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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, September 07, 1907, Image 9

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SUMMER RESORTS.
SOJiMl?3BS3IKSe3*;SSSi:il??MI3eSIia*?Kl?
E
I
)?
?
i
VISIT THE STAR INFOR- ?
MATION BUREAU. ROOM 100, ?
FOR HOTELCIRCULARS, RAIL- ?
ROAD time tables and
FOLDERS, FREE OF CHARGE. L
Iff:
ATLANTIC CITY. N. J.
LA FONTAINE,
modern ?p|H>lntments; superior table. September
rate*. *7 to $10 weekly. It. B PARKER.
m*T 14t
New Clarion, (kp"V^,kTi.vT?;
eteatn Ifut. (x?>an view ph4iim; special fm11 rates.
S. K BONIFACE.
*e7 3?M, |
The Albemarle,
high ?*la??* family house, nrw throughout. Capacity,
4?M) ofT.-rs special Sept and fall rates of $s, $!?>,
$12 r>*?. $l."? up weekly. $2 up ilaily. for large. cool,
fr?*it rooms. metal beds. Excellent tal?lf. abun
dantly supplied with fresh milk. eggs, |M?uItry an?i
ffffl ?bles from own farm. Attentive white service.
Elevat.* t?? all floors. Sat. to Moo.. $3.50.
Booklet J I'. COI*K. Propr. II. II. KING. Mgr.
hi. 11! .KH.IO
"new hotel ostendT
Occupying block of ocean front. Capacity. 500.
Bpe. ial rate?$12.50 up weekly. American plan.
New management. All baths, private or public,
and indoor swimming pool hate sea water. Ele
vators Rvfry room ua ocean view. Orchestra.
Roller Autos meet trains. D. I*. KAIITElt. Mgr.
an; it.'*
Hole] Majestic, ?;*ihnU ^
Hteel I*ler Oo-an view. Capacity, 3O0. Elevator.
Srlvate baths, etc $10 up weekly, $2 up <laiiy.
pe M for Sept. Booklet. SAMUEL D. ELLIS.
7f.5
hotel iroquois. "~
Ocean enl South Carolina ave.; center of attrac
tlmm. an Ideal modern hotel, ranking wirh the best
Bouses; capacity. 4'*>; rooms single or en suite,
with private bath, elevator to street level; ex
tensive p^rch'-v orchestra. etc.; special terms.
$12 rx> fir,. $1730. $2?? wky Special Sept terms.
Open a!i year B>?oklet mailed. W. F. SHAW,
aeu 1 41. M
HOTEL MONTICELLO,
Ocean end of Kentucky avenue. Near all attrac
tions NEW THROUGHOUT. ATLANTIC CITY'S
UK6EHT, FINEST IND BEST APPOINTED
HOIEL, at MIIPKRATK KATES. Elegant room*
with bath Table and service of highest standard,
rtn* orchestra. Lllieral management. Cap . 6?)0.
Reduced Sept rates $s up weekly, $2 up dally.
Booklet Ask Mr. Foster.
au2? 151.10 A CONRAD EE HOLM.
Hotel Lam born,
Open all year. Private Hatha. Elevator to street
Steam Heat. Booklet. O. C. MILKER,
ael Sot 4
I Avnraor-lfm Pacific and Ark. area.. 1 sq.
A u u lw<u?: u9 fn>n3 station and Vouag's pier.
Ocean view, premises extend to beach; bathing from
$7 up Booklet. PALL C. ROHECRANS.
7t 4
Grand AtHamtic Hotel,
YlUtilMA AVBM'E AND THE BEACH.
ATI.A NTH' CITT N. J.
Capacity. tV>0 icii.-sf* Serially redvicd rstM
tor SifDlcwlwr nd vtrtcbrr. American plan. $10 to
? li weekly; $2 /o $3 dally; superior table and
service; large>t ami finest rooms; hot and cold
Sea water In all baths. private and public; music.
"Write for folder; garage.
so31 141 CHARLES E. COPE.
HOTEL, NEW ENGLAND,
Booth Carolina ave. and the Bench: near piers and
attractions. Large, sunny rooms; private bathe;
elevator; sun parlor. Capacity. 350. Table and
service superior. Special September terms. Write
for booklet. BRYAN & WILLIAMS.
*?31-14t
QALEN HAUL,
HOTEL AND SANATORIUM.
Elegant stone, brick and steel building. Always
?pen always ready, always busy. For further ln
farm.it i..ii ask Mr. Foster, 1333 Pennsylvania ave.
au21 301.10 **
FIREPROOF RIO GRANDE,
New York ave. and Beach. Running water, tele
phones In rooms, elevator, surf baths free; white
service; elaborate cuisine. Septeml?er rates ex
tremely low, values considered. Paul Kllpatrlck.
aiil 2 30I.5
SPECIAL LOW SEPTEMBER RATES.
HOTFI Maryland ave. and Beach.
Every comfort and convenience.
IMPFRIAT. Elevator, baths, large rooma.
Good Talle. L G. KENDRICK.
an2g 301
HOTEL ELBERON
AND MAGNIFICENT FIREPROOF ANNEX.
Tennessee ave. near Beach, opposite Protestant
and Catholic Churches.
A new. modern, up-to-date hotel. Extra large
peoms Private batbs. Telephones. Metal beda.
?Ucrflent table. Filtered water. Poultry and fresh
vegetables from our own farms. Finest of meat
jfnaranteed by dally veterinary Inspection. Capac
ity. 450. White service. Special rates, $8 to $17.50
weekly; $1.50 to $3 dally. Booklet.
au24-3Qt. 15 _____ R B LUDT.
MOTEL CORNELL. KENTFCKY AVE NEAR
Beach; capacity. 200; elevator to street level*
convenient to attractions; superior table; ipeclal
fall rate*. M E. THROCKMORTON.
au2l30t.4
BERKSHIRE INN,
Ocean end Virginia avenue. Special fall rates. $9
to $15 weekly; elevator; private baths; every
?>oderu convenience; excellent table and service.
Eighth season. J O. A J E. DICKINSON.
an2i not.rt
OPEN ALL YEAR.
HOTEL JACKSON. ,??..
Directly on the ocean front; opposite the Steel |
Pier Capacity. 3?h); every appointment and com- (
for' superior cuisine. American plan; Quest
cafe In the city
ttPFfi \L SKP'l EMBER AND FALL TERMS.
au24 301 JOHN CRUSE.
Roamake Hotel, ^clVec"
A*t! ni and good table. $4 to $14 weekly.
au 17 3ut 4 X. A. D1EULJNO.
LA BELLE INN,
eUx" t;?t?le; $1.50 day op; $*% up weekly.
)el5-not MRS J TOL?NQBIXK>D.
OCEAN ( ITY, V J.
THE HOTEL CUMBERLAND. OCEAN CITY, N J.
A new house. accouimoibitlLg 5iK> guests, with all
modern Improvement*: facing directly on th?
scean; 70 minutes from Philadelphia, 30 mlnatea
by trolley from Atlantic City. For Information
address P H S. CAKE, Hotel Normandle, Wash
ington. D. C. E. K. CAKE. Manager, Oceaa
City. N J my27d.eSu.9ot.7
CAPS MAY, H. J.
THE STOCKTON HoTEL, CAPE MAY. N. J.,
will oi?en July 3. For Information, ratea. etc.,
addri-?? P. H. S Cake Hotel Normandie. Wash
Ington, D C. HORACE M. CAKE, Prop, Caps
May. N J my27 d.eSu.00t 5
mThyLa!*d7~
IWANN'S HOTEL. P1NET POINT. MD.-OPEN
until Sept 2o to fishing parties and families:
beating, fishing, crabbh g sailing, music snd
dancing. large dining room; rates moderate.
Take M-l and Va. and Del. steamers, foot ot 71ka
st Apply to J. T SWANN. Piney Point, Md.
Jy^TPt.o
DOUBLING GAP,
WHITE SIT.PHI 11 SPRINGS HOTEL.
VIA NEWV1LLE. ? I MBEKLAND CO.. PA.
2l> -*t|. miles of mountain forest park and lake;
refine?l environment and amusements; medicinal
springs; resident phvsi- ian. Garage and livery.
A.hirers <;EoK?;E ALBERT FliEYER. Owner.
JeP.? tf.H
l)EI.\\\ ARK WATF.lt (iAP, PA.
Water Gap House, w^r"?.P. p..
Open until in December. New ownership man
agement Not connected with any oth.er hotel. En
tirely rebuilt, modernised and n^wly furnished
throughout at cost of $100,000. Capacity. 400.
Highest altitude. Hydraulic elevators. Steam
beat Private tiled baths: running water In all
rooms. Electric lights. ( iiUine of highest standard.
White s?-rvl.-?v Private golf links Tennis. Boating.
Every outdoor diversion. Sndille horses, livery. Or
chestra Oarage Booklet of views and auto root*
?nai* on request. Spectsl Septemt?er and sutuma
rstes JOHN PLRDY COPE.
sul!> tf.lS
NEW YOHK.
CORNISH HOUSE,
CATSK I I.I. MOUNT A INS. PINE HILL. N. Y.
KMtablishetl reputation. Open until Jan. 1.
an 15 30t.5 J C. CORNISH. Prop.
VIRGINIA.
VKin At ( r.SSIBLF 60 Ml. FROM WASH VIA
Bluernont. val'ey. mt and water scenery; shsded
fr??un.|* and ?lrlve?; autoiiH>b!llng. Hihfty. boat
ng and swimming: spring t?eds; children ex
cluded. daily ma!!. R. F. D.; telephone, gotxl
fare fresh n.ests. milk, fruit*, fowls; $7 j?er wk.
till Nov.. circular Star .-aire, or MAURICE CAS
TLEMAN Castieu.au'* Ferry. Clarke Co.. Va.
JelS dtose30
WEST VIRGINIA.
Sparrow's Inn, "Sp"
looking Shenandosh river nnd mountains, high and
cool, excellent table. Mra. W. D. SPARROW,
aii23 3nt*4
""HILL TOP HOUSE.'7"
Try the "Hill Top" thla season We know yon
will be pleased. All modern luiprovemi nt* T. S.
LOVICIT. Prop.L Harpera Ferry. W. Va. jel4-tf-5
MOHEY TO * 10 AH.
Your Money Matters
fip^edlly arrangetl aame day; reasonahls ratea by
dealing with me; no "company" or red tape; ab
Si4utely cosfldeatftal. Address STATION G. Boa
MM. autt-tX
EDUCATIONAL.
IN WASHINGTON.
rPfl WXN'S BI'SINF.SS COLLEGE. 8 & K.
U I B A MONTH S.V-JS Day.
|| Civil Service preparation. Night.
" Shorthand, Typew rltlng. Bookkeeping. Ac.
se7 t f
Drawing <& Machine Design
Ma thematic*, graphs static*. elementary mechan
ics Ai strength of material* FI.YNN'S BUSINESS
A ENGINEERING CoLIJCGE. 8th & K sts. n.w
se7 tf
The
Washington School
for Boys
A day and l?oarding school affording to boys of any
hiunusual educational advantage*. Year-Book on
request Address LOUI.S' LEVERETT HOOI'ER,
A M Head Master. Wisconsin ave. se7-tf
too
For Boys and Qirls J
25tJi Year Begins
September 25.
Primary. Intermediate and High X
School Departments. Prepares for ?{*
College. Strong corps of expert- ~
enred Tearhers. Modern In method
and equipment. New building, gym
nasium. playgrounds, lunchroom,
manual training.
:thomas w. sidwell,.
Principal,
1809-1817 I St. N.W. :
I I M ! ! I -M-W-M-M-i-H
COMMERCIAL UKM>MWt*t
OLLEGE AND STENOGRAPHIC INSTITUTE, j
All commercial branches. 3300 O st. n.w.
se.Vth,sa.Sn,tu.tf,4
CTITUTI
for Boys and Young Men,
?14 14TH ST. N.W.
(Established In 1852.)
Prepares for colleges. West Point. Annapolis,
primary department. Special coaching. Session
opens Sept. 27. Catalogue.
WINSLOW HOXTON RANDOLPH.
se.Vth.sa.tn.tf Principal.
For Girls,
MOUNT ST. ALBAN, WASHINGTON, D. O.
Opens October I.
Primary, Preparatory and Academic Departments.
Students Admitted to College on Certificate.
Graduate Courses.
Instruction In Art Without Extra Charge.
Special Attention Given to Music.
Stein way Pianos for Practice.
Fireproof Building. Resident Graduate Nurse.
Coaches for day pupils leave Dupont Circle at
8:25 a.m ; return 5:30 p.m. Cars leave George
town at 8:30 and 8:50 a.m.
RT. REV. n Y. SATTEBLEE, D.D., LL.D.,
President Board of Trustees.
MRS BARBOUR WALKER, M A., PrlnclpaL
se4-30t.rtf)
United States College
of Veterinary Surgeons,
222 C ST. N.W.. WASHINGTON. I). C.
SESSION l!?>7-8 BEGINS OCTOBER 1.
[I7Fur prospectus find full Information address
C. BARNWELL ROBINSON. V. S.. I>ean.
nM-MtlO 'Phone Main 2712.
Miss Madeira's School
for Girls.
1324. 1326 and 1328 19th st.
Primary. Intermediate, High School and Grad
uate Departments.
College Prepnratory Work a Specialty. Certifi
cate privilege to Vasssr and Wellesley.
GYMNASIUM AND TENNIS.
School session begins October 1.
MISS LUCY MADEIRA. PrlnclpaL
se3-d to ocl5,15
SUCCESSFUL PIANIST
WILL GIVE INSTRUCTION DURING UNOC
CUPIED TIME AT 50c PER LESSON. CALL
AFTER 4 P.M., 720 10TII N.W. se4-10t*4
Twelfth year opens Monday, September 30. For
women and men. Regular law course for degree
Bachelor of Laws. Graduate course for degree
Master of Laws. Evening sessions exclusively.
Tuition, $50 per year. For further Information
and application blanks address the Dean, 41G 5th
st. 'Phone M. 4585. se3-tf,21
ORGANIZED BY SPECIAL ACT OF CONGRESS
In 1821.
CHARLES WILLIS NEEDIIAM, LL. D.,
President.
87fh Session. 1907-08, opens September 25, 1907.
Undergraduate. Graduate and Professional Courses ,
offered. Graduates of the Washington High Schools |
and other accredited secondary schools are admit
ted to the undergraduate courses without examina
tion.
Building's:
University Hall, 15th and II streets.
I,aw Building, 1420 II street.
Medical and Dental Building. 1325 H street.
Engineering, 1528-30 I street.
Architecture, 1532 I street.
Education. 1534 I str?*et.
Women's Building, 1536-38 I street.
The University Hospitals, 1333-35 H street*
National College of Pharmacy, 808 1 street.
Departments:
ARTS aNI> SCIENCES.
GltADI'ATF. STUDIES.
Graduate courses, leading to degrees of Mas
ter of Arts, Master of Science, Civil Engineer,
Electrical Engineer. Mechanloal Engineer and
Doctor of Philosophy.
COL1 MB!AN C<>LLE<IE.
Undergraduate courses, leading to degrees of
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science.
WASHINGTON COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING.
Undergraduate courses, leading to ttie Bach
elor of Science degrees In Civil, Electrical and
Mechanical Engineering.
DIVISION OF ARCHITECTURE.
Undergraduate course, leading to the degree
of Bacnelor of Science In Architecture.
COLLKOB OF THE POLITICAL SCIENCES.
Undergraduate and graduate courses, leading
to degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Master of
Arts and Master of Diplomacy.
DIVISION OF EDUCATION.
Undergraduate courses, leading to degrees of
Bachelor of Arts and Teacher's Diploma.
MEDICINE.
A four-year course, also a five-year course,
leading to tlie degree of Doctor of Medicine.
DENTISTRY.
A three-year course, leading to the degree of
Doctor of bental Surgery.
LAW.
Regular law course, leading to the degree of
Bachelor of Iaws.
Graduate course*, leading to the degrees of
-* Master of I*aws, Slaster of Patent Law and
Doctor of Jurisprudence.
COLLEGE OK PHARMACY.
Three-year course, leading to the degree of
Doctor of Pharmacy.
For catalogue*, application blanks and further
Information communicate with
OTIS D? SWETT, Registrar,
se2-30t Cor. H and 15th streets n.w.
COMP BT E N T~TUTO R.
University fellow of long experience, prepares for
examinations, also Interesting course* of study
for bosy people?the essentials of a college edu
cation?history, literature and language. Won
derful results from two or three lessons a week.
au30-12t*.eSu Address UNIVERSITY. Star office.
"H ALL-NO YES SCHOOL.
DAY AND NIGHT ) ADt'LTS' AND
SESSIONS. j CHILDREN'S DRPTS.
Now <n<en for special clssses and individual coach
ing Graded, High, Business and College Prepara
tory I'ertlfleate admit, to college and i?'i>feMioaal
schools. Fifth regular year opens Sept. ltf. Cata
logues. Tl?one Mala 3H77-K. FRANCES MANN
I1AI-L. A.M.. Prill.. 221 B st. n.w. sel lpd
The Berlitz School 1 Kl
of Languages, j"?
French. German. Spanish, Italian. English, Ma
Native teachers. Trial Issson ftM.
Special rata, for Iks summer.
lelft-tf
FLYNN'S 8tb * K
Beat lnatructlon. da/ or night, in Bookkeeping.
Shorthand, Typewriting aud all ichool subjects.
auSl-tf
EDUCATIONAL.
IN WASHINGTON.
Mational
University
Law School
Evening Sessions
Exclusively.
Opens October 1st, S907.
Practical three years' course
leading to degree of Master-of
laws; the degree of Bachelor-of
laws can be secured at end of
second year.
For catalog, application
blanks, etc., apply in person or
by mail to the Dean, 1331 F st.
n.w. Telephone M. 6473-6474.
Sel-tf.86
O-THOUSAND
Account of new
eight - hour law.
Salaries increased
ISO. r. DRAOGHON, President
Draughon's
Practical
Business
bag bought THE SPRNCEHIAN, Waahlngton, D. a,
8th and D, Academy of Music Bui Id inf. Draugk'
on'a Telegraphy students, by special arrangement,
ose railroad wires. Draogbon'a Co. (home office:
Nashville, Tenn.) has 80 Colleges In IT States: ,
$300,000.00 capital' 8,000 students annually. 18
yeara' success BUSINESS men say Draughon's
Is TUB BEST. THREE months' stodjln* Book- I
keeping or Shorthand by Draoghon'e COPYRIGHT- :
F.n methods equals SIX elsewhere. Draugboa alao
has 3,000 students learning BT MAIL.
POSITIONS secured or YOUR money back. Ask
(or Catalogue. It's FREE. and explain all.
au27-90t.42
Bliss Electrical School
Offers Regular (day) Course In theoretical and
applied electricity, complete In one year. Studenta
actually construct dynamos, motors, etc.. sntl are
trained for good positions In the electrical indus
tries. Fifteenth year opens September 25.
Call or Send for Catalogue.
au20-tf,13 219 Q ST. N.W.
STRAYER'S
11TH AND F S^TS. N.W.
A HIGH-GRADE, RELIABLE and PROGRESSIVE
acbool of business for young men and young wom
en. teaching I'ltmanlc Shorthand. Touch Typewrit
ing, Modern Bookkeeping, Arithmetic, Penmanship,
Business Correspondence, Commercial Law, Busi
ness Forms, English, also specializing In Clrtl j
Service work.
adk situation guaranteed every graduate.
Call, write or 'phone for catalogue. It'a free,
and will Interest you. se3tf,20
FRENCH LANGUAGE SCnOOU
Only 80 lessons to pronounce well, speak, read,
understand; classes, all grades and private lessons.
MI.LE V. PRUD'HOMMK, S14 Ind. sr. (car line).
se3-tf,eSu,4
Instructor Director and Manager
Gunstdn Hall. Of the
Y. M. C. A. Nordics Clubs.
?
MANDOLIN, BANJO AND GUITAR.
Club Advantages to Pupils.
'Phone Main 1H29 M. Studio, 1112 N. X. ave. n.w.
se.1-tf.I0
WOOD'S
Commercial
SCHOOL,
?The Leading Business School of Washington."
311 East Capitol St.
Telephone Linen. 38.
Day and evening sessions.
Offers high-grade instruction
in all practical branches.
Established 22 jears. Refers
to hundreds of graduates
who owe their success to
this school.
Wanted?6,000 Telegraphers.
If you wish to prepare for one of these positions
apply Wood's Commercial School. Special rates
for the next 30 days.
Unexcelled Shorthand Instruction.
Gregg, Pitman and Graham Systems.
Bookkeeping and Commercial Law.
Commercial law taught by attorney-at-law. Type
writing, arithmetic, grammar, letter writing, pen
manship. spelling; STKOXQ ENGLISH COURSE.
Speclul preparation for civil servicv
Call, telephone or write for illustrated catalogue
and school paper. 'Tis better to call. Fall term
begins September 3.
COURT F. WOOD, LL.M., Proprietor.
?n29-tf,25
HE DRILLERY,
1100 N. Y. Ave.
Stenography, Typewriting, Book
keeping, Telegraphy and Business
Branches. Complete course with ex
pert Instructors. Civil Service Course.
Next examination. October 28. aul4-tf,10_
SHORTHAND, TYPE
WRITING, BOOKKEEP
ING, CIVIL SERVICE
COURSES, etc.
IHI (TlXCM Send for Circular of
?3^11 Special Rates and Hapld
027 10TII ST. Office Shorthand on Re
(Below F). porting Principles.
au24-sa.tii,th,15t.9
CONGRES
SIONAL
| The Army and Navy
| Preparatory School
*x* 4101 Connecticut Avenue,
Washington, D. C. <5
V A select boarding school for young y
Y men and boyH. Thorough preparation *}*
T for colleges, universities, the United V
*t* States Military and Nava I Acad- I*
"j emles, and also for business. Num- 'i
y ber limited. Small classes and ind!- ,t*
T vldual Instruction. Special courses. *
y Fine athletic Held. Foot ball, base
ball, track teams. Fall term opens
October i. For catalogue address
t E. SWAVELY, Principal. $
X ael-30t.28 y
St. John's College,
Vermont Avenue, Near Tbomaa Circle.
Conducted by the Brothers of the Christian Schools.
A select Day College for Tonng Men and Boys.
Collegiate. Commercial, Academic aad Primary
Departments.
School opens September 6.
Catalogues setu on application.
au!7 30t-M BROTHER QERMANPB, Pres.
V. ML S. Ik. IHSTITUTE 8KV.
1736 Q STREET.
Offers practical courses of study In Commercial.
Technical, Science, Language and Qeoer Prepara
tory subjects. Classwork conducted at night, 6:80
to 10 o'clock. Faculty of 22 Instructors. 626 atn
denta season 1806-07. Superb educational equip
ment, with general club features?gymnasium,
baths, library, Ufework helps. Regular member
ahlp, calendar year, fS. Moderate claaa fees. Day
school courses in English, Mathematics and Me*
chanlcal Drawing. Opening night Friday. Septem
ber 27. For bulletin, terma. etc.. apply to
MYRON J. JONES. Director,
'Phone 4880. 1786 O st
sulS-tf.20
Shorthand & Typewriting
We teach Pitman. Graham, Gregg, Barnes and
the Syllable ay stems. 70 to 100 words per minute
In IDo hours guaranteed. Positions provided f*
our pupils. Catalogue free.
STENOGRAPHIC ACAD KMT. Colorado bid#.
ae80-tf.6
PRIVATE INSTRUCTION IN MATHEMATICS,
science, languages, music; university graduate;
twenty years' experience; literary work revised.
PROF. J.. Station O, Box 2618, city. so34-80t?
OlfT OR WASHINGTON.
MONTROSE?AN IDEAL COUNTRY BOARDING
school for girls and small boys, la the most
heelthfttl part of Maryland, terma n "
Address MTSJJ HARDY, CUrksvUe, Md.
EDUCATIONAL.
OUT OF WASHINGTON.
ATHOI.E HALL.
WnrrrntOD, Va.
Session open* Sept. IS, 1907.
Healthful locality. home Influence*. systematic
training. Individual attention. Boarding pupil* lim
ited. For terms apply
Mr*. WALTER H ROBERTSON.
ao27-to.th.?a-12t __
St. John's College
ANNAPOLIS. BID. Department of Art* and
Science* of tbe UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND.
Established 1808. Classical and Scientific Colic**
Courses leading to degrees. Special advantage* foe
student* purposing to r'ulUy I.aw or Medicine. Mill
t*rj Department under army officer. Also Prepara
tory School for boy* fitting for St. John'* or othct
colleges. Term begin* Sept. 18. Address
THOMAS FELL. LL.D.
JytO-**,tn.th.?t-H
Sweet Briar Institute
A NEW COLLEGE FOR WOMEN.
SWEET BRIAR, VA.
A college of the grade of Vsssar. Wellesley, Smith
and Bryn Mawr. Four years of collegiate and two
years of preparatory work are given. Located on
the Southern railroad only a few hours' run from
Washington. Second year open* Sept. 19. Cata
logue and views went on application to
Dr. MARY K. BENEDICT. Preat., Bo* 181.
an27 tu.th.aa.13t. 14 Sweet Briar. Vs.
ACADEMY OF THE VISITATION. FREDERICK.
Md.?Founded 1848. Boarding and day school,
young ladles and children, conducted by Sisters
of Visitation. Term* moderate. For catalogue
apply SISTER DIRECTRESS. au28-14t
MARVLAH D ASISBSy LTU RAL 60LLE(B?
COLLEGE PARK MD.
Maryland's School of Technology.
Course* of Instruction:
Agricultural, Scientific, Mechanical. Horticultural.
Chemical, Civil Engineering.
Term*: $200, payable quarterly In advance; no
extraa.
Healthful location, near Washington. All mod
ern sanitary Improvements. Two cadets to a room;
separate beds. Fifty-second year commences with
entrance examination* September 17 and 18. 1907.
Equip* for life'* work and guarantee* employment.
For full particular* addrea* as above.
aulfl-SOt.lB
MAPLEWOOD,??^
Mar Philadelphia. Oae of the b**t to wake SB
Boys to the duties of life. Prepares 40 Boys foe col
kg* or business, tftk year. Large lywaulu. Dept.
for Little Boys. No tobacco. Booklet P. O. Desk
J. ?BORTLIDO?. AM.. Yala. Principal.
?nya*-H0t.e8?-7
" RANDOLPH-MACON ACADEMY,
Front Royal, Virginia. A Branch of the Randolph
Macon System. Located In Valley of Virginia,
northern end. 8100 000 In gift* reduces cost to 8200
a year. Scholarship* offered omr students by col
lege and university. 16th aesaion open* Sept. 17,
1907. CHARLES U HELTON. All.. Principal.
jj29-38t.e3B-7
Educational Institutions adver
tising in these column* are re
quested to send their cata
logues to The Star Information
Bureau for fro* distribution to
Its patrons. The Bureau Is open
from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
PB0FESSI0NAL CAMS
4 lines. It. 00c. 8t. 8H0- 1 wfc.. HM. 1 mo.. 87.M
SAVE YOURSELF UNNECESSARY DKUDOEBY;
learn to read moslc, stag and' play piano by
natoral method*. Mme. T ESPUTA-DALY an)
Mr._NORM AN DALY. Musical Stadia. 1128 ? a.*.
FOR RESTORATION OF WELLS
LOCAIr ASSOCIATION'S PROJECT
INDORSED BT CARRIE NATION.
Several Speakers Express Indignation
Over tbe Closing of the
Public Wells.
Carrie Nation occupied the center of the
stage In the hall of the American Life In
surance Company's building, 6th and (3
streets northwest, last night, and she en
tered right heartily Into the fight of the
District of Columbia Protective Associa
tion for the restoration of the public wells
of the city. Mrs. Nation declared anew
her enmity to the "demon rum," and she
saw great danger of the people being
driven to the saloons by the closing of the
public wells, which she denominated the
sources of pure drinking water. She an
nounced herself as the agent of Providence
and declared her intention of remaining in
the light until it Is finished.
"When X heard about the closing of the
well at 3d street and Indiana avenue," said
the ex-saloon smasher, "I determined to
come to this meeting and say what I
thought of such high-handed proceedings.
People want good, pure water, and if they
don't get It th^y will go to the saloon. I'm
with you In this fight, but you have" got to
fight every step of the way."
Mrs. Nation declared her desire to become
a member of the D. C. P. A., and she
planked down her half-dollar Initiation fee.
Mrs. Nation has Just returned from a
tour of the Kansas Chautauqua circuit, and
announced her purpose to be the estab
lishment in Washington of a sanatorium
for drunkards. Next week she will begin a
round of calls upon prominent officials,
seeking to interest them In the project.
Declared to Be Vandalism.
The " 'official vandalism' which destroyed
Washington's public wells, the sources of
the best water in the city, and Inflicted un
measured suffering upon more than a hun
dred thousand innocent people," received
severe condemnation from all other speakers.
In fact, each one of the twenty-five persons
present had something to say of the so
called lack of consideration manifested by
the District Commi'ssioners, the health of
ficer and his assistants, the savants of the
public health and marine hospital service,
and others.
John S. Duffy, formerly a resident of Ar
kansas, suggested one scheme by which
his auditors could defeat the evident pur
pose of tho District officials to compel all
hands to drink Impure water. "Out in Ar
kansas we used to draw our water supply
from the Red river," said Mr. Duffy, "and
the water was so full of bacilli that most
people we*; forced to run it through a
strainer before drinking." He declared that
he Invented a better plan than this?a plan
which might be followed by consumers of
Potomac water?by simply obtaining a long
glass and tapping on the side, thus causing
all the "wiggle-tails" to seek the bottom.
After this process, Mr. DufTy said, the sur
face water could be swallowed without fear
of contamination.
"Hallelujah!" said Mrs. Nation.
Reports Criticised.
W. B. Goodale advocated a procession of
business men carrying banners suitably in
scribed. Criticism of the report of the pub
lic health and marine hospital service upon
the origVn of typhoid fever in the District
was voiced by J. W. Nl'gh, and Harry B.
Bradford of Kensington, Md., placed the
entering wedge for a general assault upon
"compulsory vaccination." He character
ized vaccination as a crime, and it was
promised that the subject will receive fuller
attention at a later meeting of the "associa
tion. Dr. R. R. Roberts and A. S. Trun
dle were also among the speakers.
MORE NEGROES ARRESTED.
Andrew Johnson Picked Up Here and
~ Taken to Annapolis.
ANNAPOLIS, Md., September 7.?Benja
min F. Gladden, colored, thirty-one years
old, of Baltimore, arrested here Thursday
charged with complicity in the assault upon
Deputy Sheriff James Crouse of Anne Arun
del county, who was assaulted by a mob
of negro crapshootere at Rock Creek Sun
day, was brought to Annapolis today and
lodged in the county jail. He is the ninth
negro to be arrested in connection with the
assault.
Although eight of the men now In Jail
here are residents of the county, there Is
a strong sentiment that some of the ring
leaders of the assault upon the deputy are
residents of Baltimore, having come down
to the resort for a day's pleasure and en
gaged in the game, which was started In
the woods near :he scene of the. negro
camp meeting.
There is additional improvement in the
condition of Mr. Crousa, who is under treat
ment at the Emergency Hospital here. An
drew Johnson was brought In late tonight
from Washington and locked up with the
other negroes.
LAST OF THE SELLSES
Louis Was the Fourth of the
Circus Family.
STORY OF THE SHOW PEOPLE
Started as Peddlers and Followed Per
formances in That Way.
OVERCAME ALL OBSTACLES
Gradually They Got Into the Business,
But They Were Circus Men
by Absorption Only.
NEW YORK. September 7.-Wlth the
death of Louis Sells on Thursday in Colum
bus, Ohio, there passed away another of
the rapidly disappearing old-time circus
men. He was the last of the four Sells
brothers, who for more than thirty years
had been In the circus business and who
were known chiefly In the west.
The Sells show never was one of the first
magnitude until about ten year9 ago. when
James A Bailey went Into partnership
with the Sells brothers. Mr. Bailey had
bought the Forepaugh show. He could not
give It the personal attention it needed and
so he combined It with the Sells show and
gave the management of the business into
the hands of Peter and Louis Sells.
Peter died about three years ago. A lit
tle more than a year ago, after the death
of Mr. Bailey, the Forepaugh and Sells
show was disposed of to the Rlngllng
brothers and Louis, the last of the Sells,
went back to the old family place of resi
dence and retired. He died of Bright's dis
ease. He died rich, like his three brothers.
The Sellses were of Pennsylvania Dutch
origin. Their father drifted out to Colum
bus. Ohio, where the boys were brought up.
The family was poor. When mere youths
the boys made a living by peddling. That
gave rise to the story that they were of
Jewish origin. At first they bad only one
horse and a wagon. They used to go to
small county seats in Ohio and Kentucky
when court was In session. They sold
neckties, shoestrings, tin pans, some dry
goods and knlckknacks generally. They
were thrifty and saved money. Sometimes
when a horse died on the road the brothers
turned in and pulled the wagon Into town;
then they bought a new horse.
Following the Circus.
Sbveral times the brothers ran up against
a circus?the old wagon-traveling circus?
In Its rounds. The crowds were out and
they did an unusually large business at
such times. That suggested that they
should follow circuses. One o? the first to
which they attached themselves was the
Coopec & Whitney circus. For a time the
circus people paid little attention to them.
They became aggressive and got in the way.
They were finally voted to be a nuisance,
and the circus people tried to prevent them
from trailing along from town to town with
them. The Sellses would not be discour
aged. Threats did not move them. Finally
the circus people took to stoning them and
driving them away from the grounds where
the shows were given. Many bitter rows
occurred and blows were struck, but the
Sellses kept right on.
With their experience in following cir
cuses the brothers picked up a good deal of
knowledge of the business. They studied
its problems and at last started out for
themselves. They got a few wagons, some
cheap performers, a pretty good collection
of animals?they were shrewd about that?
and had success. Their favorite stamping
groftnd got to be T?cas. They used to win
ter the show In Houston. When the season
was over Peter and Louis used to go to
Cleveland. Peter was the bright one of
the family and sometimes did newspaper
work. Louis used to be a conductor on a
street car, and Peter sometimes worked at
the same calling.
Buy a Train.
The brothers so prospered that in the late
seventies they quit traveling by wagons
and bought a train. They were getting
up in the world. Then they go^ a second
train and ran Barrett's circus on that.
Barrett was a brother-in-law who man
aged the concern. Money came in fast,
but the brothers did not use it to Improve
the show. - They put It into real estate In
Kansas City and Columbus largely. One
of the brothers, Allen, finally pulled out
and settled In Topeka, Kan., where he spec
ulated In real estate and got richer. Peter,
Ephraim and Louis kept on in the show
business. It was a second-rate show, but It
satisfied the crossroads.
In 1800 Sells Bros, decided to go td
Australia. Cooper & Bailey's circus had
made a lot of money out there on one trip,
and W. W. Cole, now with the Bailey peo
ple, had also made a fine clean-up dh a trip
he took. It cost Sells Bros. $."><>,000 for
transportation from San Francisco and
back. They h.ad about 150 people in the
outfit, five elephants and about twenty
trained horses. They relied on buying
horses in Australia for rough work. The
Sells boys had never been to sea before.
Hard Luck in Australia.
They were twenty-flve days on the trip.
The animals suffered a good deal from
the voyage and some of the horses grew
sick. When the show landed the govern
ment sent a veterinarian to Inspect the
animals, two of which were In bad shape.
It was in October and the weather was
damp. The veterinarian passed the horses,
but said they must be quarantined until the
next day. A second inspection was had,
and it was decided that the horses had
glanders and must be killed. Some of the
trained horses were sent to an Island. The
harness was cut up and the camp disin
fected. The authorities said that the cir
cus must return to the United States.
Masonic Influence saved the day and the t
show was allowed to open without horses.
It had a lot of acrobats, some good clowns,
and the elephants were all right, and so
the circus opened in Sydney to about two
thirds of the tent capacity.
A member of the board of aldermen made
a speech to the people, told them of the
good faith In which the Sells brothers had
come to Australia and pleaded for public
support. Every performance after that
was given to a crowded house, despite that
it was a circus without performing horses.
Speaking of the situation an old employe
of the Sellses said yesterday:
The Horseless Show.
"It was the most pitiful thing I ever saw
in forty years' experience in the circus busi
ness. When we opened the band paraded
around. Then came some of the women
performers. Then came an animal cage,
pulled by the men employes In costume
and pushed by an elephant. Then some
more women. Then another animal cage,
pushed by an elephant and pulled by the
men. The men changed their costume
several times and pulled wagons In and out.
and then we gave the best show we could.
"Gradually we got some old race horses
and ponies and they did some hurdle busi
ness and other hippodrome things. We
tried to train horses for bareback riding,
but didn't succeed. They would shy and
throw their riders. Well, we actually made
money. We went to New Zealand against
the protests of Kphralm. who was shy of
the sea and said that when we loaded on
ship again It would be to go home. We did
make some money after all. It was the
last time an American circus ever went to
Australia."
After the return from Australia the Sells
outfit continued its prosperous career. The
firm paid larger salaries and became skilled
In meeting emergencies. They even grew
to be competitors of the Barnum and Fore
paugh shows and a deal was made with
them regarding the division of territory.
Then came the merger with the Forepaugh
show and the departure of the Barnum
Bhow for Europe.
John Henry Blrchfleld. who died recently
at Cox's Landing. W. Va., was probably
the oldest resident of West Virginia, his
age being 100 years. Despite his advanced
age, only a short time before he died he
was able to walk from Cox's Landing to
Quyandotte.
Base Ball, Racing
and Other Sports
(Continued from Eighth >
added: one mile? Royal I-a<ly, 98 (Henry). 2 to 1.
won; Hare Russell, 10<l (l/>we), 4 to 1, second;
Killtorraukle. I?i3 (Sandy). 13 to 1, third. Time,
1.40 1-5. Mlutbeila, Water-speed. Neoskaleeta. Miss
Strome. rubral la, Glamors. Rudort aud Belle of
Iroquois alao ran.
Third race, handicap; three-year-olds and up;
added; one and one-quarter ml lea -Ulght
Royal. Ill illojrt). 2 to I. won; Mlaftourl l*d. loT
CMclHuiiel?. 4 to 1. seeood; i.'airu^orm, 118 <Mlller?.
even, third. Time, 2.07. D'Arkle also ran.
Fourth race; three-year-olds; $1.2?k> added; one
mile?Electioneer. 116 (8rua#ell). 7 to 10. won;
Kentucky Reau, 11H (Miller), 4 to 1, second, Am
pedo, 116 (Grand), 10 to 1. third Time, 1.3W 4 5.
Weatbury, Perjuiclo, Rappahannock and Frauk
Lord also ran.
Ftfth race; on* and three sixteenth mllea. turf
course?Beacon IJght, 1?>2 (Miller), 0 to 1, won.
Mlas Crawford. 100 (IHigan). 6 to 1. second; Aero
Wat, 99 (Burn*), 10 to 1. third. Time, 1 ft#.
Oxford. Netikm, l,anca*tr1au and OarthaK'* ?l*> **"??
Sixth race, selling; t wo-year-old Allies; non
wlnnera of $1,000; $1,?HX> added; live ami ??uc half
fnrkm*??Arase*. 104 ?Miller), ft to 1. won; M!a*
TVlaney. 109 (Bnuwelll. II to 1. *e<*>nd; Sunfl.?am
99 (Dujcan), 7 to 2. third. Time. 1.07. llanrtda.
Kerrv, Complete. Miss Marjorle, Pendlllon, Ariel.
Servile. <*old Quest. Brother Jonathan. R^stIo.
Abracadabra. Infrrnham. Ben Rose, <}entleiuan,
Catherine Corson. Geneasee and Miss Man-mi also
ran.
TWO RECORDS BROKEN
AT JAMESTOWN MEET
NORFOLJC. September 7?The features
yesterday of the Jamestown exposition ath
letic meet were the breaking of the Junior
record for throwing the fifty-slx-pound
weight by P. McDonald, of the IrUh-Amerl
can Club; the lowering of the half-mile run
ning record three seconds by P. C. Sheehan
of Boston. Mass.. and the pole vaulting of
E. T. Cook. Irish-American Club, who
came within four Inches of the world's rec
ord.
The events for the junior championships
were closely contested and spectacular, the
Irish-American team winning the day's
honors on points. The 100-yard dash was
a neck and neck run between Oehardt
and Keating. Sullivan's finish In the mile
race, after the handicap of a bad start,
taking the lead In a final sprint, electrified
the big crowd present.
In the five-mile running event. A. R.
Welton of Lawrence M. C. A.. Boston,
took the championship from WiUWim Nel
son,- Pastime A. C., whose record was 27
minutes 15 second^ The American record
is 25 minutes 23 2-5 seconds, made by E.
C. Carter, New York, September 17, 1887
100-yard Junior-Kirst. P. C. Gehrault. OlymplS.
Chicago; second, W. J. Keating, 1. A. A. C.;
third. F. 1.- Isikeman, Montreal. Time. 0 10 2 5.
Half-mile Junior- First. Frank Shulian, Huston;
second, 0. H. French, N. Y. A. C.; third. W. A.
Macky, Montreal. Time. 1.56 2 5.
One tulle Junior?First, Jamea J. Sullivan. Bos
ton; second, W. J. O'C'onnell. Xavlrr A. A.; third.
F. N. Riley. I. A. A. C. Time, 4.30 4-5
Putting 16-pound shot, Junior?First, W. Ollniore.
Olympla; secouil, Lee Talbott, I. A. A. C.; third,
P. McDonald, I. A. A. <J. Distance. 43 feet ll*
inches.
44<>-jard Junior?First, O. B. Ford. N. Y. A. C\;
second, A. T. Bailey. X. Y. A. 0.; third. I*my
Borland. Pastime A. C. of New York. Time.
I 0.51 2 5.
I Running high Juni{>?First. F. F. Klsley, I. A.
A. C.; second. W. C. Fielding. X. Y. A. 0.; third,
F. F Young, Washington, D. C. Height, 5 feet
UV4 Inches.
Throwing discus- First. I>*e Tall?ott. I. A. A. 0.;
second. John J. WhUe, Pastime A. C.; third, Her
man Merer, N. Y. A. C. Distance, 113 feet 6V4
Inches. _
22it yard dash?First. W. J. Keating. I. A. A. C.:
second, O. N. Schaffer. N. Y. A. third. J. J.
Archer, I. A. A. C. Time. 0.22 1-5
22i>-}ard hurdle?First. W S. Lee. N. Y. A. C.:
second. Walter Bursrh. N. Y. A. C.; third. F. J.
Keiir, X. Y. A. C. Time. 0.25 2 5.
I'oie vault for height?First. B. T. Cooke, I. A.
A. C.; second. William Hoppeny. Montreal A. C.;
third, W. A. McLeod. I. A. A. 0. Height. 12 feet.
Throwing 16-pound hammer First. M. P. Mc
Grath. X. Y. A. C.; second. Lee Talbott, I. A. A.
C.; third. P. McDonald, I. A. A. C. Distance. 162
feet.
Fire-mile run?First. A. R. Welton. I.awrence
?Y. M. C. A., Boston; second, F. G. Bellers. X. Y.
A. C.: third, James J. bee. Summervllle, Mass.
Time. 27.10 1-5
Rnnnlng broail Jump?First, Piatt Adams. X. Y
A. C.; second. K. L. Farrell. Boston A. C-; third.
It. 0. Xortiirldge, I. A. A. G. Distance. 22 feet 4
inches.
120 yard hurdle -First. C. Brlnsmade. X. Y. A.
C.; second. W. S. Lee, X. Y. A. C.; third. S. C.
Xortiirldge, I. A. A. C. Time. (1.16 I-ft.
Throwing 56 |?>und weight?First. P. McDonald.
I. A. A. C.; second. T. K. Barrett, Maryland
Swimming Cluh, Baltimore; third. P. J. O'Connor.
Pastime A. C.. Xew York. Distance, 37 feet \
Inch. A new Junior record.
Throwing dls<*us, Greek style?First, W. W.
Zcelg. Western I'nlverslty of Pennsylvania: sec
ond. Thomas Meyer. I. A. A. C. Distance. 72 feet
2% Inches.
The senior championship events in the
Amateur Athletic Union's annuaf field and
track championships being held on the ath
letic field of the Jamestown exposition will
be contested for this afternoon beginning
at 1:110 o'clock.
Some of the most noted athletes in the
United States and Canada are entered, and
it Is expected that several records will b?
broken. .
The events this afternoon will include the
100-yard dash, in which only first-place
men will be allowed?that is, men who have
won races in this class.
This will be followed by the 220-yard
dash and the 44<>-yard or quarter-mile run.
In addition there will be the hurdles for
each of the above distances, followed by
the half-mile run. the mile run and the
five-mile run. Other events will Include
throwing the hammer, putting the l?-pound
shot, hurling the discus, pole vault, run
ning, high and broad Jumps.
The weather Is still clear and not too
hot. and everything is auspicious for the
great senior events this afternoon, which
close the annual field and track champion
ships.
There is a large attendance, and many
new arrivals from different parts of the
country eame In this morning for the
championship contests this afternoon.
TIED FOR FIRST PLACE
AMONG CHESS MASTERS
CARLSBAD. September 7.?There was an
other change In the positions of the leaders
in the International chess masters' tourna
ment, the thirteenth mund of which was
contested in this city- yesterday. Rubin
stein, who led at the conclusion of play
Thursday, suffered defeat at the hands of
Splelmann. Maroczy. on the other hand,
won from Cohn, in consequence of which
Maroczy tied Rubinstein for first place.
Vidmar, who was even with Maroczy, will
most likely lose his game to Johner, as the
latter had an advantage when the game
was adjourned.
The other American. Marshall, defeated
Olland of Utrecht. In the other games,
drawn contests were recorded between
Teichmann and Nismbowltsch, Leonhardt
and Wolf and Schleohter and Tschigorin.
Mieses won from Tartakower and Salwe
worsted Janowski. The games between Mer
ger and Chotimirski was adjourned in favor
of Chotimirski. The records:
Players. W. L. 1 Playert,. W. L.
Maroczy 9 3 1 Marshall 6 5
Kuhlnateln M 3 Splelmann .. . . . 6 6
Vidmar 8 3 S Tschigorin .. . . 5<4 6Vfc
Telchmann 7V4 4V> Tartakower 5 7
Schlechter 7H 4V Berger 5
Duras 7 5
Xleinzowltsch ..7 5
Miesea 7 6
Salwe 7 6
Wolf 7 6
Leonhardt 6V4 5^
Janowski 5 7
Olland 4V4 8W
Chotimirski .... 4V^ 6^
Cohn 2*4 1'^
Johner
ATHLETIC SPORTS
AT NORTH FORK, VA.
Greenway. the country home of Mr. James
E. Ratcllffe. at North Fork, Va., was the
meca of a number of young people on La
bor day to participate in divers athletic
events.
The winners In the contests were an
nounced as follows and appropriate prizes
presented:
Fifty-yard dash?Won by Mr. Dudley
Lawrence of this city; Miss Anna May
Moore of this city, second.
Spoon and apple race?Won by Mr. Dud
ley Iiwrence; Mrs. W. A. Marschalk of
this city, second.
Hop, skip and Jump race?Won by Miss
Anna May Moore; Miss Anna Marschalk,
second.
Three-legged nice?Won by Miss Anna
May Moore and Miss Anna Marschalk;
Mrs. W. E. Moore and Mrs. L.. Van B.
Marschalk of this city, booby prl?e.
Standing broad Jump?Won by Dr I>elgh
ton Van B. Marschalk; Mr. Harry T. Wood
field. second; both of this clly.
Sack race?Won by Mr. Harry T. Wood
Held: Miss Margaret Tompson "f this city,
second
Hat and coat raw-Won b\ Mm Marlon
Marschalk. Miss Margaret Tompt-on, fec
und.
Obstacle ruv Won l?v .?l i >s Sitii'n-r
Klncs of I>?lthlon. Va Mr. Dudley I i?
rence, second.
Potato race?Won 1>. Mr. Oeorg** I Kii?es
of l,elttiton. Va ; Mr. I>udle> 1 iwi? - ? ?.
second.
After the exercises til - merrj parts vvu
loaded on a larKe ?agon til ? d with xtisw
for a ride, which made ,i irlous ending
to their successful hollda)
Others taking pari In the exercises fi ?m
this cltv were Slri Marry T x\\ i.idfl Id
Misses l.oulse Ackerman and l1 r it!;y M ir
schalk. Dr WIHtatn A MtnriMlk <:.d Mr
Wilson Manx-I.alk otter* wcic Mioses Sue
James KauHffe. M.i> Ratcliffe and Virginia
Merchant. Messrs J.ini-s 1" Itatcl'.ffe I'm
Kinea and Kay E ltatcllffe. v vth
Fork, Va.
WALTER TUCKERMAN
CAPTURED CHIEF CUP
LKNOX, Mas* . September 7 Walter tt
Tuckerman of Washington, l> O. >v*t?r lay
deft?at?nl Uuther Oourley of Ap.iwamU
14 up an?i 13 to play tn tho tial f??r thr
chief ctip in the golf tournament here.
Other results were:
Gorprnor*' rtij> Pinal L. J* llltpdovr, Itr -it
l!w?, defeated It. W. Itflintow lir-'rii M-k, '* up *?*!
1 to piny.
* %>n*?tHfl-?n ruj> Final?J A Jtyrlntffl'Ud.
defeat ?*d \\ a. Adrftaactt. l>utt*ht?*i? ?'ouatj. 2
and 1 to play .
Kisl LIimi Inn nip Final 1*'. J rrtrn?W?'? N**w
Haron, drf^ated lilsbop A. W. Knight, Gut>a. 4
up and 3 to play
An eighteen-hole handicap was also play
ed on the I>enox Club links K K. Wharto?.
with a net score of itl^ pmve.l the winner,
with 1-intisay Fairfax 4*?5?1! -Hi. second ml
Glraud Foster. 4*1?5?#1. third.
GOOD TENNIS TEAM
MATCHES ARRANGED
Arrangements have been completed for a
tennis match between teams of the Bach
elors' Uwn -Tennis Club of this clt> and
the Baltimore Country Club The L? Droit
Park Tennis Club. It Is also stated, wlft 1m
the opponents of the Bachelors before they
have engaged with the men from the M mu
mental cttj-. The Baltlmoreans will prob
ably come to this city within the next few
weeks, probably on September 21, and play
upon the Bachelors' courts. M street north
west. Each club will be represented by a
team of six men. Blx single matches and
three doubles will be played. The match
with the I>e lJrolta will probably be played
Hfxt Saturday upon the Bachelors' courts,
and in the games. It Is said, the men of the
M street courts will have something to do
to win for C. B. Doyle, Franklin Geoghegsn
and other crack tennis players are upon the
team from the Le Droit Park section The
return game of the Bachelors' and Cilery
Chase men will probably be played upon
the Bachelors' courts early In October.
BOWERY NO AUTO SPEEDWAY
POLICE GATHEB IN SPEEDERS TO
CHEEBS OF CKOWOS.
Machines, Big and Little, To and Froa
Bace Tracks and Coney Island,
Chased and Caught.
NEW YORK, Sep tern Iter 7.?The Bowery
was the scene last night of several
exciting automobile chases, which re
sulted In fifteen arrests before midnight.
Deputy Commissioner Bugher has been re
ceiving letters of late protesting that the
Bowery la being used as a speedway for
automobiles and also saying that no at
tempt Is made to stop the nuisance even
In the hours when the Bowery Is crowded.
Commissioner Bugher decided to Investi
gate last'night and picked Sergt. Casey to
do the work. Casey was ordered to pick
three of the fastest bicycle men on the
force and take them to the Bowery. Casey
took Policemen Pierce. Cunningham and
Gibson at 5 o'clock and distributed them
from the Williamsburg bridge to Cooper
Square.
Hold Up "Expresses."
There has l>een keen competition of late
between the various sightseeing auto com
panies to get their maohlnes to Coney Is
land and to and from the race tracks ta
the best time, and the consequence Is that
all of the companies of late have been ad
vertising express cars to the beaches and
the tracks.
Policeman Pierce hud Just taken hla
stand last night when one of these so-called
expresses for Coney Island came whizzing
across Cooper Square at the rate of twenty
five miles an hour. Pierce arrested the
chauffeur. Otto Capen, and ordered him to
drive to the Mercer street ]>olice station.
There were abodt twenty-five persons on
the wagon at the time, and there being no
choice in the matter they also went along.
It was nearly half an hour ttefore a bonds
man came to ball the chauffeur out, and
meanwhile the sightseers sat on top of the
machine In front of the station house and
tried to look unconcerned at the shouts
of the small boys.
Over on the Bowery the news spread
quickly that the raid was on, and a large
crowd lined the route to watch the fun and
cheer on the police with the old Vanderbllt
cup race cry of "car coming!"
Tom Johnson's Son Caught.
The second capture was a big Panhard
car containing, besides the chauffeur. Mayor
Tom L. Johnson's son. who said that he
was here from Cleveland to look at auto
mobiles, and was out for a demonstration
This car was picked up near the Williams
burg bridge and was speeding along at the
rate of forty miles an hour, which gave
the police some hard* work, the ctlase last
ing for eight blocks. Young Johnson gave
$l(Kt cash ball for the chauffeur at the Mer
cer street police station.
Bernard Goldstein, owner of the |ialm
garden at 150 East 5Mth street, was In a
hurry to get home from the race track and
his chauffeur was hitting It up the Bowery
at the rate of forty miles an hour when
the gleeful spectators sjiotted another vic
tim and raised a cry to warn the police
The chauffeur of the car looked puzzled
when he heard the cry, but retnemljpred
that he was on the Bowery, and failed to
connect the cries with his own quick finish
Sergt. Casey .put an end to the chase in
short order and took this offender to the
station house, where another JUKI win
added to the temporary hank account of
the Mercer street station house.
The spectators along the .Bowery didn't
have to wait long for arrests, as one car
followed another. Six arrests were made
In the first hour alone.
One big sightseeing car of a rival com
pany to that of the first car came Into the
Bowery going at full speed.
"This Is the Bowery and " began the
barker.
"You are under arrest." finished Sergt
Casey.
COUBTESY TOO COSTLY.
Saying "Please" Over the 'Phone
Takes Time in Philadelphia.
PHILADELPHIA, September 7 Here
after the -r>0 girl operators of the Key
stone Telephone Company of this city will
not say "please" to the subscriber, and
the subscribers have been requested not to
say "please" to the operator.
A. J. Ulrlch traffic manager of the com
pany, has Issued the order, and both th?
girls ani the subscribers are happy with
the new arrangement. According to Mr
Ulrlch the girls In answering calls and tae
patrons In making them use the word
"please" 1100.000 times every twenty-four
hours. Estimating that it requires half a
second to say the word, 7.50O minutes are
consumed every twenty-lour hours, which
is equal to 123 hours lost every day by
the use of the word.
Because the National Shoemakers' I'nloci
withdrew the union label from Its prod
ucts the York <Pa.) Shoe Manufacturing
Company will hereafter have an open shop

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