI.fGTOBT.
MAPLEWOOD
Mar Philadelphia. One of the brat to wake op
Bojra to the dntlea of lift. Prrpaira 40 Bora for c*Il*f<?
or business. 45th year. Large gymnasla-U. Dent,
for Little Boys. No tobacco. P. O. Box M.
J. SHOKTLIDGE. A. II., Yale. Principal.
de20-30t.eSu -
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
MR. B. FRANK GEBEST,
TEACURH OK rlA_\OPQliXK
Pop!] of HARTTI, SCHAKWENKA. MOSZKOWSKI.
Studio. 1827 14th at. n.w.
?f22 tf ----- ~
MRS. JOSEPH PtNCKEL,
TEACHES OF 1MA.N0. Pupil at Jtatoa GloeMEer.
Hen* Sefculi-Benthen. Dresden. Startlo, ISO?
Monroe it. n.w. ^I'honeNorth 1587-K. . d*li?-?Ot,g
WINTER RESORTS.
I linn, lt. eoc. St. SI 20. I wk . $2.52. I mo . I7.?.
? . v . ? - "
,? _, .
VISIT THE STAR INFORM 1TIOX
BTREAU. ROOM iOO. FOR
HOTEL. CIRCULARS. HA1LRO VP
TIME TABLES AND FOLDERS.
FREE OP CHARGE.
NEW JKItSEY.
Atlantic City.
HOTEL DENNIS
Occupies one-half square on the ocean front. New
fireproof addirion of 100 rooms and baths, with
both sea an<] fresh water. The
most liberally Appointed hotel In Atlantic
City, with an unobstructed ocean view from all
nubile rooms. Spacious solatium directly on the
llonrdwulk connecting with the Jmtel.
_de28 26t.eStM0 ' WALTER J. BtrZBY.
CMALFONTE,
AtSarEtsc City, N. J.
ALWAYS OPEN.
On the Reach. Fireproof.
Send for Literature.'
THE LEEDS COMPANY.
_Ja4-tf.eSu.20 " ~ "
" Mill Ml
ATLANTIC CITY. X. J.
Always open. On ocean front.
Courteous attention. Homelike Burivundinga.
Every comfort.
B<*>klot and-Calendar on application.
LKKDS & LIPPIXCOTT.
Ja3-d,eSutofe20-15
T!he Fredomia, l\Z lift
year. Steam beat, excellent ta-Me. Special winter
rates. U. W. CAUMANY.
no21-60t.4
SEASIDE HOUSE,
Atlantic City. N. J. Best location on the ocean
front Complete. Modern.
F. P. Cook <& Son.
no7-60i,8
Hotel RodoIllF.
Directly on the Beacb. Special Winter Rat?*
nol5-tf.4
ChetwoodeTflli
Sun parlor, steam beat. dc21-30t.4
ffiariborougD-ElenDcim
Jal-?%Ot.cSo
GALEN HALL.
HOTEL AND SANATORIUM.
Atlantic City.
On a# V? non-oat atnno h*lck mr%A n?l
lngs. with every comfort. Always open, always
ready, always busy. au2G 150t,10
GREEN'S" Til OTiBL, '
Atlantic City. N. J. Directly on the beach front,
located between the two piers. Absolntcly flren-nof.
Hot and cold sea water baths, private and j'ubllc.
Capacity, uOO guests. Offers special r Inter t-nd
spring rates: elegantly furnished. atearo lectod
rooms: Anierlfan plan, $2.SO per day, $10 ,ip per
week: European plan $l.i>0 per day up. Salt-water
batlis free to all winter gncst?. WILLIAM K.
BLACK. Manager. CllAItLES E. COPE. Pro?'r.
<lel2-'10t-12
ffHottefl Jackson,
Fireproof. Virginia are. and Beach.,
Atlantic City. N. J.
Special winter rates. $12.50 per week op; $2.50
per day op. American plan. Refurnished through*
out. Finest cafe In the city. Excellent cuisine.
Music. JOHN CBUSB.
de!6 30t. 10
THE ST. CHARLES.
Most select location on the Ocean Front.
Atlantic City. N. J.
Distinctive for Its elegance, excluslveneas. taigbclafM
patronage and liberal management. Sea water
In all baths. Booklet. rates, reservations, etc.,
apply to Washington representative. If. RALPH
BURTON. Bond building. Thon* Main 2700.
el7-12*>t.lO NEWLIN HAINES.
PENS A COL* A, FLA.
THE ESCAMBIA.
I'ensacola, Fla.
On the Mexican gulf. Modern 100-room hotel, entirely
renovated; first-class cuisine- new management.
W. W. GEDDES.
del5-sa,Su.tu,th.30t.5
AUGUST^ GA.
HOTEL" BON_AIR~
Aiuigosta, Ga?
The famous high-class winter resort of the Middle
South. Well kept 18-hole golf course and completely
equipped club house. Hard, smooth roads
for riding and driving, and every other known diversion
for winter pleasure. Three through trains
dailj; twenty-two hours from New Yofi.
C. G. TRUSS ELL. Mgr.
Also Manager Frontenac Hotel, Ti*>u*and Islands,
N. Y. no25 Su,tu,tb,sat-30t
T7TTP APT? A tt PFCADTC
4JWAVVA A.IMA1 AVJUV/UAVXIl/.
Hotel Royal.
HAM IP In the Immediate center of the
mo?t interesting and historic sections
of the ancient city. Steam
HYAIl heat and electric lights throughout.
** * i ulL-4 u o Elevators; chambers en suite, with
baths. English-speaking servants.
Address New York office. Town and Country, Hunan.
2S!? 4th are. U. MAZZKKI, Prop'r.
de2tt-sa.llt.12
THE
1WTOI IWCT/fW
.toijdijli mmlyljli
BEAL'LIEU, Southern Frunce.
Midway between Nice and Monte Carlo.
The exclusive tourist resort of the French Riviera.
Delightfully located, with !>eautlful panorama
view of the Mediterranean. The home of the
American elite who prefer to be a few minutes of
the excitement of Nice and Monte Carlo, and yet
within easy access. -autlful gardens, terrace
promenades, perfect cuisine delightful winter
climate.
New York office.
Town and Country Bureau, 2S0 4th ave.
The Silence Cure.
From the New Vork Mall.
The pathological effects of noise are being
recognized more fully than ever before.
The efforts of the newly formed society to
protect the hospital patients of New York
from the harmful results of disturbing
sounds are merely the local manifestation
of a much wider movement.
Kurope already has a long list of "cures."
But air, water, milk and grapes are no
longer the favorite specifics. The fame
of the "silent cure," which began in France
is spreading:. One of Its strong advocates
is Mme Jeanne Giraud, inspector of schools
in Purls, who must be a kindred spirit to
Mrs. Isaac Rice of New York. In her instructions
to teachers she recommends this
treatment: "There is too much noise and
talking going on in our schools. As a setoff
you should have days of absolute silence,
without speaking or being spoken to."
One of the merits of the "silence cure" Is
that, in many households, it will benefit not
only the patient but bring recuperative
peace to all the other members of the family.
We predict that the treatment will be
lavoreu uy me men 01 a merica?especially
If the men are married, and most emphatically
If they are In the diplomatic service.
I-uther T. Ileioat is wanted by the officers
of Northampton county, Va., for an
alleged assault committed near Wardtown,
that county, December 24. Beloat is a
white man. After committing the alleged
offense he succeeded In making his escape
aiM has not been seen since.
NEW ENGLAND'S GLORY
ONLY PROPER SECTION OF COUNTRY
TO BE BORN IN.
Kan, Used Only to Mississippi River
and Bocklm, Sees Fall Blvcr
and B?rkshlres.
Emerson Hooch, la Appleton's Msgarine.
AH America Is divided Into three parts:
that lying east of the Appalachians, that
lying between the Appalachians and the
Rockies, and that lying between the Rockies
and the Pacific. Ihe last-mentioned
region Is inhabited by New Journalists, of
whom little is" known save that they eat
hlimnn flpsh Thp interior Drovlnce is set
tied at wide intervals by a class of beings
who live chiefly by hunting and Ashing.
Of the remaining portion of the country,
and more especially that lying between
Flatbush, Long Island, anil Rutlandvermont,
it is to be said that It is the only
truly civilized portion of America. It Is not
in the least worth while to have been born
anywhere In America except north of Flatbush,
Long Is.and, east of the Appalachian
mountains and south of Rutlandvermont.
For myself. It is to be said modestly,
but with genuine regret tnai i was uom
among a tribe who lived practically in a
state of nature, somewhere in the chaparral
west of the Mississippi river; a stream
which some vain persons imagine to rival
in importance Kail River, Massachusetts.
My father was a person of no importance
reared as he was in some obscure southern
portion of the continent. He died at
ninety years of age. and I much misdoubt
was damned, for he chewed tobacco all his
life, was not born in New England, and
although a Christian, was not a Unitarian
As much almost might be said regarding
my unfortunate mother, excepting in regard
to tile tobacco. It was her continual regret
that she did not cyme from New Eng
land. Her last words to me were in the
- m.rrv in I
nature 01 counsel uuu i ... ,
New England, since the privilege of being
born tnere was forever cut oft from me.
This for a long time I sought to do, yet
r.one would listen to a tribesman of no
antecedents, so that the best I could-do
was to marrya near-Yankee, whose grand
father was born in New England, but wlic
had for private reasons emigrated to Minneapolis.
Minnesota.
Of my early youth I remember but little.
At the age of three my fond fathe^
bought me my tirst pair of bearskin
"chaps," iny tirst spurs, hat and six-shoot
er; he being resolved that I should be in
full western fashion, and being likewise
a close student of Mr. Remington's west
ern fashion plates. At the age of five I had
attained a certain proficiency with the
native weapons, and six months later I had
shot the family cook. Nevertheless, I was
considered a backward youth, because at
ten years of age 1 had shot but twelve
of my young friends, and even at sixteer
my string was but a paltry forty men Oi
so. True, I couia nae ana rupe, ?nu, <>n
may be guessed. I never rode a gentle horst
If I could find anv other sort. My lan
guage I gained from the 10-cent magazines;
the same as invented in Brooklyn and Boston.
I need not state that my education
in eorrest western speech and deportment
was completed through constant study of
the masterpieces of Mr. Owen Wister, who
fortunately was born east of the Appalachians,
and so was in a position to speak
with authority. I may say that thus I de
veloped into an average specimen of tribal
manhood.
Eastern missionaries.
At times missionaries came among uf
taught us to feel shame at our lack of
culture. I recall how shocked I was when
with others of my young friends, I learned
that what we had thought a calf was not
a calf, but a cough. Others came who tok
us that our country was of little worth
With one of these I grazed upon some of the
peaks of the Rocky mountains. "They are
fair hills,' said he. "but you forget Bunkei
lull and the Berkshlres." With another I
stood by the side of the Yellowstone, where
it breaks down from the mountains. "This
stream," said he. "would turn spindles if
located in Connecticut, but for grandeur
it cannot be compared with Bellows Kails."
With certain pride I showed yet another
dwellings of our main village, known as
Chicago, yet he answered me: "A good
village and worth encouraging, but you
should see Rutlandvermont."
Thus it was that when I had reached
years of discretion and no longer shot the
cook, I resolved to journey eastward and
to witness as best I mleht the chief places
of ihls holy land. Wherefore I packed two
of my best horses?using: the diamond hitch
whose throwing I had learned through a
man from Connecticut?and taking my nearYankee
wife behind me upon another horse,
set forth to see what I might see.
City of Boston.
The city of Boston Is located fifty-nine
and a half miles southwest of Rutlandvermont,
and is reached by passing through
that wonderful example of modern engineering
skill, the Hoosac tunnel, before
whose features all Colorado pales Into the
strictly 30-eent class. It is sometimes called
?and meseems correctly?the great bore.
Not so with Boston, the enterprising metropolis
situated at the western end of the
Hoosac tunnel: for here great excitement
more especially of an Intellectual nature
continually prevails.
Of Boston I learned that once came
one who offered a statue of Liberty Enlightening
the World, but to him they said:
"Back to Flatbush! We are in the enlightening
business ourselves." I cannot say
as to this speech. 1 can only say mat uoston
is badly bent in its physical contour
Some said to me that morally a'.so it is
laid out on the bias. The streets are wel'
lighted with bay state gas. which Is very
cheap in Boston now?cheaper than it waF
when the company was first organized
The population of this city is Italian, as if
customary in New England. The government
is wholly Irish. A few French Canadians
dwell in the suburbs. I saw also
three or four natives who confided to me
that they could not get away.
Of the hospitality of Boston I may not
say much, save that it consists largely
of pie, this being in consonance with the
simple New England character. Coming to
" ""?-"vnrcorv tHo plprlf thprpilf
upon me, asking me what family references
I could give. Upon my admitting that my
parents were not born in New England and
that I was married but to a near-Yankee,
he remarked. "To the woods with vouse!"
Correct Mourning.
Of all The changes In dress that have
taken place during the last few years there
is none perhaps so marked as the new idea
of what's fashionable and correct for
mourning. No longer must one be heavily
draped in crepe for any length of time,
even for the nearest of kin, but the period
of first mourning, while much shortened, is
nevertheless very marked. Crepe is worn,
it might be said, on the least excuse, but
must be worn for only a short while, the
period, of course, being regulated by the
closeness of the demised relative. Black
it 111.1 Willie is uuw nu auiai i ivm ftcwci ai w Cell
that it is rather out of favor save for the
lightest possible mourning, and gray,
mauve and lilac also are no longer considered
strictly mourning?or half mourningcolors.
Satins, however, bright spangled
robes and all materials with considerable
sheen are now considered quite correct for
all, save the deepest mourning, and bright
and dull jet trim the majority of all black
dresses, while black lace and embroidery
are also deemed permissible for all mourning
that does not call for crepe.
Crepe In Itself is an exceptionally pretty
texture, and were It not always associated
by custom with deep mourning it would undoubtedly
be a popular trimming for all
black gowns. As it was. however, relegated
to first mourning, It must be kept
fnr licit nlnriA linf flrlvnntacro chnnltl
be taken, of necessity, to adorn the allblack
forms with It just as much as Is consistent
with the mourning called for. Crepe,
however, should be used with some reference
to the fitness of things and a chiffon
bodice and skirt embellished with fancy little
bowknots and rosettes made of crepe
borders too closely on the inappropriate to
be in good taste. Plat crepe bands laid on
in some simple design always make a good
style of trimming, and the bands may be
any width desired that Is in keeping with
the mourning that is to be worn.
FAULTS OF PASSENGERS
SOME DO HOT PRESS THE BELL .
BUTTON SOON ENOUGH.
"Hey, what did you ring three bells for?"
demanded a conductor of a passenger on the
i 14th street line recently.
"Because I wanted the motorman to stop,
the car," responded the passenger, angrily,
and scowling at the Irate faretaker. "I am
taken by this street frequently, as the motormen
refuse to stop when I press the
electric button."
"He didn't stop, did he?" queried the conductor,
as the car passed the desired corner.
, "No, he didn't," was the passenger's response.
and he alighted at the following
crossing, muttering something about the
trainmen "hearing from me later."
: "You see.- it Is this way," explained the
oondnotnr tn n Star rfnnrtpr on the nlat
form. "There is an understood code of signals
by means of the bell-pull between the
conductor and the motorman. and the latter
soon becomes so accustomed to the conductor's
individual way of ringing the bell
that he Is not deceived into stopping by the
pulling of the bell-strap by passengers. If
you will care to note,'you will observe that
when a passenger pulls the bell the motorman
will in nine cases out of ten turn his
head to see who is pulling the strap, while
he seldom does so at the conductor's signal.
"As all car riders know, one pull at the
bell means to stop and two means to go
ahead, but three pulls means to stop anywhe.re,
at the crossings or between streets,
instantly. Just as soon as the bell-strap Is
Jerked; it is. In fact, a sort of danger signal,
which means to" stop, and to stop
quickly and not ask questions as to why or
wnereior; it is sometning HKe me men ai
full speed' signal to the engineer from the
bridge of a steamboat, and we ring it often
in the instance of possible or actual accidents.
But the warning should be applied
only in cases of danger. The sudden application
of brakes wears the wheels and Is
likely to cause a flat wheel, which makes a
car run with that annoying bumping sound.
"This mo'.orman knew that I did not ring
the signal, so he did not stop. It was pulle 1
at a street crossing, and not in the middle
of the block, and he knew it was done by
some passenger who understood the signal
who had been carried by the crossing, and
who did not want to go on to the further
crossing. Such stoppages as these, however,
interfere with the time schedules
more or less, and the motorman will not
make them for passengers. ;
Didn't Ring Soon Enough.
"As that passenger said, he had 'been laying'
for this particular motorman?in all
probability the motorman had 'been laying'
for the passenger, as I think I can discern
the remnants of a smile still playing around
the back of his neck. We try the best that
our many different duties permit to obey
the behests of passengers as regards alighting
at the crossing desired; but if you will
also observe, there is a certain proportion
of car riders who make up their minds to
alight only when the actual point of cross- \
ing is reached, and then they make a plunge ,
at the electric button and a dive for the
door, and if the car fails to .stop blame it ,
upon the conductor or the motorman, or
usually upon both men. ,
"Car riders should appreciate the fact (
that it requires much physical exertion on ]
the part of the motormen to stop these big
new cars, as well as the cars with trailers ;
attached, even under ordinary conditions, j
when a timely warning by pressing the but- J
ton has been given, thus enabling the mo- j
torman to slacken speed gradually. When ,
the car must be brought to a sudden and ;
abrupt halt, as at a three-bell pull, it makes (
the strongest of 'em feel it, as the momen- |
turn of a crowded car, especially on. the ,
down grades of this or any other line is j
very great. I
When the Button Should Be Pressed. <
"Could the car be stopped by an electric ]
pressure, as an elevator. It would be an <
easy matter to bring It to a quick stand- .
still, but the car-riding public should re- 1
member that there is only flesh and blood |
at the brake-artn. Passengers may greatly
facilitate their exit, and largely assist the 1
exertions of the motormen, which, repeated I
time and again, all day, Is very wearing, '
by being thoughtful enough to press the
convenient electric button not when the desired
crossing is reached, but shortly after
the next preceding is passed. They will
find that the average motorman is responsive
to these accustomed warnings, and It
will be very infrequent that they will be
carried by their destination.
"On cold and windy days and nights espe- i
ciallv. when the motormen are almost be
numbed by the weather. It is almost a
cruelty to 'put It up' to the motorman any
more than Is absolutely necessary, and now
that the winter is here the passengers might
give a kindly, if only a passing, thought to
the men who are 'out in front.' and who,
as a general rule, try to do the best they can
to conserve the convenience and the safety
of the passengers intrusted to their care.
They get small pay and little thanks at
best, but it is not impossible. In the many
ways well known to car riders, to show at
times some slight consideration toward
these men. And the conductors? Well, we
don't expect any;,but, as hard as our lot Is,
It isn't as tough as that of the 'man out
front.' ".
nucci wiuv w*. vu^au. J
From Harper's Weekly.
In Japan the lower orders of life not only 1
make war and supply meat, but evince
sundry other peculiarities that render them '
Invaluable concomitants of civilization. A
few days ago a number of people were seen 1
gazing intently toward the upper limbs of
a large pine-tree. Stopping to learn -the '
secret of this unusual interest, a man was
observed descending the tree, wrhile a crow '
was furiously cawing and beating about his '
head; then It was seen that the trespasser
had possessed himself of one of her brood, '
an unprepossessing little chick that no one <
could be Imagined to fancy for a pet. Asked
what he Intended doing with the young ,
crow, he replied that it made excellent
medicine for the blood: "Chi-no-michi-no !
1riir?nr>{ " n ML-ft Vi 11? ovortt T*i u Tr> In.
IVU^Ul l| LU UOC iiio ? AUVl ?? UO. J.U Jll
sure the efficacy of the medicine, he explained,
the bird must be taken before it ;
leaves the nest, if possible, or, if it has left
the nest, before It gets to where it can .
drink water; for, he asserted, if it has of ,
itself taken water, it loses all virtue as a
blood-cure. The process of preparing the
remedy is, first, to kill the crow, and, with- ,
out cleaning it, to encase the body in an j
air-tight covering of cement or clay. The
mould is then baked for two or three days |
in a hot fire. When the clay crust Is re- ,
moved, naturally the crow will be found to ,
be black, a lump of pure charcoal. This is ,
on/4 Intn nillo I. ^
ui ? rt ii.ru aiiu v.uin vi iru iiiiu (MHO ui 111c
"pink" order, which are very popular here
as a blood regulator. He reminded his Interlocutors
that the medicine was very rare
because of the difficulty of finding a crow
that had not taken water. The man was
perfectly sincere, and appeared extremely
proud of his success In having secured the
bird. He was reluctant to leave the tree
lest there should be another one on the
ground somewhere.
Those who, since the brilliant achievements
of the Japanese Red Cross Society
In the late war. are accustomed to take for
granted the advance of medical science in
this country, will, of course, bear in mind
that the practitioner under consideration
had not at this time acquired membership
In any legally recognized "therapeutic fra- ;
ternlty; but probably his nostrum was quite
as effective as much of the medicine that
is sold to a large constituency at a higher
price in other portions of the globe. 1
Man's Weakness. ,
From the Ixjfulop Chronicle. 1
Human weaknesses have had the sym- "
pathy of all ages, from the right sort of
sinner; and one of the many stories re- 1
lated of the great eastern wit, Nasr-eddinHodja,
illustrates this truth. A company 1
of men were confessing their weaknesses, \
some of them harmless, some of them the s
opposite. One. however?he was very ,
>x>ung?declared he had none. "I neither ,
smoke nor drink," he said; "I do not keep ,
late hours; I never lose my temper; I am
not dissipated." This had a chilling effect ,
upon the company, and everybody was glad ]
of the diversion when a poor man rushed
In upon them, beating his breast and show- ]
ing other "Arabian Nights" signs of being t
in deep distress. "I have lost my donkey.
Allan, Allan: wuai sniwi 1 uune waueo. ?
"Here, we can help you," said Nasr-eddinHodja,
pointing to the young man with no t
weaknesses; "take him. You will never i
And a blggw donkey." j
DIPLOMAS IN SIGHT
PUTT MIDDIES READY FOB
GRADUATION NEXT MONTH.
Must Maintain Present Sating During
January?List of Lucky
OnM.
Special Dispatch to Tbe Star.
ANNAPOLI8, January 8.?The scholastic
standing of members of the llrst class of
midshipmen obtained from the marks, inthe
whole course. Including last month. In
dlcate that approximately 50 of the 124
members will receive their diplomas In
February, the remainder graduating in
June, the regular time. Only one examination
remains, that in seamanship. At the
beginning of the scholastic year there were
171 members of the class, but 47 graduated
in September last and the graduation of 50
additional in February will reduce the
number of final graduates to 74. !
The first section received their diplomas
by obtaining a general average of 78 per
cent In all subjects for the three years of
their course. According to the first order
on the subject, the second section to graduate
was to consist of those who succeeded
in bringing their aggregate up to the same
per cent by their work during the present
term. It was found that this would only
result in a small number of additional
graduates and the order was changed so
that the section Included all those who
obtained 75 per cent for the first three
years and 78 per cent for the work of the
present term. The fifty midshipmen mentioned
below have obtained this standing
and should they maintain it during January
will be graduated next month.
Officers in the List.
The class includes Midshipmen Alfred M.
Cohen, the midshipman commander of the
hriirn<ir>- Miri-shinmpn FTprhprt I. SDencer
and Claudius R. Hyatt, the battalion commanders,
and a number of the company
commanders. Their graduation will necessitate
a new set of midshipmen officers for
most of the important positions in the
brigade. Spencer is captain of the foot ball
team and among the other graduates is
Churchill Humphreys, president of the
class.
The graduation of this section will play
havoc with base ball prospects, as Capt.
Thibauit, Goldthwaite and Cohen, the whole
outfield, and Symington, first base, are
among its members. Manager McKittrick
of the nine, and Prichard, who pulls bow
oar on the crew, are also among those who
have qualified for early graduation.
The full list is: William G. Wallace,
Warrensburg. Mo.; Frank H. King. Scottsboro,
Ala.: Bruce R. Ware, jr., Newton,
Mass.; Preston H. MeCrary, Lonoke, Ark.;
Archibald D. Turnbull. at large; David S.
H. Howard, Palestine, Tex.; William S.
Farber, Frankfort, lnd.; Maj. C. Shirley,
Anderson. S. C.; Arie A. Corwin, Pontiac,
Mich.; Alfred M. Cohen, Philadelphia, Pa.;
CJeorge M. Ravenscroft, Cleveland, Ohio;
Churchill Humphreys, Louisville. Ky.; Emil
A. Lichenstein, Corpus Christi, Tex.; Francis
D. Pryor, San Francisco, Cal.; Claudius
K. Hyatt, Jonesvnie, va.; unaries \v. i
Crosse. Stoughton, Wis.; Harry J. Abbett,
Covington, Ky.; Sloan Danenhower, at
arge; John S. Barleon, MacArthur, Ohio;
William T. Smith, Fredericksburg, Va.;
Roy P. Emrich. Galosburg, 111.; Herbert L.
Spencer, Duluth, Minn.; George McC.
Courts, at large; Stephen B. McKinney,
Knoxville, Tenn.; Jacob H. Klein, jr., Cincinnati,
Ohio; William H. Cochrane, Jr.,
Bismarck, N. D.; Jacob H. Hydrick,
Jrangeburg, S. C.; George C. Logan,Charles:on,
S. C.; Ix>uis F. Thebault, Winsted,
Conn.; Henry tt. Keller, Meinhard, Ga.;
Baxter H. Bruce, Evart, Mich.; Waller
F. LaFrenz, Spokane, Wash.;
jforge H. Baird, Wheeling, W. Va.;
Henry G. Shonerd, Garlin, Nev.;
Eugene B. Walker. Denver, Col.; Clar
?nce Me. McGili, Lambertville, N. J.;
John B. Earle, Los Angeles, Cal.; Herbert
Holden, Portage, Wis.; Ellis Lando, Honolulu,
Hawaii; Frederick P. Lilley, Waterbury,
Conn.; George T. Swasey, Barre, Vt.;
Harold V. McKittrick, Rochester, N. V.;
Richard E. Cassidy, Norwich. Conn.; Faulkner
Goldthwaite, Hopkinsviile. Ky.; George
r. Blackburn. Evanston. Wyp.; Harlow T.
Kays, Phoenix, Ariz.; Thomas A. Symington,
Catonsville, Md.; Earl W. Prichard,
Indianapolis, Ind.; Robert C. Giffen, Lincoln.
Neb.; Frank W. Lagerquist, Minneapolis,
Minn.
Small Arms Practice.
The department of ordnance and gunnery
it the Naval Academy, of which Commander
T. B. Howard is the head, is demoting
more attention than ever to the
training of the midshipmen in small-arm
practice. Much attention is being devoted
not only to the candidates for the rifle
team, dui also 10 me miasmpmen in general.
Five sub-target guns have been installed
in the armory and are In dally use. Two
afficers of the department havp been assigned
as instructors in this branch. They
a.re I,leut. Harris leaning, who acted in the
same capacity last year and also coached
both the Naval Academy and navy rifle
teams, and Lieut. A. P. Fairfield.
Health Hints.
Prom the Bohemian.
Never get cold feet especially In politics.
For palpitation of the heart, quit readng
market quotations.
A good way to treat appendicitis is to
:ut out the surgeon.
Avoid late hours; when the clock strikes
23 It is time to go to bed.
Maladies which fail to respond to any
ithcr treatment should be treated with
silent contempt.
Remember that care killed a cat, and
the man who has no more than nine lives
can't afford to worry.
Nose-bleed is frequently caused by not
minding your own business. It may be
lured by calling the police and diving into
the nearest drug store.
If you are fat, get thin; if thin, get fat.
Nature never meant you to be' satisfied
with your weight.
A bee sting is good for rheumatism, and
therefore those who have hives are seldom
troubled with sciatica at the same time.
Drink plenty of water, some of the clearer
varieties being preferable; that which
irnii iret from the milkman mav contain
bacilli.
For hay fever, take large doses of poison
In rapid succession until relieved. Those
who have tried this sterling remedy have
never complained of the same trouble
ifterward.
Physicians say that laughter is an aid
to digestion. Therefore, be mirthful; the
more the merrier. Young men should grin
md young girls should giggle as much as
possible. You may be thought silly, and
this will occasion some concern on the
part of your friends, but they will not
be surprised.
Walk four miles every morning, as soon
is you are dressed?not before. Returning,
breakfast upon a small dish of evaporated
bran and skimmed milk and a cup
Df Imitation coffee with condensed cream,
rhis Is a wonderful flesh-reducer, and is
said to stimulate the digestive apparatus
Immeasurably. It will make you a child
Eigain, and so whets the appetite that
within thirtv seconds you will feel as If i
pou had never eaten a thing; in your life.
The Biter Bit.
From the Philadelphia Bulletin.
Mayor Stoy of Atlantic City was describing
the cosmopolitan throngs that visit
lis gay resort:
"Every nationality conies here," he said.
'Greeks, Turks, Hindoos. Chinese, Moors?
they all come.
"I was talking the other day to one of
the physicians of the Pasteur Institute?
the hospital, you know, for the prevention
md cure of hydrophobia. The Pasteur In
stitute reminded me of Atlantic City, its
visitors seemed to be of such a diversified
character.
"The physician told me atoout an Indian
;hief who'had "come to htm for treatment
last year.
" 'My name,' said the chief, 'is War
Bagle. Please take me in hand. I fear I
im getting hydrophobia.'
' 'Have you been bitten,' the physician
isked, 'by a n?ad dog?'
" 'Not exactly bitten,' War Eagle answered,
"but I have the gravest suspicions
ibout a black poodle that was served to
me In a ragout last Friday afternoon.' "
RULES FOR SPELLING
AUTHORITIES IGNORED IN DEPARTMENT
DOCUMENTS.
"Speaking about simplified spelling, and
the confusion which may result from the
spelling of certain words one way In department
correspondence and another in
congressional matters. I am reminded of an
instance of departmental spelling which recently
came under my observation," said
a correspondent to a Star reporter.
"I received a letter from a bureau chief
containing two additional documents, and
at the foot of the dictated page appeared
these two words spelled as given: "Two
enclosures.'
"We must take something as a fixed
basis of authority In matters of orthography.
It is all well enough to theorize about
a happy-go-lucky-any-old-style of spelling,
but even the simplified spelling advocates fix
upon certain well-defined rules. Hence, in
the spelling of the word Mnclosure' with ail
'e' authorative rules of orthography are
departed from. In that all of the latest editions
of the recognised dictionaries spell
uie wora wun an i, ana not wun an e,
except as an insertion of the word In the
books as a cross-reference to the accepted
and defined word 'inclosure.'
"The spelling of the word 'inclosure' with
an "e" is, to my mind. Just as Indefensible
and without proper philological authority
as would be the spelling of 'indorse' with
an 'e,' or any of the other numerous instances
of words properly beginning with
the initial 'i.' Probably the most prominent
of these words is 'inquiry.' Just because
several newspapers, for the purpose
of individuality and without orthoe-ranhi
cal authority, spell the word 'inquirer' as
'enquirer,' some of the more thoughtless in
the spelling of this word have assumed that
such orthography of the word was sanctioned
by the authorities upon language, so
they procced to spell 'inquiry' as 'enquiry.'
"Of course. If, as some persons seem to
think, accepted rules of orthography and
the standard dictionaries don't count, then
this criticism fails, but, I am glad to say
there are still a few of us In school and
out who adhere to the rules prescribed by
what have from time immemorial been the
recognized sources of information upon this
subject. Indeed, it may be said with truth
that it is lucky for the stability of our language
that such is the case, for, as faulty
as it may be in some respects as regards
the orthography of certain of its words,
it Is a fortunate thing that it is not open to
the sledge-hammer assaults of some master
minds who would seek to mold it to meet
individual views.
"Therefore, I have often thought that
some of the departments might employ to
advantage the services of som? one well
qualified for the work who would pass upon
some of the effusions published, to the end
that improvement be made along the lines
suggested, and also along those of punctuation.
"I don't know Wtjere some of the department
officials obtanaed their knowledge as
to punctuation, but Ynany pf the examples
which have reached my hands would make
an erudite proofreader sit up and call for
Ills pencil. On the other hand, many official
letters and documents are models of
their kind, and show a perfect knowledge
not only of the subject matter, but of the
recent and accepted rules of diction, syntax
and punctuation.
"In view of the many hands through
which these letters and documents must
pass perhaps they may be said to answer
the purpose, but it is certain that in those
departments where the "e' and not the 'i'
is sanctioned, and in other Instances, a
trifling item to pay for dictionaries and
other authorities on language might be
tacked on the departmental appropriation
bills, especially in view of the fact that
Congress stands committed to abide by the
rules of the orthography tnerein."
Too Much Sleep.
From the London lancet.
Sleep is, of course, a physiological and
physical necessity which can, however, be
over-indulged in with deteriorating effects.
There is, however, some excuse for a longer
indulgence in the winter, for the short duration
of sunlight would seem to enjoin the
whole animal world to prolong its sleep as
a kind of compensation for the loss of
energy-giving radiations entailed by the
correspondingly short period of influence.
POTOMAC RIVER BOATS.
4 llnea. it..60c. 3t. SI.20. 1 wk.. $2.52. 1 ino.. |7.20.
WASHINGTON AND POTOMAC STEAMBOAT (XX
(Randall Line).
6TKAMKUS FOB POTOMAC RIVER LANDINGS.
Monday and Saturday at 7 a.m. for river landIn
T?l " Ji? -?
?U?0 auu laiiMUjftn iu 1 ui l IUIUKIU, .uauuui UU
Nominl creeks and the Wicomico river.
Wednesdays at 4 p.m. for river landings and
Nomlni and Lower Machodoc creeks. Returning,
steamer arrives in Washington Tuesday and Sua*
day about 5 p.m. and Friday about G a.m.
Steamer for Glymont and intermediate landings
at 9 a.m. dally, except Sundsy. Returning. ar?
rive in Washington about 4 p.m.
Schedules subject to change without notice.
Schedules subject to tide and weather. nolS-tf
COMMENCING JANUARY 1. 1907, THE STEAMers
of the MARYLAND. DELAWARE AND VIRGINIA
RAILWAY CO. will make one trip weekly
between Washington and Baltimore, weather permitting.
leaving Washington every Thursday at 4
p.m. for river landings and Baltimore, arriving
In Baltimore early Saturday morning. Leaves
Baltimore every Saturday at 5 p.m. for river
landings as far up as Leonardtown; returning,
leaves Leonardtown at C a.m. Monday and arrives
In Baltimore early Tuesday morning.
Leaves Baltimore at 5 p.m. Tuesday for river
landings and Washington, arriving In Washington
early Thursday morning.
STEPHENSON & BRO., Agents,
Telephone Main 745. 7th st. wharf.
T. MURDOCH, Gen. Frt. and Pass. Agent,
__de31-tf,25 Baltimore, JId._
STEAMSHIPS.
The Royal Mail Steam Packet Co.
WEST INDIES
TRINIDAD. BARBADOS, LEEWARD AND
WINDWARD ISLANDS. DEMEKARA. ETU.
JAMAICA Single, $40 Return, *75
mi <"?\T Cabin. $T0 2d Cabin, $40
Steerage. $30.
ATRATO Jan. 19 I TRENT Feb. 1C
THAMES Feb. 2 ! I.A PLATA Mar. 2
For descriptive pnmphlet, rates, etc., apply to
SANDERSON & SON, Agents. 22 State St.. N.Y.
FOSTER DEBEVOISE. P.A.. Flatiron Bidg., N.Y.
R. M. HICKS. 1300 F at. n.w.. Wasliiugtoo.
no2lJtu.lU.Hu.TSt.20
OCEAN TRAVEL.
AMERICAN LINE.
PLYMOUTH?CHERBOURG?SOUTHAMPTON.
PHILADELPHIA ?QUKENSTOWN ? LIVERPOOL.
ATLANTIC TRANSPORT LINE.
NEW YORK?I.ONDON DIRECT.
RED STAR LINE.
NEW YORK?ANTWERP (PARIS).
WHITE STAR LINE.
NKW YORK-QIEKNSTOWN-LIVKRPOOU
BOSTON-Qt EENSTOWN?LI V ERPOOL.
xr?K MEDITERRANEAN A7Z\*.%
PRO*l NEW YORK.
Celtic Jan. 19, ?:30 a.m.; Mar. 2 ?21.000
Cedrlc I'eb. 10. 8:30 a.m. ( tons.
Cretlc Mar. 30. noon; May 0. June 20
FROM BOSTON.
Canopic Jan. 12, 8:30 a.m., Feb. 23, Apr. 10
Republic Feb. 2. 1 p.m.; Mar. 10
WASHINGTON OFFICE. 130tt F ST. N.W.
R. M. HICKS, pauenser Agent.
e24-ni.\v.aatf
"FRENCH LINE.
COMr.??NIE OENERALE TRAN'SATLANTIQl'B.
Direct Line to Harre?Parla (France).
Sailing every Tbnrartay at 10 a.m.
From Pier No. 42. North Hirer, foot Morton It-.N.T.
La Bretacae Jan. 10i*La Ixjrralne Jan. SI
T.a Sarole Jan. 17 1.a Eretaene Feb. T
'La Touralne Jan. 24 *La Kavole Feb. 14
T?ln-?rre*? Kteanrra.
GEORGE W. MOSS. 1411 O ST. N.W.
mtl-MBt
n-i:_lj..t c d a
J^CllgllllUi OCd 1 lips LUC ltdl IVUUIUI
Southern Pacific
Passenger Steamships Between
New York and New Orleans
Weekly Service From Both Porta.
THE IDEAL TRIP SUMMER and WINTER.
SPEED?COMFORT?SAFETY.
Conae. tin* at NEW ORLEANS with Rail Lines
For All Points In
LOUISIANA, TEXAS. NEW AND OLD MEXICO.
ARIZONA, CALIFORNIA.
Baltimore and Hanover Sts., Baltimore.
882 Chestnut St.. Philadelphia. <
M
OCEAN TRAVEL.
NORTH GERMAN LLOYD.
Fast Express Service.
PTYMOUTH ?CIIERBOCRO ?BREME*.
K.Win.II. . Jts. H, 10 1m KilMt... Hir. 5, 10 ?
Kmnpr1n(..J*a. 22, ?oon K Wmll.Mar.12.8:30 *m
K.Win II..Feb. 12. am Kronprlm .M?r M, 1 pm
Krocprlnt. F?b. IS. f am Kalaer Auc. 2. 10 u
Twin-Screw Passenger Service.
BKKMKN DIRECT.
Rheln. ...Jan. 24. 10 au<|Hbeln Mar. 7. 10 aa
Torek... Jan. SI. 10 am llannorer Mar. 14. 10 am
Oasael.. Feb. 14. 14 a? Bre?Ua .. Mar. 21. 10 an
Main.... F?ti. 21. 10 an Ciwl.. Mar 2S, lo am
Mediterranean Service.
GIBRALTAR?NAPLES-GENOA.
K. Albert .Jan 12. 11 am K. Lolae.Feb. 9. 11 aa
P. Irane. Jan. 19. 11 am K. Albert.. Feb. M, 11 an
tK?lacr. Jan. 26.11 am Frta'drtrh Ma*. 2.11am
Xeekar. Feb. 2. 11 am P. Irene M?r 9. 11 aa
tOmltj Gibraltar. *Omlta C?noa.
From Bremen lien, and 4th ata . Hotmtn.
N O LLOYD EXPRESS SERVICE.
NORTH UKHM AN LLOYD TRAVELERS" CHECKS
GOOD AIJ, OVER THE WORLD.
0ELR1CHS * On , NO. 5 BROADWAY. Sf. Y.
E. F. DROOP A RONS CO.. U28 PENS A. ATE
tMa,m.t?.tb.f^l5t
?Jt a * ? ?
i lamDur^Amencan Line.
Twin Screw Passenger Service.
ri.YMOCTH- CHF.RBOI"RO-H A1IRCRQ.
tPatrlrla Jan. 11 Kalaerln ine?>..Jan M
Pretoria.. .. Jan. 1# tPennajlTanla ....Feb. ?
tOmits Cherboiirf.
Mediterranean Service.
TO GIBRALTAR?NAPLES?GENOk.
Hamburg Jan. 10 Itomanlc Mar. f
tIMoltkr Jan. 29 Hamburg II arch M
*Dent?rbtaod Feb. 4 tMoltke Apr. 13
Hambnre Feb If Hamburg May T
'Has Grill Room. tHan GjmDasium. *.
ruueau aud Orient Cruise. 7U ilaja.
Eight Days to lltaly
BY THR ohrat vim np!*T?i'ur *vn
FROM NEW YORK FEB. 4. 11(07.'
West Indies
6. $150 aod up.
TOVRIST 31'REAl .
R. R. Tickets, hotel accnoitnodat ions and irenrral
Information aliout foreign Travel.
Traveler*- Check*. Uoo<l All Over the World.
IIA.MH1 KO-AMKHICAN I.INK. :i7 B'WAY N. I.
E. K. DROOP & SONS. ?23 I'a. ?ve.
Be20-6:t,ra.w,f.tf
CUNARD LINE.
FROM PIERS 01 52. NORTH RIVER.
TO LIVERPOOL. VIA QL" EENSTOWJf.
Etruria Jed. 12. 2 pm l/mbrla F?-b. 2, 8 an
Carman!* Jan. 19. 10 am Lucania . . I>1? ii. 1 nr?
Campanln .Jin. 28, 2 pro ( nrmania.. Feb. 16. 8 am
Gibraltar?Naples?Adriatic
C-,rnnn 1 (20,0<l?? tnntO TEH. I'.t. 10 *.m.,
k-dl UIIM j to ,;u,ralur aD(| .\a,,u?.
Supplementing new modern twin screw S 9.
ULTONIA (2d and 3d class only).. ..Jan. IT. 10 a.m.
1J ANNUM A...... March 14, Doon; May 2. June 90
CARPATIIIA March 28, noon; May 16, July
SLAVON1A April 11, noon; May 30. July 18
Vernon II. Blown. Gen*l Agent. 21-24 State st., N.Y.
Opposite the Battery.
Or 120 State St., Boston. Mass.
O. W. MOSS. Agent, 1411 U at. n.w.. Washington.
_ aelfl-lyr.eSo.20 ^
"railroads
Chesapeake <& Ohio Ran way
SCHEDULE IN EFFECT NOVEMBER 25. 1PO0.
2:00 P. M. -OLD DOMINION EXPRESS. week
day*?Stops at principal points in Virginia.
Vestibule train; standard coaches; parlor car
to Clifton Forge, with connection for Virginia
Hot Springs. Pulluian sleepers Clifton borga
to Louisville, Cincinnati, Indianapolis, St.
Louis and Chicago; buffet service from GorJona 11
le.
4:30 P. M.-NEW C. & O. LIMITED. daily-Fast
new vestibule train; stops only at Gordons vllle.
Charlottesville, Staunton. Clifton Forge and
Covington. Va.: ltonceverte and llinton, W.
Va. Pullman sleepers to Lexington. Ixjulsvllle,
Cincinnati. Indianapolis, St. Louis and Chicago.
Dining cars, a la carte service. One night out.
11:10 P. M.-F. F. V. LIMITED, daily?Solid veatihnlp
train Pullman tr? PI n,.lnn? M
Lexington and Louisville. Compartment aleej?
fng car to Virginia Hot Spring* week da/a.
Dining cars, a la cnrte aervlce. ^leeoera Cincinnati
to Chicago and St. Loula and Loulavl'la
to Memphis. Nashville and southwest.
Reservations and tickets at Chesapeake and OtUa
Offices. 513 Pennsylvania avenue; 6o9 14?b atrial,
oeat P. and Sixth Street Station. Telephone Mala
8730 for Pennsylvania K. K. Cab Servlca and Mala
1066 for C. it O. Ticket Offlca.
ATLANTIC ^OAST |[JNB
Effective November 15. 1906.
Notice.?These departures are given as Information.
as well as connections with other companies,
but arrlTals and connections are Dot guaranteed.
4:30 a.m. dailj?Sleeping Car New York to Jacksonville,
Pin. Through coaches Washington (
Jacksonville.
3:46 p.m. daily?Sleeping Car New York to Jacksonville.
Fla.; New York to Port Tampa. Fla.t v!?
Jacksonville; New York to Augusta. Ga.; New
York to Charleston, 8. C.; Washington. D. O., t?
Jacksonville Fla.; Washington to Wilmington, N.
C. Through coachcs Washington to Jacksonville.
UN EX C E LLE L) DINING CAK SERVICE.
For tickets and all information apply at tbn
OFFICE OF THE LINE. 001 PENNSYLVANIA
AVENUE NORTHWEST. AND PENNSYLVANIA
RAILROAD STATION.
GEO. P. JAMES.
District Passenger Ag??nt. Washington, D. Q.
T. C. WHITE. Gen. Pass. Agent.
W. J. CRAIG.
Pits. Traffic Mgr.. Wilmington. N. C.
Seaboard Air Lcme Railway
TICKET OFFICE. 1421 PKNNA. AVE.
For Petersburg, Raleigh, Wilmington, Columbia,
Savannah, Jacksonville. Tampa, Atlanta, Birmingham,
Mobile, I'cnsaeola and New Orleans
10:50 A.M. DAILY?Seaboard Mail-Tbroagb
Pullman Sleeper to Jacksonville. Fla: alaa
through Parlor Car to I'luehurst, N. C. Cafe Dining
Car Washington to Hamlet. N. C.
6:28 P.M DAILY?Seaboard kipress?Solid trala
to Jacksonville and Tampa, with Pullman Sleeper?.
Through Sleeper to Atlanta, Birmingham and Mem.
phis. DAILY, except Sunday, through sleeper ta
Plnehurst. Cafe Dining Car.
Baltimore and Ohio R. R.
LEAVE STATION. X?w Jeraer are. tod 0 at.
ROT Ah BLUE LINE
EVERT OTHER HOUR ON' THE ODD nODR"
TO PHILADELPHIA AND NEW TORK.
NEW TERMINAL, 23D ST.. NEW TORS.
7.00 a.m. Diner, Pullman Parlor.
ili.00 a.ni. Buffet, Parlor. 6-Hr. Trala.
0.00 a.m. Diner and Pullman Parlor Car.
1.00 a.m. Diner uc<1 Pullman Parlor Car.
1.00 p.m. Diner and Pullman Parlor Car.
*3.00 p.m. "Royal Limited." All Pullmaa.
t4.00 p.m. Coachea to Philadelphia.
B.OO p.m. Diner and Pullman Parlor.
8.00 p.m. Coachea to Philadelphia.
11.30 p.m. Sleepera.
2.57 a.m. Sleepera.
ATLANTIC C1TT, f7.00. 0.00, til.00
tl.00. *3-00 p.m.
'EVERY Horn ON THE nOCR"
{Week dajp, 7.00 a.m. to 8.00 t> m )
T6 BALTIMORE.
Week days. 2.57, 6.00. 8.30, 7.00, 7.20, 8 00, 8.S0,
8.00, 9.30, 10.00, 11.00 a.m., 12.00 noon. 12.09,
1.00, 2.00. 3.00, 3.20, 4.00. 4.45, 5.0<>, 5.03. ?.S9.
6 (Vi 6.30 7.00. 8.00, U.30, 10.00, 10.35. 11.30, 11.8S
P'Sundar?, 2 57, 7.00, 7.20, 8.80. 9.00, 100% 11.00
a.m., 1.00, 1.1B, 3.00, 3.30, 5.66, 6.30, 0.30, #.00,
10.00, 10.35, 11.30, 11.35 p.m.
WFSTWARD
CHICAGO * NORTHWEST,' *1.22 p.m., B.St
^CINCINNATI. ST. LOPTS and ?,OCISVILLB,
8.00 n.m., *4.05 p.m.. *12.40 ntfbt.
PITTSIU'R?, *1.22 p.m.. ?9.10 p.m.. ?12 30 B*t.
CLEVELAND. 'OlO p.m. COI.OMBU8.
p.m.
wheeling. *8.00 a.m.. -S.80 p.m.
winchester, 8.3B ?.m., t4.05. t5 00 p.m.
annapolis, week dRya. s.00 a.m., 12.05 uoob,
4.45 and 8.00 D.m. Sonduya. 8.30 a.m. aod B.M
fcrRAY AND ELKTON, *4.00 p.m.
FREDERICK, t8.38. |0.18 ?.m.. |1.30, t4.0#,
t5.36 p.m.
HAGERSTOWN, t8.S8 a.m. ud tS.OO p.m.
BOYD and way point*, t8 SS, (U.1S am, (1.30,
tB.on. tS.33. 110.18, til.30 p.m.
G AITHERSBL'RO and *?J polnta, t8.35. I9.1S
a.m., 112.80, J1.30, f3.S0. *8.06. t&-S5. .0 80, |7.3?,
110.18, 111.30 p.m.
WASHINGTON jrXCTION and ??? polnta,
18.38. JU.1B a.m., |1.30, tS.00. tS.38 p.m.
Dally. t Except Sunday. JSunda.v only.
Renervatlon of Sleeping or Parlor Car MMC*.
ratea of fare, vtc., will tie quickly furnlahi-d BY
TELEI'llONK at all of the followii.f Ticket OfBcea:
1417 G ?t. n.w.. Telephone Main 16#1: Sit
I'eunsyl?arla a?e., Telephone Main 2T8. Station.
New Jersey uve. and C at.?Ticket OflW-e. Tel>
phone East 687. Information Bureau. Eaat 724.
SUUTHEKM RJULWAV.
N. B.?Following schedule flpnrei published only
as In format Jon, and are not go a ran teed.
7:35 a.m. Dally. Local for Harr.souborg, War.
renton. Danville and way stations.
10:51 a.m. Dally. Washington an 1 Florida Limited.
Through roaches and sleepers to Colombia.
Savannah and Jacksonville. Dining car service.
11:15 a.m. Dally. United States Fast Mall.
First class coaches and sleeper to Neir Orleans.
Dining car service.
4:01 p.m. Week Day*. Local for Hsrrlsonbarg
and way stations on \lana?sas branch.
4.55 p.m. Daily. Local for Warrenton. Charlottesville
and Intermediate stations.
7:30 p.m. Dally. New York and Atlanta Rxpress.
First clars coach to Atlanta, sleeper to Oolombas,
Ga.; Sonset tourist sleeper Waifblngton to Baa
Francisco Mondavs, Wednesdays aod Fridays.
B:BO p.m. uany. ww lora ana rioraa ripiw.
Through ooacbea and flccpvr* to Columbia. SaraBnali
and JaclaonTllle. Sleepers to Auzaata tad
Port Tampa. Dining car aervlce.
10:00 p.m. Dally. New York and Memphis limited
(Tla Lynclibnrg). Plrst-claaa coaeti and aWepacj
to Itoauoke, Knoivllle. Ctatlariooga and Memphis;
deeper to Birmingham and Kew Orelans. Dining
car aerrlee.
10:45 p.m. Dally. Waablngton and Snnthweatara
I.lmlied. All Pullman train: obaerratlon ear to
Atlanta and Macon; elnh ear to Atlanta. tlaepara
to Nashville. Atlanta, Macon. B'riolngbaai a ad
New OfHns. Dining or mrM.
TRAIN'S ON BLl'KMON'T BRANCH.
Leave Washington 8:10 a.m., 1:30, 4:43, 8:0J
p.m. ?r?*k di.ru for Blorroont: 6:28 p.m. vetk
day* for Leeaburf only. On Sunday lear* WaakInrtoo
9:10 1.111., 8:06 p.m., for Blormoat. ,
Ttiroujrb train* from tbe aooth arrlre W.isblnftoa
6:42, 0:82. 0:50. 11:06 a.m., 3:00, 0:30 and fl:M
p.m. dally, flarriaonbnrc, 11:58 a.m. week day*
and #:20 p.m. dally. Prom OtaarlottMTlllr 8:10
a.m.; from Lynchburg and Ckarlottearillt, >:I9
p.m. daily.
TlrL?t oflrca. 709 IBtk at.. U1 Pa. aia. and
PawiaylvaaJa station.
C. 11. ACKKRT. a M. HAIDWUX.
V. P. aad O. li. 9. T. H.
W. H. TAYLOR a.r.A. k I. BBOWN, U-A.

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