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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 24, 1909, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1909-05-24/ed-1/seq-4/

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PALACE STEAMER ST. JOHNS
Will Leave Wharf Foot of Seventh Street S.W .
Saturday, 6 P. M. and Sunday
Morning at 9 A.M. for
Classic Shore
AND
Colonial Beach, Va.
Round-trip tickets, good only on day of issue, 50c.
Tickets good on both days, $1.00.
! Buy a Lot at "Classic Shore."
Over 1.200 Choice Lots to Selcct From.
The beautiful northwest section of Colonial Beach. The
ideal health resort for Washingtonians.
Large lots. $25.00 up.
Terms as low as S1.00 cash and $1.00 per month. Send
for plat and price list.
! Colonial Real Estate Co. (Inc.),
N.W. Cor. 12th and G Sts. N.W.,
; Phone Main 3538. Washington, D. C.
ww?mBomiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii?iniminHii?ii?i?miim?iiiiiiiinmi?inniiii?m
I
?7
I FOR SALE f
1 $15,500
Rents $107
7th Street Business 1
Corner.
Can Place Loan of
!
$10,000. |
I
Stone & Fairfax,
1342 N. Y. Ave.
i* v ?? - t ' * * ' f
m.T24-2t- v
5 FOR SALE !
|
Y
630 G St. N.W.
A Sacrifice |
To Close Estate |
Lot 22.6x121. I
Stone & Fairfax, |
1342 N. Y. Ave. if
?) ?
?9'
_ nBT24-2t ~ * * ?
?4 H ?fr'-fr'-fr*
??
Business Property
Large Income
Price $ 11,000 f
Leased $90 a month
l
New Building
West of 7th St.
Price $12,000
Rent $125 month
30x87
West of 9th St.
?i >
?*>
"fr
<??
? i?
f"
Stone & Fairfax, I
1342 N. Y. Ave. f
m*?4-2t * ^
Do You Want
to Own Your
Own Home? |
We can save you $750. f
and at the same time sell %
you a perfect gem of a lit- ^
? tie home for $2,750, worth j|
& ,$3,500. ,|
??* * eatf
Cash *
S ?and $25.75 per month, *
* including all interest. i|
* You can never own your home %
2 by renting It, but you can own 2
one of these by paying monthly. 2
2 same as rent. Six pretty, bright %
rooms, a large modern bath,
concrete cellar, guaranteed fur
nace. all up-to-date improve1
m^nts. handsome cabinet man
tels. dome light in dining room,
beautiful decorations.
'Jordan & Co. , Inc.,;
Jordan Bldg., 1305 G St. *
BARGAIN
FOR
BUILDER
41 FT. ON 23D ST. N.W. NEAR
Washington Circle.
PRICE. 35c.
mj22tf
WEAVER BROS.,
1416 F St. N.W.
ta
Randlc Highlands
A CAMTOLOf U.S.
A torwit Npvsc
a O f '"iWC/NS I ? f V A T< OI
Riidl* Hlfhlsada Is tb? ssiae ?1 lata nee front
?? Tki
Capitol as iKipoot Circle. Lots and tmiUUag
?lies from $75 to $1,000: essj payments.
C. 8. REALTY CO.. Ttk st. sad Pa. ars. b.w.
UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS
(Brookland).
Bailding lots of any site. good locations,
10c and upward.
THE PLACE FOR A HOME.
Improved streets, water, gas. ete.
Oood car aervlce.
W. H. WALKER,
719 l&TU 3T. N.W.
HOMESEEKERS '
Our new form of purchase con
tract provides absolute cancellation 1
Of all debt in case of death.
Ev?ry fourth lot reserved. Over
two-thirds sold. Buy while you have
this opportunity.
Terms, (2o cash and $10 per
month.
JOHN A. MASS1E,
WITH
McLACHLBN BANKING
CORPORATION,
Cor. 10th & O Streets N. W.
1 1 ap27-tf
JUDSON BRINGS BACK IDEAS
HAS LOOKED OVER SCHOOLS AND
PRISONS IN THE WEST.
Choice of Workhouse and Reforma
tory Sites Awaits Report on
Soils From Experts.
Engineer Commissioner "William V. Jud
son returned to Washington this morning.
In his trip through the middle west he
inspected penal institutions and school
buildings to gather ideas for betterment I
of the classroom structures in Washing
ton and for the new reformatory and
workhouse to be erected for the District
of Columbia.
School buildings in Chit-ago and Indian
apolis which he visited, he said, contrast
two policies In construction. In the
Windy city li? finds school buildings are
made lireproof. In the Indiana capital f
they are not fireproof, but have numer
ous exits, so children can be marched out
during a fire drill in 50 seconds. With
the same amount of money, he estimates,
twice as many buildings of the Indian
apolis type can be built as of the Chi
cago type.
Washington school building." he said,
are a compromise between the two ex
tremes. While the buildings erected here
in recept years are no^ fireproof, they
have fireproof stairways, are fireproof
around boilers and other places where a I
fire would likely be started, and some of j
them have fireproof corridors.
During his trip Maj. Judson also look
ed at the reformatory at Mansfield. Ohio,
the house of correction and the John
Worthy School in Chicago, and the penal
institutions of Indianapolis.
Sites for neither of the two new penal
establishments for the District have been
selected, said Maj. Judson. The Commis
sioners are awaiting a report from the
Department of Agriculture regarding the
soil of locations favorably thought of. ,
The report is expected within a few days
and it is thought a choice will imme
diately follow.
The inspection of the Maryland sites
offered the Commissioners will probably
take place this week. Following the visit
to the Virginia sites several davs ago, it
was practically decided that one of two
sites on the Potomac river front, near
Oc-coquan. in Virginia, will be chosen for
the workhouse, and that a tract of land
hi Maryland will be pickad for the re
formatory site.
PURSUED MAN SURRENDERS.
Ed Bynum, Who Shot Sheriff Cor
ley, Now in Custody.
COLUMBIA. S. C., May 24.?After hid
ing for three days in the woods of Lex
ington county, hunted by armed posses
with bloodhounds. Ed Bynum. a negro,
who Wednesday shot Sheriff Corley, Sat
urday night gave himself up to J. B. Os
wold. a white man, and was driven
through the country to the state peniten
tiary here, where he is now held to await
the outcome of Sheriff Corley's wounds
The negro, after shooting the officer
fled, remaining in hiding without food or
sleep and in terror for his life until Sat I
urday afternoon. At times the man hunt
ers came so close to him that he was
able to hear their voice*, and he was in
mortal fear that he would be shot down
on the spot, but the searchers passed on.
Plans for Taft at Pittsburg.
PITTSBl'RG, May 24.?President Taft.
who will attend the fifth annual conven
tion of the Associated Western Yale Clubs
here next Saturday, has also accepted a
congregational invitation to attend serv
ices next Sunday morning at the First
I'nitarian Church. Ellsworth and More
wood avenues. While in Pittsburg Presi
dent Taft will be the guest of Mr. and
Mrs. Thomas K. Laughlin, Mrs. Laugh
lin being a sister of Mrs. Taft.
Kills Dad for Threatening Mother.
BUCKATUNNA, Miss.. May 21.?D. E.
McLaughlin shot and killed his father
here. He claims that he was protect
ing his mother from threats of death at
her husband's hands.
I
I I
Memorial Day Services Held in |
Many Churches.
i
.
VETERANS IN ATTENDANCE
Special Sermons Preached in Honor
of Dead Comrades.
SEE VICES AT SOLDIE&S' HOME
?
Civil and Spanish War Survivors
Unite in Paying Tribute?Burn
side Post Meeting.
|
{ Memorial day is nearly here, and the
sailor and soldier organizations to which
the occasion means so much are prepar
ing for the solemn ceremonies which
mark the day. Since the inception of Dec
oration day it has been the time-hon
ored custom to hold religious service on
the Sunday preceding May 30. Tester
flay was no exception to the rule, and in
several temples of worship the men who
bear the scars of war assembled to pay
homage to their comrades who have gone
to the blvousc beyond.
Joint memorial services of Encamp
ments No. 60 and 111, Union Veteran
Legion, for the members who have died
during the past year, were held last
evening in the First Congregational
Church, corner of 10th and G streets
northwest. A special musical service was
arranged by the choir and an address
delivered by the pastor, Rev. Samuel H.
" oodrow. The records oP deceased com
rades were read by Adjt. W. J. Weiss of
bncampment No. 60 and Fred ft. Sparks
of No. 111. a laurel wreath was placed
I on a vacant draped chair for each de
j parted comrade by the lieutenant colonels,
and one on a vacant chair In honor of
Jj Pa'r'?."c women of the war by Mrs.
Ada H. Weiss- of Encampment No. 60.
The ritualistic services were conducted
hy Coi. Henry Sand ford of No. 60 and an
address was delivered by Col. Thomas
Shannon of No. Ill, and national com
mander of the order.
The deceased comrades of No. t>0 were
Florence Donohue, Charles Boyd. James
F. Meline. Charles E. Boyd, Morris J.
Foote, Thomas J. Walker, and of No. 111,
Otis A. Carpenter, Walter J. Hinee, John
Lapine, Marion J. Fisher.
The services were closed by the sound
ing of taps by the bugler.
Services at Soldiers' Home.
1 he veterans of the civil war and the
younger soldiers who fought against the
Spanish forces but eleven years ago
held joint memorial services yesterday.
At the United States Soldiers' Home
Henry Wilson Post, No. 17, G. A. R.,
??d^0lLn Jatob Astor Camp, No. tf, U. S.
? O. , a combined memorial service
in Stanley Hall at .'{ o'clock in the after
2?.??",. T'16.members of both organizations
attended the services in a body. The
Army and Navy Union was represented
by A. c. Brocken of Roosevelt Garrison,
John J. Strain of Barry Garrison and Wil
liam A. Hickey of Porter Garrison.
An address by the Rev. Henry A.
Brown, chaplain Engineer Corps, United
mates Army, and the calling of the rolls
of honor of those soldiers who had died
since last Memorial day were features of
the occasion. Music was furnished by
the Soldiers' Horn# Band, and the invo
cation was pronounced by the Rev. H.
^flUb, chaplain of the home.
Miss Edna J. Sheehy, Mrs. Blanch
Mulr Dalglelsh, Miss Allee Sherrier.
Charles W. Moore and Herndon Morseli
sang solos appropriate to the occasion
The services were concluded by the
audience singing ??America," led by the
band.
Sermon by Dr. MacLeod.
Lincoln Post, No. 1, G. A. R., assisted
by Lincoln Corps, No. 6, Woman's Relief
Corps, held services last evening at 8
o'clock in the First Presbyterian Church,
John Marshall place. An address was de
livered by the pastor, Rev. Donald C.
Macl^eod, D.D. He praised the patriot
ism and valor of the soldiers of the
civil war, and said that the war had
K.ikt ,P aiates lnto a union never
to be broken. The "Battle Hymn of the
Republic" and "Tenting on the Old ('amp
choir WCrC rend*r?i by the church
rtJrfe,ir,e<i?rds?u0f t,ie members who had
w the year wer? read by S
W McElderry adjust of Lincoln Post,
and a committee from Lincoln Relief
Corps placed beautiful floral tributes
the chanc*- The choir and con
gregation sang "America." The exer
a nT?rr7e i .by A* B' Chat field
A Reinohl? * PS>" bI?wn by F'
*nd fr,en<l8 of Burn side
Post attended memorial services at Mc
Kendree M. E. Church. Massachusetts
a\enue between 9th and loth streets, last
evening at 8 o'clock. The Rev R T
Wright, the pastor, preached a special
sermon for the occasion from a text taken
vo!imfn "This day shall be unto
J ou for a memorial." Tho Anollo Or
a,,<* ,he church choir rendered a
inuslc. prOSTam of vocal and instrumental
Red Ken at Service.
'Hie Improved Order of Red Men also
held memorial servioes last evening for
the members who have died In the last
year. The exercises took place at the
Congress Street Methodist Protestant
Church by the Improved Order of Red
Men. Rev. E. D. Stone, pastor, delivered
the sermon.
Air. Stone said It was a great mistake
to imagine that death ended all. "If that
were true, we would be the most misera
int 'rearer' io^he*'?- ?'The wor,d is com*
'ni5 nearer to the truth everv dav M*n
way uK!h2,nfri l? 8ee that the Christian
way Is the only way to live."
Mr Stone was followed by Otto H
I- ischer. great sachem of the District
A quartet composed of Mrs. James
Crosson. Miss Nannie Wheatley, H. Clyde
Grimes and James Crosson sang
A feature was fourteen lighted candles
?milabOV.e thJi pu,p,t ln memory of the
t,' ,he ?">M ?? ,he
services Mr. Stone held a reception.
STRAUS MAKES ADDRESS.
Principal Speaker at Dedication of
"Roosevelt Window."
NEW YORK, May 24.?Oscar S. Straus,
former Secretary of Commerce and Labor
and recently appointed ambassador to
Turkey, was the principal speaker last
night at the dedication of a window in
honor of the Roosevelt administration at
the Metropolitan Temple in this city. Mr.
Straus* speech was principally a review
of the administration and the achieve
ments of Theodore Roosevelt. The service
began in the morning and will be held
every night this week, culminating In the
dedication of the Lincoln memorial win
dow Sunday next.
Tooth of Prehistoric Animal.
CHICAGO. 111., May 24.?The tooth of a
prehistoric animal which must have been,
according to scientists, fifty or sixty feet
long, as tall as a small building, and with
a mouth big enough to bite off the top of
an ordinary tree, has been brought to this
city from 8ycamore, III., where it was
found by Axel Stroberg, a fa*ner. The
tooth weighs more than ten pounds and
measures almost a foot in diameter. It
wil be placed in the Field Museum.
Americans at King Edward's Levee.
IXDNDON. May 24.-Klng Edward, sup
ported by the Prince of Wales, held a
levee at St. James palace today. Am
bassador Reid and J. R. Carter, secretary
of the American embassy, were among
the diplomats present. The former pre
sented Charles Carroll of Maryland and
Walter Farwell of Chicago to his ma
jesty.
I
m
Madame YaSe's
(Beauty Culture
Matinee.
Madame Yale's
Physical Culture
Lecture.
Owing to the many who ?ere un
able to hear Mme. Yale when she
grave her wonderful Beauty Culture
Matinee a few weeks ago. she has
been induced to give a
RETURN
LECTURE
At the New National Theater on
Tuesday, June 1, at 2:30 p.m.
TICKETS
COMPLIMENTARY
Although the tickets are free,
the best seats are given with pur
chases of any of Mme. Yale's
Beauty Culture Products. They
should be secured at once. Apply
for them at our Toilet Goods Dept.
*t ? ft* *?*
_ "THE DU? COftNEft
COLORED CADETS' PRIZE DRILL
SEPARATE BATTALIONS AN
NUAL REVIEW TOMORROW.
Five Companies Take Part in Com
petition This Year?March From
Armstrong High School.
The competitive drill for tlie* companies
of the Separate Battalion. High School
Cadets, will take place tomorrow after
noon at American League Base Ball Park
at 3:30 o'clock. The orders issued provide
that the M Street High School companies
will march to the Armstrong High School
by way of New York avenue atid 1st
street. The battalion will form in front
of the Armstrong High School and will
march to the park, headed by the Metro
politan Band.
The allowance for the drills this year is
thirty minutes. Fifty-three movements
will be executed in the order outlined 011
the program, but it is not to be under
stood that each movement can be exe
cuted from the preceding one. The cap
tain Is expected to exercise his judgment
and his own means to execute them.
At the conclusion of the drill each com
pany will be marched to the grand
stand and presented to the Judges. The
unused cartridges will bo collected from
each company by the first sergeants as
soon as the cadets leave the grounds.
The Separate Battalion Includes Ave
companies, the largest body of cadets
since its organization. The work tills
year has been under the direction of
Maj. Arthur Brooks, military instructor. ?
The officers of the battalion are: Major,
Clyde McDuffle; adjutant, Francis Dent:
Company A. Capt. Burnette Robinson!
First Lieut. R. Kitzhngh, Second Lieut.
J. Hayes. First Sergt. John Jones, Sergts.
W. Richardson, H. Lucas. L. Johnson,
P. Burkett. Company B. Capt. H. Bray
First Lieut. W. Hyson, Second IJeut. W.
Colman, First Sergt. B. VV. I*awson,
Sergts. L. Mayer. K. Rivers, H. Kneeland,
A. Johnson. Company C, Capt. Alphonse
Burwell. First. Lieut. William Evan*. Sec
ond Lieut. Walker Clair, First Sergt. Mc
Kinley Bowie, Sergts. Robert Diggs, Wil
liam Cole, Norman Ewing. Company D,
Capt. Ernest Hardy, First Lieut. Robert
Brooks, Second Lieut. John Coleman, First
Sergt. Lorenzo Walker, Sergts Joseph
Diggs, Ernest Mobry. Charles Scott,
Thomas Jenkins. Company E, Capt. Al
rutheas Taylor. First Lieut. Herbert Stev
ens, Second Lieut. John Carter, First
Sergt. Shermont Sewell. Sergts. Ruby
Davis, William Settlers, Charles Hender
son: color sergeant, Robert Kenney,
bugler, George Fletcher.
JDRY PANEL IS EXHAUSTED
JOHN P. TRILLING ARRAIGNED,
CHARGED WITH MURDER.
Accused of Xilling Mrs. Lucretia
Corliss, Whom He Blamed for
Alienating Wife's Affections.
John P. Trilling was placed on trial
this morning in Criminal Court No. 1
before Justice Gould to answer an indict
ment of first degree murder, in connec
tion with the killing of Mrs. Lucretia
Corliss January 20 last at 612 L street
southwest. The victim was the grand
mother of Trilling's wife and it is said
he blamed her for keeping his wife from
him.
Insanity May Be Pleaded.
From the questions propounded to the
prospective jurors by Attorneys Thomas
C. Taylor and Mark Stearman, for the
defense, it is regarded as probable that
a plea of insanity will be interposed to
save the life of the prisoner. During the
examination of the talesmen Trilling sat
unmoved, looking directly before him as
though oblivious of his surroundings.
He did not speak a. word to his coun
sel during the hour's session of the court
before the panel of the jurors was ex
hausted.
When the last talesman had been ex
amined Justice Gould' took an adjourn
ment until tomorrow. He ordered a spe
cial venire of jurors to be summoned for
^tomorrow.
Thrilling's Alleged Crime.
The crime for which Trilling Is being
tried occurred at the home of the elderly
Mrs. Corliss, where Trilling's wife had
been living after separating from him.
Trilling, it is alleged, accused the grand
mother of hiding his wife from him, and
in a rage followed her Into the yard,
whither she had tied, and hacked her with
an ax.
The man then went upstairs in the
house and fell asleep. Later he awoke
and proceeded to the home of a relative
in Georgetown, where he was arrested.
Naxt Meeting of U. C. T. at Tampa.
ATHENS, Ga.. May 24 ?Tampa has
been chosen as the next meeting place of
the grand council of the l.'nlted Commer
cial Travelers for Georgia and Florida.
TNJfM!
8th St. & Pa. Ave
"THE BUSY CORNER."
BOOK
SALE
Tomorrow
?MI
] But ooBy 60 pieces for all Washington
39c IMPORTED CHIFFON
WASH VOILES,
15c yard
First time ever such a bargain. Never to be repeated. The im
porter in anticipation of an immediate raise in the duty on such goods
rushed to this country a big quantity and held them in the custom house.
Needing money, he drew out a few pieces at a time until only 6o pieces
were left. An imperative need for cash caused him to sacrifice these.
Very fine sheer goods in the neatest, most nobby summer plaid styles
you ever saw. White grounds with plaid designs in two shades of blue,
two shades of pink and two tones of black combined. These colors are
woven and are positively fast. They are made of mercerized yarns, and
have a beautiful luster which is also permanent.
ONLY 60 PIECES in all in three different style plaids, each in the
light blue, pink and black. Get them now at 15c?you'll never have an
other such chance.
ii:
Here's yoor dh)amce===Einnilb>race ill
TAILORED LINEN SUITS
? ?
=?
?=
tt>
We couldn't sell these Tailored Linen Suits so low in price if it were not for the fact that
they were included in the recent special purchase of lingerie and linen dresses, some of which,
by the way, are still available at the very low prices previously
advertised..
At first glnace you can sec their worth. Cut according to
latest style advices. Very smart in appearance. Made with long
coats that arc formed entirely of braided white net in very elaborate
designs, and skirts with panel front of braided net to match coat:
others are of all linen, with braiding effectively used as a trimming.
Choice of a good range of colors, such as blue, tan, pink, white
and lavender. ? ,
They are suits that you would readily pay $15.00 to $20.00 for. Yet choice tomorrow here
at $9.75. Second floor.
'Worth
up to
$2<0>.<0)<0)
Altman voile skirt,
worth $15, $18 or $20,
Thev are finished with silk drops.
We have them in black only.
Made of fine, wiry quality of voile.
Trimmings are satin or taffeta bands.
Some .self-trimmed, with pipings of satin.
Some have satin-covered buttons.
The styles are the very latest.
The cut and banc of these skirts arc exceptionally
good. The workmanship is excellent.
Koi-omJ Floor?Skirt goetlon.
You cannot be stylish without
a suit of
cream dress goods
If you do not care for the tailored suit of white you
must at least have a skirt. Here arc price attractions
you cannot resist:
CREAM SICILIAN, 4*> Inches wide. Always 1 A ?
sold at 59c a yard. Special tomorrow at, a yard
55c
85c
ALL-WOOL CREAM SERGE; firm, hard
twisted weave. Worth more. Special at, a
yard
LUPIN S CREAM SERGE, GO inches wide.
Nothing better to be had at $1-25 a yard. Spe
cial tomorrow, a yard
First Floor?8. Kann. Sons ft Co.
LA WW
Cheering news for those with wash frocks to make. Hot weather brings with it the need of
so many summer frocks that one appreciates the chance to save on the fabrics whenever chance
offers it.
These lawns arc on white ground with floral designs, rings, polka dots and figures in pretty
color combinations; many with corded stripes, too, of self, which gives a pleasing effect to the
whole design.
Also at this price lawns in plain colors of light blue, pink, Copenhagen, black, lavender and
natural.
All 31 inches wide, and just the best sort of material for summer frocks?and only 8?jc a
yard to pay, too. 1st floor.
Notions at small cost
For the summer sewing
ITWEARA WASHA
BLKDRBSS SHI ELDS,
warranted; regular
prices for following
three sizes?2, 3 and 4?
are 21c, 24c, and 27c.
respectively; choice of
any size, a
pair
SHIRT WAIST
SHIELDS, lace edges;
sizes 2. 3 and 4; reg
ularly 25c a pair, t] g/.
Tomorrow, a pair
LI G H T-WEIGHT
DRESS SHIELDS,
all sizes. Choice,
a pair
SPOOL SILK. 100
yard Spools; black and
colors; best quality;
regularly ttc a Jig,
spool. Special for..
HARVARD SPOOL
COTTON, 200 yards;
black or white; regu
larly 3c a spool. 11 Kf.
A dozen
BASTING COTTON,
500-yard spools; regu
larly 5c a spool. Spe
cial, two spools
for
columbia HOOKS
AND EYES, black or
wnite; regularly
5c a card. Special..
DE LONG HOOKS
AND EYES; all Er
sizes. Per card ..."
LION BRAND
HOOKS AND EYES.
6 cards in a box.
For
Notions?First Floor.
Sc
3c
Sc
ANGORA SKIRT
BRAID, black #>r col
ors; regularly ?=]*,
10c. For ***
LINEN SKIRT
BRAID,.for linen skirts;
regularly 10c for a 5
yard piece. Sale
price
GEM PINS, all sizes;
regularly 5c a paper.
Special 3 papers jj (Qj?
sanitary safety
PINS, regularly 3c, 4c
and 5c 4 dozen. Sale
price, 2 dozen
for
LARGE PIN CUBES,
regularly 9c K ~
each. Special
COTTON TAPE. 24
yard piece; black or
white. Special,
a yard
FEATHERS TITCH
BRAID, 0 yards to
piece: assorted pat
terns; regularly 10c.
Special tomor
row
SANITARY WASH
CLOTHS, regularly 5c
each. Special, 3 jj
FANCY SILK ELAS
TIC, in all colors; \
>ard remnants; regu
larly 25c and 50c fl
yd. Remnants for
washable HAIR
ltOLLS, large size; the
regular 50c kinds,
Special at
6c
Window screens,
choice
of six
sizes . .
These Window Screens are filled with good York
wire, have light wood frames and steel slides. Here are
the sizes:
24 inches high, extending to 27 inches.
28 inches high, extending to 37 inches.
3o incnes high, extending to 26 inches.
30 inches high, extending to 33 inches.
28 inches high, extending to 41 inches.
30 inches high, entending to 37 inches.
Third Flour?S. Kann. Sons & Co.
Corsets renovated
Before leaving the city let us have your old corsets to
renovate. We'll repair them and launder them so that
they will be as good as new?and the cost will be but a
trifle. Consult our corsetiere.--Second Floor.
ILK
Two of the best values we've yet been
able to offer in this section:
GENUINE MAURIJAH SHANTUNG
SILKS, satin faced, 26 inches wide, and may
be made up on either side; will not "pull" or
"slip." Regular $1.00 quality. Of- * ^
fered here tomorrow at, a yard....
SEMI-ROUGH PONGEES, 27 inches
wide, in all the new shades and black.
Worth 59c a yard.' On sale to
morrow at.
39c
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