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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 20, 1908, Image 14

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AUCTION SALES.
TOMORROW.
The Greater Washington
Auction Company,
6II 3=6 fl 5 La. Ave, N.W.
Large sod attractive sale of furniture. com
prising in part Upright riano, Singer Seven
drawer Sewing Machine, Brans and Iron Bed*.
Kelt and Hair Mattresses. Mattings. Oilcloths,
lot of D. R. and Parlor Furniture. Odd Dressers.
Chiffoniers. Bedding, etc.; nlso otae New Cen
tury Typewriter In good condlton. All at unre
served salt- on TUESDAY. JANUARY TWENTY
FIRST.
Parties fnrnlshing will find It to their ad
vantage to attend wale. D. NOTES, Auctioneer.
THUS. J. OWEN & SON. AUCTIONEERS.
Trustee's sale of valuable
square of ground bounded
by I, K, II 11th and 112th
streets northeast, in City
of Washington.
ttT|rta*' nt ? d**'1 trust dated Mar 11.
* Hn^ recorded In Liber 11S1. filio yil of
win L"n ?TCnrMi for ,h.* of Columbia. I
will sell at Public auction. In front of 'he prem
ises, on TT ESDAV. THE TWENTY-FIRST PAY
oTLOCK' ni' ,at half past foitr
v. -J ? * Equate numbered nine
hundred and elghfr fftSOt. In the city of Wash
Ington. 1n the Dlsrrlct of Columbia. This p-op
tffers unusual inducements to bul'ders and
investors.
Terms of tale: One third casb. balance In
equal payments in one and two rears, with in
terest at the rate of five per cent per annum
from day of sale. interest payable semi annually,
secured by deed of trust on the property, or all
* ? erA* the ,?PflPn of the purchaser. A deposit1
nf S.,00 requ.red at time or sale. Conveyancing
? lid recording at cost of purchaser. If terms
of sale are not compiled with wlthlu lei) days
from day of sale the trustee reserves the right!
t?.T?,VI at r,!,k 81,(1 rf*l,t of defaulting nur-baser.
Ja9-ddf.eSu WILLIAM A. GORDON. Trustee.
ADAM A, W^^UCrTaUCTION^KIL
AUCTION SALE OF A TWO-STORY BRirK
DWELLING. NO. 1109 NEW JERSEY AVE
NUE SO l "THE AST.
By Tirtue of a certain deed of trust, dated De
cember 14. 1901. recorded In Liber No. 2730.
!>>lio 160 et seq.. of the land records of the
District of Columbia. and at the request of tb?
bolder of the notes secured thereby, default
having been made In their payment, we will off*r
for sale. In front of the premises, at public
auction, on TI'ESDAY, THE TWENTY-FIRST
PAY OF JANUARY. 1908. AT HALF-PAST
FOl. R O'CLOCK P.M., lot numbered twenty-one
(211 of James Adams, executor's, subdivision of
square north of square numbered seven hundred
and forty-three (Ne 743) as per plat In th?- office
?f the surveyor of the Dlstrfct of Columbia, in
Liber N. K . folio 253.
Terms: One-third cash and balance in one and
two years, at 6ie interest, secured by deed of
tnist on the property, or all cash, at purchaser's
option. Deposit of $200 required at time of
sale. Terms to be compiled with within fifteen
days, otherwise trustees reserve the right to re
sell at purchaser's cost. 1
LAWRENCE IIUFTY. Trustee
Columbian building.
EDWIN L. WILSON. Trustee.
Fendall building.
HUFTY A HUFTY, Altys. Blirty Secured.
JalO.eod&ds.eSu
? MARCUS NOTES. AUCTIONEER!
On TUESDAY. JANUARY TWFATY-FrRST.
AT TEN O'CiAtCK. I will sell, within ;_e sales
rooms of Marcus Notes. 426 f?tb st. n.w., all un
redeemed pledges on which there is due interest
f->r one year or more, consisting of Watches,
Rings, Diamonds, etc.
LOUIS ABRAHAMS, Broker.
Ja14-7t.1Q 433 9th st. n.w.
~~ FUTURE DAYS.
THUS. J. OWEN & SON, AUCTIONEERS.
TRUSTEES' SALE OF TWO VALUABLE
THREE-STOItY BRICK RESIDENCES, NOS
909 AND 911 S ST. N.W.
By virtue of a certain deed of trust to tjs. duly
recorded In Liber No. 2418. folio 474 ?t sea., of
the land records of the District of Columbia, we.
the undersigned trustees, will sell, at public
auction. In front of the premises, on SATUR
DAY. THE TWENTY-FIFTH DAY OF JANU
ARY. 1908. AT HALF-PAST FOUR O'CLOCK
P. M.. Ws 249 and 250 In Charles W. Simp
son's subdivision of lots In square three hundred
and slity-two (362"i. In the City of Washington.
D. C-. as said sulidlvlslon Is recorded In the
offlce of the surveyor of the District of Columbia
In Book ' 19. page 105. said lot 249 being Im
proved lly bouse No. 909. and said lot 250 by
?'?? Nfe. 911. both on S street northwest
Jltpps of sale for each bouse: One third of the
pCriuktM money to be paid In cash, and the
waJdne In two equal Installments In one and
years, with Interest at live <5) per centum
fef- annum, payable semi-annually, from day I
of sale, for which notes of purchaser to be given
secured by deed of trust upon the property sold'
pr all cash. ?t the option of the purhcaser A
deposit of $230 may be required of the purchaser I
of each bouse at the time of sale. Conveyaac
Ing and recording at the cost of the purchaser.
Terms of sale to be complied with within ten I
days from day of sale, otherwise the trustees
reserve tho right to resell the property at the
risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser.
JOSEPH J. DARLINGTON,
410 5tb at. n.w.
BLAIR LEE.
Jall dAds Fendall bid*.
V. G. SLOAN Jfc CO.: AUCTIONEERS. UOfTTslT
f RS-A"E. OF VALUABLE IMPROVED
REAL ESTATE. KNOWN AS 2016 COLUM
BIA ROAD. IMPROVED BY FOUR STORY
ENGLISH BASEMENT RESIDENCE, OF I
POMPEIIAN BRICK AND STONE. '
_ B>" virtue of n certain deed of trust, dated the
.th day of June. A.D. 1900. and duly recorded
in Liber No. 2492. at folio 192 et ?*j.. one of I
the land records for the District or Columbia,
the undersigned will offer for sale at public auc
tlon in front of the premises, on TUESDAY,
JANUARY TWENTY-EIGHTH. 1908. AT FIVE
O'CLOCK P.M.. the following described land and
premises, situate in the county of Washington.
District of Columbia, known and distinguished as
snd being all of lot one. hundred and thirty
seven <l".7i. in John Sherman's subdvision of a
part of Wyoming Terrace, as the same appears
of record In the offlcc ? of the surveyor of the
District of Columbia, improved by* handsome
fonrstofy English basement residence o' Por
pellan brick and stone, known as 2016 Columbia
road. Washington. D. C.
Terms: Property to be sold subject to a deed
of trust for $8,000. due June 7. 1900. with In
terest at five per centum per annuai. pavable
so nil annually, balance In cash, or all cash, at
the purchaser's option. A deposit of $300 will
?<? required st the time of sale. All conveyanc
ing and recording will be at the purchaser's "cost.
Terms to be compiled with within fifteen days
n*?m day of sale, otherwise the trustees reserve
the right to resell the property at tne risk and
cost of the defaulting purchaser, after such ad
vertising as they may deem uecessarv in some
aewspsper published in Washington. D." C.
LISLE S. LIPSCOMB. Trustee.
612 14th st. n.w.
IRVING WILLIAMSON. Trustee.
1al7d&ds.eSu * Columbian building.
ADAM A. WESCHLKR, AUCTIONEER.
TRUSTEES' SALE OF VALUABLE IMPROVED
REAL ESTATE. 1342. 1344. 1346 28TH ST.
N.W. AND 2704. 2706 O ST. N.W.
By virtue of a certain decree pnssed in equity
cause No. 2727'!. in the Supreme Court of the
District of Columbia, entitled Louis M. Paxton
et si. vs. John W. Pazton et al.. the undersigned
trustees will offer for ssle. at public auction. In
front of premises, on WEDNESDAY. THE
TWENTY-NINTH DAY OF JANUARY. 19<VS.
AT HALF-PAST FOUR O'CLOCK P.M.. the
following described land and premises, situate
In ihe city of Washington. In the District of Co
lumbia: Parts of lots 117 and 118 in square
1210 i being in what was formerly known as
Be?u> addition to the citv of Georgetown. In
The District trf Columbia!. ?lescril>ed as follows:
Begiunlng at the northeast comer of the lot
formerly bought by Zadoc Wilson from David
W einer's fcelrs. and running thence north with
Montgomery mow called 2Sthi st. 48 feet, thence
west 117 feet to an alley 6 feet wide, tbence
with said alley south 48 feet and thence east In
a straight l>ne to the place of beginning. Ini
thT? ?**-?"?ry frame dwellings, Nos.
134... 1,144 and 1 .{46 28th st. n.w.
???2?'.?2LTHE. SAMK r>AY AND DATE. AND
IMMEDIATELY THEREAFTER, part of lot 122
lit square 1239 (being In what was formerly
known as Restl's addition to the citv of George
town. in the District of Columbia), describe* as
follows: Beginning for the same nt the end of 47
feet from the west line of said lot and running
lh* ??"'?? l'ne of Be all (now
alle<j t)f ut. 20 feet and 6 Inches, more or less
TbT?r*T. *5>,,th parallel with said west line
until It intersects the line of Holme.vl's addition
r^oiTetown. thence with the line of said
addition to the depth of said lot 120 feet, thence
west 2 feet 6 inches, more or less: thencC north
erly .nd parallel with said Holwead's addition
F Ml striken the southwest corner of the ba<-k
building of the house standing on the lot berebv
Intended to be lonveyed. thence with the divld
P*r,,ltlon. separating the two bouses to the
south line of Real) (now called Ot st. to the
Pla? e of beginning, improved by a one and three
story frame dwellings. jCos. 2704 and 2706 O st.
Terms of sale: One-third of th* purchase
money to he ,.aid in ,?sb and th" balance in two
?V.'s 'n*'?Unients. payable '.n one ,Dd two
"I * Interest at j per cqntum per annum." pav
able semi annually, from day of sale, secured by
'J, .s 'j,<> P^PTty sold, or all cash
tho <>pt*ou nf tho purrbaaor. \ < 1 ^nc*v11
nt ,h' P?^hsser TT each
sale. All conveyancing, recording and not?rla!
fees at the crn>t of the purchaser Terms of sai?
to t* complied with within fifteen dnvs from day
of sale .otherwise the trustees r?nerre the right
th. ?*, i," W*Vr- Bt ,h* r,sk and cost of
the defaulting pur<-ha?er. after five davs" adver
tisement of #,;cb resale in The Freeing .star a
newspaper published In the citv of WaVhlnet'on
D C. DANIEL w. OWNOfiHlT!"
Trustee. 412 ."ith st n w
JOSEPH. R. FACITC?
lsl? dAds.eSti Trustee, .vm k. st. n.w.
ADAS1 A. ^ ESCHLER, AL'CTIONEERT
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 25-FT G *S
charges'LXCH- by to pay
Op WEDNESDAY. JANUARY TWENTY-SEC
?>D. 19? AT EI.EVEN O'CLOCK A.M.. I will
sell, by public aiKtloi). tt foot of Uth st. ?e
th? al?ye boat. Terms cash.
GEORGE D HORNING. Broker,
Jsl.-? d*dbs.eSu 9th snd D ats. n w.
C: ?i. >LOAN A CO.. AKrriONEEKS, 1407 G SrT
Notice is hereby given that on SATURDAY
JANUARY TWENTY FIFTH. 1908, \T TEN
O'CLOCK A.M.. within the salesroom of C. G.
Sloan 4c Co.. 1407 G street northwest, there wlli
be sold to enforce liens for storage charges. Ac
due snd unpaid, all goods, furniture, household
and persons) effects on storage with Baum's
Furniture Shop. 14th and U streets, in the
?ames of Cbsrles Dlsmond snd H. L. Apple.
Jsl8-?r.eS BAUM'S FURNITURE SHOP.
AUCTION SALES.
FUTURE DAYS.
AUCTION SALES.
FUTURE DAYS.
-? A T> ?-**???
ft
UtltTUlU
lloan's Galleries,
1407 Q St., Near U. S. Treasury.
THE McCOMAS SALE
(BY CATALOGUE).
Comprising the Personal Effects, Furniture, Ornaments, Law
and Miscellaneous Library of the Late
LOUIS E. McCOMAS,
Former Associate Justice, Supreme Court, D. .C., .and
United States Senator from Maryland,
BT ORDER OF C. G. EDGAR, Executor.
THE AMERICAN SECURITY AND TRUST CH>., Agent.
THE SALE ALSO INCLUDES
A Very Desirable Pew in St. John's Church,
a <r?LLE4?noN- or
Fine Embroideries. Silks, Hangings, Shawls, &c.,
the Property of
Chcntung Liang-Cheng, Minister from China.
AI^O THFJ ENTIRE COIJLBTmON OF
A WEIJrKNOWN DEALER ZS
Antique Mahogany Furniture,
IN EVERY CONCEIVABLE SHAPE,
With many valuable contributions from locaj estates and
families, such as Silver Plate, China Ornaments, Paintings,
Old English Prints, Books, Engravings, Skins, Robes, Bric-a
Brac, Cut Glass, Hangings. 75 Persian Rugs and Carpets, &c.,
ALL TO BE SOLD AT
Absolute Public Auction at Sloan's Art Galleries,
T407 G St., Washington. D. C.,
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday,
January 22, 23 and 24, 1908, \
At 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. each day.
On Public View Monday and Tuesday.
JANUARY an AND 21. 9 A M UL?<^EES MAILED ON APPLI
CATION TO C. G. SLOAN A CO.. AUCTIONEERS, 1407 G ST. Ja1?-tf
WALTER B. WILLIAMS ft CO.. AUCTIONEERS.
TRUSTEES SALE OFTWOtei RA BLKBRIOK
DWEULrNGS. NUMBERED 18 A. I> ,
%<? Dlitrfot ?t
fffi SeJ?
"5SS:T?t :w^8if!fErt. <? 25
xt?p ??VlHr -y&vszix
I 'OZSSS'lS.'&gZ* - r
cBiBU:ss?r.F..?t
?* w*-? '
C. G. SLOAN & CO.. AUCTIONEERS. 1407 U ST.
-^^A^SSSSS
???HSSV43
K dUrtGa wii ~?t.. ?!"??"'" <!;?el"
MBS* &-KfiKS
rotbcr with the implement" th^??Vc?"'ij?
Ing of a four-story brl? dwelling, known as No.
iM 13th street northwest. .
Terms: One-third cash, balance 1?I
stallmenta at one and two years. D "IS
at fire per centum per annum. "?"l1
annually, from the day of sale. "d *2?** v5
deed of trust on the property ?" c"^j
at the purchaser s option. A deposit of
will be required at the tlmeofsale. ?1L con
veyancing and recording will beat thepur
chaser's coat. Terms to be compiled with
ten days, otherwise the trustees re?rT? the
right to resell at the risk and coat of the de
faulting purchaser. xrATgON J. NEWTON.
ALOIS B. BROWNE.
lal5-dftds,eSu Trustee*.
THOS. J. OWEN A SON, AUCTIONEERS.
Ttir*;TTFS SALE OF VALUABLE IMPROVED
REmT ESTATE. BEING THE THHEESTORT
AND BASEMENT BRICK and
DWELLING . NO. 1732 18TH STREET
By certain deed of trust duly re
torted in Liber No. 1772. folio 1, ?t seq.. of the
land records of the District of 'CoVuinbla, and at
the request of the party secured thereby, the un
dersigned surviving trustee J*j ' *?l1- tjFdrs
auctlon. In fr<?t-of ?* BgmlIses. on'THUBH
S& \hedt^VI? BAEr.PAfr TOUR
O'CLOCK P M-. the foj. ?wlng-described land and
premises situate In the city of Washington,
district of Columbia, and designated as aod belns:
?t numbered 123 In Charles. W. King a MbdT
vision in Honare numbered 133* a? P*?* ?.
?*5 ta XrJO. folio 15 oftberecort. ^f
the surveyor ? office of said District, togem
W^hs%rar^eeD Uilrd of the purcba^money
to be paid In cash, balance in two equallnaUM
ments payable In one and two years, In
terest' at 6 per centum per annum, payable seml
annually. from day of sale secured by d?d of
trust upon the property soldorall
eLm ss.*rsa r;q
rUk^nd cost of defaulting purchaser, after Ave
dlTvs' advertisement of such reskl* In some new.
paper jjmuw
jall-d&ds.eSu 141B > St. n.w.
THOS. i. OWEN ft. SON. Auctioneers.
TnrdTvrs' ?\LE OF TWO VALUABLE
TBBWCK DWELLINGS. BEING PREMISES
NO 304 3D ST. S.E. AND 140 C >T.
Rr virtue of a decree of the Supreme Court of
the*District of Columbia, passed lu Equity t-ause
No 27509. the undersigned trustees will *ell.
?* nubile auction. In front of the Dreml?"?. on
MONDAY. THE TW^'TY SEVENTH DAY OK
JWITARY A.P. lftOS. AT FOUR O CLOCK
P.M., tbc following-described land andnFfp,f
situate In the city of Washington. District of
Columbia, and designated as and being lot num
bered 15. lu Charles V. Trott's subdivision of
lots in square numbered 701. as per plat re
in hoolc 14 ??e 214. In the office of
the surveyor for said District subject to a right
of Ingress and egress to a 3-foot "}}pfon
the eaS side of lot 1C of said subdivision, as
Stolid by deed in liber ?
one of the land records of said
Also on same day. at HALT-PAST FOUR
OTIiOCK P.M., lot 48 of TR. H. Campbell s
subdivision. In square numbered 732. as said sub^
division is recorded In book No. 14, page ,n
aurvevor-s office of said District of Columbia,
with the right of way and use forever of an alley
way. as described In a certain deed recorded In
liher 103ft. folio 32. of the land records of the
said district, together with the improvements.
Terms of sale: One-third of the purchase money
to be paid In cash, balance In two equal install- j
menta. pavable In one and two years, with In
terest at 6 per centum per annum, payable semi
annually. from day of sale secured by deed of
trust upon the property sold, or all cash at the
option of the purchaser. A deposit of flOO will
he reaulred at time of sale upon each parcel.
All conveyancing, recording, etc.. at cost of
purchaser. Terms of sale to be compiled wun
within 1ft dsya from day of sale, otherwise the
trustees reserve the rljht to resell the property
at the risk and cost of dcfaultlnc purchaser
after five days' advertisement of such resale In
some newspaper published In Washington. D. C.
FILLMORE BEALL.
310 John Msrshall place.
HARRY 8. WEI/7H.
1410 G st. n.w.
ja!4 dftds.eSn Trnstees.
FIRE NOT INCENDIARY.
Karagheusian Scoffs at Theory of
Parker Building Blaze.
NEW YORK. January 20.?Mihran Kar
agheusian. the new member of the Arm of
A. & M. Karagheusian. rug importers,
which occupied the fourth (loor of the
burned Parker building, at his home In
West End avenue yesterday scoffed at a
theory promulgamatcd yesterday that the
tire that wrecked the twelve-story build
ing. killing three flrcmen. had been set
bv the Armenian Hunchakist Society with
the object of becoming revenged upon
him. , ,
"I have received no letters and been dis
turbed in no way by the Hunchakists for
two months." he said, "and at no time
did they ever threaten to set tire to the
building. Farwgh Nevrovzyan. whom I
had arrested two months ago for threat
ening tne, had said thKt he would reveal
to Vie Turkish government a revolution
ary plot which he alleged my brother.
Arshag. in Constantinople, was interested
In He said that if I did not clvo him
what he asked h" would injure us to the
etxent of ?'JOO.noO. but did not threaten
to set fire to the building. S'nce his ar
rest I have not been bothered at all. and
1 have no fai^i in the rumor that the
Hunchakists are responsible for the fire."
Dust Shower at Sea.
NEW YORK. January 20 ?A dust
shower at sea was reported by the
steamer Monterey, which arrived yes
terday from Vera Cruz. Progress and
Havana.
The Monterey's officers declare that
January 11. the night before arriving at
Progreso. a peculiar white powder, like
flour, fell from the skies. It was not a
volcanic dust. there being no grit 1n the
composition. The dust became sticky
after falling on the vessel.
WINTER RES0BT3.
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.
The St. Charles,
ATLANTIC city, N. J.
Most select location on the ocesn front. Dis
tinctive for its elegance. excluslvenes*. hl*b
clsss patronage and liberal management. Sea
wafer In all baths. Illustrated booklet.
ja!8-30t NEW Li N HAINES.
Hotel! Tray more,
atlantic rnr.
Overlooking the Ocean. Open all. the year.
iuatmore HOTEL CO.
CTIAS. O. MARQCBTTB. D. 8. WHITE.
Ja!6-14t.lO Manager. President..
Hotel .Dennis
The boase with an unobstructed ocean view.
Hot and cold sea water In private baths.
JatMh.f.m.tu.30t.8 WALTER J. BirZBY.
{fiarlDorooab-filenbctm
ATLANTIC CITY.'N. J.
JOSIAH WHITE * SONS, Proprietor*.
Ja3-63t.5
New Clarion, SSSK.'&.Sr4
Coacb meets train.
Booklet.
Jal5.30t,4
Elevator to street level.
S. K. BONIFACE.
SEASIDE HOUSE,
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J.
On the ocean front; evei7 comfort. including
sea-water baths. elevators, golf, etc.
jall-30t-8 P. P. COOK * SON.
HOTEL IROQUOIS.
Ocean end South Carolina ave.; best location.
Capacity. 400. Private baths, sun parlors, ele
vator, etc. Special, 910 up weekly. Open all
the year. Booklet. W. F. SHAW.
jeao-aot.a
Hotel Lamborn,
Open all year. 1? rivate Baths. Elevator to |
street. Steam heat. Booklet. O. C. MILLER.
jal-30t.4
Berkshire Inn, .^"o^au'Tw*
$9 to $15 weekly,
etc.
s*J7-tf.4
Capacity. 300. Elevator, baths,
J. O. k J. E. DICKINSON.
Girls Ban Tale's Gantlet.
NEW HAVEN, Conn., January 20.?
Sunday broke bright over New Haven
yesterday, weather lending itself gra
ciously to aid the Yale men in entertain,
ing their fair guests, who came to the
city for the festivities of Yale's annual
social event, the junior promenade. Re
ligious services were held in Woolsey
Hall yesterday. Rev. Anson Phelps
Stokes, secretary of the university, con*
ducted them.
Following the exercises the under
classmen formed along the College street
sidewalk the usual double line, through
which "gantlet" the upper classmen and
their guests were compejled to pass. In
formal teas and sightseeing tilled out
the day.
A Model of Cood Style
and Simplioity.
4.114?A young Kirl's drees, which,
though simple in itself, may ?e easily
elaborated if necessary, is here sketched
and may offer an acceptable working
suggestion to the home dressmaker. The
dress has a simple blouse waist adorned
with a bertha of novel shaping, cut
i square in front to display a simulated
yoke. The sleeves are of simple bishop
style, gathered Into a wide cuff. The
skirt has a double Inverted pleat in front
and is gathered slightly in the back, be
ing tilted smoothly oven the hips. A
fancy braid supplies the trimming for
the dr?ss, which is In excellent style tejr
every-day wear. The mode, however, is
practical fo- almost any occasion. Wool
batiste, challis or any -soft fabric would
be appropriate for making. 7'i yards 3?
' inches wide being needed for. the 15-year
size. 4314-Sizes 14. 15. Irt, 17 years. The
; price of this pattern is 10 rents.
%
i
THE FUTURE OF CUBA
American Withdrawal Not to
Be Unconditional.
ORIGINAL PACT TO STAND
Tranquillity Must Have Been Be
stored to Island.
PRESIDENT KAY RECALL WORD
Insular Property Holders Apprehen
sive of Besult of a Transfer of
Governing Powers.
BTl WILLIAM K. CURTIS.
Written for The Star ind the Chicago Record
Herald.
Business men of Cuba and the property
owners throughout that Island have real
ized that the provisional government
must end sooner "or later, and the admin
istration of Gov. Magoon and his asso
ciates be relinquished to a native pres
ident and legislature; but they have been
In hopes that such an event, and the con
sequences that may follow it. might be
postponed much longer. The President,
however.-has written Secretary Taft one
of his positive and peremptory letters
commanding that "the Installation of the
president and congress of Cuba, to he
elected next December, and the turning
over of the island to them shall take
place not later than February 1. 1909- H
it can be turned over earlier, I shall be
glad," the President writes, "but under
no circumstances and fof no rea8?" '
the date be later than February 1. 1900.
Perhaps the President will have
to regret and recall this rather peculiar
pronunciamento. Everybody, of
will appreciate his desire to elose UJL/^
provisional administration and the period
of "intervention in Cuba before the endI fit
his term. He fixes the date thirty-two
days in advance of the inaupjration of
his successor, but declares that^ ?
crcumstances and for no reason shall
installation of the Cuban president be de
ferred. This means that wars and ru
mors of wars and revolutions. and e . "
the failure of the Cuban people to elect a
president and a congress, wll make no
difference. If his announcement be taken
literally, tihe government of Cuba is to be
-turned over to the president and the ion-,
gress of that island to be elected on De
cember 1 whether there is an election or
n<The pronunciamento of President Roose
velt is in direct violation of the agree
ment which Secretary Taft entered into
with the people of Cuba last April, ana
which received the President s approval
and formal Indorsement. That agree
ment provided distinctly that the relin
quishment of authority by the UWlted
States at the time designated depended
entirely upon the tranquillity of the island
and upon the fair and honest election f
a president of the Cuban republic. There
is considerable doubt In the mind of Sec
retary Taft and Gov. Magoon, not to men
tion the business men and property own
ers of Cuba, whether the present tranquil
lity can be preserved through the excite
ment of a political campaign: and Gov
Magoon. in his report, which was received
only a few days ago, says:
Gov. Magoon's Advice.
"Doubtless numerous election contests
which must be settled will develop, for
it is essential that the municipal and pro
vincial officials be duly installed and be
come familiar with the duties of their
offices prior to proceeding wltlr the second
(presidential and congresional) elections.
I do not think this will require six months,
but, of course, cannot fix the limit with
out'knowing the effects of the prelimi
nary elections. The present prospect is
that those elections will pass off quietly,
and will cause sufficient
the political groups to show the general
outline and outlook of the national con
test. The proper thing to do- n fact. the
onlv thins that can be done?is to await
?lie results of the provisional provincial
| and municipal elections before taking the
n^niat is tihe advice of the President s
representative on the ground, whoknows
the situation and can J"dSe ??r?
rately than anybody else what is best for
the government at Washington to. do. B t
the President evidently has not read Gov.
Magoon's report and issued his announce
ment without considering the situation or
any of the interests involved.
On page 29 of the printed copy of Gov
Magoon's report he expresfea
doubts as to the abllit> th? J ?
people to choose their president. He says.
"The serious aspect of the present -
ation is the lack of unanimity among the
people and the want of a P?mlc*l ,ssue
of sufficient importance to cemmand the
efforts of a majority of the electors for
Its promotion. The caitipal^ lnvolm no
other issue than the personal popularity
of the several candidates now announced
or befni Considered, and its present stage
consists of effoiHs to secure the support
of local leaders. It Is s??ilar t? ? states"
convention campaign in the ^t^States.
At this time there exists a general lack
of confidence that any of the candidates
has a following sufficiently large and
united, or possesses sufllclentpre^geand
public confidence to make his administra
finn stable if he were elected and In
stalled in office. The partisans of each
candidate are certain that their leader
has such a following and prestige, but
thev are equally certain that all the other
candidates have not. As already stated.
I hope and believe the preliminary elec
tions will give thl several parties more
form and substance and do away with this
uncertainty. If they do not the question
of the time for holding the presidential
election will be further complicated in
stead of elucidated."
Property Owners Apprehensive.
The business community, the planters
of Cuba and other large property inter
ests. which are represented chiefly by
foreigners?Englishmen. Frenchmen. Span
iards. Germans and Americans-are very
much excited and apprehensive because
the President has refused to accept tills
advice of Gov. Magoon. and. without con
sidering the facts contained In his report,
has withdrawn the only condition upon
which the promise of the restoration of
Cuban authority was based
The Taft agreement, to which everybody
in Cuba cheerfully assented last April,
was accepted because of that condition.
The only way in which the politicians
could recover control of the government
was to behave themselves and preserve
CHRONIC CATARRH ,
Caused by Run Down Con
stitutions and Continued
Colds?The Best Remedy.
Our changeable climate is very trying to Wash
ington people with run-down constitutions..Tint's
, why such a large proportion of them suffer from
chronic catarrh and pulmonary troubles.
We want to say to every person in Washing
ton at this season of the year: -Build up your
run-down system aod your ailments will ditmn,
pear." For this purpose we hare never sold
anything in our store equal to the delicious rod
liver and iron preparation. Vino!.
Being rich in the elements of life. Vinoi tone*
up the digestive organs, rreates ? healrhy appe
tite and makes rich red blood. In this natural
manner strength is created for every organ in tbe
body, and chronic catarrh and pulmonary trou
bles are overcome. We ask the aged, weak and
run-down people of Washington, and those Buf
fering* from chronic rttarrb and pulmonary trou
bles. to try Vinol. If it does no good we will re
fund jour money.
James O'Donnell Pharmacies,
Washington. P. C.
,;hh F at. n.w.', nai and M sta. n. w.
3d at. and' P?. ?*?. a.e.. S2d aud O ata. n.w.
the peace of the island. That Inducement
has proven very effective?the most ef
fective that could have been devised?and'
Gov. Magoon ventures the hopeful en
couragement that there will be no more
violence?no more attempts to stir up rev
olutions or resistance to authority. And
!?T that for the first time in history
the Commercial and industrial interests of
Cuba are on a conservative and solid
foundation. But there is a. grave and
widespread apprehension among both for
eigners and natives who have business
interests and property at stake that the
President's Impulsive and generous with
drawal of this condition is very indiscreet,
and his declaration that the government
will be turned over to the na
tives on the 1st of next February,
whether or no. will not only destroy the
good effect of Sefretary Taft's agreement,
but will excite the contending politicians
to form conspiracies and revolutionary or
ganizations that will disturb the peace,
retard the progress and impair the pros
perity of the island. If the price of inde
fendence had been kept at Secretary
aft's terms, if the President had in
sisted upon the condition precedent in his
announcement, there would be no such
fear.
1* ortunately. however, there is nothing
in the President's announcement about
the withdrawal of the troops. There are
now about 6.000 soldiers of the United
States army stationed in different parts
of Cuba, and as long as they are there
peace will be maintained, although trouble
is almost certain to break loose as soon
as they are withdrawn.
Secretary Taft's Assurances.
I have not been able to see the Presi
dent, but Secretary Taft is convinced that
the good people of Cuba need not fee! any
misgivings concerning the President s in
tentions. He is positive that the Presi
dent s letter is based upon the presump
tion that the present good order in Cuba
will be prolonged, and the revolutionary
element can find no encouragement in it
to organize conspiracies. Although the
President does not think it necessary to
make that clear, the condition precedent
to the withdrawal of our authority in
Cuba remains the same as it was when
Secretary Taft made his agreement with
the representatives of the conflicting in
terests on that island. That agreement
reads:
"The carrying out of this plan, of
course, is stTictly dependent upon the
tranquillity of the country, which must
continue through two elections, and
which must give assurance of the stanlllty
?ui !tnew government, because, without
this, the United States would not be un
charging the obligations devolving upon
it by reason of the intervention."
''That holds good since the President's
letter was published, as well as before."
said Secretary Taft. "and the President
did not mean anything different. The
government of the United States has as
sumed th? responsibility of protecting
and preserving the life and property of
our own citizens and the subjpets of for
eign governments in Cuba, ana the trans
fer of authority will certainly not take
place as long as there is any danger of
a disturbance." .
This assurance from Secretary Taft w...
be consoling to the business element In
Cube, and to all who are interested In
having the present prosperity .prolonged.
Cuban Progress.
Gov. Magoon's report is full of statis
tics concerning economic and commercial
prosperity. He shows that the receipts
from customs have increased nearly 10.
per cent during the last year, and although
the next sugar crop will not be as large
as the last, the improvement in prices will
make up the difference to the planters.
There is a surplus of about ?13.00>?,.o0
n the Cuban treasury, which is rapidly
increasing because of larger receipts and
greater economy, but that is a disad
vantage, because the hungry adventurers
jof the liberal party are eager to get hold
of the money. A considerable portion of
it is being used In the construction of
roads, bridges and other internal im
provements, which are very much needed
The administration of President .alma
did very little in ^hat direction, wuba
is far behind the times in its transporta
tion facilities, which Gov. Magoon and
Col. Black of the army, who is acting
minister of public works are energetic
ally trying to supply by building a
system of macadamized cart roads over
the entire island.
The^ legislative commission, of which
Col. E. H. Crowder of the army is chair
man, has prepared a series of laws, which
have been very much needed, to mi..e
the provisions of the constitution effect
ive, for nothing of that sort was done
during the four years of Independence. A
commission of twelve members, represent
ing the different political parties, nas
prepared (1) a' municipal law embodying
the requirements of the constitution; (2)
an electoral law under which the regis
tration and balloting can be conducted
under the direction of a non-partisan
bureau of elections; (8) a law reorganiz
ing the Judiciary and defining the jurisdic
tion of the various judges and the man
ner in which they shall be appointed, and
(4) a law reorganizing the civil service
upon a non-partisan merit basis.
Gov. Magoon explains that the work of
the commission iy rapidly approaching
completion; the laws they have prepared
will be printed in pamphlet form and
given a wide circulation in order that
their provisions may be examined and
pritlcised .before they are declared in
force; but he believes that they will be
cordially accepted by the public, and com
pliments Col. E. H. Crowder of the judge
advocate general's bureau of the army
for the wisdom and ability he hag ?.hown
in the work.
The census of Cuba has recently been
taken simultaneously by 1.800 enumerat
ors under the direction of Victor H. Olm
sted of the Agricultural Department at
Washington, and the returns thus far re
ceived indicate a population of about tw?
millions, which is an increase of 25 per
cent since the first census was taken im
mediately after independence.
Obligations of Foreigner?.
A very important question now pending,
perhaps Mie most serious of all in the
Cuban problem, is whether the obligations
of citizenship shall be imposed by law
against their will upon the foreigners,
Americans and Europeans, who constitute
a large portion of the population and own
or control the commerce, the productive
industryj and the public utilities. The
greater part of the property in Cuba is
owned by aliens, and they pay 75
per cent of the taxes; but. as Gov. Ma
goon says, there is a manifest neglect of
even the obligations and civic responsibili
ties devolving upon a resident alien who
receives for his person and property all
the benefits of orderly government and
the business opportunities existing in the
island, and makes little or no effort to in
fluence or control political powers by
which good government Is to be secured.'
Neither the foreigners referred to nor the
native Cubans are anxious or even will
ing to have the obligations of citizenship
imposed upon aliens. The future peace
of the island is so uncertain that nearly
all foreign-born citizens are afraid to re
linquish the protection of their govern
ments. but this leaves the political con
trol of the island in the hands of non
property holders, non-taxpayers and the
illiterate and irresponsible classes of the
population.
This question has not yet been decided.
Gov. Magoon says that tihe protests from
the foreigners "call attention to the injus
tice of compelling them to participate In
the partisan strife resulting from election
contests and' express a grave fear that
they would be Injured by having the right
of franchise forced upon them. The mat
ter is still before the advisory law com
mission."
AMUNDSEN STIRS NORSEMEN.
They Are Confident He Will Discover
North Pole.
MrLAVA(J??. ??. Wis.. January 20.?
Wheo Gov. Davidson said yesterday that
Norsemen the woid over were looking
to- Capt. Roald Amundsen as the coming
discoverer of the north pole a demonstra
tion took place a.t the Hanover Street
Congregational Church which will be re
membered long by- those who were in at
tendance at the largest gathering of Nor
wegians ever held in the city. Although
he made no reference to his plans to dis
cover tlw pole in the" lecturc which he
gave. Capt. Amundsen later confirmed the
statement made by Gov. Davidson, say
ing that he would head an expedition in
101ft. .
He said he would make his start from
San Francisco and proceed through the
Bering strait.
"I do not expert to follow the course
taken by Dr. Fridtjof Nansen." said Capt.
Amundsen, "but of course 1 shall make
use of his experiences and information."
I
THE AWAKENING OF 1
HELENA RICHIE.
By MARGARET DELAND,
Author of "Dr. La vender's People/' "Old Chester Tales," Et:
(Copyright. 1906. 1006. bf Barpw * Brothers. All Right* R?Mrved.)
?? ' ? ? 1 ' 1 11
CHAPTER XXVII?Continued.
"Secrecy wouldn't do." he said. "To
get married and not tell is only whipping
Satan round the stump as far as Alice
is concerned. Ultimately It would make
double explanations. The marriage would
come out. somehow, and then the very
natural question would be: 'Why the devil
were they married secretly?" No. you
can't keep those things hidden. And as
for Alice, if she didn't think anything
else, she'd think I had fibbed to her. And
that would nearly kill her; she has a
perfect mania about truth! You see. It
leads up to the same thing: Alice's dis
covery that I havf been?like most men.
No. if it's got to be, it shall be open and
aboveboard."
She gasped with relief; his look of cold
annoyance meant, just for ttie moment,
nothing at all.
"I shall tell her that I have met a lady
with whom I was in love a long time
ago "
"Was in love?* Oh. Lloyd!" she broke
in with a cry of pain: at which intrusion
of sentimentality Lloyd Pryor said, with
ferocity; "What's that got to do with it?
I'm going to pay the piper: I'll tell
Alice thpt. or any other d?-d thing I
please. I'll tell her I'm going to he mar
ried in two or three months: I shall go
through the forfn of an engagement. Alice
won't like It. of course. No girl likes to
have a stepmother; but I shall depend on
you. Helena, to make the thing go as well
as possible. That's all I have to say."
He set his teeth and turning hls back
on her. threw his half-smoked cigar Into
the fire. Helena, cowering on the sofa,
murmured something of gratitude. Mr.
Pryor did not take *he trouble to listen.
"Well," hft said, "the next thing is to
get you away from this place. We've got
to stage the drama carefully, 1 can tell
you."
"I can go at once."
"Well, you had better go to New York;
what will you do with your youngster?"
he interrupted himself. "Leave htm on
Dr. Lavendar's doorstep, I suppose?**
"My youngster?" she repeated. "Do
you mean David?"
Mr. Pryor nodded absently; he was not
interested In David.
"Why," Helena said, breathlessly, "you
didn't suppose I was going to leave
David?"
At which, in spite of his preoccupation,
Pryor laughed outright. "My dear
Helena, even you can hardly be so fool
ish as to suppose that you could take
David with you?"
She sat looking at him, blankly. "Not
take David! Why, you surely didn't think
that I would give up David?"
"My dear," said Lloyd Pryor, "you will
either give him up or you will give me
up."
"And you don't care which!" she burst
out. passionately.
He gave her a deadly look. "I do care
which."
And at that she blanched, but clung
doggedly to his promise. "You must
marry me!"
"There is no must about it. I will. 1
have told you so. But I did not suppose
it was necessary to make your giving up
David a condition. Not that I mean to
turn the young m&n out, I'm sure. Only.
I decline to take him in. But. good
heavens, Helena," he added, in perfectly
genuine astonishment. "It isn't possible
that you seriously contemplated keeping
him? Will you please consider the eltect
upon the domestic circle of a very natural
reference on his part to your brother?
1 ou might as well take your servants
along with you?or your Old Chester doc
tor! Really, my dear Nelly." he ended*
banterlngly, "I should have supposed that
even you would have had more sense."
Helena grew slowly very white. She
felt as if caught in a trap, and vet the
amused surprise in Lloyd Pryor's face
was honest enough and perfectly friend
ly. "I cannot leave David here." she
said, faintly. And as terror and despair
and dunjb determination began to look
out of her eyes, the man beside her grew
gayly sympathetic.
"I perfectly understand how vou feel.
He is a nice little chap. But, of course,
you see it would be impossible?"
"I can't give him ur."
"I wouldn't," lie said, amiably. "You
can go away from Old Chester?of course
you must do that?and take him with you.
And I will come and see you as often a*
I can."
He breathed more freely than he had
for weeks; more freely than since the re
ceipt of that brief dispatch: "F. is dead,"
and the Initials H. R. 8o far from hav
ing used a sling and a smooth stftne from
the brook, the boy had been a veritable
armor bearer ?o the giant! Well, poor
Nelly! From her point of view it was,
of course, a great disappointment. He
hated to have her unhappy; he hated to
see suffering; he wished they could get
through this confounded Interview. His
sidewise, uneasy glance at her tense fig
ure betrayed his discomfort at the sight
of pain. What a pity she had aged so,
and that her hands had grown so thin.
But she had her old charm yet; certainly
she was still an exquisite creature in some
ways?and she had not grown too fat. He
had been afraid once that she would get
fat. How white her neck was; it was
like swan's down where the lace fell
open in the front- of her dress. For a
moment he forgot his prudent resolutions;
he put his arm around her and bent his
head to touch her throat with his lips.
But she pushed him away with a flam
ing look. "David saves you, does he?
Well, he will save me!"
Without another word she left him. as
she had left him once before, alone In the
long parlor, with the faintly snapping
fire and the darkness pressing against the
uncurtained windows. This time he did
not follow her to plead outside her closed
door. There was a moment's hesitation,
then he shook his head and took a fresh
cigar.
- "No," he said, "it's better this way."
CHAPTER XXVni.
. "If it was me that was doin' it." said
Sarah. "I'd send for the doctor."
"Well, but." Maggie protested, "she
might be mad."
"If it was me. I'd let her be mad."
"Well. then, why don't you?" Maggie
retorted.
"Send for him?" Sarah said, airily im
personal. "Oh. it's none of ray business."
"Did you even it to her?" Maggie asked.
In a worried way.
"I did- I says. 'You're sick. Mrs.
Richie,' I says. She looked like she was
dead. 'Won't I tell Oeorge to run down
and ask Dr. King to come up?" I says."
"An' what did she say?" Maggie asked,
absently. She l?new what Mrs. Richie
had said, because this was the fourth
time she and Sarah had gone over it.'
" 'No.' she says. 'I don't, want the doc
tor. There's nothing the matter.' And
she liko death! An' I says. 'Hill you see
Mr. Pryor. ma'am, before he goes?' And
she says. 'No,' she says; 'tell Mr. Prvor
that I ain't feelln' very well.' An' I
closed the shutters again an* come down
stairs. But If it was me. I'd send for Dr.
King. If she ain't well enough to see her
own brother?and him just as kind!"?
Sarah put her hand into the bosom of her
dress for a dollar bill?"Look at that!
And you had one. too. though he's hardlv
ever set eyes on you. If she ain't well
enough to see him, she's pretty sick."
"Well." said- Maggie, angrily. "I guess
I earned my dollar as much as yo\i.
Where would his dinner he without me? I
Thai's always the way. The cook ain't
seen, so she gets left out."
"You ain't.got left out this time, anv
how. He's a kind man: I've always said
so. And she said she wasn't well enough
to see him! Well, if it was me, I'd send
for Dr. King."
So the two women wrangled, each fear
ful of responsibility, until at last, after
Maggie had, twice gone upstairs and lis
tened at that silent door, they made up
their minds.
"David." Maggie said, "you go and wait
at the gate, and wh^ji tlie butcher's cart
comes along, you tell him you want on.
An' you go down street, an' tell him you
want off at- Dr. King's. An' you ask Dr.
King to come right along up here. Toll
him Mrs. Richie's real sick."
"If it was me. I'd let him wait 111! he
goes to school." Sarah began to hesitate;
"she'll be mad."
But Maggie had started in and meant
to see the matter through: "I^et her be
mad."
'"Well. It's not my dnin'." Sarah said,
with a fine carelessness, and crept up
stairs to listen again at Mm. Richie's
door. "Seemed like as If she was sort of
?cryin*!** she told Maggie. in an awed
whisper when she came down.
David brought his message to the doc
tor's belated breakfast table. William
"iad been up nearly all night with a very
*tck patient, and Martha had heon care
ful not to wake him in the morning. Ho
pushed his plate back, as David repe.ite.l
Maggie's words, and looked blankly at
the tablecloth.
"She's never really got over the shock
about Sam Wright's Sam. has she?"
Martha said. "Sometimes I almost think
she was?" Mrs. King's expressive pan
tomime of eyebrows and lips meant "In
love with him"?words not to be spoken
before a child.
"Nonsense!" said William King, curtly.
"No. I don't want any more breakfast,
thank you. my dear. I'll go and hitch
up."
Martha followed him to the back door.
"William, maybe she's lonely. I'm very
tired, but perhaps I d better go along with
you and cheer her tip?"
"Oh. no." he called back over his
stioulder; "it isn't necessary." Then he
added, hastily, "but it's very kind in you.
Marttia. to think of it."
"I'd just as lieves," sh? Jtosisted. flush
ing with pleasure.
He tried to get his thoughts in order
as he and Jinny climbed the hill. He
knew what, sooner or later, he must say
to Mrs. Richie, and he thought with re
lief that if she were really ill he could
not say It that day. But the sight of
David had brought his duty home to him.
He had thought about it for days, and
tried to see some way of escape, but
every way was blocked by tradition or
religion. Once he had said stumblingly
to Dr. Lavendar that it was wonderful
how little harm came to a child from bad
surroundings, and held his breath for the
reply.
"An innocent child in a bad home."
said Dr. Lavendar. cheerfully, "always
makes me think of a water I y growing
out of the mud."
"Yes!" said the doctor, "the mud doesn t
hurt It"
"Not the lily; but. unfortunately. Willy,
my boy, every child isn't a lily. I
wouldn't want to plant one in the mud
to see how it would grow, would you?"
And William admitted that he would
n6t.
After that he eveti put the matter to
his wife. "Martha, you're a sensible
woman; I'd like to ask you about a
case."
"Oh, well." said Martha, simpering. "I
don't pretend to any great wisdom, but I
do know something about sickness."
"This isn't sickness; It's about a chlt4.
Do you think a child is susceptible to the
Influence of an older person who is not
of the highest character? If. for in
stance. the mother was?not good: do you
suppose a child would be injured?"
"Not good?" said Martha, horrified.
"Oh. William! Somebody in Upper Ches
ter. I suppose?"
"But she is a devoted mother: you
couldn't be more conscientious yourself.
So do you think her conduct could do any
harm to a child?"
"Oh. Willy! A child In the care of a
bad woman? Shocking!"
"Not bad?not bad?" he said, faintly.
"Most shocking! Of course a child
would be susceptible to such influences.".
William drew arabesques on the table
cloth with his fork. "Well, I don't
know?" he began.
"I know!" said Martha, and began to
lay down the law. For if Martha? prided
herself upon anything, besides her com
mon sense, it was the correctness of her
views upon the training of children. But
she stopped long enough to say, "Wil
liam. please! the tablecloth." And Wil
liam put his fork down.
He thought of his wife's words very
often in the next few days. He thought
of them when David stood rattling the
knob of the dining room door and say
ing. "Maggie says please come and see
Mrs. Richie." He thought of them as
Jinny pulled him slowly up the hill.
Sarah was lying in wait for him at the
green gate; Maggie had sent for him. she
said, and having put the responnibility
where it belonged? she gave him what In
formation she could. Mrs. Richie wasn't
well enough to see her brother before he
went away on the stage: she wouldn't eat
any breakfast and she looked like she
was dead. And when she <Sarah) had
given her a note from Mr. Pryor. she read
It and right afterward kind of fainted
away like. An' when she come to. she
(Sarah) had said. "Don't you want the
doctor?" An' Mrs. Richie said "No."
"But Maggie was scared. Dr. King, and
she Just sfent David for you."
"Quite right," said William King. "L<et
Mrs. Richie know I am here."
He followed the woman to Helena's
door and heard the smothered dissenting
murmur within, but before Sarah, evi
dently cowed, could give him Mrs.
Richie's message that she was much
obliged, but did not wish?William en
tered the room. She was lying with her
face hidden in her pillows; one soft braid
fell across her shoulder, then sagged
down and lay along the sheet, crumpled
and wrinkled with a restless night. That
braid, with Its tendrils of little loose
locks, was a curious appeal. She did not
turn as' he sat down beside her. and he
had to lean over to touch her wrist with
his quiet Angers.
(.To be continued tomorrow.)
BUBNING WOMAN AT 'PHONE.
Switchboard Boy Heard Her Screama
and Sent Help.
NEW YORK. January 20. ?Willie, the
boy at the switchboard in the lower hall
of the Alyda apartments, at 2 West 94th
street, was just turning a chapter in a
novel yesterday afternoon when the tab
fell for Frank Henry's apartments on
the fourth floor. He jammed In the plug.
"Number?" he said, and he looked up ,
from the page with his forehead wrinkled,
for there was a strange gasping, gurgling
sound in *his ear. He thought the wires
were crossed and pulled out the plug.
The brass tab was still down and there
was a humming frons the buzzer. Willie
jammed in the plug again and bawled for
the number.
"Come?oh. for God's sake "
"Say. Jimmie" yelled Willie with a
w'hite face. "Run up to Mr. Henry's
rooms. Something's doing there. Some
body's got it bad and they're trying to
telephone."
Jlmmle jumped for the elevator. When
he got to the fourth floor he leaped out
and threw himself against the door of the
Henry apartment. He smelled smoke and
he heard fearful noises.
Jimmie br??ke th? door open and there
In the hall on the floor under the wang
ling telephone receiver he saw a woman
writhing In flames. Nothing but her fH?-e
was visible through the smoke and the
red tongue of rtre.
The boy gave a yell and threw a rug
about the burning woman. Others from
nearby apartments hurried in. They
brought fire extinguishers and sprajed
the carpet where it was burning about
the woman. After a doctor in the hous*?
had examined the sufferer he ordered a
call sent to the J. Wood Wright Hospital,
and an ambulance carried her away.
The woman was Mary .j. Nugent, a
servant employed by the Henry family,
who had gone into a i loset with a lamp
and overturned it upon herself. At the
hospital it was said she probably would
not recover.
TO PREVENT THE GRIP.
LAXATIVE RROMu QUININE tk*
ctaw. There is only oie "BROMO QCIK1M."
Look (or signatvre of E. W. CKOVE. 25c.

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