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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, July 20, 1907, Image 13

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THE EVENING STAR
VTTL 8LKDAY KOBSTNG tinOX
0*tin?M Offlc*. lltb Stn?'. uc ^cas^bn-nit. Anna*.
The Er?nins Stai Navspapei Company.
THfcO CRE W IIOifEb. Prteiocat.
Haw York Cfilco: Tribune Buildinfr.
Chicago Ofllca: First National Bank Building.
Tke Evening Stir, with the Sunday morning edition.
is delivered hy carrier*, on theli own account,
within the city at P?0 cpnta per month: without the
Sunday morning edition at 44 rent a per month.
% _ By mail, i^ostage prepaid:
.-uiiu?y uiciiHipii, one uiuiiin. o?) crnu?,
P?Uj. Sunday eirept?>d, one month. 50 cents.
Pnturdaj Star, one jeir. $1 00.
Snndaj Star, one /ear, $1.50.
I MAGNIFICENT 81
I -IN
'f Ideality Located am^
I PETW
. j only <?
I'
I jbijH
f..&.
WW ?*o.t?
| HOUSES THAT WILL ST A}
- | ARCHITECTURALLY AND !
? DESCRI
Y Full 3-ntory bay-window brick, co
Y planned rooms; beautifully papered.
Y tels. hardwood finish: tiled bath; wide
Y dashed and brick construction, con
4 ' lot 30x100 to lO-ft. alley.
' ! ARRANG
< i First floor?Parlor, reception hall, <
< i Second floor?Four large bedrooms
< ' Third floor?Two large bedrooms ai
< i HOW TO GE
f t i 'Phone or call at office, or take Br
< ' Webster st.
4 1 CRITICAL INSPECTK
4 ' OPEN SUNDAY AND
] j EVERYTHING AS RE
ki FRANCIS A.
bReal Est a
nerly Prest. of Blundon, O'Brien & 1
KK-W'WWW'WW'M
The All Important I
!Is
Location.
RTIY IN "fHFVY i
CHASE," DX.?Whether
you buy for Investment
or Home only, you should
have the future possible
sale in mind. You cannot
v 'tell how soon you might j
want to sell. If located
f properly a poor house is
always in demand, while
? if badly located a very
handsome and well-arranged
house can seldom
find a buyer.
P I \r of i V** ?*??* i "U?..^
vj x <11 v^lltV N V^ild?C,
D. C, and know that you
are saving money, not
wasting it.
What section has better
prospects?
W e could not afford to
? urge this property upon
you it we were not sure of
I] its future.
II We have property on
line of Connecticut Avenue
at prices ranging from
5c to $1.50 per square foot,
and every foot is a go**!
one.
Call, telephone or write
us for details before buyiiiLr
elsewhere.
I'jjlThos J Fisher & Co., !|
; Incorporated.
14114 F Street N.W.
lj r m a-tns.
1 Phones-! M 34-..
L Chevy Chan-, i>h M
jjEBSS $?7500
; Reduced From $6,500. !
La thitc aftut v and r b?j-wta4ow i
brick. oil ??'<(! lettered stree t n u . h |
r?K*niH. flrut klt?-b?*n: l?ath. cellar. ?j
I furn?<"e, dwp l?-t S.-e tbiu at once.
_ $4,000 Jj
IA very racnrie.
Nine r nt'.?< i kit. h-n. ujotli-rn
hutu. ftirmi? h??Mt. ?! < 4-l ar, ii? unrth\\w*t.
??n 1? t?UV" t; u gt*xl r?'*idi-n< ?*
> mwzk-WM osi^TS m., I
m-? I'knna. AVK. N VV. M 3M<4.
ii
* A somiuimbullst from rhildho(>d. GeorgtSandht-rg
eighteen years old. walking in
liw sleep, plunged from a third-story win1
di,w early Tluirxila v In New York and sufflle<j
a frailurei^ skull and broken It* and
*- Vm
Pages 11=6.
JBURBAN HOMES ;
A IN?
Convenient Section off
ORTH,
5.850.
M;- I
,. -k~ - * ' I
.>./ 1
M nS^v WMBBSmi isssSS H
will
^L_o_
* " i
f hi ii 1
U ?... ...?
?- ~
sD THE TEST.
:TDT t<TT 'DAT T V D17 D T? T? nT
j -1 IVL v. JI nai^L, x i L1\1 ?-v_ J..
PTION:
ntalning 10 large and admirably
expensive gas fixtures, elaborate manfront,
side and rear porches; pebblecrete
cellar; HOT-WATER HEAT;
EMENT:
lining room and kitchen.
; and bath.
id storeroom.
T THERE.
ightwood ave. line and get off at
!>N IS INVITED.
EVERY WEEK DAY.
^PRESENTED.
, BLUNOON,
ibv u-*?? y ,
607 7th St. N. W. ;
|Own Your Own Home
| on Your Own Terms
| Only Two (2) Left
T n Ci * *.t r> n a
3 r oircei n. c. oeiween
14th and 15th.
|
Splendidly finished ? six
4 large rooms and fine bath?
% steam heat; large concrete
? cellar under the whole house;
large iront and back yards.
I'. Don't fail to see these at
once. Representative at
house from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.
4 every day.
David Moore,
3 II328 New York Ave.
4
|jj
Only Two Left
Last Chance.
1
II
Conceded to be the very
i hist and most attractive new
houses ever sold tor the price.
Six and seven larjje rooms
|| and modern tiled bathrooms;
splendidly built and beauti|
fully decorated; strictly modern
in every particular; fine
concrete cellars: furnace heat.
Only $3,975.
Hjcn ricli P.-jlarw-o ><"?
y,)j"
monthly.
Osen fcr Insjpectioini.
N. L Sansbury,
719-21 13th St. N.W.
: | . .
Tobacco Smoke Scared Deer.
From tli*' London Kvening Standard.
A new way of preventing deer from doin
damage to a holding has been adopted b
mr otrmiicr vi iMuciun urm. in the heai
of tlie Devon and Somerset stughound cour
try.
Discarding the use of tarred ropes an
other strong-smelling materials in fence!
he walks through his turnip fields two c
three times a night, smoking a strong pip<
tt:e smell of which, he says, frightens tli
I deer away. Before he adopted this devi<
I his fivrm used to be visited b> scuiea of dec
i
cT lii- f
(3^
WASHINGTON,
f DRAWBACKS IN ITALY
1
i
A M M
% uonaitions in hotels uisnonor to
| Nation. '
?*
| SERIOUS INCONVENIENCES
a Journeys by Carriages in Central
Italy.
| COUNTRY IS VERY ENCHANTING
V Poor Food Served Tourists?Health of
jjjj Many Injured?Americans
I seeping Away.
A Special Cablegram to Tbe Star.
j* ROME, July 20.?According to an Italian
X writer, one of the drawbacks to traveling
Y In Italy Is the hotels. The condition of the
S hotels In these out-of-the-way places Is
A such as to dishonor a civilized country,
Y just as a defeat In war might, in many
places hotels are even wanting because
Y traveling strangers ar?^ wanting, and unY
der these conditions and circumstances the
A writer does not hold the nat'vos greatly to
* blame. Occasionally In such places the visjf
(tor has to seek lodging in a private res
? Idence. If the traveler Is furnished with
y the proper letters of recommendation he
? finds that the ancient hospitality prevails.
>* the "siBnori" of the place offering their
'j* house, their carriage and their table to the
}, visitor during his stay, and all with the
most exquisite courtesy.
y Not to speak of the places that are insignificant
and without any special attrac?
tlons where the stranger would never dell*
sire to stop, there are cities and towns
J. which are centers of art and history, or
jf are starting places for excursions, or which
are Joyous in the possession of fair views
? and pure, fresh air.
5* One of the peculiar features met with in
I. p*>ntr:il It;ilv is th.it of hnvinsr thp towns
? far distant from the railway station, and
I* to reach your destination you may have to
X pajjs from one to two or more hours in
y what is facetiously termed a diligence and
5* sometimes still more facetiously called a
p. carriage. To begin with, says the Traveling
Italian, this Is a serious Inconvenience.
But when the Journey has to be made under
a burning sun or in the midst of sun
y and rain, in a horrible old, disconnected
?* vehicle with one door that will not open
5* and another that will not shut, driven by a
j? jehu eighty years of age or a boy of seven,
i dragged by an indeecslbable roslnante,
J, whether horse or mule or donkey, the unit
declaklng becomes a serious Affair. You
fi> can, if you are good-natured and If one
? of your fellow travelers is not given to
^ blaspheming and the otner to lamenting the
evil state of affairs, amuse yourself by
? looking abroad on the country, which, as
r often happens, is enchanting in Its plc5,
turesque beauty. Sometimes, too, you may
X laugh at the witticisms of the driver or a
passenger. But when you reach the inn
you laugh no more.
? The Inn is of various kinds. It Is alii'
ways or nearly always set in the noisiest
y center, where the population Is most
numerous, and where every view of the
surrounding lanscape is shut out. It is
= the antiquated "locanda," or lodging,
where the host .and hostess do all of the
work. They receive the guests, clean the
i rooms, wash the linen, keep the accounts,
do the cooking and carry on the conversation.
This, says the Italian Traveler,
is what Is called the "old style,dirty and
good-natured. It is not infrequent that
the mistress of the house, showing you
lnft) your room and pointing out the
sleep-destroying bed, the rickety chairs,
the wash basin no larger than a soup
plate, with a water Jug that looks like a
coffee pot, turns to you with a prodigious
serenity, saying, "As for cleanliness, don't
let that trouble you, sir! I take care of
hat mvofllf onH T Ir nntir V? n ?l/.n ?.l
^ ?- ?' j ""u -* """ " Liiai ^i?;aiiiiiicoa
.< In a hotel Is everything!"
f It iti needless to follow the writer Into
f other details?the signs that the floor has
been unswept and notoriously unwashed
'* for months; the lost hairpin of some unit
tidy waiting maid; the cigar ashes left so
'* long ago by some untidy tenant who strove
](. to deaden the musty smell of the place, and
other evidences of neglect.
if These and other things, such as poor
food, rendered unfit for human beings
by wretched cookery, make a tour in certain
parts of Italy a series of adventures,
T" and not always adventures of ihe most
pleasant kind. A very celebrated art
]? critic, who in the pursuit of his researches
was obliged to visit every vlllage
and town of !Tmbrla and the Idarche,
had his health ruined by bad and lnsuf.f
licient nourishment, even the almost uni
f vernal egg was not to be had. As a rule
in even the most neglected hotels or inns
it usuallv hannfnK thnt the he<l linen i.vi
^ clean; though In V'almontone in the auTi
tumn seasons, when fruits are piled up in
the bedroom and insects of many kinds
Inhabit these rooms, it is often the part
of wisdom to sit up all night and let
these insects fight out a sort of tribal
war among themselves.
Americans who are pouring Into Europe
by the thousands and tens of thousands
will, unless they are accustomed to "roughing
it," do well to keep out of many sections
of the interior of Italy. As a general
thing, by hugging the seaport cities they
tan get along, and if worst comes to worst
can head for some fair-sized town and
find a boat and make their way back to the
comforts of civilization.
Victor Emanuel III, the King of Italy, Is
not only one of the most "constitutional"
ii | oi Kings, uui ne is one or me most democratic.
He lias recently been interviewed. '
i ami lie openly says that he takes little In- J
terest in politics, leaving to his ministers 4
i tile duty of/regulating the affa'rs of the ,
nation. He prefers, he says, meeting the ,
people themselves; attending the inaugura- ,
tion of art exhibitions, the laying of foun- *
datlon stones and the reception of the nu- ?
merous princely and notable persons who i
visit Italy. f.
In giving his opinion of the Italian poet,
Giosue Carduccl. and the French poet and
novelist, Victor Hugo, the king said Uiat It
was his belief that the French people read
fewer of the works of Carduccl in the original
and knew much less about him than ^
was the case with the Italians in refurence
to Victor Hugo. The king is also an enthusiastic
automobilist, and in the discourse '
I between the interviewer and Victor Eman- t
I uel III upon this subject Ills majesty ex- /
pressed tne opinion that tlie motor industry
was still in its infancy. 0
Excavations on Palatine Hill, which was 8
the site of the ancient city of Rome founded i:
by Romulus and afterward the spot selected li
by Augustus and his successors in the em- F
pire for the palace of the Caesars, have just .
I revealed the existence in the center of the ;
- hill of a very Important tomb, situated be- 1
neath the foundations of early construc- t
tions. It resembles the most ancient tombs ;
of Ktruria and seems to have be^u imiB
tated from the shepherd's huts in the Camy
pagna. s
t ?. 1
Augurs at War. ^
d From the Philadelphia Tress. r
' A Windsor Castle farmer says he has J
? killed his oldest rooster, and its breast- t
e bone Indicates that much rainy weather j
e will follow until lulu in the spring, and [ c
>r I that the goosebone weather prophets are I 1
? I all wrong. . ?X
u mm a
D. C., SATURDAY, J
i STONF &
I
| Low
1 TOe
| mvestmi
5: There's a spec
J: you'll find every ho
f: H ave us show
| Nortl
i _. .. _
$3,600
V ?nth et. n.w.; note the size of the lot,
y 24xif5. A good 7-room brick dwelling;
V bath.
I $5,115(0)
J1 ?A good 7-room bay-window red brick
y dwelling, on rtth st. n.w. near O; 21x03.
House splendid rejialr.
| $4,5m
T ?A corner dwelling, west of 14th St.; 3
V stories; stone front VERY HAND*t*
SOME.
J $4,(MM)
X ? Ifith st. near G; stories; 10 rooms and
bath; lot 20x100. A
^>1
A ?A very cheap 2-story Roman brick
?*. dwelling. .v'ITH STEAM HEAT; tiled
> bath; dry cellar; splendid condition;
|> near R and North Capitol sts.
| $3,85?
Y ?In Mt. Pleasant; 7 rooms; cellar; furY
nace heat; in first-class condition; lot
y 2"ixl4<i to alley; near 2 car lines.
| $4,750
X ?Brick dwelling and stable, west of 14th
St.; 2 stories and cellar. This Is a low
A price for such a well-located house.
A Owner needs the money to pay a trust
5 on another property.
$4,100
4 ?Is a 20-ft. front 8-room brick house
4 on R st. n.w. between N. Capitol and
y let ets. A good house to buy.
|| $5,000
y ?A Q st. house, containing 0 rooms, IS
Y ft. front, 92 ft. deep. , There is a good
Y deal for the money. ?
% $3,750
T ?A semi-deta'-'hed house- . ? ?. in flrstX
class condition; tiled bath and porcelain
tub; lot 28x120; a convenient section and
near car line.
$4,000
?Fronting on R. I. avenue, west of
Sth St., a good solid brick dwelling;
nice location.
* $4,500
1 ?An 8-room house on S St., between N.
X Capitol and 1st sts. This is one of the
X most complete and attractive low-priced
A residence squares in the city.
A
$ $?,5(0x0)
A ?A house on Q 6t., containing 9 rooms,
A A stories and cellar; built a short time
J ago: lot 20x100 to an alley. Now. you
5 could not build the house for the price If
V you were made a present of the lot.
I $3,850
"J* ?An 8-Toom house on 13th St., wide
V parking, good Blze lot, room *for a stable
f on the rear. A cheap property.
| V
?A corner house near 7th and Q sts.,
V containing 8 rooms; there are 3 bay winJt,
dows; southern and eastern exposure; on
X account of the trust coming due the
X owner has reduced the price of this
A property.
X $5,65?
y ?A 3-story 9-room brick dwelling near
Y scott circle. a goo a square; tne aujoinV
ing house, which is a similar one, held at
? $0,000. W.OOO was once loaned on this
? house that we now offer you for t.l,?50.
An out-of-town owner wishes to dispose
of this property.
{ $4,5??
X ?A pretty house; 3 stories; front of buff
A brick; west of 13th St.; 8 rooms; cabinet
A mantels; modern plumbing; select nelgh?>
borhood. This house is worth much
?!? more than the price. For certain rea>{
sons the owner is quite anxious to real
"J* lze from th* sale of tills house, and will
? give you a bargain.
| $5,00?
? ?U St. near 14th St.; 3 stories. 8 rooms;
't* 4 rooms on the first floor; lot 18.8x100 to
i an alley; a convenient section in which
| to live.
I ~STC
I 1342 New '
rrr*
TIMBER PBODUCTa
lull ?tin Issued by the U. S. Census
Bureau.
Lumber and timber products of the
Tnlted States are the subject of a bulletin
No. 77) Issued by the United States bureau
f the census. A comparative tabular
uramary for the decades from 1850 to 1900,
nclusive, and for the year 1905, shows an
ncrease in value of lumber and timber
iroducts of from $00,413,000 in 1850 to
Vm, 107,000 in 1000 and $580,023,000 in 1905.
lit? uuiuijer ui eaiauusnmems lnciuaeu in
hese summaries was 18,700 In 1850, 23,063
n 10<K) and 19,127 in 1905. The average
mmber of wage earners, not including
alaried officials, clerks, etc., was 55,810 in
850, 413,335 in 1000 and 404,626 in 11)05.
'he census of 1905 "was confined to nierhant
mills and timber camps of similar
riagnitude, thus excluding the custom
niils and petty establishments In all
iranches of the industry." So far as pracleable,
the figures for the census of 1900
tave been revised, for the purposes of
>omparl8on, to correspond with those for
900, but uo sucll revision was attempted
or earlier year*. It Menu* iuobable, we
Jlfat
ULY 20, 1907.
FAIRFAX,
=Frice
today a special list of lo1
Very desirable as hom<
ent.
:ial reason demanding th
use greatly reduced in
you the properties that
^iwest.
| $^,600
?8 rooms on 8d st. n w.; bay-window
brick; room for a stable on the lot.
$4,0 ?o
Near the 9th et. car line, a 2-story
brick dwelling, with 4 rooms on each
one of the floors; cellar under the entire
hous?; furnace heat; lot 20x100;
less than the house could be built for.
$4,11 50
S st. near 13th St.. fi-room brick dwell- !
ins; in first-class condition; a cheap * |
house; lot 18x100 to an alley. One of ,
the best locations we know of for a
low-priced house.
$5,650
Will buy a house on the north side
of Westminster St.; 0 rooms and cellar,
furnace * heat. This is a most con- 1
venient section, close to two car lines, a
nics walk to tha business section.
$4,500
West of 13th St., on a wide through
street, fronting on an expensive property.
A well-planned house, 4 rooms
deep on each floor, front and rear stairway;
dry cellar, furnace heat; double
porches on the rear of the house. THIS
HOfSE WAS FORMERLY HELD AT
A t
$5,75?
Near Pt. Stephen's Catholic Church
and near the Pa. ave. car line; a comparatively
new three-story stone and
brick, beautiful front: parlor, reception
hall, dining room, pantry and kitchen on
th<? first floor; LARGE TILED BATH,
PORCELAIN T!'B. NICKEL PLUMBING;
many cabinet mantels; electric
gas lighting; cement cellar; HOTX\r
A Tl*D UP 4T Mn nr.r n-li.fnn- .,r>
II AlUik UUA 1. vntlCI ?1*1110 up IIVUOCkeeping,
has reduced the price of this
splendid home to this low figure.
$3,S<0)<0)
A nice little home on a very select
square west of 14th st. No colored
persons in the block. A neat, twostory
dwelling, with a cellar: seven
rooms; bath; porcelain tub; open plumbing;
furnace heat; lot "20 feet wide; goodsized
back yard to a public alley. For !
a home or an investment, this Is a I
desirable property, and will be sold
quickly.
$3,900
NICE WIDE HOUSES. Nicely situated
In the northwest, south of T St.; two
stories and cellar; furnace heat; all
front rooms; tiled bath; covered front
and rear porches; lots 21 by 90 to a 10foot
alley; finished throughout In hardwood;
beautifully decorated. This is
strictly a first-class neighborhood. Convenient
to the Metropolitan car line.
This Is an exceptional offer. If you will
give us an opportunity to show you the
houses we are satisfied you will be
Interested.
Price, $3,115(01
HOMES OR INVESTMENTS.
WILL. Fl'RNISH A TENANT WHO
WILL. PAY $25 A MONTH; a neat baywindow
brick dwelling, very near the
union station; six rooms and bath; cellar;
in first-class condition. The owner
claims to have spent $500 in the way of
repairs. On account of second mortgage
coming due he is obliged to make a
quick sale^ and will give some one a
oargain. This House will be sold Inside
of a week. We hope you will become
the owner.
$4,6S >
SEE THIS BARGAIN. FORMERLY
HELD AT $7,250. *4,750 IX)A NED ON
IT. _ A handsome 3-story dwelling on a !
numbered St. south of T St.; front of
red brick, stone trimmings; 10 rooms,
cellar; FOUR ROOMS ON FIRST
FLOOR; furnace heat; lot 18xl'J0; 20ft.
alley.
$3,3(0)(Q>
A CHEAP CORNER. J3.300 will buy
a comparatively new corner house on
5TH STREET NORTHWEST; eight
?0.? 1 *
1? v/vinQ, iciiuHB iui a. munm. i ne II
house alone would cost more to build.
)NE &
York Ave., /
.AAAAA.*. .1. A - - -- -- -- -- -- -- --
>~<nr?-?-yvvvvvWWVW?WWW^W!
may interject, that a lurge number of the 3
establishments included in the earlier cen- 1
suses, particularly the one for 1850, were t
of such a character that they would not v
have been enumerated under the rules fol- t
lowed in 1905. It is interesting to note i
that the number of establishments and t
also the number of wage earners fell ofT t
materially between 1900 and 1005. The
number of sa.laried officials and clerks, {
however, increased from 14,238 to 18,485, T
and th?lr salaries from approximately $12,- ^
500,000 to $20,000,000. The earnings of h
wage earners increased from $148,000,000
to $183,000,000, notwithstanding a decline
of nearly 9,000 employes from 1900 to 1905.
In 1880 there were 5,907 children under six- B
teen years of age reported as at work; in
JLOi*', Oi^Ki, HI xvw, willlC 111 I if\J\t LUC
number had fallen to 2,500. ^
Unprofitable Vineyards of South n
France. 8
From the Lomlon Globe. e
A cry of dire distress Is going up from the f
south of France. The whole of the Midi i|
Is In despair. , Its vines, for decades the v
wealth of its people, are now their misery. ''
Almost incredible stories are told of the J
oegree of oppression into which the in- 0
dustry has fallen. Vineyards which a few fa
Part 2.
*7 ?
1342 New
d Ho
w-priced houses?and
*s and offering snlend
O i
e quick sale of every li
rice.
appeal to you.
Northeast an
$4,6S<Q)
Near Capitol, 3 stories, cellar, hot water
heat, tiled bath, first-class condition,
much below value. Former owner took
It for a debt.
$3,7S<Q)
A TT "nr?tT ri.T I ra ? n r r/-< T *-*
.rv v iji; i v in'jrtj nui.orj.
A NORTHWEST CORNER.
SOUTHERN AND EASTERN EXPOSURE.
Reduced to $:f,-750.
Formerly held at J4,fC0.
One of the best bargains on Capitol
Hill, between East Capitol st. and Pa.
ave.
A THREE-STORY DWELLING.
Eight-rooms, modern bath; all In firstclass
condition. Owner can use money
in hlisinpfifl t? hi* roacn r* far .iffurlnrr o<\
iow.
S5JI?
Near 7th and East Capitol its. A full
three-story brick dwelling; nine rooms
and bath; cellar; good-sized lot to an alley.
Well arranged, four rooms deep on
a floor.
$3,?<0>? EACH
New houses west of 7th St. n.e.; nix
rooms and bath; nicely decorated; goodsized
back yards.
$2,90? EACH
Attractive new six-room brick dwellings.
Northeast, west of 7th st.; bath
and modern impovements. Very attractive.
Renting for $20.5? a month.
$3,6(0)0 EACH
Near Lincoln Park and East Capitol
St., beautiful homes; two stories and
cellar, furnace heat; tiled bath, cab'net
mantels, good-sized rooms, nice back
yard, covered front porches, many desirable
features, making the houses comfortable.
Very attractive location, cement
sidewalk, curb, large shade trees,
etc.
$4,(Qi(t])i0) EACH
New houses on B street northeast.
Well constructed; two stories and cellar
under the entire house; furnace heat;
many cabinet mantels; beautiful bathroom.
The entire house very handsomely
papered. Covered rear porches.
$3,600
A beautiful new house, two stories,
cellar, tiled bath, furnace heat, hardwood
finish; lot l?xl<iO, wide alley.
Splendid location near 2d street north
east.
$3,50?
Tenth Ft., near Me?s. ave., R rooms,
bath, cellar, furnace heat; lot 22x115. to
alley: first-class loop Hon. A very low
price; will sell nuickly.
INVKST
Gilt-edged Ir
Choice locations. Prices so low
these properties should be resold
at a profit.
Prices reduced to make quick sale.
$3,75?
Renting for $33 a month. Nearly new,
on one of the widest thoroughfares in
Mt. Pleasant.
$5,25(0
Renting for >44; a corner store
bet. 7th and 14th south of S.
~ V"? "
Renting for >41; 3 small houses
on Bye St. n.w.
$110,50(01
Renting for $75 a month; .1
bricks; west of 7th, south of R.
$3,500
Renting for J2!); store on 9th,
st. n.w.; always rented.
$4,000
"Rpntinc fnr JL'iT* 4 brirk hnns#?s:
west of 7th ??.
$4,1100
Renting for $31; lot 23x100; G
st. s.e.
FAIRF
i H i o! n i n o* Clc
ears ago yielded a rental of ?400 a year
ire now yielding ?H>, and many cannot
;ven be let for the mere payment of taxes,
vhlle mortgages are everywhere, and It is
>eing found impossible to pay the Interest.
Sven the pick of the estates, such as that of
he late Baron Hlrsch. do not yield mdre
han a quarter of their former value.
The reason given for this condition of
hlngs is that the growers have to sell their
trine literally for less than It costs to prouce,
and the explanation Is more than
ilnted that the cause is to be found in the
xtent to which laboratory chemicals and
he pump have combined to replace the j
? u>/c.
The Newest Sleeves.
roin Harper's Bazar.
First,' the sloping shoulder , which, by
neans of the Tonkinese and other loose
leeves, has become an accepted and necssary
form of the fashionable dress, is
radually, but only very gradually at presnt,
beginning its retreat. For the summer
t will reign In all the soft chiffons and
eiling materials. In the short Jackets anil
ri those soft cloths which are always in
luded for the cooler days of summer in
he well-stocked wardrobe. The influence
f the reign of this loose sleeve will be
cen in the sloping and uuiooUi shoulder oi
A Merchant Recently Remarked:
'The men who go to work
at 8 o'clock in the morning
get up at 7; those at 9 get up
at 8, and so on; and it is my
observation that men do not
have time to read advertise
! ments m the morning.
York Ave. I
i
11 CPC I
the houses are bar- |
id opportunities for |
louse in this list and ?
id
Southeast. |
$3,750 ?
Grand location. M:'ss. ave., nenr ?ith. <
Bay-window, brick, with cellar, furnace >
heat; worth much more. Owner needs y
cush, offers at a sacrifice. ?
$3 J 00 ?
A doirble dwelling, near 7th and B X
n t> f^rmarlu tn.1/1 o f t I k'Jt I~> A
owner took it In a trade; offers low to 5
make a quick Bale. y
$4 J 00 $
A most desirable new house on 8th X
St., 2 stories, collar under entire house, X
4 rooms on each floor, tiled bath, fur- },
naoe heat. Room for stable on lot. ?
$4,100 ?
New brick dwelling: and brick stable, y
on lttth st. n.e. A ver> attraclve house, X
cabinet mantels, lurnace heat. A
A low price for a modern 3-story y
dwelling. on East f'apltol St.; 9 rooms, V
tiled bath; lot 18x120. Alley. y
$3,650 &
Brick dwelling and stable on an avenue
northeast; a cozy home; furna<e &
heat; nearly new; lot 17*138. A
$3,350 $
A brick dwelling on Md. ave. ne.; 2 X
stories, cellar, 7 rooms and bath, 2u J.
feet wide. All large rooms. i,
S3.500 X
A bargain on Pa. ave. s.e.; bay win- V
dow brick: 7 rooms, bath and cellar; y
furnace heat; this Is a better house than X
many selling for $4.o00. '
$3,50? X
South Carolina ave. s o., near 0th, a &
pretty little home on this choice square
A very low price. < ?
$3,75(0 t
Will buy an 8-room brick dwelling, on ,,
New Jersey ave. s.e.; 20 feet wide; for- < .
merly held at f&,2T>(>. A
$3,?MM) ;
On North Carolina ave.; brick dwell- Y
lng and brick stable; ^5 feet wide. X
$4,5<D0 t
Reduced from $5,">00 one of theBe com- &
fortat>le "homelike'' houses, on North < *
Carolina ave., near !>th. <?
$3,300 ;;
Brick dwelling, on B St. ?.e.; 7 room* J,
and bath, cellar; furnace heat; first- aC
class condition. < >
$3,0 >0)0 >
Eight-room brick and hath; P Bt. s.e.; ' '
20 feet wide; tills is a very cheap prop- ?
erty. ]||
MENTS.
lvestments. ! I
SUB,000 'x
Renting for $100 a month, on New X
York ave. n.w.; valuable for business X
purposes. <j?
$7,000 ::
Renting for 963; lettered street west of '[
14th; hot-water heat. ' f
For Sale?Good Income Producer. ] r
Price, $4,800 ;E
Renting for $."??? a month.
8 small houses on a lettered At. I.e. ?!?
For Sale?Corner Investment. Y
Price, $5>,750 ;F
Renting for $71; M st. n.w.; S'Jte ??
40x7tj. A
$18,000. i
Renting for $13C.a month.
12 brick houses on a numbered street "r
northwest. ' f
$4,800
Renting for $5fl; small bouses on a let- jt
tered street s.e. ,t.
$4,000 ?
Renting for $.'17.50 a month, Mt. Pleas- J.
ant. v
SJJdMI $
Renting to same tenant for year at Jir> y
a month: 8-room brick on a lettered ^
street n.w. Y
AX, |
>r. 14th St. |
For Lease
THE NORTH TAKOMA HOTRI.
In the suburbs of Washington.
D. C.. a building containing over
HO rooms, with spacious grounds;
to be thoroughly renovated and
fitted with modern plumbing and
heating facilities; especially adapted
for use as
School or Sanitarium.
Apply to
DAVID MOORE,
1328 New York Avenue N.W.
Exclusive Agent.
the new sleeves, the seam of which will be
carried oulte low to effect It Al?<-. < .?
upper portion of the sleeve will be fitted
close to the arm by a sleeve cap by means
of shirring or smocking or flat-stiiche<l
tucks, which will c'.asp the upper arm to a
depth of several Inches. Below tlitx the
material will be puffed. Hut all this is in
the future, at least several months ahead.
For the present fashion tukes ever> possible
form in diupeU skeves.
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