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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 31, 1908, Image 13

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DUST OF COLUMBUS
< ?
Proposed to Restore All to
Original Casket.
EFFORTS OF J. B. THACHER
Matter to Be Brought to Attention
of Santo Domingo.
DISPUTE OVER THE REMAINS
Removal to Havana. Thence to
Seville?Sensation Caused by
the Discovery of 1877.
RV WILLIAM E. CURTIS.
TCritteo for The Stnr ami the Chicago Reeord
Itrrald.
The Secretary of State has forwarded to
Fentori McCreery. United States minister,
to the republic of Santo Domingo, copies
of recent correspondence between Mr.
Robert Bacon, the assistant secretary, and
Mr. John Boyd Tliaeher of Albany. N. Y..
and has directed him to communicate the
subject matter of the same informally to
the Dominican minister of foreign r ela
tions for his information and for such ac
tion n? ho may think necessary to take.
It is a very unusual siib.jfct for diplomatic
correspondence, as it relates to the res
toration to the Cathedral of Santo Do
mingo of certain portions of t.he remains
ot Christopher Columbus which arc said
to have been removed from their recep
tacle In that cliitieh.
When Santo Domingo passed out of the
" control of the Spanish government in
17W> the Duke of Yeragua. the descendant
of Columbus, and the retiring officials re
quested permission to take wit>h thein the
remains of the discoverer of America,
whicli was granted, and they were trans
ported with royal honors to Havana,
where, for more than a century, they
were the greatest object of interest in the
cathedral of that city. One hundred and
. three years later, when t?he Spaniards
evacuated the island of Cuba, they made
a similar request of the government of
the United States and the alleged remains
were tak?n back to Spain, where they are
now lying under a magnificent monument
in the Cathedral of Seville.
Burial of Columbus.
Columbus died in an o'd hous?. No. 2
'Calle'Ancha de Magdalena. in Yalladolid.
Spain. May 20, 1306. His remains were
first d?posited in the Convent of San
Francisco in that city, and, in 1513. were
removed by members of his own family to
tk'ie vaults of the Carthusian monastery of
l.as Cuevas. near Seville. In 1337. upon
the application of Dona Maria de Toledo,
widow of his son. Diego Columbus, a royal
order was issued permitting their removal
to Santo Domingo, but for some reason it
was not carried out until 15-11. when they
were placed in the great cathedral. .
There 'has always been a dispute be
tween the people of Santo Domingo and
the Spaniards concerning the authenticity
of the remains which were carried_ to
Havana after the treaty of Basle in 17'.?."?.
Several volumes have been written on the
subject, the most important of which is
a report of the Royai Academy of History
at ??fadrld. which made an investigation
ard decided in favor of the claims of the
Cuban capital. The people of Santo Do
inir.fo. however, are convinced that the
coffin that was taken away contained tlie
remains of his son Diego, who succeeded
? him as admiral of the Indies.
The Discovery in 1877.
, On the, 14th of May. 1877. while the
fitiiedral at Santo Domingo w.is being
restored some workmen discovered on the
epistle side of the altar a metallic box.
? The arch-bishop was at once notified, ar.d
be directed that the box be removed in
ithe presence of a number of officials. It
was fpund to bear an inscription in Span
ish which reads;
? "The Admiral Don I.uis Colon. Duke of
Yeragua. Marquis of Jamaica."
This discovery caused great excitement.
On the opposite or gospel side of the altar
?two more crypts were disclosed. On-j was
empty, from which the coffin transported
to II a vara was - taken. The other con
tained a metallic box similar to that in
which the remains of Luis Columbus were
found. Within It were a quantity of dust,
a number of hopes, a portion of a skull,
a leaden ball and a silver plate about two
Inches long. It was supposed that these
were toe remains of Christopher Colum
bus. i?ecause or certain inscriptions on the
box.
The box was of lead, about a quarter
of an inch thick. It was eighteen inches
long, nine Inches wide ar.d ten inches
deep. On the front and on one end was
engraved the letter C: on the other end
;"i.e letter A. which was supposed to sig
r.ity "Cristoval Colon, admiral." tin Hie
top of tl.:? lid were tl.e letters "D. d? la A.
i*er A.." interpreted as "Descubridor de
? la America Prlmsr'Ahnirante." < Discover
er of America, the fisst admiral.)
J On the under side of the lid was u : itten
rn German text "Yllme Y Esd'. \ ..rot),
l>r. Cristoval Colon." (Illustriu.??- and re
uowncd man. Don Christopher Columbns.)
On one side of a silver plate, which ap
peared to have been screwed or bo'.ted to
the irodde of the box was inscribed. "I*
Cristoval Colon." which is supposed to
mean "l'rna Christoval Colon" (ttte
coffin of Christopher Columbus). On tne
other side of the plate were the words:
"I'a pie. d? los ltos del pmer Alto D.
Cristoval Colon D.." which arc decipher
ed :o be "l'rna perteneciente de los res
los del 'primer Ahivrante Don Cristoval
Colon. Descubridor." or, in English,
"t in belonging to the remains of the
lirst Admiral, Christopher Columbus.
"Discoverer."
The line dust iuto which the body had
"crumbled was carefully gathered up and
placed 111 a kittle casket of gold and
crystal, such as is used by ladies to keep
their jewels in. and laid back in the
leaden chest. The latter was then sealed
and inclosed in an octagonal case of
satlawood with glass panels, which was
secured with three locks, to which the
minister of public works, the archbishop
nnd the governor of the city have the
keys. The case was further protected by
broad b&nds of white ribbon sealed with
wa^ and stamped with the official seals
of the three officials named, so that it
may not be op?ned without the consent
aud presence of all of them. It w.is then
placed in a vault to the left of the altar.
Once each year, on the 10th of Sep
tember. the precious casket is exposed to
public view in the presence of the offi
cials of the Kovernment and the public,
wh^-n high mass is celebrated by the
archbfslkop for the repose of the soul of
the great discoverer.
Distribution of the Dust.
? While the dust was being transferred
from the leaden box to the jeweled cisket
in 1S77. Senor J. M. Castillo, who was as
sisting in the work, took out a pinch of
ihe dust. whicP.i he phued in a crystal
locket and afterward presented to Mrs. K.
l?. Snrjfent of New York city, from whom
it wax obtained by Mr. John Boyd Thacli
er. The archbishop of Santo Domingo
sent fi pinch of the du?t to the luiversity
of Pit.via. Italy, where Columbus is al
leged to have been e<l : -ated. and it is
there preserved in a crystal case. Another
pin^i of the dust was sent to the mayor
of f.Jenori. his birthplace, where it may be
s?c:i in the case which contains the "Co
d-x" of Columbus, one of the most impor
tant ard vaiuubie collections of manu
script* in the world, embracing the will of
th* riiseoverer in his own handwriting,
and t ie original of his contract with the
Spanish sovere!gns. There is also a pinch
of tlie dust in tin* Yaticari. and two or
three In other p'a-es. nine altogether, of
which Mr. Thacher ha* t>hree. and he de
stre.-- to lxave them ail collected and re
stored t.? the ca-ket in Santo Domingo,
as appears by the following letter recemly
received by Secretary Root:
. "Dear Sir: Some years ago. after long
invest lea tion. I bei-am* convinced that
;lie remains of Christopher Columbus are
still present in the Cathedral church at
San Domingo. These remains were found
thei# rluting some repairs to the Cathe
dral. September l<?. 1*77. and on that oc
casion and on the occasion of their r?
cx jfm i.na riuu which took place on tiie
(
\
?fr'X 4>^"t,?<8^>.<H^MSKp<t^K->?i8i???S>'???<g-<>ii?&?'?"j"t-?3*3"? *'!<?*??? <"i'?'frfrC""fr??'*? i1 ? 0"t '>C10? '>????i"?>|'??<???<???'
II
$1.50 Kid Qioves, 59c.
A special offering of Women's 2-claso and
8-bntton-length Sucdc and Glace Kid Gloves,
in black, white and all the wanted shades.
These gloves positively sell for Si i
and $1.50. A great special sale, for
Saturdav onlv, at much below cost
Open Until 9 O'Clock Tomorrow Night.
i'V'H
*
Veils and Veilings.
FINE QUALITY FISHNET VEILING,
in plain and dotted effects: black and colors;
the quality that sells for 25c
yard. At half price
*
t
*
REAOT-MADE CHIFFON VEILS. I'*
yards long; plain hemstitched border; In black
and colors: regular price is ?*c: reduced to
BEAUTIFUL. LACK VEILS IX PRETTY
dotted and floral effects; tlie price is regularly
f 1; now reduced to
49c
69c
*
?*
+
?
i
*
Mr. Mao,. Do You Realize What
This Sale Meaos?- AM Cloth In
at Exactly Half Price! . : ,
* .
If the Suit is marked to sell for $20, pay us$10, arid it's yours;
if the Overcoat has a $15 price tickct on it you can own it for $7.50!
That's the way the entire stock is going. Ever before hear of such
a bargain? You can take your choice from absolutely the entire
stocks, except the plain black suits.
Your Choice of Any Man's Suit
at Half Price!
Your Choice of Any Man's Over
coat at Half Price!
Your Choice of Any Youth's Suit
- at Half Price!
*
Your Choice of Any Youth's
Overcoat at Half Price!
Bargains
Hosiery.
MEN'S SEAMLESS BLACK HALF
Hose that sell regularly
at 12*io. In the Clearance
sale at
WOMEN'S l,V SEAMLESS BLACK
Hose; good and service
able quality; all sizes. For
the Clearance at
6%c
S BLACK
7%c
17c
.?
500 pairs of Men's Trousers that arc marked to
sell at $4. $4.50 and $5. All sizes. All now
Men's Wash Vests that sell at Si.00 and Sr.50"; sizes
34. 35- 36. 37, 38. Reduced to
Men's Flannel Vests in neat stripes and checks; sizes
tO Sold for a ....................... ........
Men's Vests in black thPbet, blue serges and mix
tures, from suits worth up to S20; sizes 34, 35
Two Full-dress Suits that sold for $30; size 36
stout onlv. Reduced to
Men's Cloth Full-dress Vests; sizes 36 and 37
only. Sold for S3.50. Reduced to
50
? 50c
..98c
.50c
$112.5?
$1.50
MEN S HIGH-GRADE
Mercerized Hose; all sizes. :t
pairs for 00c. Pair
MENS EXTRA GOOD QUALITY
Fancy Hose, in all the latest styles
and colors: have never ^
sold under 19c pair. Clear- II II ?
ance price
ALL THE MEN'S FANCY HOSE
that have been selling as high "^/r>
as $1; many styles and kinds; 9C*
in the Clearance al
MEN'S GOOD AND SERVICEABLE
Quality White Sole Hose:
these hose sell regularly
at 15c pair. For the Clear
ance reduced to
934c
For Girls and
Children.
For These Fine Glasses.
*
alter 4:30
p.m. we.
I
beautiful. Clear
C ? " / "
Glasses; with engraved
Tomorrow
will sell these.
Blown
bands, as shown in illustration, at
2'Xc. They are clear, fine, smooth
glass; absolutely.perfect, not "s$c
*: * . - _
oiids full 8-ounce capacity. None:
can be delivered, v ? ?
t
*
??>
w
ft
?
?I*
<r>
K?
<z>
?*?
<?
?*?
t
AH the Stylish Qioves at
Sacrifice Prices.
WOM EN S 1t> - B1JTTON-LENGTH
White Glace Kid Gloves: /jo Q
sold in every stor? at $4. >) fj
For Saturday only at ^
98c
WOMEN'S s- BUTTON-LENGTH
Kid Gloves, In blue and green; sell
at $l.r??> 11 s 11 a I I y. F o ??
the Clearance tomorrow
MEN'S $1..V> *KID GLOVES. IN VA
rious shades of tan. In the
Clean Sweep Clearance /y(*
at a
WOMEN'S WHITE KID GLOVES,
in all sizes; a?ll!ng always at ?,?>
$l..">t?. For the Clearance at /W
nearly lialf ^
women's s - button-Length
Black. White, Green and
Blue Kid Gloves; have a
never sold under $2. A 5iL I.S
big saving at
WOMEN'S 12 AND lti BUTTON
Length Suede Kid Gloves in black and
white only: sold usually ** ^/nv
i ^.51.39
.98 Suits -
$2.98 Suits
$3.98 Suits and Overcoats
$4.98 Suits and Overcoats
$5,98 Suits and Overcoats
$6.98 Suits and Overcoats
$7.98 Suits and Overcoats
$8.98 Suits and Overcoats
$9.98 Suits and Overcoats
$110.98 Suits and Overcoats
Boys' Madras and Domet Flannel Waists..'..
I
ill
All the$2
Wash Suits.... /!<34^
Remarkable Underpricing
in Women's Wear and Furs!
For the last day of the Clean Sweep Sale the offerings in the J,
Women's Department anc truly wonderful. You'll never have 1*
another such chance? t - ?
Very Stylish Striped Broadcloth
and Plain-color Serge Suits; excellently tailored and up
to-date. The selling price has been $30. Clearance price....
3 -QUALITY
to 11 years:
$2.98
CHOICE OF ANY GIRL'S COAT IN
the store, no matter how
fine; none reserve
many styles
GIRLS" EXTRA, GOOD -QUALITY
Heavy School Coats: 10 to 11 years:
finely tailored. Were
$7.08. For the Clean
Sweep Sale
GIRLS' WASH DRESSES; MADE
of best fast-color chambrays Erf/TV
and ginghams. For the
Clean Sweep Sale
LONG AND SHORT BEDFORD
Cord Coats. Some sold
as high as So. For choice
in the sale'....?
INFANTS' WHITE SLIPS;
soft and fine; short and long.
Special for Saturday
GIRLS' CLOTH DRESSES. LINED;
best material: neatly
trimmed : worth $5;
sizes 6 to 14 years. Spe
cial
$1.98
25c
LINED;
$1.98
A handsome lot of Women'sSuits,
in fine brondclath; plain, black, blue and brown. Not a
suit In this lot sold under $25. Clearance price
For the Clean Sweep SaEe you can
take your choice from all the suits in the store, including
the very fir.eat: none reserved: rich broadcloth and finest
fabrics. Worth up to $70. >Pale price for any one
$112,
$117.
?I
???
?1
$39
n*
Handsome Ecru and White Lace
an<l Xet Waists, made over silk. Have always Fold at S3.
Kot* clearance????? #????#?????????#?????#?????????????????????????????????
Choice of 1100 Fine Sampie Skirts,
in the season's most desirable styles and fabrics. Sold u;i to
S10. For the Ciean Sweep, a great bargain at
50
49
$3.981
f
?;>
*5*
Choice of 75 Finest Dress Skirts, in ao X
voiles, panamas and novelty fabrics. Sold at $15 regularly. (Q) V
For the Clean Sweep at V
ciuise
to
Large Sot of Women's Famous Mar= ^ ^
ise Shirt Waist Suits': splendidly made, and worth from *5 V
$7.oU. To be closed out at ~
ExtrenieBy Stylish EveningWraps;^ |i /n\ g/n\ |
in garnet, golden brown and black; were ?30 and S40. ||
fo be closed out in the sale at f... "?
The Very StySish and Handsome ?
"Fluffy Ruffles" Feather Boas: have been selling at *6.08 o 'V
A number of Ermsne Fur - Scarfs and ^
several Dark Fur Scarfs that have sold l ight along at# *5. ^
To be closed out in the sale at
Misses' Long Gray Frieze Tourist
Coats, with black velvet collar; the selling price
$12.98. Clearance price.
has been
All Boys' Clothing Going
at. Half Price.
One of the biggest and best features of the Clean Sfcveep Sale
is that the Boys' Clothing is being sacrificed at half what it is
worth and always sells for. Small wonder that the selling is
breaking all records. Absolutely no exceptions save the plain
black and plain blue suits.
99c
$1.49
$2.49
$2.99
$3.49..
$3.99
$4.49
$4.99
$5.49
.. \2yiz
Boys' Wool Knee Pants; sizes 4, 8 and 9; worth 69c and 75c. .29c
w * ... *" "
A Great Wash Wear Purchase.
wish Suits.S H o49
$2.95
V
tr>
*5'
V
...
i
?i'
. *s>
V*
V
Y*
*!'
V
i
Groceries-at Ciean Sweep
Reductions.
The following" reduced prices arc for three days?Saturday, !?
Monday and Tuesday: *
SMALL. LEAN SUGAR-jCURED HAMS 12'?c
1 MINCE MEAT: liARGE GLASS JARS 12'<:e
BONELESS BACON 1
IMPORTED KIPPERED HERRING
GRANLLATED SLGAR?????>? ?????? ???*
S HRIVER S CORN
PITTED PRUNES; 15-OZ. PKG
Ql AI\.ER CORN iVIEAI^? 3*LB. FIvG????
TOMATOES i ''WIFE S PRIDE ???.???????#??#???????#???????????????? ?*
PEAS l SHRIVER b
VAN CAMP'S CATSUP: PT. BOTTt.ES
RUM FORD S BAKING POT\ DER *. Xm LB. TINS. 22c
VINEGAR. BOrTLB*. .'. . .*??. .i.t......?..
PI R E LA RD; o ~LB. P AI I.S
* PIN EAPPLE; 10c CANS. ? .l.*?. ?.*.?. ?. ??. ?"?
QL AKE R OATS; LARGE PKG .*. ? ? 1 Oe
SEEDED RAISINS; 1 -LB. PIvG* ..................... 1?c
CUT RR A NTS; 1 -LB. PKG .Y. <9?*
25c ONYX COFFEE 1 * ??<'
I X L STARCH 3e
BREAD; FRESH TWICE DAILY 3>y4c
FRUIT AND POUND CAKES; 2 LBS. EACH.
FRUIT CAKE: .VLB. SIZE
Belts and Neckwear,
The latest fad?Mull
Elastic arid Kid Belts; all
have steel studs; all colors, in
cluding the new tan: the quality
sold at 98c. For clear- 50c
ance
?
?
a
Bows *v
with colored dots; also silk, lace ?
*h
w
and net bows; the usual
50c quality for half
25c
same day of the following year. Septem
1 >er 10, 1ST*, several minute portions were
extracted?nine portions in all?and pre
sented to ^public and private recipients.
Of the*-* nine I have collected three and
a fourth is at Jiand. 1 contemplate the
restoration of all nine portions to the
leaden box in the Cathedral ?tt San Do
mingo. where the main portion of the
body now lies. Tire municipality of Genoa
and the University of Pavia each, possess
a portion, while the Vatican Is ?-ai?3 to ex
hibit a crystal vase holding another small
, portion of tlie Venerated aslTes.
"'I write to ask it the Department of
State would institute an inttfiiry arf to the
willingness of the several public reposi
tories in Italv to restore the dust now In
their keeping to mingle with the larger
portion of the bone* and ashes of the
discoverer in the island of Santo Do
mingo? _
"Of -collide, if it be true that tlis veri
table ifmains are in the cburch ai San
Domingo, the remains at Seville which our
government consented tf> have removed
from Havana are not the true relics of
the first admiral, but. probably, those of
the second adnjiral. his son Diego. 1
simpl.v mention this, lest the government
of the United States in having, directly
i or Indirectly, identified the Havana re
j mains, might now be in embarrassment
by interesting itself in my efforts to units
in one repository the several portions of
the discoverer's body. Yours with great
respect. JOHN BOVD THACJiER."
State Department's Action.
Mr. Hicon wrote Mr. Thaeher i?) reply
that lie "could not well see how this
government eonld make the proposition
suggested to the University of Pavia. the
municipality of Genoa or the Vatican,
but said tliiit the department would be
willing to forward a copy of his letter to
Mr. McCreery. tin* Amerlcjn minister at
Santo Domingo, for informal communi
cation to the Dominican minister of for
eign affairs, so that that government
might take the initiative if it Tlesired to
J do so. Whereupon Mr. Thaeher responded
j as follows:
"In reply to your favor of January 4, 1
respectfully ask you to forward a copy
of my letter of December '27. 1*)7. to Mr.
McCreetv. the American minister at San
to Domingo City, for informal communi
cation to the Dominican minister of for
i eign affairs. ?
i "1 beg you to so qualify my letter, or
to so qualify your interpretation thereof,
i as to leave open the propriety of my re
? storing the particle of the remains of
Columbus now in my possession, should
' the possessors of other portions decline
! such a restitution as 1 propose. *
"logically. It' I believed in the propriety
: of piously restoring ail parts, or any part,
of the remains to their principal reposi
tory. I ought not to l<e governed by what
others may do. Sentimentally, however,
if Italv Is to retain possession of such
particles of the sAcred dust as are-with
in her territory, why should not our coun
try retain similar relics?
"I have the honor to resr.
"Your obedient servant.
"JOHN BOYD THACHKR."
r
Mr. Tliacher's good intentions will be
' communicated to the government of Santo
Domingo, and we will doubtless hear from
Mr. MeCreeiy concerning its wishes and
decision. The disposition of previous
I administrations at Santo Domingo has
been to mnke a? m\ich pecuniary profit out
of the sacred dust of the discoverer an
risible. At.the time of the world's fair
in Chicago the president of that country
offered to rant or sell them to the .ex
position authorities, and that proposition j
being deeiined. he attempted to arrange
for their exhibition in tlie Convent of i
La Robida for an admission fee. That
proposition was also rejected, but the re
mains of Columbus were represented J
| there b.v the particles then belonging to
Mrs. Sargent of New York, with her ap
proval.
JOINT CEBEMONY.
Army and Navy Garrisons to In
stall Officers tfonday Evening.
With music and oratory and other in
teresting features-the newly ejected offi
cers of three of the local garrisons of
tlie Army and Navy I'nidn, f. S. A., will |
be installed next Monday evening at 8
o'clock, in G. A. R. Hall, 1412 Pennsyl
vania avenue. The garrisdns are: Ad
rhiral David D. Porter. No. ?: Gen. Wil
liam F. Barry, No. 26, and Col. Theodore
Roosevelt. No. 74.
Scrgt. John J. Strain,> formerly of the
! "Fighting Ninth." United States Infan
j try. who is chairman of the committee on
I arrangements, says tlie following noted
? men are expected to be present: Sena
tor Nathan B. Scott, West Virginia; Rep
resentative Albert Fi. Dawson, iowa;
Representative George E. Waldo, New
York: W. K. Andrews, auditor of'.the
Treasury Department; Capt. Richmond
Pearson llobeon. Col. M. A. Winter and
others.
Gen. Andrew S. Burt, lT. S. A., will' be
j the presiding officer, and the following
: program will'be given:
Opening song. ' My Country. 'Tis" of
? Tliee," by the audience, ltd by Mrs. Inez
; Seymour MeConnell; address of welcome,
C. M. Shinn; song, selected, Aug. . F.
Broacker; address, Senator Natiuwi B.
; Scott of West Virginia; selection on the
i mandolin. John A. Mitchell; address, Rep
| rc.sentative Albert F. Dawson of Iowa:
! Washington's noted soprano soloist, Mrs.
? Inez Seymour MeConnell; installation. In
! stalling officer. Capt. James Campbell.
! past commander Admiral D. D. Porter
) Garrison, No. ?l; address. W. E. Andrews.
auditor Treasury Department; "The
Drummer Boy of lSfll." Comrade Spring
steen; Miss Florence B. Callahan, elocu
tionist: William J. O'Contiell. champion
I sand jig dancer; Prof Charles Kohler,
Washington's favorite; song, selected,
Joseph F. Sullivan. Prof. John Niblack,
accompanist.
The committees in chaarge of tiie in
stallation and entertainment .are as fol
lows:
Committee of arange:nents?John J.
Strain, chairman; J. L. King. Aug.' F.
Broacker, D. J. Preston. Van A. ?al:n.
Dr. T. E. Lee. C. W. Blush. W. J. Har
bison. J. F. Sullivan. Reception commit
tee?Capt J. Walter Mitchell, chairman;
] Dr. Charles V. Pet leys, Edward J.
; Bureli.
; The officers and members of the De
partment of the Potomac, G. A. R.,'.the
i several camps of Spanish War Veterfeis,
Other patriotic'societies and th? public
I have been Invited to l?e~ present.
STATEMENT ISSUED TODAY
TOBACCO TRUST DISCLAIMS RE
SPONSIBILITY FOR RAIDS.
None of Its Product Purchased in
Affected Territory?Not Opposed
to Farmers' Associations.
NKW YOI'K. January So.?Relative to
the recent disturbances in Kentucky, the
American .Tobacco Company has issued
the following- statement: "In Kentucky
there are several distinct types of to
bacco grown?burley tobacco. Green river
tobacco and dark .tired tobacco. The
American Tobacco Company is a large
buyer of burley tobacco, using approxi
mately fio per cent of the total production.
It uses also large quantities of Green
river tobacco, taking, perhaps, a third
of the total production. Of the dark flred
tobacco the American Tobacco Com
pany uses substantially none, but .the
American Snuff Company, in which com
pany the American Tobacco Company
owns stock. uBes about 13 per cent of the
total production.
"There has been no disorder in Ken
tucky in the hurley tobacco growing sec
tion: there has been very little disorder
in the Green river section, but the dis
order lias been in the dark fired section
of Kentucky and Tennessee?at Hopkins
Ville. Rus-ellviilo, Clarksvllle und other
|M>inls. This dark tfred tobacco is bought
principally by buyers representing the
| tobacco manufacturing, government mo
i nopoiies of Italy. France and Spain, but
to some extent by the American Snuff Coin
i pany? and to some extent by the Imperial
j Tobacco Company of Great Britain. The j
aftuirs of .the American Tobacco Com- i
I pany. tlx? Imperial Tobacco Company and '
I the American Snuff Company have been
i under government investigation for more
| than two yea*;s. . s ?
Access to All Books.
'The Department of Commerce and
I Labor has had av-ress to all the buoks
ind papers of these comptfiies; employes
and oncers of tli?- companies have been
before numerous grand juries and equity
examiners. The fullest possible examina
tion has been made by. all of these
agencies into all Cine hiding the most pri
vate) letter books and other papers of
these companies, and there has been ,
tin- most thorough examination and cross
f xamlnatlon of their officers and em
ployes. it is inconceivable that if there
exists or . had ever existed any combina
tion of buying interests it should not have
been disclosed/ The fact is that there j
exists no such combination. No interest ;
In any way connected or allied with the I
American Tobacco Company is in com
bination with any other buying interest.:
no Understanding, agreement, arrange
ment or combination f-xtsts between the
American Tobacco Company or American '?
Snuff Company ami the Imperial Tobacco;
Company, or between any of these com- !
panies and any government or other pur- i
chaser.
"It is simply *and wholly untrue that
there is any contest between the tobacco
growers or tobacco dealer? in Kentucky
and the so-called tobacco trust. Where I
disorder lias occurred the so-called to
banco trust Is the smallest factor in the ;
purchase of tobacco. Where the so-called !
tobacco trust is the largest purchaser of
tobacco there has been 110 disorder or
lawlessness.
Tobacco Prices Higher Now.
"As a matter of fact also, the prices
now being paid for leaf tobacco grown j
in Kentucky and elsewhere are very much
higher than they were ten years ago, and ;
their trend has bepn. constantly upward!
since the so-called tobacco trust was or- j
ganized.
"The land 011 which tobacco is grown
can be used to grow other crops: hurley
tobacco Is * grown on the famous blue j
grass lands, the Virginia leaf ds largely
grown 011 land well adapted to the
growth of cotton. It Is inconceivable that
the s?-called tobacco trust (even If it had
a monopoly in the purchase of tobacco,
which It has not. not being the purchasar
directly or indirectly of half the tobacco
produced In the United States) would at
tempt to depress the price of leaf and
thus drive the farmers to the^e other
crops.
"Tiie so-called tobacco trust is con
stantly buying tobacco In Kentucky and
elsewhere, ajid is always ready to pur
chase tobacco from any one. whether an
individual or association, that has it fofr
sale. It has never thrown any obstacle in
the way of the organization or success of
any of tlie so-called farmers' assocla
tions.'.'
NEWS OF FREDERICKSBURG.
Death of Prominent Resident?Gen
eral and Personal Items.
S(N?eixl t'orren)>oiiileuce of The Star.
FREDERICKSBURG, Va..
January ;su. lws.
Edgar W. Mills, a member of the city
council, ex-president of the Business
Men's Association, and a prosperbus
merchant, died of the grip yesterday in
tills city after an illness of three days.
He was aged thirty-four years. Mr.
Mills was very active in his efforts to
improve the town in every way. Through
his . efforts the appropriation for the
dredging of the Rappahannock river was
increased considerably last year. It was
also through his activity that an appro
priation was made at the last session
of Congrc-ss for a public building for
this city. Mr. Mills wa* an advocate of
the repeal of the present law in Virginia
prohibiting the paralleling of the R. K.
and P. railroad and had spent a greater
portion of the past few weeks lobbying
in behalf of the repeal of the bill. He
was a prominent Elk. One brother.
Willie D. Mills of Washington, and a
half-slriter. Mrs. Yerby of Washington^
a half-brother. Joseph Mills, and his step<
mother of this city survive him.
? A suit was entered in the corporation
s
court of this cits' yesterday by Mrs. Alma
Sullivan of Quantico, through her attor
ney. against the Richmond, Frederleks
biirg and Potomac railroad for for
alleged personal injury. She claims she
was thrown to the ground by the~<?tart
Ing of the/train before she alighted at
Quantico last fall.
The public school building at btaftord
Court House was destroyed by Are yes
terday evening. Originated from an
overheated flue. No insurance.
R. E. Mountjoy of Mount. Stafford
county, charged with selling whisky
without a license, was given a hearing
yesterday before United States Com
missioner W. W. Ilutzuer in this city#and
held for the United States grand jurj.
GOOD SHIP TAFT SUNK.
Steamer That Hit Her Went on?All
Hands Saved.
NEW YORK. January 31.?.V message
to the United Wireless Telegraph Com
pany from the Clyde Line steamshto Oo
rnanclie, due at this port today from
Jacksonville and Charleston, says she
picked up at 1 o'clock yesterday morning
off the lower North Carolina coast Capt.
James T. Fales and nine men of the four
masted schooner Helen E. Taft. bound
from Baltimore to Galveston. The caat
aways were in the schooner's yawl and
had been adrift about flye hours. Capt.
| Fales said the Taft had been run into by
; a coastwise steamship, which kept on her
[ course after the accident. The schooner
sank twenty minutes after she had been
rammed and all hands took to the yawl.
No one was hurt, and the steamship ap
parently was not damaged.
The Taft measured 1.107 tons and was
built at Tliomaston. Me., whence she
hailed, in 1904. She was owned by J. B.
Crocker of Thomaston.
SNATCHED HER MUFF.
Daughter of Bishop Paret Victim of
Negro Thief on Street.
BALTIMORE, January 31.?Miss Adelia
Paret. daughter of Right Rev. William
Paret. the Protectant Episcopal Bishop of
Maryland, had a sealskin muff, contain
ing her pocketbook. in which there was
$5. snatched from her by a negro on the
pavement of the Madison Avenue M. E.
Church. Madison and Lafayette avenues,
about <1:13 o'clock Wednesday evening.
The police of the northwestern district
were notified and are making every ef
fort to capture the {guilty parly.
Th* negro was of medium build and ap
peared to i?e about twenty years old. He
wore a light suit of clothes and was
rather light in color. While it was not
entirely dark at the time, and the street
lamps were lit. it was impossible to obtain
a definite description of the man, owing
to the fact that the crime was committed
so suddenly.
Dead Man Named by Gov. Crothers.
STATEHOU8E, A ANNAPOLIS. January
?1.?Gov. Crothe-s surprised the senate
yesterday by submitting the name of *a
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?lead man as one of the board of man
agers of the house of refuge. He nomi
nated among others the late Col. Charles
B. McLean of Baltimore county: who was
a member of the board at the time of hi*
death. The other nine who were pro
posed are: J. P. II. Gorsuch of Baltimore
county. William M. Abbott of Anne Arun
del county, James K. Williams of Mont
fomery county, John W. Renahan of St.
lary county, William B. Davis of Cecil
??ountv, Wifllam B. Baker and William
8. Forwood. jr.. of Harford county. Hope
H. Barroil of- Kent county and John O.
Rogers of Howard county. All of thes-?
were referred to the committee on execu
tive nomination*.
?

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