OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, July 20, 1907, Image 15

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1907-07-20/ed-1/seq-15/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 3

SUMMER RESORTS.
f?wiiiii i i iiiiiminiWinwMi jj
'! VISIT THE CTAR INFOR- ?
,J MATION BURFAU, ROOM 100, i?
FOR HOTEL CIRCULARS. RAILH
ROAD TIME TABLES AND ?
g FOLDERS, FREE OF CHARGE. jf
8- ttl
r% ?t
*
ATl.AMTir CITV. M. J.
i - tr->?r\rvf Om (Tk W OJ fTl I
ii HO V|>ll Wi'J U'X a vr vjj u <nv a m *wi ^
N 'vr Y<?rU .iv.- hikI Itoach \oi<Tii,an *n?l European
...mt-* ituii 111 site whI? r awl IclephrtiM* In ?>T??r 1 < K|
. .in -view room*, li'vator, cafe; aurf hath bonses
f. n most , < 111.?*I??#?; valuta considered,
ii - ;ir*> cttrfiucljr low J I'.StL K1 LP AT HICK,
lyl.7
Tiotki ? ?>i:\ i ii kKvriT;k? ave. near
Ii ? n| h< lty. -?m> KU-rnlor t<? ?tr??pf
i i ? niirHrfiom. Sii]rr!nr talile. $1.50
Iln.i up. $s wi til M. K THK?X*KMOHTON.
'< il? ?>?r. 4
UfiTKL 80T1IERN?V.%. AT*. AND BEACH;
o?nt rally Imainl wftliln *J?H> f??et of funiotM
Si.-tl I'li-r. Miflltnt labl#>; Ii1 manncenieiit;
>.11 iiMtdiTn ('iMtTcnlHH'en. GILnKKT L. CAKK.
j.-li' #>?t. *
\ IRUIN1 \ AVE. AND BE\' If
IK?TK1. M AJi;STl? ('lone to Stwl I lor. Oconn
vfctr. < n purity. *:?) > K?p?i?tor. private baths.
, *1 Superior tahl?>. $10 tip \vp?>kljr. $2 up dully.
SA.\II'KI. I? F.I.I I#. It IS 21t.ft
. ! HOTEL KHIS,
ATLANTIC CITT, N J. 9
OortipS'S one-bilf ?qu??re of
uitobstrucied front.
It >. 7-20t ogp.10 WALTER J BIZBY.
TUB CARLTON. ho,<"
Special rates* fur Sept Management of
J> 17 iot.4 C. 1*. ZAZZAU.
' HOTEL GLENSIBE, '
< >nn and Oriental ? < *. One minute from boach.
I use. airy room*; superior i.iWp, home comforts;
i .oonaMe rates. Booklet mailed A F. GHFENK.
tyl5-iau
Snpfrtor lui'itkn, AppolntMeut*. Ci?Ww.
NbW HOTEL OSTEND.
4?. .111.ft,.f A. ..in fr..ii 4 mtai'itr \tU\
! if .1'il.r is oiTfrtni; xp. , inl rnf?- $1." up weekly,
Auifii mm pinti. w m.uingt'metit. Ali bath*. pripuiili.
/i ii.l i n??. ? ?r swimming |hxj1 li:ive
? # ?M"r. l".\ t^nsivr por<*h?'s. Bverv
i un 1:ms > '.? ! v; w . furnished. Or(( -iri
I?<??Ulet. m-*ef tr.iin*.
I" l> P R UITTR. Mgr.
HATIPH MIP.W IPMrtll! AMlhT
u u w u j. -f i n ?i_* v v " -t i >4 xai iu: ui n ^ 9
Souih Carolina Hvr. :?n> 1 Ibe Itearb. near piers nn<l
?i' tra '(Jon*. I.nrtfp. stiniiy room*; private t?atb&:
' ''M itnr. .-Ma parlor. Capa?*lty. 3T?(>. Table and
?i'irI Bitperioi U rl(! for tiooklrt and t? rms.
, . N " r.iiv w w*i i.i.i \ms
THE ST. CHARLES.
Moat Select ] .or a Hon r?n the O.i-jn Front.
t>! ^ 11 n<T I v e for lis Meganee. cxdiislvpness, blghclasa
patronage mil lifwral rnanatfenvnt; orchestra
of so 11 ?|?i . S<*.i wntrr In n!l f?aths I booklet. rate*,
r M4*rvnrfir. Apply to Washli 51011 repjesenrat
*e. II KAKI'll llMcioN. Bond h?vlI?Sfnjc: i<h.>ne
Mi:In 27?m>. NKW1.1N I! A INKS.
J.vU -KM. 10
"TOE ALBEMARLE,
Virginia are., m ar Heath. M lern. hl^h-rlasa
fcuily houae. new throughout. Capacity. 4?h>. Offrr?
ape'lal l??*r mh^ for July of $8 $1<?. $12.50
v eekly $2 (H> up dally ?for lar^e. cool fr?;oi rooms.
Piet.1l l*d* Kieellent table. abundantly supplied
with fr??*!? milk egc*. poultry and vegetables from
own f.irtn Xttentlve white HTvlee. Elector to
nil floor*. 4 *nx> ft. wMe. cool r-n'he*. R>?>klef.
Saturday to Monday, &t.50. J. I'. COPK. ProprlII
11 KINO. Miugn JyKMa>t.i2
HOTEL IMPERIAL,
Maryland ave.. vcrv near RKAC . STKEL TIER
Mi FINE i BATH I NO GROUND.
Rvery convenience of n high priori Imtel; every
* <vm?f,?rt of a modern home, yet MOI'KRATK KATES,
(hvnfrslilp management. !. CI. KENDRICK.
iyia-aot.7
HAMILTON HALL.
I nder new manas** lent. Elevntor. R;ith*.
Jyl3 30t H. M. REEVES.
Grand Atlantic HiotsS,
Virginia sre. and the Beach. Atlantic City. N. J.
I'uiler entire now management. 350 beautIfullv
fi'n):.-ht?J rooms. en suite, with bath; hot >ind cold
s?-n wmtcr attached to all *>ath?. Also public hot
?e.? water baths. 'Phooea In rinnns. Mu^lc and
i?vk i.il diversions. Terms: American plan. S2.50
j-cr d.iy up. $1 :.:? > weekly up; European plan. $1.50
I>er d.iv ui>. (iarace. CllAKLES E. COPE. Prop.,
f rnierty of Ibe Klttatlnny. Delaware Water liap.
h jyti-aot.ia
[SWIM (fulfil BR antl ArL- 1 ,s(iI
i- //ull iXJvLQ U lyJlKJffruai station and Younj s pier;
woaii view; premises extend to t>ca<b; bathing from
liouse: $7 up. Hook let. i'Al'L C. UOSKCRAN3.
Jy3-2?Jf.e8i:.4
\ w \y TTK R kT I KV Kentacky nDrt
'N T- \ 1 * I\ i\ I - L-r. I Boani^valk. Board
wall; cutrance. Oceau vlear every room. Mod.
rate* FAIRBANKS. & MACKENTUIN.
* Jy 11 tut.4
H OT EL 1ROQUOIS,
euj South Carolina av??.; rpntPT of attrir
ii??n6. an I U*al mulrrn hotel, ranking with ?b.* N?st
1?(m.>?? ?. capacity. 4<?u; rtorns slng> or en suite wi'b
|?: iv'?te l?ath- elevator to street level; xtenslv*
iwlnn. orchestra. et<~.; *|Kvlal terms. $12..V). $15,
$17.?V?. $lft? wky. Open all year. Booklet mailed.
J>?. wt 10 W I SHAW.
LA FONTAIN E,"&TS2?
modern uieota; auperlor table; $$ up weekly,
up dally. K. B. PARK Kit.
J)U30t
Miller Cottage, Xo?h 9G?r".
Excellent tattle; electric light*: SI 25 dally. $7
ftD*l weekly. J A F. L. MXUN.
Irn .int.*
HOTEL l..\ M Tons,
M. rvland ave. near tH?aeti. i-l?ra mid aOM*cmeDta.
8elei t location New management. Open all
jear. Elevator to atreet. Private baths. Booklet.
Jy*-30t.5 O. C. MILLER.
11 (HI 17's lloll K11 AM.
Ocean end Virginia ave. Elevator. Private
l.atb*. 0|M-n ?tu rounding#. $10 to $18 weekly.
!:<vikl**t upon application.
j> I WW.3 W. B. CQTTEN.
] 1( )TEL OR! ENTAL yVSnZ??
IWDER KKW MANAGEMENT. Modrro hrlM
Inutjrc. strkllji 0r<t>roof. M. STUASBUKGER,
I*i oil. Jy4-3ut
" MOTEL MONTICELLO,~
Ocean end of Kentuckr avenue. Near all attractions.
new THiiorunoirr. atlantk: citvm
IWt<J FST FINEST A NI > !< EST-A PPOI NT EI>
HoTKl.. AT MOPKKATK KATES Elegant rooms
with bath. Table and service of highest standard.
Fine orchestra. Home like aunoundings. Liberal
xuanagement. Can.. 1)00. Spcclal rates. $10 up
$11 up daily- Booklet. Ask Mr. Foster.
je3o::ot A. CONRAD KKDOLM.
O A 1\JC* f ^ lilchlgan ave. nesr Beach,
r Extensively Improved.
$S up wkly. Excel. tK*r?. A. IXXMJAN, Prop.; M.
COOP AN. Mgr. Jy4-60t
HOTEL"ELBERON"
AND MAGNIFICENT FIHEPHOOF ANNEX,
Tenuciaee ave. near Beach. op;iostte Protestant
and Catholic ChtiP-hea.
A new, Jiodern. np-to-date hot<M. F.xtra large
loouia. Private hatha. Telephone*. Metal beda.
Kicellent table. Filtered water. Poultry and fresh
vegetablea from our own farms. Finest of meat
guaranteed by dally veterinary Inspection Capac?
h, 450. White aervice. Special rates, $S to $17.50
w'eeklv . $1.50 to $3 dally. Booklet.
mj2tt-U0t K. B. Lt'PY.
rw*? Tr** a tr ?.? ?
I. rrorsteraac,
New. modern bote!. a? good aa tbe beat. Capacity,
230. Special July terms 8 up weekly. (1.50 up
dall-. Satunlajr to Monday. 13. Including iarp*.
ocea u- le w room a. metal be-la. elevator. batLa.
fiup*?r1or cooking. white eervlce. etc. Wide, cool
por-bea. overlooking ocean aud Boardwalk. Booklet.
Jy2 3?t.y W. F. WATTS.
NEW CLARION,
Kmigi-kj ?t?. Second bf>n* from beicb. Klcntor.
Ml r?i . Kuoklrt. S. K BONIFACE.
jjl 301.4 -
GALEN HALL,
flOTKL AND SANATORIUM.
tine "i me n+'W.-fct atone, brim and steel DUUdJnjcs.
with every eouafort. AI way* open, alwayf
ready. always busy. For farther Information ah*
Xlr. lv>*ter l.ii.J 1\ nnayivanla avo. Je22-30t,10
TheLoraine,
Fresh and ae? water bat ha, private and public;
runnng water, etc. Write for ratea.
' yOt.l < HAS. K. WAQXEB.
HOTEL SCARBOROUGH,
Beach Front nnd Maryland Are.
Between biers, e.ter of all at'-jettons: adjoin|n>'
rft bathing beach; excellent ocean-front rooms. |
connectelevator t street level; private tmina: j
music. finest I'renc'; cuisine Weekly rates. $12.50 !
Hi' daily. 1- 00 up. American pier.. Management 1
> cf ALFKKU W ..AN, Owurr.
| =??'
. ? f Ocean end S. Carolina
AW.; MlarSfd nnd re|r
furnisht yJ-'r*; lar^e. airy rw>ms; special
July ra Aeekly. Booklet. A. Li. ilL'HFk'.
<+ y
^ti k v. - pleasant ROOM* \.NO
"Tfcrnt 'flii neir twarh; tatbtiig c?ii b?
yjrorl *?*. t*ruia rr* *>nafo?e. Mr*.
S"SL?UKNC- on. 1S1 South Carolina
*' "*
?MiO'aitiL BELDEN,
mr, a*t- ?cd Near pier* ao<l
Social rate?- r'L*ralur Mm. C. StlDDON.
to???-<*'>. ___
note!, e?? en**"
,<0d Ut"e- 18 t0 NV^mmno.
* hotel stickney
Cnnerior Uxjtioo; spacious lawnn; bathing prlvlfro*;
hotel Capacity, 500. Klevator. ei*
'* tJnaive |? f'h^a, etc. 8p?.-cial, $10 to $15 vi??ekly;
Bto $3 Mf. L. 1. STICKNEY.
-- . J,4 30t I
ll
SUMMER RESORTS.
ATLANTIC Clfr
THE CLIFTON, COK. CONN. ANp~ATLANTIC
TPS. Cod*. 200. 8op?rlor accom. t~ to $12
wklj. Kxccllpnt bomf* cooking. I>"slr?Me for
fkiiilllr*. Trollrjrt dirwt to nil R. R. statloua
fnd bench. (JelOOOt.SI C. A. 8HAW.
la belle inn,
c)f?? table; fl.fio dij op- $8 up weeklj.
/Hft-90t MRS. J. YOUNqBt,OOD
berkshire inn, Virginia J?|.
Altraja open. Eleralor. cte. 18 to (IS wee'?:j.
i?p.. 800. 8th leiioa. 1. O. M J. K. D1CKI.NSOM.
chesterYnn, near Botch.
Fle*ator. Moderate rates.
nir2 !*>t.4 Mrs. D. KNAtEB.
ASHtKV rAHK, W. J.
"The Victoria.
I Aabury Park. N. J.. 3d and Ocean Avea.
Open all rear. Suites of rooms with bath.
Booklet. S. KEMPR.
I jy7-tn.tb.fi.Sii.20t
' BEAC-II HAVEN. N. J.
The Englesiide,
Reach Haven, N. J.
Now open. The best combination of seashore
features on the cosst. Matctoleas bny for sailing
and fishing: perfect beach and bathing. The Englesfde
has all the modern conveniences. private
bath tvfth sea and fresh water. Booklet.
JerUV JlOt. 10 R. F. EXGLK. M*r.
CAI*K WAY, N. J.
STAR VILLA.
Cape SJajr, N. .
Full "-Mr tfrw. First hou*e from beach. I leedlifame
phone. M. L. RICHARDSON.
if i jni.f'su
TITK STOCKTON hOTKL,. CAI'K MA*. N.J.,
wl!l open Joly 3.' For Information, nlei, ete..
P. H. 8. CAKE. Hotel Vtrmnndle, Washington
D. O. HORACE M. CAKK. Prop., Caps
lla; X. J. my27-<l.eS<i.uOt.O
CAPE MAY POINT, N. J.
r'-arltrin Hnticp Th* largest ami lending famL
anion nuusp, u, house; rap.. :t.v>; large
grounds; music. Terms moderate. Booklet.
M. II. KltOMRH, late of Cape House.
J<'13 th.ss.Su.tii.tn nu2n.4
SHoltKllAM HOTEL.
Select f .nilty bouse. Mod. rates. Cap. SIM). Tre#
batb bonnes. Oritientra. Trolley to nil stations.
JeW n<)|.4 J. C. SriUNGKR
DEAL I1F.ACH. N. j7
Motel St. EIrao,S^;v: ;;
rrnind. Ercellent service & culaln?; good boullu3 on
I>eal lake; golf links; booklet.. Mrs. A. E. SMITH.
je23-aOM
~ i'oxm'QRT. JVT~j.
The Devonshire, ,?,?
rlpu fpnin i>i'<'rr nmm Kvi>rv nuiii.lnlnH'r.f nnil tv>Tl
venience. Write for rates and booklet. W.
HUHK. Jel-60t
(H KAN CITlT %. J.
Hoiei May berry,
OCEAN CITY. N. J.
Location nnetirpassed; cuUlne tirst class; June
rat^H. Send for booklet. S. II. MAYBKUltY,
Proprietor. ^ Jel-eo.eSu.30t.7
TliK HOTKL CUMBERLAND. OCKAN C1TY, NTT.
A retv bouse, accommodating 500 Kueata. \rtth all
modern Improvementa; facln? directly on the
ocean: 70 minutes from Philadelphia. 30 minutes
by trolley from Atlantic City. For Information
address P. H. S. CAKE, Hotel Normandle. Washing.
D. 0. K. li. CAKE. Manager. Ocean
City. N. J. my27 il.e3n.90t,7
* OCEAN GROVE, N. J.
OKSIKARLE SBCO NI ?-STO K Y ltOOM. WITH
board. for two In i>rlvat*? party; terms. $S por
Address 1*2 C?w>kniann ave.. Ocean
t.*r<?v?\ N. J.
THE EULALIA,
Central; light rooms; special rates.
Jy9-tiMMa.l3t.4
OCKAN GROVE. 83-05 MT. T ABO It WAY.
Large and small families can find excellent accommodations
at the Ilowland House; abundant
table; homelike: near beach and Auditorium.
Kates. $s to $15; $2 a day; table board.
Je20-f h.sa.Su. tu.20t.5
iyifJBTEO STATli IniOIEi
?m ? ?tl. 9oa. knn,<oamala
DIUlh IU uvruil, f IV IV fll? tn^., ?.\rv, uaii'iouuici/
furnished. Booklet. F. B. CHAMBKKLIN.
J*^-Su.tu.th.?.2:n.4
Osborne House Corce"t?i,m.7e.nDd
Box 2121. Near beach. Moderate.
je25 :*0t 4 n. WKLSFORP.
" SKA GIIIT, N7J~
BK ACH-[YuLJSE. SKA~i;! lif. S EW JK1LSKY.
Grandly situated on bluff, directly on the beach,
amid pine graves, adjoining State Military Encampment.
finest roads for driving In the state. No m<>squit?K?s.
2 hours from Philadelphia. Capacity, 300.
Moderate rates. Booklet JOHN H. RISDON, Prop.
jyti-QUt.6
CAW A PA.
A Land of Lakes and Islands
Ac a point 113 miles north of the city of Toronto,
Canada, on the Grand Trunk Hallway System. Is
reached one of the moat magnificent districts in
the "Highlands of Ontario." known as the "Lake
of Bays'* District. Ae region comprises a series
of connected lakes. Over which large steamers are
navigated. What greatly adds to Ihe Lake of
Purs' value as a health-giving and sportsman's resort
Is the unmatched purity of the air oue
breathes upon its Mgbts. The visitor forgets his
ills under its reviving influence in less than a
week. Its bracing morning breeze, which rivals
the celebrated atmosphere of IMke's Peak. Col.,
lmrmrfa new lime i.ower and fresh vitality. 'land
some Illustrated "publication* seut free on application
to
r;RO. W MOSS, r a singer Agent.
my1-b0t.20 1411 ii ?t. n.w.
MAHVLA^Tb. _
"Ti IK AVAl<0\'' ON catoctiN MO IN IAIN;
altitude. 1.200 ft.; beautiful scenery; pure \rater:
no mosquitoes. An Ideal place for rest and
rerreatlon. For terms app4y to .Mrs. THOS. H.
MVKltS. Iiraddock Heights. Fred'k Co., Md.,
R F P No. 20 Je2."?-30t
itivkic si'iu sTis. so \iiiTks fk<>m wasiiington.
ou Potomac river; all amusements on water
and shore. 'Phone Chaptlco O-lP. Booklet. It.
I). r.LATKIS I <>NK. River Springs. .Md. Jyl7-3'?r
HOTEL BRAD DOCK,
Braddock Heights, Md.
OP UN JUNE Ift.
1,000 feet elevation; 110 malaria: no mosquitoes;
20 minutes by trolley from Frederick; new modern
liottl; large rooms. single or en suite, with or
without hath; first class public hatha on both
sleeping Moors, free to guests. Write for t>?>oklet.
"Kt'iumrui uraauock i\ r- iaj.au. t?.v iioiei.
Frederick Md Jy4-30t
FAIU V 1KW L'CVi 1 AGKS; DKLIGHTFl LLY SITuatrd
ou the Tred-Avon river; boating. l?atblng,
fishing. crahbiug. lawn tennis, etc.; artesian well
water. For terms write to Mrs. H. BiUMiMAN,
Oxford. 11 d. jyfl30t*
Tome Institute Inn
AT TO MP. SCHOOL FOU BOYS.
Open for Summer Guests June 15. Good table,
beautiful surroundings, all modern convenience?.
Golf, tennis, floating, flailing. Access to Institute
Library?ten thousand volumes. Terms moderate.
Address TOME 1N3TITUTB INN. Port Deposit.
ki art-Tit rtrl 111V 1 eod 4T?t 1 0
8WA.\N'8 HOTEL. PINKY POINT. MD.-OPEN
Julr 1 for the aeaaoo; boating. fl>hln*. crabhlng,
ailing, aiiwtc and dancing; large dining room;
rates m<xlerate. Take Ma. and Va. mil Del.
teamen. fjot of 7th at. Apply to
Jy4 60t J. T. 8WA.NN. Plner Point. Md.
COLTOV8 HOTEL, ON PICTUHKSQUB I'OTOmar.
HO miles from Washington; take ateamen
Kau'lall 11 dm to Coltnn'a wharf. Baltimore line to
HuKhwuod wharf. 'Phone CliaptUo. Md., til8. or
ttddrpM n W. LOVE. Prop., I'almer P.O.. Md.
IbH 9A(
HOTEL ST GEORGE.
Oponn July 10. Boating. hatbfog auil fiahlng;
music nn?i dancing. Term* moderate. HOBBS a
CHKSSKR. Propa.. St. George l?Uud. Md.
)yi aot.a
Ocean City, Md.
Til F. K1DKAV. weSTStV.
Post ??ftJ?*e I5(?x 103. Directly on tbr l?eacb. Table
uii?uri?aH?i*'(l Mudera Improvement*. Mrs. PAL'L*.
J.fl 7 SOI M
(W'ff tvir Il/ITWI
mt. vkrmjn "hotel.
Uce?n from.
Jyl2:i0t.?* j.n siiowki.u
TII \i PLIMIIIMMON HOTEL
BKACH kuont, ockan city. mi)
SritK hatdinu. ball.uoom. orcll k*ttla
feS-SOt B. T. 8bbevb.
THE DENNIS, <?r.na& 5*.
ThMh first class. Terrus very rcasnoahle. Apply to
1o2.V30t,4 mm jt j. dknnih.
MT." PLEASANT HOTEL,"
OCEAN CITY. MD.
new tuioaceoioDt; ocean front; snn parlors:
ulry rooms; excellent trfble. For particulars
B.'.rlr.-X W. O. ABBOTT. I'rop. ica-JUl"
M:\V \ OHK.
ADIRONDACK#.
" 45 Minute, from Sar tosra."
7 Honrs from >rw York. \Vi:liout ChaojC*.
WAYSIDE INN and COTTAGES
LAKH LUZERNE. NEW YORK.
Open July to October.
Mountain. Ijike, Forest, Golf, Tennis, and all
6ix>rtn. Itooaii*, with private batb. Write for
! l>ocklet. ratog. CUFFOKD M. LEWIS, Prop.
I Bookings at Hotel Krerctt, II ?t. bet. 17th and
lfith u.w. my2l-tu,tb,s-45t,ll
u-f KM ^ U 11 II UVCU-VWlly
I.OSO BEACH. LONG ISLAND, N. T.
"In ail the world no beach like this."
NOW OPEN.
Largest and oiost delightfully located resort hotel
I In the world.
I Under name management as the Hotel Empire*
New York city.
Lighted throughout by electricity.
VICTOR SOBLIN AND HIS ORCHESTRA.
? Jf4 per day and npward.
"*t jfal.OO per irtand upward.
SOUTH COAST HOTEL CO., Proprietor..
W JOHNSON Q< INN, Prraldent, Manager.
J*l-M.Su.tu.U.30t.lT
SUMMER RESORTS.
NEWVOHK.
The Earlington,
Richfield Springs, N. Y.
* Renovated and remodeled throughout.
Reopens Jane 29.
Directly opooalte Great White Sulphur Spring
Bathing Pavilions and Xatatorlam for tbe relief
and core of Malaria, Rheumatism. Gout. Nearastbenia
aod all skin diseases. Kxpert Masseurs,
both Male and Female, In attendance. Under the
<tiru><inn e\t Alfr?H R ('rain M fl 199 U'aar
TSlb st.. New York.
New York offltc.
THK BItOXTKLL,
3 East 27tb st.
GASHERIR [>E WITT Proo.,
Ask Mr FOSTER.
mr2! tn.th.?.Su.36t.22
Saratoga.
The Qramd Umion
For Particulars Address
WOOLLEY & GERRANS. Proprietors,
Saratoga Spring?, N. Y.
ALSO OF THE
HOTEL MARIE ANTOINETTE.
Broadway, titltli to (JTth Sr.. New York City,
And THE IROQUOIS. Buffalo.
Jy0-*a.m,\r.tf.20
PENNSYLVANIA.
MOUNTAIN HOUSE AND 1HAPMAN MANOR?
Highest point on W. M. R. R.; both house* built
of stone. For rates apply to M. L. C. McCOMAS,
Blue Ridge Sunuuit. Pa. JylO,w,f,aa.lJt*
DOUBLING GAP, "
WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS HOTEL.
VIA NEWV1LLE, CUMBERLAND CO., PA.
20 sq. miles of mountain forest park and lake:
refined environment and amusements; medicinal
springs; resident physician. Garage and liver/.
Address GEORGE ALBERT FREYER. Owner.
JelO-tf.S
" "THE KlTTATlNNY, "
Delaware Water Gap. Pa.
New management; largest, most modern, finest
located hotel. in private park of 2i>0 acres; golf,
tennis. howling. l>oatiri?r. fisliing. I>a thing, etc.
Hotel has private Itatbs, elevators, steam beat, open
wood fires, hot and cold running water in rooms,
orchestra, telegraph and telephone offices, livery
and garage, etc. Suj>orior table, supplied from
()\VN FARM. Illustrated l?ooklet ui?on application.
Special July rates American plan; also a la carte
service. (Jvl2-tO G. FRANK COPE.
7 ATlCiri) in A in> OA.n TCrr*
vv/^uiGiK; v-ji/^ir H u<u>iu^iC,
Delaware Water Gap, Pa.
NEW OWNERSHIP MANAGEMENT.
Now open, remains open until November, for the
entertainment of a refined, select patronage. Entirely
rebuilt, enlarged and modernized by expenditure
of $100,000. N w .nd luxurious furnishings.
Now the finest equipped and host ippointed
mountain hotel. Capacity. -100. Highest altitude.
Coolest location; commanding unobstructed vlevrs
of thirty in Ilea. Entirely removed from noise and
dust of railroads and highways, but within easy
accesa of both. Hydraulic elevators, steam heat,
loj flroplares Private tl!?*d hatha. Running water
in all rooms. Lighted by elect riclty and gaa.
Cuisine. under direction of noted French chefs, will
be of the highest standard. White service throughout.
Orchestra. Varied social features, milliards,
bowline etc. Golf, tennis, rowing. c-ia.vMng. bathing
fl?hmg. New garage and livery, with highclass
saddle horses and equipment. Write for
Illustrated booklet and ;?I auto map*. Special
Julj terras. JOHN PUUDY COPE.
Je2fl .TO?. 2*
Chalybeate Springs Hotel,
Bedford, Pa,
Strictly first clasn; large grounds; flue shade; rool
nights; nil vegetables served on tables fresh dally
from our own gardens; lmve own d;ilrj* for use of
hotel; orchestra during the season. For 1 ooklets or
any other Information address GEO. II. DAt'LER,
Jr.. Prof.
my27-ea.30t.10
~ HIIODK ISLAND.
THE MANISSES,
BLOCK ISLAND. R. I.
Fifteen miles at sea; dally boats from N. Y. without
change. Every modern convenience. Bathing,
listing boating, orchestra Reference*. Dook'efs.
C. E. & B. A. BROWN. Propj.
1e21 -f ?a.fu.th.iOt.7
vinnnru.
HOTEL ROYAL. .FRONT ROYAL, VA.; fe MILE
fr?un town; Blue l'ida?? mountains; North and
South Shenandoah rlvojs; fine bass tishing; popular
amusements for all; our 3d season. S. B.
FKltk L\s. Prop. Jy20-2t*
watktf Ui' K ivn ITE s TLrillTR SPRINGS? Apacify.
250; hot & cold water every room; swimming
(xm-?I. livery, pool. billiards; ground* large;
phone. T. S. Duncan. VVaterllck. Warren co., Va.
Jyl2-30f4
Bright View ^koht,tva.
Iln ten, $2 o $3 a day, including meals.
Jyll-aot*
JORDAN' wfhtr shlpbur springs, in bradtlftil
Sh'-nnndoab Valley; hotel onder new manageuiciit;
lighted by ga?; hot. cold water bat hi;
spacious dining room and bill room; outdoor
amusements; wafer famous for medicinal purdop?*s;
terms. $8 to $12 per week; special rate*
I 10 rammed A ani ens w. A. MUUIO.N. Manager,
Stepli.Mipno Frederick ?nunty. V'a |e2S-30t.9*
VKRY ACr PSSIB(7k. 60 UI. FKOMWASH. VIA
Bliieinont; valley. mt. and wafer scenery: shaded
grounds and driven; automnbiling. fishing. bo*tfus
ami swimming: ?|rrlug l>eds; children excluded:
dally mall. It. F. D.; telephone. sood
fare: fresh mem a. milk, frutts. fowls: $7 fw?r \rfc.
till Nov.; cfrciilHr Star offlce. or M AURICR v'ASTLEMAN.
CaKtlcmao's Ferry, Clarke Co.. V?.
JelS dtose30
WEST VIRCilMV ~~
AU RORATMDUSE"a,^i^v,^>
In the Beautiful Alleghanies,
NEAR I>F.KR I'AKK AND OAKLAND.
Large airy rooms, comfortable IhmIs and excellent
table. Fre*h vegetable?* from our own srardena.
and our own cows supply milk and cream for the
tal#le. rnexcelled health and family resort. Grand
scenery. No mosquitoes. I'or terms. iKtoklet, etc.,
Address J. A. SHAFFBK. Al'ROItA, W. YA.
JylH-th.Su.tu.12t
SPAKKOWS IXX. H \ICPKItS FKItKY, W. \ A~^
Situated on Camp Hill. overlooking SheniiutPinh
river and mountains; beautiful location; high ind
cool; excellent table. Mrs. W. D. SPAHHOW.
Jy1-301 *.4
THE LOCKWOOD.
and service excellent. Address A. P. DANIKL.
Prop., Harpers Ferry, W. Va. my22-tf,4
"MIILL TOP liOUSE." ~
Try the "Hill Top" this season. We know you
will he pleased. All modern improvements. T. s.
LOVF.TT, rroiv. Harpers Ferry. W. Va. Jel4-tf.5
^SUMMER RESORTS?FOR SALE
A SKA SI I >B SIMMER roTTAOK.
WITH 3 AORBS OF LAND.
FOR SALK. AT JAMK8TOVVN. R. I
This i* a most l>eautifully situated cottage. It
commands magnificent views of the oeean and
also of all of Narraganset bay. House com a i mm 8
bedrooms, hath. etc. <'ity water, etc. liatlii:ig.
boating and fishing. Jamestown oaliy 2<> minutes
by ferry from Newport. In order to close an testate
I will sell this place for a very reasonable
figure.
$110,000,
which is about half of Its actual cost.
Apply to
A. OD. TAYLOR (Established 1887>.
Heal Estate Agent,
132 Bellevne arenue. Newport, R. I.
Branch Office, Jauieatowu, It. I.
i.,0A -it
JJ
The Democracy of Golf.
From I he Circle.
It Is doubtful if there Is any game played
by men which has so many followers and
enthusiastic devotees as golf. Base ball lias.
t\f I'rtlirau o!? rnaH 41 a ! !*? tA "(Hnotlanal
game." but it is seldom played by men
In business, and the rank and file of Its
supporters take their pleasure in filling the
grand stands or bleachers, as their purse
o*>rl lool/innr * * /-??.!<? .1.^
uiv luito, U11U iwomiiti WI?. \J\Jl A 19 UIC
most democratic of all sports, in that it
brings together the oiii ami the young, the
rich ami the poor, the delicate and the robust?all
so Intent on the game that social
and Oslerian lines are forgotten. ? ? I
have seen playing the same day on a wellknown
course near New York one of the
richest men in the world, two of the bestknown
supreme court judges, a surgeon of
international repute, the president of one
of the largest trust companies in America,
a Presbyterian minister, an organist in an
Episcopal church, a medical student, a
clerk in a country store and several schoolboys.
There are thousands of business and
professional men who, if It were not for
golf, would be losing the stimulating and
invigorating.jout-of-door exercise which was
as my physician friend expressed it, keeping
old men young. * There has never
been another game which produces so much
good-fellowship as golf. Meet a stranger in
traveling or on business, and it it is found
that both are golfers there is an instant
bond of comradeship established; a common
hook on which conversation, anecdote
and experience can be hung. If your r.ewly
made acquaintance is a golfer, what care
you whether he is a millionaire or a poor
man?
A Proof.
Translated for Transatlantic Tales Prom Fllegende
Blaetter.
Mistress (opening the drawing room door
during a chat with her friends)?"You were
listening. Johann!"
Servant (frightened)?"Certainly not, reaflame!"
Mistress (severely)?"Do not deny tt! Ycur
hair is standing on end!"
THE PENCjUNDUSTRY
Dearth of Red Cedar Will Close
Many Mills.
SUPPLY OF MATERIAL LOW
Factories Now Using Knotty Stumps
and Old Bails.
HOW THE CEDAR WOOD GROWS
Where It Is Found at Its Best and
Some Suggestions.for
Its Cultivation.
One of tlie most: common articles In every- |
day use is ttie lead pencil. Something like
Slj.OUI.OCO pencils are manufactured in the
1'nited States each year, and the Industry
is steadily growing. In the manufacture of
these 315.000,000 pencils there are required
1<MMKK> tons or 7,300,000 cubic feet of wood,
so that each day in the year 300 tons or
20,000 cubic feet of wood are used for pencils.
By far the greater part of this wood
Is red cedar. Its softness, straight grain
and freedom from defects render It peculiarly
adapted to the purpose, and a suitable
substitute has never been found. Indeed, it
is doubtful If any other wood-using Industry
is so dependent upon a singie species as
the pencil industry Is dependent upon red
cedar.
To realize the scarcltv of nencil material
It
Is only necessary to visit tlie cedar mil 1 |
yards where arc now being used old rails i
and small and knotty logs, which a few !
years ago would not have been considered.
How long the supply will last Is hard to
say. but It Is certain that some of the mills
now in operation mu3t shut down inside of
a dozen years, and this regardless of any
measures which may be taken in the meantime
to protect th* young growth.
The requirements for lesd-pencll material
are very exacting. A soft wood, even and
straight gialned. free from defects, and one
which wiil not check or warp. Is essential.
Thfi hpflrt U'onil rtf l'Pil fiilHITs t hoco
requirements and Is, besides, very durable.
The quality 0f the heartwood, however,
varies widely throughout the tree's range.
Fven local conditions Influence Its texture.
As an example of local variation, the heartwood
of cedar which grows on nummocks
and on low ground Is decidedly of better
quality than that of trees wh:ch grow on
the upland. It has a more uniform dark
red color, is softer and contains very little
white rot. or "polecat " wood, which occurs
frequently In upland cedar.
Its Commercial Range.
The commercial range of red cedar extends
from the Ohio river on the north, as far
east as eastern Tennessee and central
Georgia, as far south as Tampa hay on the
west coast of Florida, and as far west as
eastern Texas and western Arkansas. The
tree almost Invariably grows In mixture
with hardwoods, and only in rare Instances
is it found in pure stands. In the Florida
hummocks the chief Associates of cedar are
live oak. hickory, magnolia, red gum and
palmetto. Among these, ceda- once grew
to Jar*e size.^but excessive cutting has
talren nnf hr?nct r?f tho 1 ariro tra/ic loai-lnc
seedlings and saplings scattered beneath
a dense cover of hardwoods and vines,
where the young growth, notwithstanding
its tolerance, has little chance for development.
On the uplands farther north the
principal associates are oaks, hickory and
elm. Only rarely Is It found with pine.
Among the hardwoods, ceda- oft?n forms
from .? to 60 per cent of the stand, and
this proportion, under normal conditions,
la Increasing .
in the hummocks, whore the soil Is deep
and fresh and the stand unbroken, red
cedar Is tall, straight, narrow-crownpd and
has a well-pruned, gradually tapering bole.
It Is here thai it remrfc's its greatest s!z?.
Since ail the largest trees have b;en removed.
the only basis upon which to determine
the size which the tree will attain
was tha dimension of logs in mill yards,
where ?ome measured thirty-six Inches In
diameter at base. The used length of many
of thes> was eighty feet, and when the
top Is added, tills would make a total
height of at leart loi fe-t. Cedar trees In
stands of similar density on uplands, in
gooi sin, are usua.iy snorter, wi-Jercrowned
and hav? sorter clear l?nqth?,
due to tiie pres>nct? of a smaller number
of HitoLrani species that are crowding
t he m.
Open-grown cedar is of little value for
commercial use except for pnsts and poles.
It lias a wide and heavy crown, a bol > that I
Is rough and fluted, with almost no c ear
length, and limbs so c!"se together that no I
pencil block can b? obtained between them. 1
The root system of cedar varies with the
soil depth, but Is usually very shallow and
widely branched.
A Hardy Tree.
For its actual existence red cedar is modest
in Its demands upon soil and moisture.
It will grow on the drl?st exposures where
the soli is but a shallow layer, or even in
rock crevices. Suo.h situations, however,
never produce good tre.-s. For Its best development
cedar requires a fresh, moderately
deep, well-drained soil which may '
vary In composition from loamy clay, the
asual upland soil, to a sandy, calcareous j
one.
A tree like cedar, which ran adapt Itself
to the varying conditions found In a wide
range, is necessarily liardy. Fire is cedar's
greatest enemy, since the thin bark of the
tree offers but little resistance to the
flames. The damage from this source is
confined chiefly to the hummocks, where
during the dry season fire In the inflam- i
mable forest floor needs only a start lo I
spread over large areas and to kill all '
seedlings and saplings in its path. Cattlemen
who burn over grazing areas in the
upland pineries are usually responsible for
the fires. Goats and hogs harm young,
cedars. These animals should be excluded"
from cedar lands if the forest is to be
managed on a paying basis.
The diseases of red cedar are few and do
little harm except to cause greater mill
waste. The cedar apple Is frequent, but of
no serious consequence. Red rot is a common
disease of upland cedar, and fully 15
per cent of tree3 seventy-five years old are
affected by it. The rot seldom extends
more than eight or ten feet up the tree
from the base. White rot is another disease
found mostly in the upland trees. It
shows In the heartwood of the trees as
white streaks from one-fourth to two
Inches wide, and often runs two-thirds the
length of the bole. The screaks appear
perfectly sound, but they are usually cut
out as waste.
How It Reproduces.
The amount of seed borne by red cedar
Is governed largely by locality and density
of stand. The best trees which fruit are
located on the higher and more open areas,
where the crowns have had full development.
Trees so situated may begin bearing
when twelve years of age, but maximum
production is reached much later. _
Tne seed ripens In the fall of the second
year and begins falling soon afterward,
though much remains on the trees until the
following spring. Since the fruit !s a one
or two seeded berry, it cannot ba scattered
by the wind, like that of other conifers.
For the most part seedlings are found
near seed trees in abundance, but elsewhere
they are widely and unevenly distributed.
princip-lly by birds. Thorough
seeding cannot be depended uix>n for any
definite area, and an attempt to secure a
new crop entirely by natural methods is
certain to fail.
It cinnot be expected that the private
owner, who now controls the supply of
cedar, will take steps to protect his present
crop and to grow a future one sufficient to
insure a constant supply of pencil material.
Among the many reasons why this Is so is
the private owner's lack of interest in cedar
production, since in most cases his time is
taken up with ither business. Moreover, a
long-time investment on a small capital ;s
not desirable, while lack of skill in tending
the crop and lack of knowledge of its rate
r?f flTnwth nnii flnfl-1 vain#* all fond to iiia
Icourago the small ttmiberland cuner from
r.vamgtnr t,U cedar lr tl:e bert way. I
Since tala is ?c, U.e caiy chauce for a ^
future supply of cedar lies In a change of
ownership. The pencil companies are the
most interested in the future of the tree,
and it would seem that the most practical
solution of the problem Is for these companies
to purchase the land on which cedar
makes a good growth and manage It on a
conservative basis.
The advantages of such an ownership are
plain. Timber can be raised at a cost which
insures a fair profit. If the tract is a large
one, the cost of exploiting will be much less
than under the present expensive system.
By locating the mill near the tract to be
managed from 2 to 3 cents per cubic foot
will be saved on freight rate alone. Lastly,
It would be unnecessary to spend thousands
of dollars each year In sending buyers over
the country. This will remove another
great source of expense.
Cost of Planting.
The Initial cost of planting will vary with
ivai ui orcuiuiga. 11 mrnc can uts uittallied
from the immediate neighborhood, as
Is usually the case, the .cost will be reduced
to a minimum. If they have to be hauled
or shipped, however, the cost would be ?2
per thousand. One man can plant 500 trees
per day, and wltii wages at $1 per day and
a spacing 6 feet by ti feet, the total cost of
seedlings and planting would be $4.S4 per
acre.
After the plantation has been established
according to plan, the young cedar will require
very little care. A man should be
hired by the year to guard the crop from
theft and tire and also to supervise the
cuttings.
When the young cedar has reached the
age of twenty or twenty-five years the
crowns should completely fill the growing
space. To encourage growth the stand
should then be thinned. Practically onehalf
the stand should be removed (as
shown in the diagram*, which would leave
the trees spaced approximately 8.5 by 8.5.
Trees to be removed should always be
marked by a competent man. who will use
care in leaving the most thrifty trees where
i ii?j ui? inn iiiicrmc iuu gi rait.t mtu
ing. This thinning should easily pay for
itself in second-class posts.
Tho young stand is now at an age when
the final quality of the wood can be more
or less easily adjusted at a small expense,
and pruning, while very impracticable and
uncertain in Its benefits to most of our
forests, might pro\-e very successful If
practiced on red cedar. This should be
done when the trees are less than four or
five Inches in diameter, which would allow
a complete growing over and considerably
less waste in knots. Any larger-sized trees
will receive but littla benefit by this practice.
The Second TMnmng.
When the remaining stand is thirty-five
or forty years old the crowns should again
be crowding, but to stimulate height
growth the second thinning should not be
made until about tho forty-fifth year, when
height growth will be completed. By this
encouragement of height growth for forty
years the limbs are spaced farther apart
and the trees have a greater merchantable
length.
The object now Is to put on diameter
growth. To do this will require a heavy
thinning which will bring the remaining
stand to the final spacing of 17 by 17 feet.
The 4,V> tre?g removed will furnish posts
worth at least 0 cents each, stumpage. To
make the value of this thinning conservat-itrs*.
rv??f /iont f\t troc-a arp thrown Ollt of
the yield for failures and underslze. The
regaining i?7 trees should furnish <M0
posts, or $4<Vort per acre.
NOVELTY IN ROLLING PINS.
Holds Ice Water to Keep Pin Cool
and Prevent Sough Sticking.
The housewife and baker know that it is
practically impossible to prevent <TT>ugh
sttcklng to the rolling pin when preparing
the mixture for baking. To prevent the
dough sticking a little dry flour is sprinkled
' * > I- f h n t'rtl 11 n 0
uyti u'-'uftii ia v r> ???v? ?
lit
,i;l . -
pin. This Is successful only for awhile. As
the pin becomes warm, caused by friction,
the more the dough Is liable to stick. If
the rolling pin can be kept cool the dough
will not adhere. A Pennsylvanian has devised
a scheme whereby the rolling pin can
and thf? rioiiirli thus
from sticking. He employs a hollow rolling
pin. having an Interior chamber for the reception
of a cooling medium. At each end
are detachable handles, providing an opening
in the chamber for the introduction of
th? cooling nit-dium, as shown In the Illustration.
The cooling medium would preferably
be i<-e water, which could be readily
retained at a low temperature for a long
time.
Down Stairs and Up in Business.
From the Philadelphia Record.
"l>ownstalrs for oysters? Not now.
That day's gone by. Poople don't like
to go downstairs for anything. They
don't mind going upstairs, but object
to the basements." So spoke an oldtimer.
"Yet it is easily within the memory
of a middle-aged man when oyster
cellars were numerous. There are only
a few left. The same way with barber
shops. Forty, or even thirty, years ago
most of them were in basements. Even
saloons were often downstairs, despite
the obvious difficulty of throwing an obstreperous
customer out. Nowadays it's
upstairs for everything."
Check Reins in Germany.
From the Cleveland Lender.
In 1003 the use of the check rein was
prohibited in the German emperor's stables,
and almost simultaneously with
tills prohibition the new notice ree-ula
tlons of the city of Berlin governing
public cabs came into effect. According
to the provisions of these regulations, the
use of blinkers or of the check rein on
public cab horses was prohibited. In
the streets of Berlin one now seldom
sees a check rein or blinkers on horses,
except on a few belonging to private
teams.
OF COURSE NDT.n
Suter?I don't know whether I
ought to take your daughter from
her father's roof or?not
Pop?She doesnt live on the
roof, young maiil.
ITEDDY BEARS TREMBLE
SCHOOL TEACHERS DECLARE
GIRLS SHOULD RETURN TO DOLLS.
Furry, Stuffed Peta Don't Encourage
Little Ones to Learn to Sew
as i>oils Do.
.Special Correapondenre of The Star.
NEW YORK. July 19. lf?07.
The hundred thousand Teddy Bears In the
metropolis are on the verge of panic.
Though the nature-faking controversy left
them unscathed, a newer and greater peril
conrronts them. School teachers are declaring
that the Teddy Bear 1st a menace
and must )>e abolished, and though the
board of education has taken 110 official
action In the matter, and Is not likely to,
the agitation against the Teddies In educational
circles Is growing very Strang
Indeed.
The crusade against the Teddy Bear
at a rtorl vAnan*l?? ?* ~ " ? ?1 1 ' x'
I fTimii n LICI a'ai Rffll 11*111 till
came out with the statement that In replacing
the doll, the bear was a pernicious
substitute. For. while the doll appealed to
all the maternal instincts of a little girl
and develonfid them along healthy and natural
lines, the Teddy Bear did no such
thing.
Now the teachers have Joined the fight.
I.lttle girls, they point out. formerly got
their first lessons In sewing through the
natural desire to provide their dolia with
pretty clothes. The Teddy Bear, however,
does no wear clothes, save possibly a ribbon
or sweater or cap, and so the up-todate
child who has discarded her dollies
for the intrusive bruin, haa no incentive to
learn to stitch and make button holes.
"The Teddv Bear Is not good for little
gir!3." said Miss Jane G. Close, a supervisory
teacher of sewing in the New York
schools. "The bear Is ke?nlmr tli? MMren
from the pleasure of caring for a doll. He
can't wear pretty frocks and dalnt.v under- '
wear, and the little girl who lias htm f ir a I
pet sets no incentive to make these things (
Henc9 she loses the education involved in
choosing, making, handling and caring for i
dainty garments. The Teddy Bear Is all '
right for boys, but not for girls." j
Teachers furthermore point out that they
have other troubles in teaching children to i
do things for themselves, because of the
modern ready-made sort of existence. People
do not darn and mend old clothes; they
throw them away. But the teachers are
tryiner to revive the Interest in domestic |
art among children, and the local university
summer school Is devoting muali attention
to this.
Meanwhile the fate of the Teddy Bear
hangs in the balance, while the teachers
decide whether he is a menace to childhood.
And from thousands of nursery shelves the
great legion of forsaken dolls, from the
great flaxen-haired wax creations, with
blue eyes that open and close and cherry
lips that say "papa" and "mama." to the
raggeu^st ran clous, watch the controversy
with keen elation, for perhaps It may result
In their coming into their own again
Behind the Mask.
From Ii nrjter's Weekly.
It Is a depressing thing to watch the
faces that hurry past one on the street.
To Jostle one's kind on the thoroughfar.-s
and In the shops Is to see humanity at its
lowest ebb. The faces are evereager.
strained, anxiety-ridden, or drab, futile,
"lack-luster, and weary, and one Involuntarily
asks: "Why do they go on living?
What object makes this dull driving worth
while?" Outwardly, superficially, there Is
but Kicn nf lnvp r*f lifo *!-?*? i
being. the exultation of existence. It Is a
dull panorama, this endless stream of tired
people, mostly ugly and disfigured by the
exigencies of their taslfs. They seem all
to have worn off the bloom of life by the
unhalting struggle. They bear the marks
of living in yesterday or tomorrow, and this
moment is but a dull thud of time to be
endured while they press on to another
moment no better than this one. It is In
the far-away behind us or in the great to ;
be that Joy Is hidden, and one by one the
moments drip by unheeded, ungrasped and
untreasured.
There would seem to be too many of us.
too. In this great undifferentiated mass of
people, all unsmiling, silent, giving out
nothing, but each one hurrying along, eager
to attain some goal, and pushing toward it
as if harried by an invisible throng.
What an experience it would be. wliat an
enlivening and enriching experience it '
would be. to peer behind the uglv mask.
and see what lay back of the stupid haste
and seemingly useless activity! If one
were free to call a halt to any one and de- ]
mand that he deliver up for our enlightenment
the heart of his motive and his deep- <
hidden desire, what significance would be
added to the scene! If for a moment one
might but play the part of the fairy In the
old tales and grant each man a single wish,
what a strange insight one would gain into
the life beneath the dull appearance!
"What one thing will you have to make
you happy?" It would be money, doubtless.
often, or health, or a jewel, or the '
power to stay the approach of death, or to
annihilate space and overcome separation.
OCEAN TRAVEL.
t llnfg. lt.OOr. 3t. $1.20. 1 ? H'.IB. I mo.. t7.2D.
Russian Volunteer Fleet.
NEW YORK?ROTTERDAM?LIB A U.
Monkva July 31 (Smolensk Aug. 28
Petersburg Aug. 14i?Saiau>v Sept. 11
All twin-screw steamers. Cabin to Rotterdam,
$G3; Paris, $74; London. $73; Berlin, $78.
C. B. KiCIIAUD & CO.. 31 33 B'nay. New York.
fe2S-th.sa.tn.t>5t.8
^ CAXIMNAVIAN A \1 KRICAN LINE.
| ll>.000-tou Twin-screw Tassencer Steam**
| Direct to
Norway, Sweden and Denmark.
Railing from New York ?t noon.
C. F. Ttetgen July 25, Helllg Olav Aug. 15
Oi>car II Aug. 1 Inlted States. .. Aug. 2t?
Saloon. JlUi an<l up; second ratlin. $00.
A. K. JOHNSON & CO., I Mroaflway, New York,
Or to Local Agcuta.
)elaa.tf.l4
FRENCH UNE.
COMPAGXIE GENERALK TRAN8LANTIQCE.
I>lrect Line to Havre? Paris (France).
Sailing every Thursday at 10 a.m., from
Pier No. 42, North Uiver, foot Morton t>t.. N. Y. S
La Savoie July 25|I^a Hretagne Aug. 15
La Touraine.... Aug. 1 *La Provence. ... Aug. 22
La Lorraine.... Aug. 8l*La Touraine... .Aug. 2y
Twin screw steaim-r*. ]
GEO HUE W. MOSS, 1411 G ST. N.W.
mhl-36T>t 1
CUNARD LANES.
FROM PIERS 61-52, NORTH RIVER,
TO LIVERPOOL, VIA QL'KENSTOWN. I
Passengers booked tbrougb to London and Paris.
Lucania.. .July 27, 8 am <"ainpania.. Aug. 10. 7 am
'aronia.. ..July 30. 9 am Carmania..Aug. l.'i.8:'#>atu
Uinlirla. ..Aug. 3. 11 am Etrorla . Aug. 17. 10 am j
Hungarian-American Service
TO FIIJMB VIA 1
GIBRALTAR. NAPLES AND TRIESTE.
PANNONIA Aug. 8. uoou: Kept. SMI. No?. 11
fi. pii iTiiiA JCalllug also at GENOA. ,
CAKi a J in a. | Aug lint 22. noon; October 10
SLAVON IA Sept. r?. noon; Oct. 24
\eiuou 11. Brown, Oen'l Agent, 21 24 State St., N.*.
Opposite the Battery.
Or 120 State St.. Boston. Mass.
G. W. MOSS. Agent. 1411 G st. n.w., Washington.
fel5-lyr.eSu
11 am fry rg=American Line,
Twin Screw Eipreso am: Passenger Service.
Plymouth?Cherbourg?Hamburg.,
Deutsoblund July 23! Waldersee Aug. 10 I t
Patricia Jnlv 27| Bluerher Aug. 15
P. Lincoln (new).Aug. 3jPennsylvania Aug. 17 4
Kaiserin (new)...Aug. SLVmerlka mew)...Aug. 22
Among special features of those vessels are:
Grill Koom, Gymnasium, Palm Garden, Bltz-Carlton
Restaurant. Elevators. Electric Batbs. *
Mediterranean Service. J
TO NAPLES AND GENOA. .
tllamburg Auz. 13. Kept 24. Not 5 ,
tMoltkr Sent. 3. Oct. 15. Nov. US
Has Grlil Room. tllus Gymnasium.
Or t e n np :
MADEIRA, SPAIN. HOLY
LAND AND THE NILE. J I
Two Cruises oi 72 ami 79 days'
duration.
S. S. MOLTKE. from New York. Jan. 28.
$300 and L'n, Including All Expenses Alioard. , t
New S.S. "PRESIDENT GRANT" <18.000 tons).
I"eb. 13. $373, Including all expenses aboard 4 astiure.
TOI KIST ni KEAli.
U. R. Tickets, hotel accommodations and general o
Information _ about foreign^ trayeL _ m _ j P
|iinvei?r? v h, uwu /\ 11 uvvt ine wuriu. ?j
HAMBURG-AMERICAN I.INE. 37 B WAV. N X. v
E. F. DKOOI* A SONS. 920 P*. ?re. k.
mh30-sa.tu.tta Ci
OCEAN TRAVEL.
NORT41 QERMAN LLOYD
Fast Express Service.
PLYMOPTIl?CtlKRBOCHQ?BUKUICN.
Haider. .. July 30, 10 am K aiacr...Aug. 27. 10 ftta
K Wm. 11. Aug t. ft am K.Win II.... Sept. 3, 1 pm
Kronp r,. Aug. 13, 7:30 im Kronprlii*. Sept. 10. ^ ?rn
Oecllfe i new"). Aug-. 20. Ipin CeoUietnewl Sept. 17,1 lain
Twin-Screw Passenger Service.
PT YMOUTU-CHILHBOUUO-RHKMKS-. 10 A M.
Frledrtch July 23 Kurfnerat Aug. 22
P. Alice Aug. 1 Frterirlch Aug 29
Bremen Aug. H Oocl?on Sept. *
Bart>aroa*a Aug. lb llreiuen Sept. 12
Bremen direct.
Mediterranean Service
GIBRALTAR?NAPIJCS O K.N OA. AT II A.M.
K. I.ulae July 27 K. Albert S*?pt T
K. Albert Aug. 8 Nwk*r Sept. 14
P. lr*ne Aug. 17 P lifM Sept 21
K. Lntue Aug. SI K Lulm* Oct. &
Oinlts Genoa.
Prom Bremen Tier*. 8<1 and 4th St*.. Flobok??.
NORTH okkman lloyd travelers* cheoks
good AU'j OVER TUB nm'ku).
ORLRICHS A co.. NJ. s Broadway, n. t
K F droop & SONS CO.. W26 I'KNNA. AVB.
f*2 aa.m.ttt th.f.SHt
AMERHCAN LINE.
PLYMOUTH?CHERBOURG?SOUTH AMPTON.
St. Paul Aug 3 St. Lou In An* IT
New York Aug. I0i Philadelphia Aiik. 24
PHILADELPHIA - Ql EEN8TOWN - LIVKRI'OOb
Harerford July 27,FrleHlami .... Aug. 10
Nsordlnnd. Aug. 8'Medon. Aug 17
Atlantic Transport Line.
NKW TORK-LONDON DIRECT.
Mtnnetonka July 271 Mlnnehuh* Aug. 10
red star Line. "
HKW XOKK-DO\ KK-ANTWKRi*.
Finland July tl Krnonlnml A'tg. Id
Vadrrlaud Aug. S Zevlawl Aug. IT
WHITE STAR L8NE.
NEW VOKK-Q! KKNSTOWN - LIVERPOOL
Celtic juijr 23j*Haltlc. Aug 8
Arabic Aug. l| ?Ce?lrle Aug. 15
PLYMOUTH?CHERBOl KO SOUTHAMPTON.
Teutonic July 24. VMaH^c. . Aug. T
Oceaulc Juljr ?11 tADRIATIC Aug. 14
fNew, 25.000 tons, bu* Elevator, ojiuua hi urn.
Turkish Baths aud *Baud.
HOSTON-QI E K N ST< >WN - LI V KRPOOL.
Republic July SI Cymric \ug. 14
NKW YORK ? AZOltES? MKIMi ERR AN KA.N
Cretlc \ug. 1. uoon . CrrOe Sept. 'M, ikwb
BOSTON - AZORES MKM'l KICK A.N LAV
Canoplc .Aug. 10, 11 am 'Romanic. 14, :l pm
WASHINGTON Ol KICK. 1300 K Si. NW.
R. M. I11CKS. Paaaeuger Ageut.
?fltl d.eSn im
POTOMAC filVEK BOATS.
?_Unra. lt.OOc, 3t. ?1.20. 1 wk.. ?2 ^0 1 ino.,|T 2.).
WASUINUTON & POTOMAC STliAMBOAT CO.
(Randall Line.)
STEAMERS FOR I'OIO.MAC UIVKR I AM>IN(iS.
Str. Harry Randall, Monday and Wednesday at
1 p.m., aud Saturday. 7 am. for river luuflluga
lo Wicomico river and Noratnl creek laudlnga.
Lower Machodoc creek Monday au?J Wraafttlll only.
Returning. steamer arrives In WaKtiiii^tou WedneaJay
and Krldav mormoga and Sunday alternonna.
Steamer Wakefield. Hiiudat*. 'Iueaduv uuil I hura.
jay at 7 a.m., for river Uniting*. 1 line I'orl
Tobacco creek and creek* It?*t tuning. arriven
In Washington Momiaj, Wcdaffday ana Fri*
Jav afternoons.
Steamer for Olymont, Grinder's and Intermediate
landings. 8 a.in d.illv. returning al?Otit 4 :'fl> p.in
_JvHMf
RAIL-tOADS. *
SOUTHERN RAILWAY.
N. It.-Following schedule figures published oily
a.H Information. ami are not guaranteed.
:O0 a.m.?Danville and way stations.
8.05 a.m.? HarrisonInirg and way stationa
a.m.-Sleeper* and coaches to Atlanta and
New Orleans. liinlng car.
11:00 a.m.-Sleepers and cos dies to Columbia,
Savannah and Jsckxonvllle. Iilulng ear
14Mil p.m. ? Harrisonburg and way station*.
4:55 p.m.?Charlottesville, Warre?lou and way
stationa; Strasburg week daya.
0:15 p.m.- Sleepers and coaches to Atlanta and
ColtmlMM, Ql. SWNt Umite Tourist rtMWV to
San Francisco tii n?tilv.
9:50 p.m.- Sleojx'M and roadies to Charlotte.
Columbia and Augusta. IMnlng ear.
10:15 p.m. Sleepers ami roar ties fvla l.ynchlmrg
nnd Bristol* to CbaU*n<n>ga, Memphis and New
Orleans. 1 lining car.
11:00 p.m.?New York and New Orleans l td.,
solid Pullman to Ashevllle. Atlanta. i'-iruilnghahi
a lid New (.fries ns. Clul and observation taia
Dining car.
Note. ?*11811 v. tWeek days.
Through trains from the south arrive Washington
35. H:45 and ?:05 a.m.. 5:LT?. 8:45. 11 to
i?ml 1l:4o p.m. daily. I?oral triiltis from Harrlaoobnrg,
12:25 i?.m. week dsvs and S*:2o i> m. dally;
from Charlottesville (lallr. uul Slrn?t?urg week
d?i3'R, 8:10 rt.m.
Frequent train? to nn<! from Rlucmoat.
Ticket offices: 7??f> 15th. St., 511 !'??. are. .sod
Pennsylvania station.
( H.ACKKin.V.P 8 H.HARhWICK.P.T \l
NY H. TAYLOK. Ci.P.A. U S. IIKOWX. G.A
Atlantic Coast Lone.
Effective April 6. 1907.
Kotlw. - Tbwe depart urn ar? given a* Information.
aa well as connections n l'ti otlier companies,
but arrlvnl* and connect Ions are not guaranteed.
4:20 a.m. dally -Sleeping car Netr York to Jackson
fille. Fla. Through coaches Washington Is
Jacksonville.
8:45 p.m. dally?Sleeping Car Near York to Jackscnvllie.
Kla.; New York to fort Tampa, Fla., els
Jacksonville; New York to Augusta. CJa.; New
York to Charleston. S. C ; Washington to Wilmington.
N. C. Through coaches Washington to
I.ickMonrllle. UNKXtKLLKD DININli CAB 8KMVICR.
For tickets and all Information apply at ths
OFFICE OF THK LINK, 001 PKNN8TLYAN IA
AVKNL'E NORTHWEST. AND PBNMSYLVASIA
I; A J I.KOAU STATION.
GEO. P. JAMES.
District Passenger Agent. Washington. D. O.
X. 0. WII IT It, Gea. Pass Agsat.
W. J. CRAIG.
Paaa. TV?(lle Mgr.. Wilmington. N. O.
Seaboard A5r 8 Joe
TICKET OFFICE, 1421 PKNNA. AVE
NOTK E.? Followfuk schedule not guaranteed.
For Italclgh. Wilmington. Columbia. Sava? nati.
Jacksonville. Tampa, Atlanta. Rlrmlughnm, Mem
plil* auil New Orleans.
I): 05 A.M. DAILY?Seaboard Mall. Through
poaches and Pullman Sleeper* to Savannah ao<l
Jacksonville. Through Sleepers Waahlngton to
Hamlet and Hamlet to Atlanta and Birmingham.
Dining Cars.
G:<>0 P.M. Dally?Seaboard ESipif. Solid train,
with coaches and l'ullmau Sleepers to Savanuab.
Jh ksonvllle and Tampa. Through Sleeper to Atlanta
and Birmingham- Dining Cars.
U. H. STAN8RU,. District Passenger Agent.
Chesapeake & Olh5o Railway
SCHEDULE IN EFFECT JUNE :I0. 11K>7.
2:00 P.M.-OLD DOMINION EXPRESS, drill/
? Stops at principal points In Virginia. Vestibule
tralu; standard roaches; parlor car to
Clifton Forge, with connection for Virginia Hot
Sprlng?. Pullman aleepnv 4'1 if ton Forge to
IxMiisville, Cincinnati. Indianapolis. St. I^oul*
and Chicago; dining car with a la carte service
from Gordoiiavflle.
4:10 P.M.?NEW C. & O. LIMITED, daily Fast
new vestibule train; stops only at Gordousvtlle,
v iinnoiirsviiie, .tinuuuMi, v mum r ?rj;r nu<?
Covington. Vfi.; White Sulphur. Roncf?crl* and
Illiiton. \V. Vn. Pullman .sleepers to Lexington.
I^oiiIm v i lie, Cincinnati. Indiana poll*. St. Loula
and Chicago. Dlulug ears, a 1ft carte service.
One light out.
11:10 P.M. F. F. V. LIMITKD. dally-Solid v+utibule
train. Pullman sleeper* to Cincinnati.
Lexington and 4/>iilsril1<>. Compartment si *epIng
car to Virglnlu Hot Sis-lugs week day*.
Dining cor*, a Ta carte service. Sleepers Cln
clnnatl to Chicago and St. Louis ami Louisville
to Memphis, Naahville and aouthweat.
Reservations and tickets at Clionaiwak** Obli
Office*. 513 Pennsylvania avenue, OoO 14th street,
nenr F, and Sixth Street Station. Telephone Main
37.H) for Pennsylvania R. R. Cab Service and Main
1<hJ0 for C & O. Ticket office.
Chesapeake Beach
Railway Co.
chedule of excursion trains to and from Chosjpeak*
Beach. Subject to chau- without notloe.
WKKK DAYS.
GOING?Leave District l.lne Station at 9:23 and
11:00 a.m., 2:30. 5:40, 7:15 and 0:45 p.m.
KFITKN'I^'G?I>ea ve the Reach at 0:30 a.m.,
12:45, 2:00. 6:<K>, 8:00 and 10:00 p.m.
SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS
GOING?0:25 and II a m.. 2:30. 4. 7:45 and
).45 p.m.
RETURNING?7 a.m.. 12:45, 2 10. 0. 8 and 10
>.m.
PAUL Y. WATER8, General Manager.
Jy4-tf,20
BaHtDmore aodl OhJo R? R.
1.EAVG STATION New Jersey Ave. and C St.
ROY A I, HM'i: LINK
EVERY OTHER HOl'R ON THE oi?|? HOf R"
TO PHILADELPHIA \NI? NEW VnllK.
V'EW TERMINAL. ?J!? STREK. NEW VORK.
7.00 a.m. I'lnnr. Pullman Parlor.
i'J.OO a.m. Ruffe t. Pari* . f? hour Train.
1 #.?m? h m. IMner anil Pullman Parlor Car.
fl 1.00 a.m. l?5ner and Pullman Parlor Car.
1.00p.m. l?'r.*ir and Pullman Parlor < ar.
3.00 p.m. "Royal Limited." All Pullmao.
14.00 p.m. Coaches to Philadelphia
5.00 p.m. I'iner and Pmlman Parlor.
S.oi p.in Coaches to Philadelphia.
11.."Jo p.m. Sleepers.
- r*2 a.m. Sleepers.
' i i i" vii i, t i Til.'-'" a.in.,
l.uo. :t.?w? p.m.
ANNAPOLIS, weekdays, 8.00 a.m.. 12 05 noon.
13. G.IK) p m. Sunday*. 8.30 a.m.. 5.30 p.m.
"EVERY Unl it ON THE IIo| H"
(Weekday*. 7.00 a.m. t?? 8.00 p.m.)
TO HALTlMORi:.
2.32. t5 f>0. ffl.30. 7.UI. *7.20. t.S.uO. *s 30, *0 00.
1) 30. lO.'H). *11.04) a.m.. 112 *) noon. tl2<?3.
1.00. *1 15. f2??0v t;{.2'?. 13.30. H"O. * 43.
ft CO. tS-03. *5.30. tO.OO. *0.30, 17.00. *?OU. f0 3u.
10.00, *10.35. '11.31). 1I.:<3 p.in
WT.STW \l{|)
CHICAGO. *0.10 a.m. 1 22. *3.30 p m.
? IXCINNATI, ST. l.ol IS an.! I.Ol ISVIM.K,
0.10 a.m.. *4 ?>3 p.m., *12.40 nUlif.
l*lTTSBrRL>. *6.10 a.m., *122. *tt 10 p.m.,
12.30 n 1?Jit.
CLEVELAND. *0.10 p.m.
t'OI I'M HI'S. *5.3u p in.
WHEELING. $) lu U.4P? *5 30 pro
' 'INCIIESTER. W.lO a.m., t * 03. : 5 00 p.tn
FREDERICK. IS 20. 19.lo. fi?.i3 a.m.. 11.30,
4 ?3. *5.33 p.m.
UA'S ER8TOWN, tf).10 a m . 13 00 p.m
Daily, thln-epr Sunday. JSunday only.
Reservation of SWping or i'arlor Car spare, rates
r fare. err., wl l Im? <pilcl.lv furnished I;TKL#EIloNi:
;i( all of tljf following Ticket Offices; 1417
Sr. N.W.. Telephone Main 1391; til9 |Vnn<ylinia
Aw. Telephone Main 278. Station, New Jer y
Are. an?l C St.-Tleket otfk-e, Telephone Ea*t
t*7. Information Uuicau, Kaat 724.

xml | txt