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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 19, 1909, Image 20

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LOCAL MENTION.
AMUSEMENTS TONIGHT.
New National?"The Thief," 8:15 p.m.
Belasco?Lew Fields in "The Girl Behind
the Counter." 8:15 p m.
Columbia?Chauncey Olcott in "Ragged
Robin." 8:15 p.m.
Chase's? Polite vaudeville, 8:15 p.m.
New Academy?"Sold Into Slavery," 8:15
p.m.
New Lyceum?"The Brigadiers," 8:15
p.m
Gayety?'"The Night Owls," S:15 p m.
Majestic?Continuous vaudeville and
moving pictures. 7:iW p.m.
Altamont Spring Water.
"Of exceptional purity."?Dr. McDonnell.
Tate chemist, .Md.
The Great Bear Is an Ideal Table
water. Office. 336 R n.<?. Phone X. 4373.
C. A. Muddiman & Co.
Artistic Electric and Gas Drop bights,
Natl. Inverted Lights. Art Domes.
1201 G st. 616 12th st.
Great Fire Sale.
The Fair. S18 7th.
Ten days to sell stock of housefurnlshnss,
china, glass, toys, hardware.
To Make a Success of Your
i bating dish gadierings let "Old Glory"
leeompany the rarebits, oysters, etc. This
superior dark beer finds favor with all.
Phone W. t.V?, Abner-Drury Brew. Co.
Exceptionally Fine Pies.
The cleverest skill and the best ingrefter.ts
are employed in making Holmes'
Delirious Homemade Pie*. All favorite
kinds, delivered direct. 2t>c. Homemade
Milk Bread, Holmes' Bakery. 1st and
K sts. Phones Linen. 1440 and 1441.
CITY AND DISTRICT.
Mrs. Margaret Hughes. forty-three
years of age. of 1221 11th street northnest
was struck and knocked down by
ar No ::il? of the Le Droit Park line
-hortly after o'clock yesterday afternoon
at hth and E streets northwest, re?
eiving a lacerated wound of the scalp
and injuries to her right foot. The injured
woman was removed to the Emergency
Hospital in the ambulance, where,
it is stated today. Iter condition is improved.
Marion Augustine, five years of age.
of 41M 11 street northwest was run over
yesterday afternoon by a wagon in front
of her home, receiving a slight injury
o her left leg. She was taken to her
home by friends.
Eva Peak fifty-six years of age. of 701
H street northwest fell from a ladder yesterday
morning in her home and received
injuries to her eye and leg. The first
precinct patrol was summoned later in the
day to remove iter to a hospital, but she
refused to leave home. Her injuries are
said to bo slight.
?
Results Only Count.
A young man just starting in the real
estate business said as he handed In
several classified ads at The Star office
counter: "I am doing this on the advice
of a friend old in the business. He told
me that he put ail his advertising in
newspapers only, and that it was his
experience that results from The Star's
advertisements as compared to those in
the other local newspapers were as ten
to one."
Burton Holmes on New Japan.
Another large audience at the New Masonic
Temple Auditorium yesterday afternoon
testified to the popularity of the
Burton Holmes series of illustrated lectures.
The wonderful transition of the
Japanese city life of Tokio and Yokohama
was shown in views both interesting
and instructive. Despite the wide
range of subjects covered by the Holmes
pictures the auditors were whirled along
from point to point and treated to scenes
and descriptions in a bewildering yet
captivating manner.
The next lecture will be Old Japan.
Owls Install Officers.
Officers were installed for the coming
year and a rousing banquet held last night
by Washington Lodge, No. P8, American
Order of Owls. About 200 guests and
members attended, including visitors from
the Baltimore and Alexandria nests. The
new officers are: ITesldent, Wtlliam E.
Evans; vice president. Jesse T. C'arr; warden,
C. A. Scheuch; secretary, George W.
Solers; treasurer, Edward S. Schmid.
Owen-Tailored Overcoats
are standard for quality and style. 42G 11th.
?Advt.
Oas Employes Meet.
Installation of officers of the Washington
Gas Light Company Beneficial Association
was held last night. Following
the ceremony a musical program was
tendered and refreshments served. Timothy
Costello gave clever imitations of
nirds and animals. The officers are:
President. Thomas L. Holden; secretary,
H. G. Ott, and treasurer. G. M. Whitwell.
Attacked by Dog; Sues Owner.
Alleging that November 8 last she was
attacked, knocked down and twice bitten
by a dog belonging to Peter Thomas,
Rosa E. J. Keene has filed suit in the
District Supreme Court to recover J1.50C
damages from the owner of the dog. She
declares the dog was negligently allowed
to run at large unmuzzled. Attorneys
A. B. Webb and Edwin Forrqst represent
the plaintiff.
Georgetown Star Branch.
Pride's Drug Store, 28th and P sts.
r..w? receives "Want Ads" for The Star
at 1 cent a word.
Report Sale of Residence.
w tmge, limbs & Daniel, real estate
brokers, have sold for John Scrivenei
premises Mil Gth street, between II and ]
streets northeast. The house is a twostory
brick, with six rooms, bath and
modern appurtenances. It occupies a loi
lhxlki feet to a rear alley. It is the purpose
of the purchaser, Mrs. Mary J,
J.*win. to occupy the premises as hei
residence. It is understood that the
price was $M,600.
Killed at Perryville, Md.
A message was received yesterday
by Mr. J. C. Simpson, superintendent ol
the local tire alarm service, telling of the
killing of iiis uncle. T. R. Simpson ai
Perryville. Md. He was killed by i
railroad train. The deceased, who wat
about fifty-five years of ago. had a mint
her of friends in this city. Thre<
nephews of the dead man reside here
They are J. C.. R. L and W. A. Simpson
Indiana Society Election.
officers for the ensuing year will b<
elected at the meeting of the Indian*
Society of Washington to be held at th<
Washington Club. 17H? I street, thl
evening. Col. Elijah W. Halford. forme
private secretary to President Harrison
will speak, and a musical program wil
be carried out.
Rough Riding at Fort Myer.
There will be a special "drill In the ridinj
hall at Fort Myer Friday at 2:30 o'elocl
for the benefit of the athletic association
The 1.'tth Cavalry, which is now at th
post, has been ordered to the Philippine!
so the time in which the public can enjo;
the rough riding stunts of this organiza
tIon is limited. The drill will be particl
jvat -d in by Troops K. F and G of th
lftth. assisted by Batteries D and E of th
bd Field Artillery.
A Money-Making Bank Account
Is worth having. Start your funds ti
work In hanking dept. of Fninn Trust Co.
trsli anil H sts. Interest paid on all ao
co\jnt?. subject to check. Gov't .supervision
?Advt.
I , .
?
KEPT BUSY BY SMALL FIBES
FIREMEN HAVE MANY RUNS
OVER SLIPPERY STREETS.
Half a Dozen Genuine Calls Answered
and One False Alarm
Sent In.
The fire department was kepi busy yesterday
afternoon and last night answering
alarms for a number of small fires,
and In one instance a false alarm. Although
the streets were slippery no accidents
to the fire apparatus occurred
| No. 5 Chemical Company responded to
a local alarm about rt o'clock for a fire in
the home of Arthur Ferguson, 314 Raleigh
street. Congress Heights, and owned blithe
17. 8. Realty Company. The flames.
wntch were caused hy trie upsetting m an
oil stove, were extinguished after about
$3.1 damage had been done to furniture
and house.
An alarm was sounded from box 603,
22d street and Rhode Island avenue
northeast, about 4 o'clock for a*fire in Odd
Fellows' Hall. 2226 Rhode Island avenue.
The first floor of the building, which was
occupied by John Miller as a feed store,
was partly destroyed. The cause of the
flumes is unknown.
An overheated stove in the home of
John Simons, 021 K street northwest,
shortly before 6 o'clock, called out No. 6
engine company. The flames were extinguished
before any damage resulted.
While playing with matches in the home
of Mary Hale. 204 13th street southeast,
one of her children set fire to a mattress
and caused a slight blaze. The flames
were extinguished by citizens.
Box 173, 10th and D streets northw'est.
was pulled about 8:20 o'clock for a supposed
fire In the sign shop of Jacob Goldsmith.
924 D street northwest. Upon the
arrival of the fire department it was
found that Mr. Goldsmith was starting a
fire In a stove, and the smoke which had
come out of the windows had attracted
some one who thought the building was
on fire and turned in an alarm.
A reflection from an open grate attracted
a passer-by last night who
thought there was a fire In the Department
of Justice, 15th and L. streets northwest.
and turned In an alarm from box
149, which brought out the water tower,
several engines and truck companies.
A false alarm shortly before 7 o'clock
gave the fire department a hard run, when
box 651, at 12th and D streets northeast,
was sounded by some unknown person.
The police are endeavoring to locate the
person who turned in the alarm.
A small blaze was caused yesterday afternoon
In the bacteriological laboratory
of the health department. District building.
when a lighted match was carelessly
thrown into a waste paper basket. T. F.
Ranney, an employe, discovered the
flames, and in extinguishing the blaze had
his hands slightly burned. He was treated
at the Emergency Hospital.
A Minimum of Ash With a Maximum
of heat units Is a characteristic of
our special one-colliery coals. J. Maury
Dove Company.?Advt.
ENJOY A SLEIGH RIDE.
Two Young Men Make Use of Outfit
Belonging to Another.
Two unidentified young men enjoyed a
sleigh ride last night at the expense of
John Copperthite of-3275 Prospect avenue.
The sleigh was left near the curb in the
hnclnpta section of the cltv and when its
, __ ? ? ___
owner w-as readv to start homeward he
was surprised to find that it had disappeared.
It was learned by the police that an outfit
answering that belonging to Mr. Copperthite
had been seen going through
the eastern section of the cltv, and at an
early hour this morning Constable Ricks,
at Beltsville, Prince George county, Md.,
telephoned the police that he had recovered
the horse and sleigh, the outfit
having been abandoned on the road by
two young men. He cared for the horse
until Detective Cox went there today with
a representative of its owner and got
it.
Oriental Bug Sale Tomorrow.
The sale of oriental rugs and carpets
from Keresey & Co., New York, opens tomorrow
at 11 and 3, and continues Thursday
and Friday at the same hours, at
Sloan's. 1407 G street. This collection
embraces rugs of the finest weaves in all
colors, sizes and designs, fully warranted
by Messrs. Keresey & Co. Rooms comfortable
and seats provided for patrons.?
Advt.
FUNERAL OF MBS. M. H. HITT.
___ ?
Body to Be Sent to Chicago Aftei
Services Here.
Funeral services for Mrs. Mary II. Hitt
wife of Isaac R. Hitt, who died yesterday
morning at her home, 1334 Columbls
road, will be held at the residence this
afternoon at 5 o'clock. *Rev. Joseph Daw
son. pastor of Calvary M. E. Church, wll
officiate. The interment will be in Ros<
Hill cemetery, Chicago, 111.
; Mrs. Hitt was seventy-eight years o!
age, and was one of the best known work
ers in the Methodist Church in the cityShe
was born In Evanstou, 111., and cam<
to Washington with her husband abou
twenty-five years ago. Her husband wa!
an official in the Indian reclamation serv
; Ice until ten years ago, when he resignec
' to practice law. Two sons, Isaac R. Hitt
jr., of this city and Arza B. Hitt of Texas
I also survive her.
LECTURE ON HANDEL,
ft+tn Simon to Entertain Nationa
Society of Fine Arts.
A lecture on Handel will be delivers
by Otto Tourney Simon before the Na
tional Society of Fine Art* In the Audi
toriuni of the new Masonic Temple, to
> morrow evening at 8:30 o'clock. Musica
Illustrations of the lecture will be givei
[ by Dr. B. Merrill Hopklnson, baritone
accompanied by Mrs. Simon.
I The free lectures to be Riven In th
t Public Library are announced as follows
January 26, "Convincing Architecture.'
Albert Kelsey; February 0. "France. He
People and Her Art." Miss Ann Seatoi
1 Schmidt: February 23, "American Paint
ers." Miss Leila Meohlin; March 9, "Gree)
Legend and Archeology." Mitchell Car
roll, and March 30. "Architectural Vienn:
and Constantinople," George Okley Tot
' ten, jr.
t CHINESE NEW YEAR DAY.
L
* Local Chinamen Planning for Cele
bration Next Thursday.
I^ocal Chinamen are busy writing o
. small slips of bright red paper the mysti
legend. "Gong He Fat Toy." Translate
into English the meaning is "Wishing Yo
i a Happy New Year."
1 The Chinese New Year is scheduled t
? arrive next Thursday, when there will b
s all sorts of celestial doings in Washing
r ton's Chinatown, down on Pennsylvani
i avenue near the Capitol. The many mi:
lions of Chinamen in the celestial emph
and those scattered over the earth wi
Thursday celebrate the closing of the
(r year 4909 and the beginning of 4910. Ever
jj Chinese year is given a name, asid tl
coming period has already been namei
It will be called "Suan Tung," the ne
e empire.
' Local Chinamen are discussing the con
y lng event that Is casting its shadows b<
- fore, and many toasts will be drun
- Thursday in rice wine and brandy to tl
e baby emperor, wflio is about three yeai
e old.
Open house will be kept by the laundr;
men and others, and the Chinese Refor
Association will hold a reception in i
0 rooms, Pennsylvania avenue between i
and 4'? streets. The refreshments wi
1 comprise rice wine. Chinese candy, frui
i. sweetmeats and other products of II
flowery kingdom.
*
AMUSEMENTS.
New National.
"The Thief," Henri Bernstein's remarkable
play, in which Kyrle Bellew. Etfie
j Shannon. Herbert ^Kelcey and Eugene
; O'Brien won new la'urels at the National
| Theater last night, is another of that
series of plays in which the playwright
seems to tempt his audience just to see
how far he can go before it revolts, trusting
to intense situations and good acting
to win the victory.
It is difficult for the judicious mind to
yield sentimental pity to the - wretched
Marie I.ouise Voysln, the young wife,
whoso love for dress, excused because
with tine clothes she hoped to hold her
husband's love, prompted her to rob her
friend, disgrace her husband and sacrifice
a hind-minded boy whose infatuation for
her impelled him to give up everything to
save her. It is, indeed, a revolting character.
and yet KfTie Shannon held her audience
as if sp-llbound throughout tlye
woman's trying ordeal and won eight curtain
calls after the second act. in which
tlie confession of thett ana appeal tor
the husband's forgiveness were made. It
was a triumph of dramatic art. Kyrle
Bellow gives a strong portrayal of the
outraged husband's part. His quiet manner.
even in the strongest situations, was
very effective. Eugene O'Brien, as the
young son, also portrayed his role in excellent
manner. Herbert Kelcey appears
as the father. Sidney Herbert was good
in his work as the detective.
The play is a strong one from the playwright's
standpoint, fuil of situations that
grip the audience witli logical force and
intense in sympathetic* appeal.
Belasco Theater.
The observation has been 'made, and
often repeated, that all musical comedies
are alike. However. "The Girl Behind the
Counter." the attraction this week at the
I Belasco Theater, presented by Lew Fields
and an unusually large company, differs
from those that have gone before in at
least one respect. It apparently reaches
j the limit.
Reference Is made to the V bark, the
'only break in tiie stretch of while, or
pink, being a tiny circle of black court
plaster. In fact, the stage pictures give
the impression of a series of Vs. half
In the natural position and the other half
inverted.
A capacity audience last evening seemed
to enjoy the entertainment thoroughly,
.laughing unroariously at the comedy of
Lew Fields atid his assistants, and demanding
repetition of the musical and
terpsichorean numbers, of which there
are an abundance. Prominent in the
production is a pony ballet, the members
of which work hard, with entirely satisfactory
results. A pleasing personage,
who stands out noticeably, perhaps because
of a certain dignity and grace in
the midst of nonsense fast and furious, is
Daisy Dumont. "I Want to be Loved Like
a Leading Lady." rendered by her, is a
song hit of the show.
The olot is as discernible as necessary
In a musical comedy. Fields, as Henry
SehnilT. suddenly ricli. is in London with
his wife, formerly a boarding house
keeper, who aspires to social position, and
his stepdaughter. Circumstances compel
Schniff to impersonate a detective in a
department store and also a head waiter.
All manner of complications arise and
incidentally the stepdaughter serves' as
h "salesperson" behind a counter in tiic
store. Hence the title. Featured in the
cast, other than those namfd. are Connie
Ediss, Pearl Lund. Lotta Faust, Tops.v
Siegrist. Martin Brown. Benman Ma ley.
Joseph Rattliff. Charles Judels and Vernon
Castle.
Columbia.
It was a likable, handsome. we!l-put-up.
devil-may-care, whole-hearted Irish lad.
with a song in his heart and a lilt in his
tongue, that Chauncey Olcott presented
to an oversow audience in the Columbia
Theater last evening. The vehicle was
a new one. "Ragged Robin." but the
sweet singer sang as well as ever, and
the singing was the feature of the performance.
as. indeed, it has been the
feature of every Olcott production.
Whether Chauncey appears in a military
costume of other days, with the
ever-ready sword of n D'Artagnan, or in
the humble garments of the poor Irish
I peasant, he breathes Ireland to Itis hear;
ers. for Ireland is a land of song, and
i more of its history lias been written in
'! music than in story. Of course, last
! I evening's performance possessed many
1 other points of excellence. To any one
who understands the traditions of the
Irish peasant about the "good little people"
and their influence on the fortunes
of lovers "Ragged Robin" has a particular
appeal. Tt is a clean, wholesome
! story. Ragged Robin and a maid drink
from the fairies' well the same morning.
The well brings union to lovers, according
to the tradition of Innishannon, where
the scene-iOf the play is laid. Their love
sustains many vicissitudes* and finally
there Is a happy ending.
! Manager Augustus Pitou gives Mr. Olcott
a fine setttng for his presentation
The scenery is beautiful, all the
i effects showing the hand of the master
of stagecraft, dtid It was handled with
precision, there being no long waits be
tween the acts.
A most remarkable ovation was given
to Mr. Olcott at the end of the perfortnj
ance. During the evening he sang five
; new songs. After the final curtain tlm
I audience remained seated and applauded
1 ! vigorously. Mr. Olcott appeared and the
5 j audience remained seated until it heard
. ; all of the songs repeated, and then a
j j speech was demanded, which was given.
I Mr. Olcott Is surrounded by a very
; competent company. Miss Alma Belwin
makes a charming Margaret Orattau.
r The other performers were all very good, j
Chase's.
i ' At Phase's Theater last night two skits
t gave a suggestion of seriousness to a
3 program that fairly overflowed with mirth
j | and musie. while "Jovland," a speetacii^
lar musical comedy and dancing novelty,
, i won hearty appreciation. A pony ballet
! gave several numbers, including the "Arilj
mated Cornstalks." "Joyous Toodles" and
| "Frolicking Frogs." The principal parts
i were taken by Clara R^lle Jerome and
I ? William Seymour. Walter C. Kelly.
I "with a new docket for his honor, the
i Virginia judge." gave some typical reci1
, tations of prisoners at a police court in
. | the tidewater section of the Old Dominion.
! The dialect testimonies of the colored
culprits caused the house to respond with
" I choruses of laughter. There was a
1 | creditable Instrumental presentation by
ii I the Hughes musical trio: a modern farce.
, , "A Trial Marriage." by Henry Keane and
' ; Olive Briscoe; Johnson and Harty. singing
comedians, who won several hearty ene
cores; Donde and Tilly, in a clever Kng;
lish athletic turn: Miss Angela Dolores
? and Thomas M. Reynolds, in the comedy
"Cupid at Home." depicting the experir
ence of an up-to-date club woman and a
n henpecked husband, who finally revolts.
- and the motion pictures giving scenes
depicting "King Cotton" in the south.
^ "Sold Into Slavery."
Very few Academy audiences have been
treated to a scene of such activity as
thai which occurs in the third act of
"Sold Into Slavery," the melodrama of
the week. In that act hisses flow in iin"
ceasing streams toward the villains and
the villainess, who capture an honest old
n German engraver and try to force him to
c put the finishing touches to a counterfeit
. plate for the manufacture of spurious
twenty-dollar bills. Torture refuses to
11 budge him from his steadfast purpose.
A white-hot iron held before his face
Q has no effect. In addition to the** troubles,
Austin Rogers, the man of mystery
e of the melodrama, joins hands with the
counterfeiters in addition to pursuing the
a young woman who has been sold into a
distasteful marriage to him for $1,000.
" The story is that of Kate Metz, who is
e sold into slavery witli the man of mys11
tery, who is a fiendish-looking old villscn.
ir She consents to the marriage to keep lie^
,v father, the engraver, from prison. lie
*, is innocent, but she doe** not know it.
, Kmily Ivacelle, as Cora Metz. the adventuress,
was hissed from start to finish
w last night. So was Aubrey Noyes, whose
make-up as Auatin Rogers is a work of
s i _ i.^ai ? r
? ari. emiuy v urus, as c,me liawnins. an
-- English slavey, and John Morris, Irish
k comedian, playing Col. Torrance O'Toole,
le contribute conjedy. John Martin appeared
rs as Adolpli Metz.
v- Lyceum.
m "The Brigadiers," a very popular burlesque
organization. Is playing a return
jl engagement at th? New Lyceum this
t week. They present two breczv burJerques
and an olio of the usual variety.
Harry Weston and Harry Keller, In
I
"Photography," received a hearty applause,
their comedy being clean and
laughable. John L. Sullivan gave an Irish
monologue, which was followed by moving
pictures of the (nmous Corbett and
McCoy flght. hater in the evening "The
Champion Heavyweight" and Jake Kilrain
exhibited the art of self-defense.
The vaudeville portion of the performance
includes Francis Clienault with illustrated
songs, Tom Fisher and May
Rosalind, in a comedy duo. and the Three
Melvins, in an excellent gymnastic skit.
Gayety.
The "Night Owls" were wide awake last
ihx.MKrh tifrt hiirlottoe tn
Jlglll, 1 i isnillg kllll/u^ll ? V uu? >viV(U] ?W
very tuneful music. Charles Robinson
displayed remarkable versatility, appearing
first in the ro^e of a Dutch barber and
afterward as a tramp and a Hebrew.
He won the house with his parodies.
The features of the olio were Lawrence
and Kdwards in a clever political playlet.
and Harry Seebaek, the champion
bag puncher. The show ends with a musical
satire, in which the chorus figures
to good advantage. Mr. Robinson offers
a burlesque on the Salome dance.
Majestic.
The Camerapiione talking pictures, with
Bessie Wynn, were the feature part of the
performance at the Majestic Theater yesterday.
The motion pictures took up
their usual part of the performance, and
Were followed by the live vaudeville, consisting
of the Morey brothers in their
acrobatic act, the Kiltie Duo in their musical
and dancing act and Juliet Wood,
comedienne.
Money to lend at 5 and 6% on real estate
Frank T. Rawlings Co., 1305 Pa. ave.?
Advt.
TO LIVE LIKE CHRIST.
More Than One Hundred Persons
Make Pledge at Revival.
More than 100 persons promised to try
to live like Christ at a revival service in
the First Presbyterian Church last night.
At the close of the sermon Rev. Dr.
Spooner, pastor of the Sixth Presbyterian
Church, who had preached on the theme
"Walking in the Light," uttered the following
prayer: "Lord, help me to live today
just as you would i/ you were in my
place."
As he closed he asked if there were any
persons In the audience who would utter
the prayer daily and live like Christ, and
in response HfJ persons arose and gave the
pledge. The resolution to make the practical
test of "Christ-like living" is the result
of a series of sermons by Rev. Drs.
Ppooner and Macl^od, In the First and
Sixth Presbyterian churches.
"What Would Happen if I Should Live
Like Christ?" will be the subject of Dr. j
Spooner's address this evening. The meetings
will be held throughout the week at
7:45 o'clock each evening at the First
Presbyterian Church, with a special service
at 4 o'clock Friday afternoon. *
Connection for L&kewood.
Leaves Washington. Pennsylvania railroad.
all-rail route, at 11 a.m. week days.
?Advt.
OHIO REPUBLICANS MEET.
Gen. Keifer Chief Speaker at Club
Entertainment.
Th<* growth of the Ohio Republican Club
of Washington and the good work it has
performed, particularly during the recent
presidential campaign, were commented
upon by Gen. J. Warren Keifer, representative
in Congress from the seventh
Ohio district, at the club's regular monthly
meeting last night at G. A. R. Hall.
Gen. Keifer was the speaker of the evening
and after reviewing the record of the
club up to date said he considered it the
duty of every Ohio republican in Washington
to become a member so that when
a lime came for ihem to respond to the
call of political duty in Ohio they would
be properly organized.
E. A. Gongwer made a short speech on
"Taft and Ohio." in which he expressed
pride in the election to the presidency of
another Ohioan. A. V. Elufrlo, with a
piano solo: Mr. and Mrs. A. Thomas,
with a mandolin duet, and th^ Mandolin
Club, with a number of selections, and
Mrs. Chaddock furnished the music for
the evening
Miss Bessie E. Dunn's recitation,
"Ohio," was so well received that she
was forced to respond to an encore, which
she did by giving a satire on William Jennings
Bryan. Representative Ralph D.
Cole, who was on the list of speakers,
w;ls prevented from attending the meeting
by illness.
9:00 A.M. for New York.
This is the leaving time from Union
station, 'Washington, of the fast morning
express via Pennsylvania railroad. Parlor
cars and dining car.?Advt.
FRIENDS OF PLAYGROUNDS.
?????????
Means of Raising Funds Discussed
by Monday Night Club.
The need of Increased appropriations for
the playgrounds of Washington was
voiced last night at a meeting of the
Monday Night Club at the Y. M. C. A.
building. The club is composed of workers
and students along sociological lines.
Dr. Henry S. Curtis, secretary of the
Playgrounds Association, delivered an illustrated
lecture, showing the value and
needs of the grounds. Commissioner H.
B. F. Macfarland spoke on the efforts of
t lie Commissioners to get money from
Congress for the purpose, and Judge William
F. Del.acy of the Juvenile Court discussed
the value of the playgrounds as a
preventive of juvenile crime.
Others who made brief addresses were:
O. K. Darnell, superintendent of the National
Training School for Boys, who presided;
F. Skinner, superintendent of the
Industrial florne School; the Rev. John
Van Sehaick, jr.. pastor of the Chinc h of
Our Father; the Rev. Dr. William T.
Russell, pastor of St. Patrick's Church;
Dr. Merrill E. Gates and William F.
Downey.
?
Table Decorations.
Centerpieces of character and refinement
hv (Jude. Simple or elaborate. 121-f F.?
Ad vt.
Oyster Plentiful and in Demand.
The supply of oysters in the shell at the
11th street wharf market is ample to
meet all demands, and the bivalves are
selling at prices ranging at from 60 cents
per bushel for the smaller Potomac stock
up to $1.10 and $1.25 per bushel for fine
bay stock.
The demand yesterday was quite brisk
Several vessels completed selling out
their cargoes and sailed yesterday evening
for the Potomac oyster beds to load.
This morning there were fifteen or more
boats at the wharf witli good cargoes ol
the bivalves aboard. The tug Camilla
will bring a tow of several vessels Into
port from the Wicomico river, Blackistone's
Island .and other points.
There has been no decline in the excellent
quality of the oysters being broughi
here this season.
Chickens Bearing the Metal Seal
are the milk-fed kind. None finer.? Advt.
Dismisses Divorce Suit.
Justice Wright in the District Supremt
Court yesterday dismissed the divorct
suit instituted by Olan G. Roote againsi
Charlotte E. Roote August 2K, l?0fl.
Mill If MM
miiiyMmo
Off Women Use
Cuticura Soap and
Cuticura Ointment.
For preserving, purifying and beautifying th?
.king, for cleansing the scalp of crusts, scale*
and daudruff. for dry, tbln and falling balr, foi
softening, whitening and soothing red, rougb ant
aore bands, fnr annoying Irritations and ulcers
tire weaknesses. and for many sanative antl
septic purposes, as well as for all the pur pones ?
the toilet, bath and nursery.
ARRANGES FOR A MEMORIAL
|
FATHER STAFFORD ASSOCIATION
HOLDS MEETING.
Organization Receives* First Contribution
to Fund?Decides to Issue
an Explanatory Letter.
Within fifteen months a handsome memorial
will be dedicated in this city to
Father D. J. Stafford, for many years
pastor of St. Patrick's Church, according
to plans outlined at a meeting of the
general committee of the Father Stafford
Memorial Association, held in the board
i room of the District building yesterday
afternoon. Commissioner West presided
ana ? uno H. ttuaoipn recornea me m:n;
utes. Men of prominence in local busii
ness. professional and political circles attended
as members of the committee.
A feature of the meeting was the presentation
of the first contribution to the
memorial fund. Judge DeLacv of the Juvenile
Court tendering a check for $lrtO in
behalf of Washington Council. No. I.
i Knights of Columbus. It is expected that
the total fund will amount to between
$15,000 and $20,000. Each contributor, it
was decided, will become a member of
the Father Stafford Memorial Association.
To Explain the Aims.
The committee voted to send out a letter
explaining the alms of the association.
"^he cash payments, it is explained,
can be made in four installments, the
first April 15. and one every three months
I thereafter. It is expected that all the t
contributors will be indicated by April
15, and that the association can then take
steps to employ a sculptor and proceed
with the practical work of erecting the
memorial.
The site for the monument. It was
voted, shall be selected by the executive
committee. When it has been chosen, a
legislative committee, headed by Senator
Elkins. will be appointed to secure from
Congress permission to use the public
space for the purpose.
tfames of Those Present.
The attendance at the meeting yesterday
included Commissioner West. Cuno
H. Rudolph, Representative J. E. Ransdell.
Representative Champ Ciarke.
United States Attorney D. W. Baker.
Commissioner H. B. F. Macfarland,
Judge DeLacy. R. M. Harper. P.
J. Haltigan. Edward Walsh. Scott C.
Bone. Rev. W. T. Russell, Rev. T. E. Me
Qulgan. Rev. Robert M. Moore. Rev. M.
Ross Fishburn. W. P. Spurgeon. John
Joy Edson, M. I. Weller. A. Lisner. R.
Golden Donaldson. Henry Sohon, John
H. Nolan. John R. Galloway and E. J.
Hannan.
For Speed, Comfort, Convenience
hire a "T. T. Co." cab. Phone X. 1212.
?Advt.
PETITION FOR SUFFRAGE.
E. W. Oyster Directed to Draft a
Memorial.
Tbe first meeting of the suffrage committee
representing the recent convention
of presidents and delegates from sixteen
citizens' associations was held late yesterday
afternoon at the office of Louis P.
Shoemaker. (112 14th street
The meeting was attended by the five
members elected at a meeting of the associations
held some weeks ago at the
Riggs House, who are: Louis P. Shoemaker,
president of the Brightwood Citizens'
Association; E. W. Oyster, president
of the Petworth Citizens' Association;
Judge C. C.* Lancaster, president of
the Northwestern and Suburban Citizens'
Association: Capt. C. M. Potter of the
Southeast Citizens' Association, and Capt.
J. Walter Mitchell, president of the Randle
Highlands and Twining City Citizens'
Association.
The committee was organized by the
election of Mr. Shoemaker as chairman
and S. McComaa Hawken as secretary.
The method of procedure in presenting a
petition or memorial favoring suffrage In
the District, was discussed at length. EW.
Oyster, whose plan providing for a
board of ten Commissioners of the District,
five to be elected and five appointed
by the President, was adopted by the late
convention, was directed to draw up a
suffrage petition for submission to the
Senate and House of Representatives.. He
will report at another meeting of the committee
to be held at 4:30 o'clock Saturday
afternoon in Mr. Shoemaker's office.
The members of the committee were invited
to attend a meeting of the Randle
Highlands Citizens' Association tonight,
-1 *V ? *-*1 ? V*- TJ?U
Wlldl rvepreseii 1<1UI*: *? . iia.c uj
Tennessee, Mr. Shoemaker and Capt.
Potter of the Southeast Washington Citizens'
Association will address the meeting
on the subject of suffrage In the District
of Columbia.
JUDGE LECTURES PRISONER.
Old Offender Goes to Jail for False
?
Pretenses.
"I've struggled with you and tried to
help you for I don't know how lor.g, until
I'm at my wits' ends." said Judge Mullownv
in the Police Court yesterday
to John Rabbttt, a false pretense defendant.
"There is no use in my lecturing
you?I've done that before and it's
had no effect. I'm afraid you're gone.
When a man begins forging names and
taking other people's property it seems
as thougii it's almost an impossibility for
him to break away from it. It's too bad,
Rabbitt. I'm genuinely sorry for you."
The defendant was convicted and sentenced
to jail for six months.
The testimony for the government showi
ed that last Friday Rabbitt went to the
store of Mrs. Cora Wheat ley, 65 Myrtle
street northeast, and obtained ham. a
quantity of eggs and other grocery stock
to the value of about $2.50, representing
that he had been sent to purchase the
goods for a Mrs. Granges, the price to be
charged to her account. The groceries
were delivered to Rabbitt. and it was
subsequently ascertained Mrs. Granges
knew nothing at all of the transaction.
Disease Germs
Cannot harm healthy human
bodies. We cannot have healthy
bodies unless we have pure blood
?the kind of blood that Hood's
( Sarsaparilla makes.
?
_ This great medicine has sn uneqiiRlrd, unap>
preached record for purifying ai?d enriching the
blood.
It cures scrofula, eczema, eruptions, catarrh,
rheumatism, anemia, nervousness, that tired
feeling, dyspepsia, loss of appetite, general debility,
and builds up the whole system.
I Get It today In the usual liquid form or in
chocolated tablet form called Sarsatabs.
' The Car With a Reputation,
t FLYNN MOTOR CAB CO.. Inc..
Phone L. 336. 615-617 B it a*.
; <wgS-QOt.lO
MANY a good proposition
is lost by not being
advertised properly.
Consult us and
we'll put you on
the right track.
We write the
right ads to
make advertising
good advertising.
?
\ L. P. Barrel! Adv. Agency,
I*. P. Darrell. Rooiua 102-103-104,
| It. W. Cos. Erenlnx Star Bldg.
V. T. Barter. Phoaa Main 3441.
FUNERAL OF C. E. SIMMS.
Masonic Organizations Conduct
Final Services at Oak Hill.
Funeral services? over the remains of
Clayton E. Simms. who died Friday last,
were held yesterday afternoon at his late
residence. 3200 P street. Rev. Dr. Stone. (
pasto* of Congress Street M. P. Church,
officiating. Interment was made in Oak
Hill cemetery. The pallbearers were J
Henry Small, jr., George W. Evans.
Charles H. Koster of New York. Thoinae i
IJoyd of New York. William J. Yonderheide
Messrs. Craig. Smith and Cemeron.. I
Mr. Simms being a prominent Mason,
the various organ!nations of which he
was a member conducted the final services,
the Knights Templar ceremony being
read by Eminent Commander Charles
P. Sweet of Columbia Commandery. No.
2. K. T, and the blue lodge service at the
grave being conducted by request of the
deceased by Past Grand Master J. Henry
Small, jr. Among the prominent Masons
attending the obsequies were Right Eminent
Sir Georire Gibson. Jackson F.
Blair. Past Commander E. C. Elmore,
Capt. Gen. Charles A. Stewart. James
H. Mcintosh. John Crawford. R. Gil- |
hert. Wallace Streater. Harvey Ellis and
Jacob Spleidt.
Mr. Blmms was a charter memlwr of
the Nat onal Rifles, and for many years
served the organization as quartermaster,
and a delegation from tlie veteran asso- i
ciation, under command of Capt. James F.
Oyster, attended the funera'
Flowers for Your Dinner Party.
Fine table decorations. Shaffer. 14th 1.
?Advt.
Many Improvements Planned.
The Colonial Beach Company, the new
Virginia corporation that recently purchased
the holdings of tiie late Capt. E.
S. Randal! and the Washington and Potomac
Steamboat Company at Colonial .
Beach. Va., and lias secured tlie Interests
of the Central railroad of New Jersey
and of the Washington and Potomac 1
Steamboat Company in the big side-wheel I
steamer St. Johns, is said to be planning i
many improvements that will make Co- ; |
lonial Beach a most attractive resort. ' \
The big hotel there, and ail the other J ;
buildings belonging to the old comnanv ! |
that operated excursions from this city i
to the beach,'are to be put in thorough !
repair and additions are to be mad-', j
What these additions are to be has not j
been announced, but they will, iu is said, j
add to the popularity of the resort. The
steamer St. Johns, when it <returns in the
spring from Baltimore, will be practically
a new vessel, as its owners are having
it put in thorough repair. It will be fitted .
[ out with new furnishings and will be re- j
painted and decorated.
CITY ITEMS.
????
You Ought to Know ''Criterion"
Whisky if you're fond of exceptionally
smooth, mellow rye. Delivered in full qts.,
$1. John T. Crowley, 831 14th n.w.
Dinger's, 811 7th N.W., Headquarters
for Cots, Mattresses, Pillows
and all kinds of bedding. You'll save '
money by having your inauguration wants j
in this line supplied at this store.
Automobiles operated by E. R. Hummell,
1763 U street northwest, and R. J.
Belt. 1217 F street northwest, collided
about 8 o'clock last night at 15th and H
streets nort Invest. Both vehicles were
slightly damaged.
You Can Drink Heurich's Beers
?with particular profit just now. They
restore the energy and vitality that cold
weather saps. Rich in tonic elements. 2
doz. Maerzen or Senate, $1.75; "J doz.
Lager. bot. rebate, 5<>c. Phone W.1600.
Hotel Johnson Cafes.
Oysters! Oysters! Oysters!
Pucks, Fish and other game. New York
meats. Noon lunch, 5 o'clock dinner and
a la carte. Talented music. Mr. Thomas
McDonald, manager culinary department.
Wilbur's ^-Lb. Cans Cocoa, 19c;
Chocolate. 18c; Jellycon. 7V?c; Indian Cornstarch.
5c; Seeded Raisins, 7tsc; 7 lbs.
Buckwheat. 25c: Kairomel Syrup. Sc. J.
T. D. Pyles" 12 stores. jal9-2t
A. R. Brown, sixty-four years of age,
of 921 E street northwest was struck by
a horse and sleigh about 8:30 o'clock last
night while attempting to cross the street
at 10th street and Pennsylvania avenue,
and received a cut near the left eye. The
aged man was removed to the Emergency
Hospital In an automobile, where
the wound was treated.
Weschler's, 920 Pa. Ave. N.W.
A reliable auction hou^e. Goods sold only
on commission. You will he pleased with
results. Next sale, furniture, pianos, etc.,
Saturday, 10 a.m. Telephone M. 1282.
jalS-4t
Morris Frengut. 1521 5th street, reported
to the police of the second precinct last
night that some unknown person had
raised a window of his grocery store
early in the evening and stolen a cash
drawer containing between $2o and $21
and some valuable papers. No one is
suspected.
i
Free Mandolin School.
In response to many urgent requests
from young ladies and gentlemen and
boys and girls. Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin
will organize a free mandolin class in
connection with their Free Violin School
on Thursday, January 21. 4 p.m.. Pythian
Temple, 1012 9th n.w. Pupils (6 years and
upward) joining violin or mandolin department
entitled to 6 months' lessons
free and free use of instruments at classroom
upon purchase of instruction book
specially reduced to $1 on Thursday. As
applications far exceed our greatest expectations
would advise acceptance of invitation
Thursday. jal8-3t*
Our Prices Will Appeal to Your
pocketbook. Everything in millwork and
lumher. Phone Elsinger Bros.. 2109 7thjalS-d,e8u.3
The roost popular Havana Cigar <>n sale.
Why?
Try one and you will s'xin know the reason.
EL-PO-DER-SO,
Eleven sizes. 10c to 3 for 50c.
Jn8-WOl
? N CHOOSE LEESE
n IFOCALS.
UJ -'.'fliwldfr ihe in.-ossnni work of the
< ere. the instant anil exact adjusted
l tnent demanded. that sight may be
always equal and ready to every
I chance In position. instance and
?'J light. 11 n ilt emphasize the itiipori ance
of getting I.eese Bifocals If classes
are in eded for reading and distance.
M. A. Leese,
JalS-Ud
" "i1"'
| M. Marceau's
{BORDEAUX |
:: CLARETS. s
i, Meiloc, St. Jullen. Marenux. Chateau
U Tour Marceau. I'outet Cauel, $7, ,
$8. *?. $10. $11.30 dozen. , i
Christian Xainider's ?c"ey I
I 909 7thySt. N.W. }
jal?-20d" * " " A
CONCERTS
BY THE CELEBRATED
Hungarian Gypsy Orchestra
LAZLO 8ZABO. Leader.
Evwy evening from 7 :ao to 12. No charge.
All Invited. Especial invitation to visitors to
Washington.
F. H. GEYER, 1*27 14TH SI .
Jaltitm.lO
rAMUSEMENTS. "/T
NEW NATIONAL THEATER.
Philadelphia Orchestra,
CARL POHLIG. Conductor.
Tuesday Afternoon, I Soloist.
Jannary 26. I AT.WIN RCHROEDER.
at 4:80. I Violoncellist.
Tickets at T. ARTHUR SMITH'S. 1411 V at. a.w.
V
AMUSEMENTS.
iiKMiif srr
TUF! GREAT ri.AY OK MODKRN TlMEK.
SOLD INTO SLAVERY.
IN KOI It A<"TJ< AVI? EIGHT SCENES.
>RIG1NAL X. Y. CAST ANP PKOIMTTION.
Next W>fl TIIK OITI.AU S CHRISTMAS.
J.xIS-tM2
Palace Roller Rink
ir.TH AND FA. AVI". BAND EVERY VIOUT,
AdmUwIon mid nkates -Indies. I.V; Brut*. 1VJ t
ill siiiiIiiii*. jalA'-tfd
NEW MASONIC AUDITORIUM
BURTON HOLMES
TKA VELOCiVKS
SIMDAV BsmMi tz,
M](?) Wih'l . '4.10
OLD JAPAN
| Reserved Seats NOW, S< - t" $1.
! J. m-5t . .*?>
AXNIVKRSAUv" DAME
t . i... ... i
\.\TI<V\.U, CIIVK.'Sirt. 1.
Indies "f the Maci-almes of the World.
Masonic Temple. S>t!i Hiid I* Ms n u.
iVcii . Jan. 9n. Admission. 25c Dan Uig at v
CoravemitJoira Haill Rirck,
SKATING MORNING. AFTERNOON. M<!HT.
Ian. so. World's Champion Marathon Runner,
I.ONGItOAT? n lfi-mlle Rai-e.
Sfs-ola! Children'* Pay Saturday.
Kvrllml Hand lti Attendance,
jalfl r.t.s
Dally Matinee*. 2.V. Evening*. 2."., .VI ?nd 7Sc.
CLARA BELLE JKROMF. IX "JOYI.ANP."
With Wrn. Seymour and the Eijjht DaintT
loylatider*. WAI.TER C. KEI.I.Y as THH
VIRGINIA JinoE." Anjrela Dolores A <'<?.
Keane Jk Rrls.-oe. Johnston & Ilarty. Iltifnes
Musieal Trio, (.onde A Tilly. "The South'* ?'otlon
lndu?'.-v." ritatr-aph. NEXT WEEK Win.
II. Thnrri>si?n In "Waterloo." "Ao-ake at the
Switch." Stuart ltamea. Jeannette Lowrie. Ktc.
.Ia1*-?t-lt5
J Toniffht ! li ft NEW ^ g
MATS. |
a national js
CHARI.ES FROHMAN PRESENTS
THE THSEF
BERNSTEIN'S TREMENDOUS DRAMA.
KYRT.E BEI.IjEW
| And a Remarkable Company. With EFEIEj
MIAN\ i).\ \\i> IIKKHM:r KKIA-HY.
Next Wefli- Matinees Wpdwsdty, Saturday?Scats
Thursday.
!| Mootgomeiry
|l!! AXD Stone ,N
Charles Dillingham's Production.
Ill Til III MILL
jiiiv->;t..".o
WASHINGTON'S
Hi ll I !l F? LEADING
THEATER.
Evenings at 8:15. ' MAT. Thurs.
Prices, 5<)c to $1.5)1. Priops, ."stc to $1.00.
AUGUSTUS PITOU PRESENTS
' CIMUMCEV OLCOTT IN
his SEW p"r.BAffie?B MM
By Rida Johnson Young In Collaboration
with Rita O'cott.
SS I T8i it? HOMESTEAD
jal*s-6t
BELASCO
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday.
SPECIAL Mat. Wednesday
25c. to $1.50. /
LEW FIELDS
And the Stupendous Musical Comedy
Success, THE
Siltl. BMK8 THS eaiiXTEI
WITH A CAST OK 100 PROPER
NEXT WEEK -SEATS THURSDAY.
Messrs. Shukert Present BERTHA
QALLAND
In a New "Fantastic Reality" by
EEE W. DOLID.
"The Return of Eve" |
The leading charactofw are called Adam
and Eve. Reared in a primitive sort of
war in a place designated Eden.
ORIGINAL IN THEME
XOVKE IX OH.Ut.UTKIUZATrOS
asss aiMB fes m 1
IEEL'STRATED LECTURE
BY
REV. S. H. WOOD ROW. D.D..
At the
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. *
Cor. 10th and G Sts. N.W.
SUMMER DAYS
IN
BONNIE SCOTLAND.
TUESDAY EVENING. JAN. IB.
AT EIGHT O'CLOCK.
Reserved seats, ttfty cents. On sale
at Jones' Agency, in Hickman A
White's. 1319 G at. n.w. jalKAlt
1H LYCEUM S.
THE BRIGADIERS
In Conjunction With
John L. Sullivan
And JAKE KII.RAIN. *
Concluding With MOVING FICTFRE8 OF TH0
JAMES J. CORBETT-KIII Mr COY FIGHT.
Neil Week-KKNTFCKY BEI.I.KS. JalK-lMA
LIVE VAFDEVILLF..
CAMERAFHONE ILLUSTRATED SONGS.
MOTION FICTTRKS.
OK MESSINA KAUTHgt AKE AND Ol'R NAVY.
jalS-et.10
WETfTEIfEite
ALI. THIS WEEK. MATINEE EVERY DAY.
CIIARLBS ROBINSON AND HIS
NIGHT OWLS
IN A ROUSING Ml SICAI. SATIRE,
"The Trimming Shop,"
ANI? TIIK H11.AitIOl S HI HI.ETTA.
"The Mardi Gras Mashers."
Next Week?WM. S. CLARK'S JERSEY LILIES.
ja 1 >-i;t. l.'i
Jack the Giant Killer
UNDER THE DIRECTION OF
MISS HAWKE.
FOR THE BENEFIT OF
Children's Country Home
BEL A SCO THEATER. FRIDAY MATINEE.
JAN. St. AT .'I:SO I' M.
Tickets. 50c. 75c and $1.00. Box office open
Jan. 20. ja!7-5t
EXCURSIONS^
Norfolk <& Washington
er<i
a v jQI k>0<0-i. ^'LVUltJlJp'CO.Ull^'
WOR FORT MONROE, NORFOLK, NEWPORT
NEWS AND ALL POINTS SOUTH.
Leave Washington daily at 6:4.' p.m.
Arrive Fort Monroe T:<a) a m.
Arrive Norfolk.............. .^R:00 a.m.
Arrive Portsmouth 8:30 a.m.
General ticket office. "05 14th at.. Colorado ?
bid" (phone 15201. or 7th st. wharf (phone 37601.
W. H CALI.AIIAN, Gen. Pass Aft.
jai.'-l id
Hfast electric
TRAINS
FROM POST OFFICE CORNER TO
MOUNTVERNON
DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAY.
EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR
FROM 10 A.M. TO 2 P.M.
mM9.tr 1 ft
DANCING. "
MH?. GI.OVKK S DANCING ACADEMY. 013 27ft
t. Private lessons. 50c. Waltz ft two-step guaranteed
5 lessons; barn dance, 2. Class Toes., Snft
eves., 28c: Ballroom for rent. *5.Phone W. 112ft. '
no2S-90t.eSn.4
Davison's
Bam Dance. Waltz. Two-step, correctly to
few lessons. Select Assembly Dance#.
National Kiflea' Armory Every Bat. JtwMtoto
yno28-y0t,6
---- 4
*
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