OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, June 24, 1909, Image 12

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1909-06-24/ed-1/seq-12/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 12

?>
y
l
5.
+
!?!
V
if
V
V
*
*>
S
5
t
?
Y
X
v
A
i
1
THE OUTER A GARMENT SHOP
60S TO 614 ELEVENTH STREET
Friday and Saturday
Bargain Sale.
$5 J
j for Princess Batiste Dresses
Lioene TuHj Frocks=heretofore
to $112.50.
r
$10.00
for French Lsnen Dresses, Pongee
Silk Dresses and Foulard Silk
Dresse^=lhieretofore up to $25.
r
Tail Bored Cloth Suats.
$7.50=fonnnierly. . $22
$11 L50=fonnnierlly $28.00
$117.50===ffoinnnierfly
$22.50=
EJnen_Smts.
$fl0.00=formerly $35.00
$11 H.50=formierly. $118
$U4.75=forinnierly. $25
*
?
1
I
f
T
V
t
Y
v
4
V
*
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
v
?>
}
*> !
?
?>
*
Y
Y
T
Y
Y
?>
*
Y
*
?
V
*
2
+
Y
?!?
Y
t
I
?
T
Y
Y
?
T
|
?>
?>
4
?
Y
T
X
?
?
? T
Y
Y
Y
.?
x
Y
x
v
Gowns Reduced.
$115.0&
$20j
$35j
$2.90=formerly,
$5.95-=formierfly,
| $6.75,-=forrnerly<
| $i0.00=formerIiy,
I
$4.00
$9.00
$1111.00
$118
Waists Reduced,
t
I
I
??
v
?
X
X
x
Y
t
35,=l
$ 11 .95'=fonnn!erly,
9Er=i
$2.50
$3.50
JfKJ^neio's
Bargain Bulletin!
?Great Underprice Selling of
?Small Lots of Summer Wearables
?to Make the Busiest Friday of June.
d? fl g for $25, $28.50, $32.50, $33.50, $35, $40,
4/ 11 cD) $42.50, $43.50 and $50 Stylish Voile
Prunella and Serge Suits.
for Handsome $30 Silk Jumper Suit.
$110 f?r Stylish $16.50 Pongee Skirt.
$10 for $23.50 Dressy White Voile Skirt.
$2.25 f?r $3-5? Natural Color Linen Skirts.
$8 for Misses' $10 Wash Suits.
$9 for Misses' $12 Wash Suits.
$5 for $12.50. S15.50 and $16.50 Silk and Chiffon Waists.
49c i?r 0fld lots Si to $1.25 Corsets.
$11 for odd lots $2.50 to $5.50 Corsets.
9c f?r I-adies* 12} jc Swiss Ribbed Vests.
3C an<3 5c yard for 5c to 15c Laces.
5c f?r Ladies' and Children's Handkerchiefs.
5c and |?c for 25c Wash Belts. 1
28c f?r 35c Black Lace Lisle Hose. (Size 8Vi.)
67c $1 and $1.35 Long Silk Gloves. (Black and gray.)
$11.89 f?r $- and $2.25 1'arasols.
a
::
New shipment of Ciolf Coats for mountain wear.
WM. M. McKNEW. CO., 933 PA. AVE.
The Woman Suffrage Movement.
To th'1 FMltor of The Star:
Referring to your editorial on the wom
an suffrage movement, the Xntional
American Woman Suffrage Association is
at the present time conducting just such
a campaign as you have sugsested, by the
circulation of a great national petition
asking Congress to submit to the Jegisla
tures of the *everal states for ratification
an amendment to the national Constitu
tion which shall enable women to vote.
No such petition has been circulated for
the last twenty years, and we intend this
petition to show, when proper!} classified,
the number o' men and the number of
women throughout the I'nited'States who
?re in favor of w?>m.m suffrage.
From these headquarters, now located
at 1K23 H street northwest, thousands of
petition blanks have been sent out. and
enough returns have been received to in
dicate that this will be the largest peti-i
tion ever presented to Congress on a>iy
subject whatever. This should be a practi
cal answer to the question, Do women
want to vote?
In regard to the expressions of Kishop
Doane, Cardinal Gibbons and other church
dignitaries, it can be said that they can
not represent the opinions of all the mem
bers of their respective church organiza
tions. There have been other high, church
ufli< ialf. whose opinions probably carry
just as much weight and authority, who
have spoken In favor of the movement,
and who recognize the work of women in
the churches as well as at home, and
give them credit for equal intelligence
with their male relatives.
JEXNETTE il. BRADLEY.
4
WORKING FOR SHIP SUBSIDY
MERCANTILE MARINE LEAGUE
OFFICERS GIVE DINNER.
\ *
Speaker Cannon Guest of Honor.
President Lends Encouragement
by Appearing for Brief Stay.
Ship subsidy took a new lease on life
last evening, President Taft being a
guest for a short time at a dinner ghen
by the friends of subsidy at the New
Willard. The dinner was to boom the
Humphrey bill. The Mercantile Marine
League, which is backing the movement,
has representatives and an organization
in 200 of the 301 congressional districts
and is willing to swap its support for
congressional backing to the bill when
the next election rolls around.
Speaker Cannon was the guest of honor
at the dinner and President Taft gave
encouragement to the promoters! of the
measure by dropping in on the diners
shortly after 9 o'clock. The hosts were
officials and members of the Merchant
Marine league, with headquarters at
Cleveland, Ohio.
Avowed Purpose of Dinner.
The avowed purpose of the dinner was
to persuade President Taft. Speaker Can
non and the republican leaders that the
new Humphrey bill should be made a
part of the republican legislative pro
gram of next winter. Officers of the
league explained to their guests the de
tails of a remarkable organization with
members in 2?0 of the 301 coP^es?'?K
districts, to create a sentiment in behalf
of the Humphrey bill. They offered
turn this organization to the advantage
of the republican party in the next cam
PThe two novel features of the Hum
phrey bill are free ships- and a new sys
tem of tonnage taxes At present Amer^
cans owning foreign-built ships, are not
permitted to fly the American fl? g .
them or have them admitted to Amerl
can registry unless they are more than
half rebuilt in American shipyards. The
bill proposes to admit to American reg
istry foreign-built steamers of 5,000 gross
tons or more wholly owned by American .
These ships nre to be restricted to for
eign trade or trade with the Philippine
and Hawaiian islands, and are to he bar
red from the coastwise trade and from
mail compensation under the act of 1<-Ji
or the Humphrey act.
As to Tonnage Taxes.
The tonnage taxes in waters of tins
hemisphere are to be reduced, while ton
nage taxes In the transatlantic trade and
in the eastern trade are to be materially
increased. The reciprocal law relating to
tonnage taxe3 is repealed by this bill.
This will mean an increase estimated at
a million dollars in tonnage taxes to be
paid by foreign ship owners, and it is
expected to decrease the tonnage taxes
now paid by American ships, which trade
is chiefly in local waters.
Further than this, a rebate of 80 per
cent of all tonnage taxes will be allowed
American ships which carry American
boys or apprentices to be trained in sea
manship. The other features of the bill
are the same as those of the last two or
three mail subsidy bills to be introduced.
This bill seeks, as those did, to establish
new mail lines to South and Central
America, Japan. China, the Philippines
and Australasia, the compensation of
these lines being paid out of the mail
receipts.
Card Index System.
The organization of the Merchant Ma
rine League to promote sentiment for
this bill is based on an elaborate card
index system, covering each of the 'Jt'O
congressional districts whose members
are opposed or lukewarm to the ship
subsidy proposition. The card devoted to
each congressional district contains the
names of from fifty to seventy-five prom
inent men. These men are being bom
barded with publicity material. 1 h rough
them, in this fashion, a sentiment is ex
pected to be developed which will reach
the member in each case. This card in
dex system has been offered to the re
publican leaders for use in the next elec
tion. . _ ,
The dinner was a private affair. Among
the hosts, officers and members of the
Merchant Marine League were President
Joseph G- Butler of Youngstown, Ohio;
Vice President Myron T. Herrick of
Cleveland; Treasurer J. J. Sullivan of
Cleveland and Secretary John A. Ponton
of Cleveland. Besides Speaker Cannon,
the guests were Representatives Payne
of New York, McKinlev of Illinois,
Dwight of New York and Burke of Penn
sylvania. Senator Gallinger, Postmaster
General Hitchcock, John Barrett, director
of the bureau of the American republics;
Assistant Secretary of State Wilson, Gen.
Clarence R. Edwards, chief of the bureau
of insular affairs; former Senator llem
enwav, former Representative Charles B.
Landis of Indiana, former Second As
sistant Postmaster General McCleary and
many others interested in the ship sub
sidy question.
HI6HER TARIFF ON PINEAPPLES
SOUTHERN SENATORS WIN
FIGHT FOR GROWERS.
Maryland Senators' Efforts to Help
Canners of Their State Fail?Coal
Schedule Completed.
| The finance committee struck another
snag in the Senate late yesterday after
noon when the pineapple paragraph was
readied. The contention in this connec
tion was for higher tariff rates, and came
from democratic sources. The objectors
in this case-were Senators Taliaferro and
Fletcher of Florida. The House had fixed
a duty of 8 cents per cubic foot on pine
apples in barrels and of $8 per thousand,
but the Senate committee on finance re
duced this rate to 7 cents and $7 respec
tively, thus restoring the provisions of
the I^ingley law.
Mr. Taliaferro presented an amendment
| restoring the House rate of per thou
1 sand, but changing the other portions of
the provision so as to require the pay
ment of half a cent a pound for pine
apples in bulk. The contention was for
and against this increase, and the light
was mainly between the Florida sena
tors, representing a pineapple-producing
state, and Senators femith and Ra\ ner of
Maryland, in whose state there are large
pineapple-canning establishments. Dis
avowing all championship of the canners,
the Maryland senators made a : uenuous
fight on general principles against the in
crease of the duty. In the course of i.is
remarks Mr. Rayner charged the repub
lican party with bad faith in promising
| to lower tariff duties.
\fter a debate extending over about
t lour hours' time, the Taliaferro amend
I merit was adopted, 34 to 30. This was a
| defeat for the finance committee, but the
amendment was not strenuously resisted
I by tlie committee and several of its mem
j hers voted for it.
The close of the day presented a sur
prise ir. the completion of the coal sched
ule' It had beeh expected that this sched
ule would be debated at great length,
but it was passed after litile more than
mi hour's discussion. A new schedule
I was presented by Mr..Aldricb as chair
man of the finance committee reducing
the House rate on bituminous coal from
<?7 cents per ton to (W cents and eliminat
ing the House reciprocity clause.
Numerous attempts were made to re
duce the rate, and thene was one effort
to obtain free coal, but they were all
voted down and the committee's scale re
tained.
Asks for an Absolute Divorce.
Otho E Peters today filed suit for an
absolute divorce from Hatt e May Peters.
They were married in Martinsburg, Md.t
August 14, ltKK!, and came to this city
two years later. They have one son fivt?
years old. Infidelity is aliened and a co
lespondent named.
Fred Blake, a young neero. was run
over by a C. & O. train at Staunton, Va.,
and his body cut in tw?
MAN TRIES TO SLAY HIS WIFE
AND STEPDAUGHTER.
Effort by Suicide, Who Had Been
Separted From Spouse, at
Reconciliation Fails.
BALTIMORE. Md.. June 24.??nraged
at his wife's refusal to bec<jme reconciled
to him. George A. Rocks, fifty years old.
of Ensor street, near Ashland avenue,
shot and killed himself after he had tried
to kill his wife, Mrs. Ida Rocks, and his
stepdaughter. Miss Lily Cole, fourteen
years old, by shooting them with the
same pistol at their home, U817 I" rlsby
street. The two women are at St. Luke's
Hospital, where they were taken in the
northern district ambulance. There is
hope for their recovery.
Rocks had been separated from his wife
since last March, and numerous efforts
at reconciliation had failed. He had only
been released from the northern police
station about four Ivpurs. having been
fined $5 and costs for assaulting his
brother-in-law. Howard Lamb, H810 "N al
ley street, Tuesday at U5th street and
Greenmount avenue.
Mr. and Mrs. Rocks were married about
ten vears ago. and for a long time lived
in Waverly. Both had been married be
fore. and Mrs. Rocks has a daughter and
Rocks a son, both grown. Until last
March they lived together, but, it is
said. Rocks became addicted to drink
and grew quarrelsome.
Mrs. Rocks had him arraigned at the
northeastern police station in March and
they had since been separated, with the
exception of a period of two days.
Asks to Be Taken Back.
Shortly after 4 o'clock yesterday after
noon Rocks went to his wife's home,
where she conducted a grocery.
"Where is Ida?" he asked as he entered
the store.
"She is back in the kitchen," said one
of the younger children.
Rocks embraced t lie child. Then he
was met by his wife, who inquired what
he desired.
"Ida, please forgive mel" he said. I
will treat you all right in the future.
Let me come home with you and the
children."
Mrs. Rocks declined to have him back
with her under any consideration.
"Well, then, I want some money," he
said, "and I am going to stay here to
supper." _ , ,
"Leave the house! You are not wanted
here, and you cannot stay for supper,
Mrs. Rocks said. She then left him and
went back into the kitchen.
A remark from Miss Cole seemed to
incense Rocks, for he grabbed her
around the neck, and. pulling a pistol
from his pocket, pressed it to her fore
head and fired.
Falls to the Floor Screaming.
She fell to the floor and screamed.
Mrs. Rocks heard the shot, and as she
ran from the-kitchen to the dining room
Rocks fired at her. The bullet went
through her mouth and lodged in her
throat.
Rocks' two youngest children were in
the room when he shot his wife and
stepdaughter, and they ran screaming
from the house. He walked coolly back
to the kitchen, after stepping over his
wife, who lay on the floor. Placing the
muzzle of the pistol in his mouth'he
fired.
The two women managed ?to get to
their feet and ran screaming into the
home of Mrs. Harry Norris. 2815 Frisby
street. Mrs. Norris had heard the shots
fired, and when she saw the two women
run into her yard, bleeding profusely,
she sent her nephew. Raymond Shettle,
for Dr. W. J. Pillsbury, 2801 Green
mount avenue.
Patrolmen Wolters and Gcrnhardt of
the northeastern district and Sergt.
Dunn of the northern district soon ar
rived and found Rocks dead. After re
ceiving medical attention, the two wom
en were hurried to the hospital on 'he
advice of Capt. Gittings. Rocks' body
was taken to the morgue in the north
eastern district wagon by Patrolman
Hoffman.
HOLY TRINITY SCHOOL CLOSES
INTERESTING ENTERTAINMENT
IN THE PARISH HALL.
Numerous Premiums Awarded.
Presentation of Play by
the Pupils.
Numerous prizes were awarded and an
interesting entertainment given at the
closing exercises of Holy Trinity School,
which took place in the parish hall last
night. The school is in charge of the
Sisters of Providence from Immaculata
?Seminary, on Wisconsin avenue extended.
Rev. Thomas J. Harlin presided. Rev.
Joseph C. Mallon, pastor of St. Ann's
Church, Tenleytown; Rev. Father Flem
ing, Georgetown University, and Rev
Fathers O'Connell, S. J.; Rrennen. S. J..
1 and Hart were the other clergymen pres
I ent.
An Interesting Program.
The program included a song and drill
j by the fifth and sixth grades; the "Lit
i tie Fiddlers," by the minims; the "White
Caps," by the third and fourth grades;
the "Drummer Boys," by the first and
second grades, and a drama, ' By the
Rising of the Moon, or Christian Forgive
ness." the cast taken by the following:
William O'Brien, Eugene Mclntyre, Jo
seph Camnbell, William Barron. John J.
King. Flancis Farquhar. Ralph Mur
taugh, Edwin Stohlman, Francis Smith,
Julian Poor. Carroll Daly, Edward Hayes,
Walter Colburn. Leonard Spellman. \N il
liam Malone, John Killeen. George Reck
ert, Thomas Frobey. Francis Macaboy,
Lawrence Colburn and Norman Hess.
Award of Premiums.
Ralph Murtaugh. seventh grade; Ber
i nard McCarthy, sixth grade; George No
lan, fifth grade; Harry Spillman. fourth
' grade, and Maurice O'Connor, third grade,
| received premiums for the highest aver
: ages.
Gieatest progress in second grade, Os
j car Mink; greatest progress in first grade,
I Luke Smith.
| Russell Kelley, Harry Blandy, John
' Kelley, David Colburn, Frank Kearney,
William Newhieser, James Reilly, James
Earl Cook, Martin Cook, James MeDer
mott. Joseph Murtaugh, Luke Kearney
| and Francis Campbell received premiums
in the minim department.
Premiums for attendance were awarded
to Edward Hayes, Julian Poor, George
Rikert, Walter Colburn, Joseph McFad
den. Bernard McCarthy. Charles ..eckert.
Maurice Colburn, John Brown. Francis
Smith, Michael Cook. Edwin Stohlman,
Andrew Thurier, Le Roy Knott, William
Smith. Maurice O'Connor, Norman Con
lin, Roy Schellhorn, John Cocker, Russell
Srhule, Aloysius Smith, William Rekert,
John Finnelly, William Wise and l&adore
Costolow.
Joseph A Campbell, William F. X.
Barron, William F. X. <i)Brien. Edward
1'. Hayes, Julian P. Poor and Carroll A.
Daly received scholarships.
A gold medal for attaining the highest
average in Christian doctrine examina
tion was awarded to William Barron.
Sanctuary medals were awarded to Ju
lian Poor and Edwin O Brien.
ROYAL ARCANUM CELEBRATES.
Thirty-Second Anniversary of the
Order Observed.
Members and friends of the Royal Ar
canum to the number of '_\30t> celebrated
the thirty-second anniversary of the birth
of that order by an all-day and evening
picnic at Chevy Chase Lake yesterday.
Grand Recent G^or^e S. Britt was as
sisted by various committees in lcokln?
after th- comfort of all participants and
they were untiring in their effcrts to
FRIDAY?
REMNANT DAY.
FRIDAY
REMNANT DAY.
- W. B. MOSES & SONS ?
I I
Stock-Taking Sale
Summer Draperies and Linens
Sheets and Pillow Cases
Mohawk
Regular. Special.
42x36 in... 17c 15c
45x36 in... 20c 17c
54x90 in... '55c 50c
72x90 in... 70c 65c
81x90 in... 80c 72!ic
90x90 in... 9pc 80c
Utica
lire lit: Special.
Bed Spreads Reduced
Rppular. Special.
8 11-4 Crocheted Bed Spreads.. $1.00 75?
24 11-4 Crocheted Bed Spreads.. $1.25
12 11-4 Crocheted Bed Spreads.. $1.75
12 11-4 Crocheted Fringed Bed
Spreads $*-75
$1.00
$I-35
$i-45
Special Linen Remnants
6 2)4x2',<4 Heavy Double Damask Pattern
Cloths; rich designs. Regularly
$6.50. Remnant price
30 Extra Fine Quality lluck Towels;
hemstitched border; large size. Regu
larly, 50c. Remnant price, each ?jUC
25 Extra Large and Heavy Turkish
Towels. Regularly 25c. Remnant 1
price J
30c
>kius;
75c
Ruffled and Embroidered Curtains
12 pairs
6 pairs
7 pairs
8 pairs
10 pairs
6 pairs
8 pairs
10 pairs
, 4 pairs
Ruffled
Ruffled
Ruffled
Ruffled
Ruffled
Ruffled
Ruffled
Ruffled
Ruffled
Muslin
Muslin
Muslin
Muslin
Muslin
Muslin
Muslin
Muslin
Muslin
Curtains
Curtains
Curtains
Curtains
Cu rtains
Curtains
Curtains
Curtains
Curtains
Rffnilii r.
$1.25
$ 1.2 T
Si. 25
$1.50
$1.50
$1.50
$i-75
Si-75
$2.00
Special.
95C
Si.00
Si.10
$1.15
Si.25
$1.20
Si.35
Si.50
$1.50
3 Pair*
4 pairs
6 pairs
pairs
pairs
pairs
pairs
pairs
pairs
4
6
4
4
6
4
Ruffled Muslin Curtains
Ruffled Muslin Curtains
Embroidered Curtains...
Embroidered Curtains...
Embroidered Curtains...
Embroidered Curtains...
Embroidered Curtains...
Embroidered Curtains...
Embroidered Curtains...
Regular.
S2.5O
$3.00
$2.00
^) >r
C* 5
$2.50
$3.00
S3-5
$4.50
$5.00
Cleaning
Laces and
Blankets.
Upholstery Shop
We Will Make Your Old Furniture
As Good As New.
Let us take your furniture and upholster it while
you are away for the summer, returning it to you when
you open your house in the fall.
Exceptionally low prices for summer work.
Let us estimate.
Dust and
Light-proof
Storage.
Draperies
Hung Full
Length.
42x36 in.. 18c i^c
45x36 in.. 20c 18c
54x90 in.. 60c 55c
72x90 in.. 80c 72' ..c
81x90 in.. 90c 80c
00x90 in..Si.00 85c
25 dozen 42x36 in. Special Pillow Cases at 10c each
15 dozen 45x36 in. Special Pillow Cases at 12) jc each
Regular. Special.
12 10-4 Crocheted Fringed Bed
Spreads $1.50 Si.25
4 11-4 Satin Spreads S3.50 S3.00
4 11 -4 Satin Fringed Spreads... $4.50 $375
12 11-4 Dimity Spreads S2.00 Si.50
12 10-4 Dimity Spreads $ 1.75 $1.35
10 remnants Fine Bleached Table Dam
ask ; 2/2 yards long. 2 yards wide.
Regularly* S3.12. Remnant price. a* 1 qQ
each Jl.OO
24 Fine Damask Towels; fringed ends;
new patterns. Regularly 50c. Rem
nant price, each
25 dozen 18-inch All-pure-linen Napkins;
good quality. Regularly $1.00. Rem
nant price, dozen
Speiial.
Sl.50
Si.75
Si.45
Si. 50
$1.^0
S2.25
S2.25
S375
$3-5
Founded
186*
W. B. MOSES & SONS
Carpets and Rugs Cold
Cleaned and Stored. Storage.
Awnings and Fly Screens Furniture Floor# Summer
to Order. Polish. Polish. Furniture.
*foZhite Mountains
Aew /Hampshire
You can't help being a mountain climber, once you
set foot in the White Mountains.
The trails are too tempting, the fine brisk, balsam
laden air is bracing, and temperature just cool enough
to make you feel active and vigorous.
Besides climbing, you have your choice of a dozen sports, ana
all of them just a trifle more enjoyable than they are elsewhere.
These hotels will give you a royal welcome:
Mount Pleasant House
Bretton Woods, N. H.
v Capacity 275. *
Twin Mountain House
Twin Mountain, N. H.
Capacity 150.
Forest Hill Hotel
Franconia, N. H.
Capacity 125.
Intervale House
Intervale, N. H.
Capacity 200.
Went worth Hall
Jackson, N. H.
Capacity 250.
Maplewood Hotel
Bethlehem, Maplewood Sta
tion, N. H. Capacity 400.
Sunset Hill House
Sugar Hill, N. H.
Capacity 325.
The Mount Washington
Bretton Woods, N. H.
Capacity 600.
Crawford House
Ent. Crawford Notch, N. H.
Capacity 300.
The Balsams
Dixville Notch, N. H.
Capacity 100.
New Profile House
Franconia Notch, N. H.
Capacity 500.
The Kearsarge The Sinclair
North Conway, N. H. Bethlehem, N. H
Capacity 250. Capacity 300.
The Waumbek Fabyan House
Jefferson, N. H. Fabyans, N. H.
Capacity 500. Cipacity 300.
WITHIN TEN HOURS OF NEW YORK CITY
(Service effective on and after June 28th)
White Mountain Limited (full vestibule Parlor, Dining and Observa
tion car train) will depart from Grand Central Station, New York,
9.50 a. m., and Coach Train at 9.15 a. m.- Night Express (Standard
Sleeping Cars) at 9.00 p. m. Service on all trains daily except
Sunday. For tickets, full information and booklets, call or send to
Boston& Maine K.K. Ticket < )lihce,
171 Broadway, New York City
make the occasion worthy of the natal
day of the Royal Arcanum.
The committee 011 athletic sports pre
sented tiie following interesting program:
3ii-yard race children under ehrht years
? Katherne Eckloff won Christ i* Bell
second.
3o-yard race, children und r twelve
years?Bradford Buckley won, Ada Ma\
C??nn second.
73-yard race, children under sixteen
years? Melvin Oliver won, Harvey Flirm j
second.
uo-yard race, for ladies?Miss Richmond 1
won. Miss Buckley second.
3o-yard race, children* under twelve
years?Whitman Conn won, Irvine Claude
second.
3'i-yard dash, for men-C. E. Eckloff
won, George S. Brut second.
?V>-yard dash for boys?Bra nard Fi?rce
won. Gordon Oaten second.
Rifle contest between teams represent
ing the !-e\ era I councils resulted as fol-|
lows: Municipal, 1?^?: National, I.e.; Pis
pi;;. l,v-: Kismet. 77. Tne h ghest in
dividual score was made by Muj. Gl-3ndie'
B. Young, scoring 3'-> out of a possible
4o.
Bowling contest: Municipal Council. Wi;
National Councial, 334: Ouray Council.
::ns; District Council, 310; Oriental Council
1EW; Kismet, J17.
Base ball championship same won by
National Council, score to 0.
Mrs. Mary Slus-s. aged eighty-seven
\eais. i.- dead at th? home of her son,
1.011 iSluss of Frostburu. Md Sh? was
a native of Virginia.

xml | txt