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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 24, 1909, Image 12

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IN THE WORLD OF SPORTS
I
NATIONALS GO DOWN
BEFORETHE TIGERS
Gray Pitches Good Ball, But
Cobb's Timely Hits Score
a Victory.
Special Dispatch to The Slur. (
DKTROIT. Mich., May J4 ? Grabbing a
game that was in many ways one of the
most peculiar ever played on the local lot.
the Detj-oits yesterday went back into
first place at the expense of Washington,
4 to J. '
Against them was Dolly Grky. the
Golden Gate southpaw, while for them
was Edgar Wille*. The Detroiter was hit
in six of the nine innings and had two
runners on sacks in the seventh, assem
bling all of his gifts in this period. Gray
kept first base clean in almost as many
innings as his own team had it occupied,
taking the Tigers in one. two, three order
tn six of their eight offensive efforts. The*
home team won because its bingles, four
in all. were bunched. Washington went
down to defeat because it could not swat
them safe tfhen men waited to score.
In both scoring sessions the heretofore
frequently hitless Cobb came to the plate
with runs in sight, and both times hit
ihem home. Once Mclrttyre and Bush
were waiting, and a single sent them
across. The other time Crawford was
perched on first and a double speeded him
around. Ah error followed, on which
Cobb completed the course. Outside of
these two rounds no Detroiter made first
base, and in these two none.was stranded.
?No Tigers Left.
That was one of the peculiarities of a
game that was carried though in fast
time, and that was marked by beaufiful
fielding on both sides, only excepting a
wild throw by each, each of which cost a
run. Seldom does it happen that a game
of ball is played in which one of the
teams has not a man.left on the base. It
is an occasional occurrence of a no-hit
and no-run game, but does not always
accompany such a performance. It is
extremely doubtful that a Detroit team
has ever played a game of ball, before
yesterday, in which no runner was left.
For a team that is at present anchored
in last place, Washington played a re
markably fast game. It had very ef
fective pitching. Detroit, being unable to
connect safely with the big curve ball
that Gray was handing up, but that,
pitcher, to play the bet t;wo ways, also
had excellent backing, .his team making
a number 6f brilliant plays, and indulging
in one' bobble, which affected the score,
but not the result. The Tigers also work
ed in an entirely different strain fjom
that they have shown in recent appear
ances. Willett pitched an excellent game
for his club, but he almost always had
some one on, and his backing never
.faltered, and sometimes saved him. The
only error on his side he contributed
himsell. It cost a run. , _ ?
Browtie Opened Nicely.
It was in the first inning when Wash
ington got its only tjvo tallies of the
ua>. Browne was the first hitter, and
tripled to left. Conroy bounced at
Willett, who ' threw to O'Leary to get
Browne off t,he bag. The peg was wide
and got through. Browne scored and
Conroy went to second on the error.
Delehanty sacrificed him along, and
Donohut* lifted a fly to Mclntyre so far
out that Conroy scored on the catch.
Milan was easy for Crawford. .
Though two runs looked.big here, they
didn't remain large for any length of
time. Mclntyre started Detroit's half
with a single- over second base. Gray
handed out his only pass of the da>* to
T!uj,h. Crawford bunted in front of the
pla'.e. advancing the men. Cobb came
to bat with a drawn-in infield, and
smashed a fast liner over second base,
on which both runners registered. Tyrus
tried tu steal, and Street stopped him
Then Moriarity lifted a fly.
There was only one other - inning in
which the home team scored, and that
was the seventh. Outside of these periods
Gray had the Tigers hitting at infielders
or into the air, and in those six other
innings no Detroiter trod first base,
Cobb on His Job.
Starting the seventh. Crawford hit over
first. Donohue got the ball just too far
back to be able to beat Sam. He tos?d'
to Gray, who covered, but Crawford's
foot spiked the sack a fraction of a step
in ad\ance. Crawford was on his way
to second, on a hit and run 'play, when
Cobb drove the ball out between Browne
{SVGGEiSlIOPi. TO CANTILLON ? _A 3>I2>QUL5? LIRE.
THIS OUGHT TO QUEER. THE, TI6EBS.
and Milan. Sam kept going and scored
in advance of Browne's throw to the
plate.
Cobb made two basea handily and took1
a big lead past second, figuring to grab
an extra base tf the throw bounded bad
ly or was handled poorly: Street saw
his chance to nail Cobb. He started into
the infield to get Cobb between the bases.
Then he drove the ball to second.' The
throw was so high that it cleared by
a good foot the geirt who was there to
handle it, and went to deep center. Cobb
scored in a gentle canter. '
Meantime the Nationals had been trying
hard, but getting nothing. In the third
Gray walked, and Browne's bunt to Wil
let{ 'forced him. Browne' stole. Conroy
grounded to O'Leary. Delehanty was hit,
and Donohue was thrown out by Wil
lett.
Hard Luck Here.
Milan should have scored in the fourth.
He doubled, and Clymer sacrificed him to
third. With McBride up. and one strike
on him*, Milan started to steal home.
He had half the distance done before Wil
lett pitched. When the ball was started
it was low, and on the inside, so that it
certainly would have gone past Stanage
for a wild pitch, letting the run Bcore.
But McBride hit at it to protect the run
ner. He fouled the ball. Milan had to
go back, and McBride struck out. Bush
attended to Street.
Milan hit with two down in the sixth.
Street, doubled with one gone in the
seventh, .and two flies followed. Dele
hanty singled in the eighth, one gone, and
Donohue fanned and Milan filed. McBride
got an infield hit in the ninth, one oue.
Cravath hit for Street and lifted to left.
Gray enj3ed it by fanning.
The score:
DETROIT. AB.
Mclntyre, If 4
Bush. ??: 2
Crawford, cf 2
Cobb, rf ?. .1
Jones. rf 0
Morlarlty, lb..J .1
O'Leary, 3b 3
Schaefer. 2b 3
Ktanaicc. <? 3
Willett, p .3
Totals 26
WASHINGTON. AB.
Browne, If 4
Conroy. 3b 4
Delehanty, 2b 2
I>onohu?, lb 3
Mil^n. rf 4
Clymer. rf.. 3
McBride. km 4
street. '?* 3
Gray, p 3
?Cravatb 1
B. H. TO. A. E
114 0 0
10 12 0
1 1 ft rt 0
1 2 2 0 0
0 0 0 O O
O Oil 0 O
O 0 O 3 0
0 0 0 0 0
0 0 4 1 0
0 0 # 0 3 1
4 4 27 8 1
B. B. I?0. A. E.
1 1 4.0 0
1 O o 1 u
0 12 3 0
O O 11 0 0
0 2 3 O 0
O 0 1 o 0
<? ' 1 2 4 0
Ml 12 1
0 ?' O 1 0
0 0 0 0 0
Totals i 31 2 ? 24 11 1
?Batted for Street in ninth inning.
Detroit 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 x 4
Washington ; 2 0 0 o 0 o 0 o 0?2
Two-base hit*?Cobb. Milan.' Street. Three
base lilt Browne. Sacrifice hits?Crawford. Del
ehanty, Clymer. Stolen base -Browue. Bases on
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
How the Clubs Stand.
w. L. Pet.
Detroit:... 19 11 .633
Philadflp'a 17 10 -6:t0
Boston.... 17 12 .586
New York.. 17 12 .086
W. L. r?-t.
Chicago.... 14 17 .4.13
St. Louis.. 13 16 .448
Cleveland.. 11 IK .379
Washington 8 20 .286
Today's Games.
Washington at Detroit.
New York at Chicago.
? Boston at St. Louis.
Philadelphia at Cleveland.
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
How the Clubs Stand.
w. L. Pct.t w. L. Pet.
PlttshuTg.. 18 11 .621 [Cincinnati.. 15 17 469
Chicago 19 13 . 5941 New York.. 12 14 .462
Philadelp'a 14 12 .538 St. Louis.. 14 18 .438
Brooklyn.. 13 14 .4811Boston 11 16 .407
Today's Games.
St. Louis at New York.
Chicago at Brooklyn.
Pittsburg at Boston.
Cincinnati at Philadelphia.
MINOR LEAGUES.
American Association.
At Milwaukee?Milwaukee. 4: St. Paul. 2.
At Toledo?Toledo. R; Coluuibus, 6.
At Indianapolis? Louisville. 2: Indianapolis, 1.
At Kausas City?Kausaa City, 4; Minneapolis, 3.
Eastern League.
At Montreal -Montreal. 5: Baltimore. 3^
At Jersey City?Jersey City, 2; Rochester, 3.
New York State League.
At. Utlca?(First game) L'tlca, 3; Ttov, 1.
(Second gapiet Utica. 2; Troy, 4.
At Albany?Albany, 1: Elmira, 4.
At Syracuse?Syracuse, 5; Blnghamton, 1.
At Scranton? Scranton, 6; W'lkesbarre, 5.
Western League.
At Omaha-Omaha. 7: Denver. 1.
At Des Moines?Des Moines. 5; Pueblo. 4.
At Sioux City? Sioux City. 7: Wichita. 4.
At Lincoln?Lincoln. 3; Topeka, 4.
balls- Off Willett, 1: off Gray. 1. Hit by pitcher
? By Willett. 1. Left on bases?Washington. 7.
Struck out?By Willett, 4; by Gray. 1. llm
plres?Meskrs. Hurst and Evans. Time of game
?1 hour and 34 minutes.
WHITE SOX DOWN YANKEES.
Batting Rally in Second Nets Three
Buns for. Victors.
CHICAGO. May 24.?Chicago yes
terday won the opening game of the
series from New York. 7 to it. A bat
ting raily in the -second inning, when
the home team made a three-base hit.
a slnffle and a double in a row and
scored three runs, was the feature.
Score:
N. Y. R. H. O.A.F.
free.If <? O 1 0 0
Hemphill.cf2 0 110
I'base. lb. . .0 O 14 1 It
! Demniltt.rfo 2 2 10
? Elb'rf'ld.SbO 2 2 3 1
I .a porte.2b..0 1 1 5.0
Aufttin.fi)...0 115 1
' Blair^c 0 1 2 o o
l.nk*.p 1 1 0 o 0
Quinn.p.. . .o 0 o 2 0
Chicago. R. H. O.A.E.
Hahn.rf....l 12 0 0
White.cf...O 1 <i 1 o
Dough'ty.lfo 1 1 it 0
Aitir.iT.it>. ,ii o In 1 0
Purtell.3b. .1 1 0 2 O
Tanii'hill.ssl 2 2 2 1 ;
At*.2b 1 2 2 3 0 |
Sullivan,e..2 1 8 1 0 |
Walsh,p... .1 2 2 4 0
Totals...3 8 24 18 2 Totals. . .7 11 27 14 1
New York 1 0 2 0 o 0 0 o 0 3
Chicago o 3 0 o 1 2 0 1 x-7
Two-base hits Walsh. I/ake. Tannehlll. Atz.
Three-base hit .At*. Sacrifice hits?Austin. At*.
Dougherty, Sullivan. Stolen bases?Hemphill.
White t2?. F.lberfeld. Sullivan. Altizer. Strm-k
out?By Walsh. 6. B'a^es on balls?Off Walsh.
2: off Ijike. 3. Double pWys -Demmitt to Aus
tin; Hemphill to Elberfeld. Iieft on bases?Chi
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Passed Nail?Blair. Umpires?Messrs. O'Loughlln
and Perrlne. ?
SNAPPY GAME AT ST. LOUIS.
Boston Americans Lost Out in Ninth,
. 1 to 0.
ST. LOUIS, May 24.?In . the best
game that has been seen in St. Louis
this year. Boston yesterday lost, 1 to
0. In the ninth the winning run was
scored on two singles and two sacri
fice hits.
The score:
Boston. R.H.O.A.E. i St. L. R.H.O.A.E.
French.2b. 0 O 2 2 0 Hartzell.rf 0 10 0 1
' " * R Hofman.cf 1 4 S 1 0
Ferris.3b.. 0 0 0 2 1
Wallace, an 0 1 3 5 O
Willia's.2b 0 0 2 2 0
Jones.lb.. O 0 7 2 O
MAleese.lfO 110 0
Stephens,e 0 17 3 0
Waddell.p. 0 0 2 2 1
Totals... 1 8 27 17 3
Uessler.rf. 0 15 0 0
Speaker,cf 0 13 0 0
Hooper,If.. 0 12 0 0
Stah].lb.. O 0 8 1 0
Mies.3b... 0 12 4 0
Wagner.ss. 0 13 3 1
C'arrlnan.c 0 O 1 1.0
Arell'nes.p 0 0 O 1 0
Totals.. 0.5*26 12 1
?Two oat when winning run scored.
St. I?ui8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1?1
Boston 000000 0 0 0?0
Sacrifice hits?Ferris. Williams, Stabl. Double
plays -Stephens to Jones, Huffman to Wallace to
Waddell, French to Wacner to Stahl. Niles to
St a 111. Stolen base? Hooper. Wild pitch?Wad
dell. Base on balls?Off Waddell, 1. Struck out
?By Waddell, 4: by Arellanes. 1. Lrf'ft on base*.
?St. I.ouls. 5; Boston, 4. Umpires? Messrs. Eitun
and Counolly. Time of game?1 hour aud 42 min
utes.
BANNER DAY FOR
WOODBURN TEAM
Woodburn had a banner day yesterday,
winning two games, defeating the Rose
buds in the morning to the tune of 16 to
0, and winning from Corby's Bakery in
.the afternoon by 4 to 0. Reynolds, pitch
ing for Woodburn In the morning, held
the Rosebuds to 3 hits and struck out 14
men. In the afternoon game the feature
was the pitching of E. McDonald for th?
winners. He held the Bakers to 1 hit.
Scores by innings:
Morning game?
Woodburn 15 114400 0?16
Rosebuds 0000000 OO-O
Batteries?Mclnlyre and Reynolds; Hip and
Waters.
Afternoon game?
Woodburn 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0?4
Corby's 00000000 O-O
Batteries?K. McDonald and Mclntyre; Sandcra
and Charlton.
While the fans in Cleveland are be
moaning tlie fate of the Naps in fighting
it out with Washington for last place,
wlial can the feeling of the fans in New
York be, due to the poor showing of the
Giants this spring??Cleveland Leader.
Cheerful and confident.
Toledo Buys Freeman.
TOLEDO, May 24.?Manager Ar
mour of the Toledo base ball team
announced last night he had closed
a deal late Saturday night with
Joe Cantillon. manager of the
Washington American Club, for the
purchase of" Jerry Freeman. Nego
tiations have been under way for
the first baseman for several
weeks. The consideration was not
made public. Freeman is expected
to report immediately.
TOLEDO.
I
FIRST BASEMAN JERRY FREEMAN.
"Wonder What Mertz
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There are 25 attractive styles in fancy mixtures to choose
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AVERAGES OF THE
lATIONJLSJO DATE
Donohue* Leading Hitter, With
Conroy in Second
Place.
The following tables show a complete,
concise and accurate description of the
work of all the players of the Nationals
team of 1909. from the commencement of
the season up Jo Sunday, May 23, In the
American League championship race for
the pennant, which so far has been very
disastrous to the home team. It having
played twenty-eight games with Boston.
Chicago, Cleveland. New York, Philadel
phia (Athletics) and St. Louis, and havirig
won eight.
It has lost nine games by the c,os?
margin of one run, and In a majority or
these games a long sacrifice-fly or a
at the proper time would have turned the
tables, but the hard hitters were unable
-to deliver-the same.
"Jijrgs" Donohue leads the team in bat
ting with an average of .333 In four
games, while Conroy. who has played1 in
all games to date, has an average of .281
Conroy leads in total bases with thlrt>
six. tlvmer leads in base stealing with
five and Street leads in sacrifice hitting
with nve to h's credit. Unglaub and Don
ohue have the same percentage. 1,000. at
the first corner of the diamond, so it is
easy to be seen th^ the team has two ex
cellent players for that position. During
the past week the team played six games,
winning two and losing four.
Individual Batting Averages.
BA- BA.
May. May.
O. AB. B. BH. 23. 1?
tKoelev 2 2 0 1 .500 .500
Donohue * ? jj 5 "2rj OTS
Sm?Jh ...... 7 15 0 4 .267 .308
lv 1? ?2 4 in .258 .258
10 41 1 10 .244 .294
" 2 3 .231 .hoo
?Blankenshlp ???????? 13 13 0 3 .2tl
McBride V- *> '19 '2?' .176
Clrmer .. .... ...28 102 4 21 .206 .235
Inelaub 19 76 ? 15 .197 .197
'Freeman ........!. - 19 48 1 9.188.195
Johnson 7 23 1 4 .174 .214
Johnson ....... 10 .168 .156
strop".::...:::;....28 *7 5 is.uo.no
Delehanty 28 103 6 15 .145 .141
tSlilpke 8 J? f '*5$
H lichen 0 10 0 1 .100 .<?00
?Tannchill 4 4 O 0 .000 .000
Oroom ..::: 12 13 o O .000 .000
?kXU ... 1 1 0 0 .000 .000
CravsTh 1 3 0 0 .000 .000
Altrock 0 ? o 0 .000 .00)
Totals, Mar 23 28 916 55 183
Totals, May 10 , 22 725 40 J41
Weekly gain 6 191 15 42
?(Jrav h*n been called ?von to bat in seven
games, Blankenshlp In eight, Milan in threv.
lianlev in two. Freeman in three, Tannehlll hi
two and Kahoe in one as aubst'tutes for other
bateuien. Shipke was railed upon to run for an
other hat<uiuii in one same.
*Tliese olayers have been sold or traded to
other teams.
Individual Fielding Averages.
K.A. FA.
?i. P.O. A. E. May23. May 16.
Inelaub lb . 11 118 . 10 O 1 000 1.000
ffihue.lb..: 4 37 2 O 1.000 1.000
?Oanley. If.... 11 18 0 0 l.(K>0 1.?H)0
Milan, i f IN 14 ? ? 1-JJJW JJg?
(ianlev. ef .5 14 l-"0t> J-OOO
Brown. ef ? I? 9 }?{**{ J-JJJJJ
Tannehiii.il... 1 2 5 ? ?*> ? ?
?Keelev ?> 1 0 ? O l.?*X>
Conroy.'l^.... 2 4 0 O JOOJ 1000
Conroy. rf 3 4 . ? -4J <? J-000
<"lyiner. ef .... 1 3 0 O "*1:000 1.4100
uKlaub If.... 8 3 O O 1.000 1.000
''ravatb. rf.... 1.1 1 ? [??? )
Blankenship. e. 5 0... 1. 0 JJ**
?Shipke. ss 2 1 ? ? 1-000 1 "J'
Street. c 28 Ml . .39 .5 .9<6 .MS8
Freeman. lb... 14 153 ?"> 5 .JOO .$>04
Fonroy. 3b 23 34 54 4 ?5. Obi
aSSh:pp:.v:::.- 7 0 15 1 & i:*?
Delehanty. 2b.. 28 58 83 8 .946 .945
Johnson. p 7 4 11 1 938 .To
Brown, if 7 ? 2.1 .917 .000
MeBride. aa.... 28 . 3 8? U 912 .924
We. 3b.. 5 5 14 2 .904 .000
(.ray. p... < , 4 W5 ^
"(I s 1? 2 .807 .867
4'lymer. rf. ..
?Burns, p ? 3 ? 2 w,
Hughes, p *? ? M
I'reeman. If... 1 ? 0 1 .<*? .000
Hughe*. rf ... 1 <? ? ?> ?
Milan. If 2 O 9 1 -000 .000
Totals. May 28 28 752 391 54
Totals. May 10 22 r.H0 320 4.t
Weekly gain.. 6 Is3 71 11
Note.?In computing tli? fielding averages of
lh<* catchers all passed balls are counted as er
rors as a runner Is advanced a base or a run Is
scored thereby, and are conaeqiieutly placed in
tlie err.?r column. Street to date is < red1ted
with two passed balls. 'These players have been
sold or traded to other teams.
Long Hits and Total Bases.
tj. B.H. 2B. 3B. H.B. T-B.
Conrov 28 29 .420 .46
Clvmer 28 21 5 1 o 28
Delehanty 28 15 4 1 0 21
?Ganl'ey 19 16 3 0 0 10
rSilaub 19 15 2 1 O 18
Street 28 13 O O 0 , 13.
Milan ..i 21 10 3 O O 12
Brown"! 1" 2 O o 12
Freeman 19 9 O 1 O 11
Ilouohue 4 5 > 1 ? ?
Johnson
Smith
4 1 () O 5
4 0 0 0 4
liiav 12 3 O 0 0 3
Klaiikenshlp 13 3 O 0 ? 3
?Shipke ? q o i S S
?Burn f ??.?.? i
Hughes 6 1 ?> ? ?? j
Keeley 2 1 O o 0 1
Mav 23 ... 28 183 28 7 0 225
Total* May T6.... 22 141 21 3 0 168
Weekly gain 6 42 7 4 0 57
Note.?In computing Ion* hits and total bases
a two-base hit counts as one extra base, a tnrep
base h!t as two and a home "in as three, as a
batsman muat reach first t\"*'V.br .,h
hit before he can be credited with extra
base.
'Released tx> oth^r tcinw.
Team Batting Average.
G. AB- R BH. BA.
nn 28 916 55 183 . 200
Mty *?'.???????* ?? v r i1 At
May 16 22 725 40 141 .!??
Weekly gain... 6 191 15 42 006
n. ro. a. k fa.
Mav 2i4 28 752 391 54 .95?>
May 16 ? 599 320 43 .965
Weekly gain. .'? 153 71 11 -001
Sacrifice Hits and Stolen Bases.
The National*, from the commence
ment of the season to Sunday. May
Zl, have played twenty-eight games, and
in these games they have made thirty
sacrifice hits and have purloined twervty-?
three bases, while their opponents have
made twenty-nine sacrifice hits and pil
fered twenty-three bases. The players*
of the Nationals who have been credited
with performing the work are as fol
lows:
Street .28
Delebanty 28
Freeman ... V.. 19
?Ganle/ 1#
* ?
a. sb.
McBrlde
Conroy
Clymer
Hughe* 6
Smith 7
Gray 13
Groom 12
?Shlpke 8
Totals. May 23.28 80
Totals. May 16.22 25
Weekly gala..*6 ^5 | Weekly gala.. ?
?Released to other teams.
Clymer 8
Oonroy 28
Freemsa 1?
Hianlay 19
Uaglaub 19
Milan 21
McBrlde 28
Smith 7
Street 28
SB.
Totals, May 23.28
Totals, May 16.22
23
22]
BLUE RIBBONS WIN
FROM YEATMAN BOYS
The Blue Ribbons defeated the Teat-1
man Athletic Club In an eleven-inning con-1
test. The pitchers received good support,
each team having only one error chalked
'up against it. Howell, for the Blue Rib
bons, pitched a shade better ball than I
Neill, striking out eleven men.
Manager Pyne of the Blue Ribbons
wishes to arrange games with teams
averaging eighteen years old in the Dis
trict. Address letters to William Pyne,
1027 10th street northeast.
The score:
B. R. R.H.O.A.E.
M.R'gan.ss X 2 0 U 1
Daniels,lb 0 2 14 1 O
Bryan,cf.. 0 1 1 ?> ?
MerTine.2b 0 2 3 2 0
Crump.rf.. 0 0 0 0 0
Pyne.rf... II??"
H'dlboe.lf. 0 2 0 1 0
W.R*gan,3b2 2 2 2 0
CalWrw.c ..011320
HOwell, p.. 1 2 0 6 0
T. A. C. R.H.O.A.E.
E. Burke, of .0 3 2 2 0
Madlgan.rf 0 0 2 0 0
Sblner,rf.. o 0 2 0 0
Welsh.2b.. 10 2 10
Downey,2b o 1 2 2 o
MeKee.lt>. 0 0 6 2 0
Hutton.'Jb. 1110 1
H.Burkr.ss 2 2 2 1 0
Sartain.lf. 0 12 0 0
GlebH.c... 0 19 2 0
KeUl.p.... 0 113 0
-i- -
Totals.. 4 10*31 13 11 Totals... 5 10 33 14 1
?One out when winning run scored.
I Yeatmsn A. C... 1 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0-4
I Blue Ribbons 1100010100 1-5
Twi?-basp bits?H. Burke. 2. Three-base hit ?
W. Itcsxan. Bases on balls?Off Howell, 2; on
Neill. 2. Struck out-By Howell, 11; by Netll, .
Hit br pitcher?By Nelll, 1 iCallow). Stolen
bases?E. Burke t4). H. Burkc (3), Welsh, Sar
taln. Sacrifice bit?E. Burke. Umpire?Mr. Mc
Donald. Time of fame?2 hours and 6 minutes.
Eastern Clubs Doing Well.
Detroit's champion nine, which had a
I lead of something like two hundred points
when the despised eastern clubs which
brought up the rear of the American
League race in a melancholy body of four
last year went west, dropped Into second
place for a day on Saturday, with Bos
ton and New York right on its heels.
Connie Mack's Philadelphia Athletics,
who didn't look particularly good here,
I have swept through the west like a cy
clone and led the league until yesterday,
when the Tigers crawled back by beat
ing Washington. 80 far they have won
eight games and lost two, and having
cleaned up well in Chicago and Detroit,
should* have no trouble with Cleveland,
touted as a sure winner before the season
| began. Boston has been doing almost as
well as Philadelphia, winning seven
games and losing four, while the Yankees
are on the right side, too, wi.th six. vic
tories and five defeats. About the only
j consolation the Western clubs have found
1 came when Washington came to town,
1 and the Nationals haven't been easy
I picking, by any means.
How Pitcher Mullin Wins.
George Mullin has- pitched seven games
this year. He pitched his seventh straight
I victory Thursday. He finished one game,
making a total of eight In which he par
ticipated.
I April 14 he beat Frank Smith and the
I Chicago White Sox at Bennett PArk, 2 to
0, allowing the Sox one hit.
April 16 he beat the Clevland Naps at
Bennett Park, Wright pitching. Xhe
score was 3 to 2. and the Naps secured
three hits.
April 23, in Chicago, he beat the White
The Evening and Sunday
Star's Voting Contest
For the Most Popular
Base Ball Players.
Professional.
This
Counts
TWO
VOTES
For
Professional,
Amateur ~nd
Sender.
I Amateur
This coupon will not be counted
unless reoelved at The Star office toy
, 12 o'clock noon
Thursday, June 3, 1909.
If you or ono of your friends are a
contestant for one jef the ten?day
vacation trips, expenses paid by The
Star, fill In the name hi
Name
te the
?tar
| Address
nil Mt sad lead V* aufl er
Bus Ball Contest Salter, The.
oflee. 11th atreet aw
Waahiagtoa, Z>. C.
Patentee ia packages aad ?
bar af votaa plainly oa the tap. If eotee are
net all fer the same playars make separate
packagea for the diSereat players.
WHEBE TO DIKE.
<MPK ?TH AND KKLin,
?hii * room; new manafrmmt; ta
dinners. 50c; special attention t<i
? tny?<ID< 7?* par,,M- Vhoa* "lead Col 610.
^nt"f IJof ^'tev 3 to 1, the Sox n?.
Curing four hits In eleven innings.
April 28. in Cleveland, he defeat->1
Young and Faikcnberg and the Naps. A
to 1. allowing hut four hits,
a 3- Jn Ch,cag'>. he defeated Frank
?ng ,i?"h"n. Wh"e 801 * t0 5' a"ow~
J** S- In 8t Louis, he pitched to the
fnr t^anTiUP 'Oro t;ror8* Speer. Credit
Speer ?era 3 to 1 victory went to
6' '5 ??' Lfu,s- he bcat Railey and
Powell and the Browns 7 to 3, allowing
ttl nltla
p,Mfy 20. at Bennett Park, he defeated
Em!?-'eYk'*er8 and Dygert, and the AXli
lctlcs 5 to 3. allowing nine hits.
Pennsy and Harvard Tied.
Pennsylvania's second ten-inning Ar
tery over Princeton last week makes it
appear as if the Quakers and Harvard
must divide the honors of the so-called
intercollegiate base ball championship.
Lnfortunately, as was the case when the
same situation arose in foot ball last fall
these teams do not meet, owing to a
i?*- 1 ath,etlc relatione that to the
minds of most persons has lasted alto
gether too long. Harvard and Princeton
were to have met Saturday In their sec
butTial? forced a postponement
until today. If Harvard defeats Prime
ten for the second time as easily aa in
the first meeting it will give the Crimson
the call, for the Red and Blue had two
hard struggles with the Tiger?. Brown
complicated the situation a little during
the week by shutting out Harvard
thanks to the great pitching by Nourse!
It was Harvard's second defeat and
Capt. Currier did not play with his team.
Amherst furnished a surprise by defeat
ing Yale Wednesday, and it begins to
look as if weak hitting has ended any
chance Yale had for the title. This seema
unfortunate, as Capt. Murphy's team is
strong in the box and in the field. Much
credit for the victory of Amherst must
go to McClure. who ranka well up with
the best college pitchers.
BASE BALL 1TOTES.
Tannehill or Altrock may do the pltch?
lug for the Nationals today.
Of course. Ty Cobb had to pick up hi?
batting eye Just aa soon aa the Wash
ington boys have struck town. He hasn't
been hitting of late, but was there yea
terday.
Clyde Milan Is coming around all right
and only needed steady work to make
him hit his proper atrlde.
The Nationala will get a warm welcome
home next Saturday, no matter where
they stand in the pennant race. Every
body In Washington wants to give
"Jiggs" Donohue a hearty welcome to the
Capital city.
George Mullin has been pitching won
derful ball this spring, but the National*
are just about due to break his string
of straight victories this afternoon.
Lmpire Settle.v, who has been working
in the South Atlantic League, will make
this city his home in the future. He is
an old-time ball player and will be a good
man to umpire for the many different
amateur leagues in the city.
.Since 1870 Harvard and Princeton have
played eighty-four games of base bail.
Each college has won forty-two.
Jiggs Donohue is putting ginger in the
Washington!* and setting the pace for
them in clouting the ball.?New York
Sun.
"The hit" and run play." says Connie
Mark, "is a necessary factor in a base
ball K?me." .^ltto the caught fly, the
base hit and the pitched ball.
Eddie Collins is about the only Colum
bia base ball player who ever made good
as a professional. That's true for twenty
years back, anyway.
The St. Louis Browns have their Man
ager McAleer and their Outfielder Mc
Aleese, and from the way they have been
going they have a McAloose.
Those Athletics arrive home Friday.
Possibly there will be some reception for
them. Why, you couldn't build a wall
around the park high enough to keep th?
fans out ?Philadelphia Press. National!
wHl be with them.
Frank Baker, the Athletics' kid, has
had one two-bagger and three hits, good
for three bases, on the western trip, and
a'.l of them figured in the run-getting.
And yet his batting average is only .3*1.
After all. it's not always the .:X*) clout
ers who win games.
Harry Niles. who wasn't wanted by the
Browns and Highlanders, is holding up
his end with the fast Boston Red Sor
and doing helpful work in various capaci
ties.
Tenney's play on a bunt the other day
whereby he threw out a runner at third
base was so smooth and quick that sonte
folks who did not observe closely thought
Marquard made the play.
Were the code used by the pinched safe
breaker adopted in base ball Covaleskie's
name would be spelled something Hk?
this; Xgrzkmnbk. You'd have t" have a
mouthful of tacks to pronounce it.
Talk about college players not being
able to hit. Young Mr. Stevens of the
Yale freshmen made a homer, a triple
and a single against the Tiger cubs last
Saturday. On the same day two homers,
two triples and two doubles were made
in the Pennsylvania State-Michigan game.
The board of directors1 of the National
League are trying to arrange a date for a
meeting to act on the appeal of the Cin
cinnati club of President Heydler's de
cision of the Clncinnati-Pittsburg pro
test. It may meet during the coming
western trip of the eastern teams, pos
sibly June 16.
In the matter of managers Fred I^ake
is deserving of the bay. He had the nerve
to dispose of two such big favorites aa
(Continued on Thirteenth Page.)

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