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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, August 28, 1909, Image 3

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SPECIAL NOTICE.
Everlastingly At It.
All our business ambition Is centered In one
field ROOF WORK: Repairing. Guttering. Slag
, i:?nfltig. Roof Painting. Our thorough. sincere
wurk pars best in the end. It lasts. Call us upl
II3? ON C1I O RooflnK ,412 ?st- n w
* ^ Company. Phone Main 14.
liti2S ?m|
Grafton's Roof Paint
Makes Roofs New.
It "finds out the leaks'* and mends them.
Our experts should bo consulted about roof
. troubles. Over 12,000 roofs testify to their
' ability.
G rafton&Son,i nc.f -7^w
atl2S UVI
We Handle the Finest
Bathroom Fixtures
And will remodel' ? Bathroom at a T*ry
reasonable price. Have us submit plans
and estimates.
Cobcrth, Hancs & White Co.,
UU II ST. N.W. ,-hone M. 2739.
sti2S H>1
An Excellent Drink.
Ballantynes Ale, brewed from a
fine Canadian Malt, is stimulat
ing. beneficial, pure. Si doz.'bot.
Sihoomiaker Co., SJm! um m.
au2S-Ka.tu.th. 10
SMALL PURCHASERS
are as readily accommo
dated by us as extensive
buyers. lowest prices and
prompt attention constitute
our business motto.
rcTMillwork In stock and
made to order. Doors. Sash,
Blinds. Stalrwork. etc.
1 -umber
and MILL
.WORK
Geo. M. Barker, S?7N?' V*'
au2S-d.eSu.14
'When Making Ice Cream
?Confectioners and Druggists
will find it advantageous to use our FLA-]
VORING KX TRACTS. FREEZING SALT.
COLORINGS. Ktc. Absolutely satisfactory
quality. I.OWEST PRICES. 1
consumers supplied.
B. B. Earnslhaw <& Bro.,
WHOLESALE GROW ERS. 11th and M sts. s.e.
THE NEW BATHROOM
Won't cost so much if we furnish and
install the flitures and It'll prove thej
sreatest sort of a luxury. '
HUTCHINSON & MCCARTHY. 1317 14TH ST.
?i ti27-fld
THE SISTERS OF ST. ROSE
Wish to announce to their friends and patrons
that they have moved to their new home.
I'beip* pi. anil Cal. ave., ami will be ready by
September 1 to receive orders for the coming
season. au27-.T0t.ft
Clever Thoughts
in Printing.
?There are many distinctive features that indi
vidualize the Booklets. Folders, Circulars, etc..
printed at the Rig Print Shop. It's the printing
that wins the business.
Judd & Detweiler, line.,
THE BIG PRINT SHOP. 420-22 11TH.
mi2?i-1Qd
TRE\ St'UY DEPARTMENT.
OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER <W thE
- CURRENCY,
WASHINGTON, August 14. 1909
WHEREAS by satisfactory evidence presented
!?> the undersigned It has been made to appear
tb.it THE NATIONAL CAPITAL BANK OF
WASHINGTON." In the city of Washington. In
the District of Columbla, has complied with all
the provisions of the "Act of Congress to en
able national banking associations to esteftd
th -ir corporate existence, and for other pur
poses." approved Julv 12, 1882:
NOW THEREFORE. I. Lawrence O. Marrnv.
comptroller of the currencv. do hereby certtfv
that THE NATIONAL CAPITAL BANK OP
WASHINGTON," In the city of Washington. In
th? District of Columbia. Is authorised to have
succession f'?r the period specified In Its amend
ed articles of association, namely, until close
of business on Augast 14. 1929.
IV TESTIMONY WHEREOF witness my hand
and seal of office this 14th dav of August. 1909.
Signed: LAWRENCE O. MURRAY.
Comptroller of the Currency.
No 4107. Ex. No. 2714. aul7-30t
Worch's Piano House
Offers the Following Piano Bargains:
Knabf. f'JIO; Steinway. $230: Cable * Nelson,
NcAdbam. $175: Chlckerlng. $180.
HI GO WORCH, 1110 G. Worcb building.
sulT-tf.O
Office SuppSies of All
Description.
LOWEST PRICES.
Standard Diaries for 1910 Now Ready.
MORRISON PAPER CO.,
1009 ^a- Ave. N.W.
aulO-tf.lO
SPIRITUALISM.
MRS. WHITE HAS RESUMED HER SUNDAY
and Friday meetings at 730 8th at. n.w., 8
o'clock. Private interviews dally.
MRS. F. NOBBE, 1323 11TH ST. N.W.. HOLDS
meetings every SuBday. Tuesday and Friday
night. Readings dally. Phone. No. 7775.
MRS. HKNKLE HOLDS MEETINGS SUNDAY
and Friday evenings at 11 4th at., 8 o'clock.
Everybody ttets a reading. Advice daily.
Phone L 2049.
CHURCH NOTICES.
BAPTIST.
METROPOLITAN. ?TH AND A STS. N.E.:
Rev. John Compton Ball, pastor.?Preaching
by Rev. A. F. Anderson, llarrlaburg. Pa., at
11 a.m and 8 p.m. All welcome.
TEMPLE BAPTIST CHURCH. COR. 10TH AND
N sts. n.w.?Rev. J. S. Sowers of Norwotd,
Ohio, will preach at 11 a.m. and 7':45 p.m.
S. s.. }?::{?? a m.: C. E.. <1:45 p.m.
CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH, 8TH AND H
sts. n.w.; Rev. Samuel H. Greene, D. D.. Das-'
tor.??:30 a.m., Sunday school: P. H. Bristow.
supt. I'ublic worship, with sermons by Rev.
A. S. Hvbart, D. D.. of Cheater, Pa.. 11 a.m.
and 8 i?.m. Teachers' Bible Club Thursday, 7
p.m. Church prayer meetings. S p.m. En
deavor meetings Tuesday. 8 p.m.. and Sunday,
and ?>:45 p.m. All are cordially invited.
litMANI KI. BAPTIST CHl'RCH, tX>R. 10TH
? t. and Columbia rd., Rev. G. E. Whltehouse,
minister. Bible scliool at 9:30 a.m., Percy S.
foster, aitpt.: preaching at 11 a.m. and 8 p.m.
by Rev. Ge?>rge W. ({ulcli, D.D., of Newport,
It. I.: midweek prayer service, Thursday at 8
p.m. Seats free. All invited.
FtifcST HAITIST CHURCH, 16TH AND O STS.
Rev. .Ia?. B. Clayton. D. D.. acting pastor.
Will pr?ach at II a.m.; subjeet. "Alone on
Paimos"; no evening services: Sunday school
al 9:3?i. Everybody welcome.
FTi riT BA~PTIST CHURCH.?PASTOR JOHN I
E. Rrigcs will nrea>-h at 11 and 8. His ser
mons wilI reflet some vacation eiperletjens in
? limbing hills, sailing lakes and wandering1
? nvxig the rhododendrons. Morning subject.
'How Jesus Spent a Vacation": evening sub
ject "Help from the Hills"; Sunday school.
New t>nr?ils and workers wanted.
Everybody invited. Strangers made welcome.
JJreat BUSH MEETING. GREEN WILLOW
I'ark. tomorrow, by Friendship Baptist Ch'irch.
D. It. Willbanks. IV D. in two great sermons. 3
o'clock. "The Devil Hog Killing": 7:30 p.m.,
"A Child Sneeilng Seven Times After Death.
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH OF THE ASCENSION. MASS- AVE
and 12th st. n w.. Rev. J. Henntng Nelma,
rector.?Services. 8 a.m., 11 a.m. The Rev. J.
Quinn will p^eiyh at 11 a.m.
ST MARK'S CHURCH, 3D AND A STS. S.E.;
lt?? W. I.. DeVriea. Ph.D., and Rev. R. A.
Curtis, clergy. Services. 7:80. 11 and 8.
bT. ANDREW"CHURCH. 14TH AND COR
coran its. K*\. G. Calvert Carter, rector;
lie v. W. M. Pettis, D. D.. Rev. J. R. Blcknell,
curates. Sundays, 7:30 and 11 a.m.; S. S..
9.:X) a.m.; w?tk daya?holy days. 7 and 10
a.m.: every Thursday. 10 a.m.
PEOPLE'S OPEN Til: EVENSONG ON CATHF.
dral grounds. Mount St. Alban, at 4 p.m.. Au
gust 29: specisl preacher. Rev. H. A. Brown,
chaplain. U. S A : vested choi* led by de
????bment of the United Statea Marine Band.
Take Tcnleytown cars. Dally morning and
evening prayer every week day at 9 a m. and
5 p.m. In St. Alban's Church or the Little
Sanctuary on the cathedral close. Requesta
for intercessory prayer or thanksgiving may lie
sent to the cathedral clergy. Mount St. Alban.
El'Tl'HA.NY CHUKCH, G ST. BETWEEN 18TH
and 14th. Rct. R. II. McKlm. D. D., rector.?
Services. 8 a.m.. 11 a.m. and 8 p m.
ST mTcHAEL'S AND ALL ANGELS' CHURCH,
st between F St. and Va. ave.. Itov. J.
II I> is. M. A.. B D.?Services, 7:S0. U aud
5:15.
LITHERAN.
K I- 1,1J-.R MEMORI AL. Mil. AVE.
st. n.?? R<v. P. Wiles. )>aator.
11: Sunday acho<il. 9:30; C. E. mee
I t. r\ Kawtv wolccmp
AND OTH
Preaching.
? 1. pmiwii, ...w, v. ?.. meeting. 8 p.m.
I"vcryhmly welcome.
I NIU-fPKNDKNT KI T11HRAN CHURCH. 1322
\. rm"nt are. n w. Services. 11 a.m.. sermon
?>> Re?. S.' V l>-ecb of Methoilist Episcopal
? btirch; S. S.. 9:.'!t? a.m.; Y. P. S.. 7 p.m.
ST I'aTT.S. l'TIi \NI' II STS. N.W.. JOHN
T. Huddle, pastor. -Service, with sermon by
Cue pu?tor. 11 a.m.: Sunday school. 0:3Oa.tn.;
prayer meeting. Thursday, 8 p.m.
LI THERAN rHI KCli OF TIIK RKFCHtilA
tlon. Pa. ave. and F si. s.e.. Rev. John Weld
lev. minister. Service at 11 a.m.; Sunday
s.-hool at 9:30 a m.; (Tiristisn Endeavor prayer
meeting at 7 p.m.
MEMOlirAL < H? RCII, Tllo.MAS < IR(T.F~
Service^ at 11 o'clock, sermon by Rev. Charles
II. Kiitler: Sunday school at 9:30: Christian
Endeavor, with addi -ss by Key. Lloyd C. Doug
las. 7 p.m. Everybody Invited.
CH RISTADELPHIAIV.
yTTsHINGTON F.CCLESIA. NAVAL LODGR
Hall. 3.SO Pa. ave. s.c., cv?r/ Sunday at 11:30
a.m. N? collection.
CHURCH NOTICES.
METHODIST EPISCOPAL.
WAUGH, 3D AND A N.E.. A. H. THOMPSON',
pastor.?Sunday acbool, 9:30 a.m.; preaching,
11 a.m.; lawn service, 6:3<>. The pastor will
speak at both services.
WW LEY CHAPEL M. K. CHURCH, COR. 5TH
and F at*, n.w., Rev. W. 1. McKenney, D. D..
pastor.?Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.: preaching at
11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. by Rev. W. Glbbs Mc
Kenney. I.angdon, D. C.; prayer service, Thurs
day. 8 p.m.
CALVARY M. E. CHURCH. COLUMBIA ROAD
bet. 14th and 15th ata. n.w., Hot. Jos. Daw sod. j
Ph.D., pastor.?9:30 a.m.. Sunday school; 111
a.m.. preaching by Rev. John E. Fort. No
evening service.
HAMLINE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH.
9th and P sts.. Rev. Charles E. Guthrie. pas
tor.?Sunday school. 9:30 a.m.: public worship.
11 a.m.. sermon by Rev. K. E. Marshall, and
at X p.m.: at 6:45 p.m.. final open-air services
of summer, conducted by Epworth league, at
following stations: 8th and O sts.: 8th st. and
R. I. ave.; Iowa Circle; engine house. R st.
bet. flth snd 10th. Good speakers and singing.
Public welcome at all services.
METROPOLITAN M. E. CHURCH. CORNER
John Marshall place and C st. n.w.?11 a.m..
preaching by Rev. J. Iywls Hartsock: 9:30
a.m.. Sunday school: 7:30 p.m.. Epworth
League, at which Dr. Hartsock speaks.
FOUNDRY VN E CHURCH. 16TH AND
Church sts.. Rev. Robert M. Moore. I>. D.. pas
tor: Rev. C. E. Wise, assistant pastor.--Sunday
school. 9:30 a.m.; public worship at 11 a.m.
and N p.m.. with services by the pastor. A11
welcome.
MT. VERNON PLACE METHODIST EPISCO
pal Church South, cor. 9th and K sts. n.w.,
J. Howard Wells, pastor.?9:30. Sunday school:
11 a.m. and 8 p.m., sermons by the pastor; 7
p.m.. Epworth league.
DUMBARTON AVENUE M. E. CHURCH, Rev.
Charles L. Pate, D.D., pastor.?10 a.m., Sun
day school; 11 a.m.. ??Nehemlah"; 8 p.m.,
"Tho Good Shepherd." Come; you will enjoy
the services.
TRINITY M. E. CHURCH. COR. 5TH AND TA.
ave. s.e.?Preaching. 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.. Rev.
n. S. France. D. D.; 9:30 a.m., Sunday school.
McKENDREE M. E. CHURCH^ MASSACHU
setts ave. between 9th and 10th sts. n.w.. Rev.
R. L- Wright, pastor.?Preaching at 11 a.m.
by the pastor; twilight service from ? to 8
p.m.; Sunday school, 9:39 a.m.
DOUGLAS MEMORIAL M. E. CHURCH, 11TH
and H n.e.. Rev. W. W. Barnes, pastor.?9:30
a.m., Sunday school: 11 a.m.. preaching by the
pastor: 7 p.m., twilight services. All welcome.
METHODIST EPISCOPAL, SOUTH.
MT. VERNON PLACE METHODIST EP1SCO
pal Church South, cor. 9th and K sts. n.w.,
J. Howard Wells, pastor.?9:30. Sunday school;
11 a.m. and 8 p.m.. Rev. A. W. Graves. Ep
worth League at 7 p.m.
MT. PLEASANT. POST OFFICE HALL. 1413
Park road, pastor. Rev. P. W. Jeffries?9:30
a.m.. Sunday school; 11 a.m., "Let Us Not Be
Weary"; 8 p.m.. "The Keeping of the Heart.*'
MARVIN M. E. CHURCH SOUTH. 10TH AND
B sts. s.w., Rev. Selwyn K. Cockrell, pastor.
?Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; preaching 11 a.m.
and 8 p.m.
ST. PAUL M. E. CHURCH SOUTH. 2D AND S
sts. n.w.. Rev. Wm. Eustace Henry, pastor.?
Divine worship at 11 a.m. and 8 p.m.; other
services as usual. Strangers welcome.
" METHODIST PROTESTANT.
NORTH CAROLINA AVENUE METHODIST
Protestant Church. 8th and N. C. ave. s.e.,
Rev. Richard L. Shipley, pastor.?11 a.m.,
7:30 p.m., preaching by Rev. J. B. McLaugh
lin; evening service on lawn.
r! L AVE. METHODIST PROTESTANT
Church, cor. R. I. ave. and 1st n.w., pastor,
Rev. J. M. GUI.?S. S.. 9:30 a.m.: church
services. 11 a.m. and 8 p.m.; Christian En
deavor, 7 p.m. Seats free. Everybody invited.
PRESBYTERIAN.
METROPOLITAN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH,
4th and B sts. s.e.; Rev. Paul R. lllckok.
pastor.?Services tomorrow at 11 a.m.. con
ducted by Wm. Hart Dexter. Ph. D. Sahbatii
school, 9:45 a.m.; Y. P. S. C. E., 6:30 p.m.;
no other evening service. Midweek services
Thursday. 8 p.m.
NEW YORK AVENUE PRESBYTERIAN
Church. N. Y. ave.. H and 13th ats.; I)r. Wal
lace Radcliffe. pastor.?11 a.m.. sermon by
Rev. John Clark II111. D. D., First Presbyterian
Church. Springfield, Ohio. No evening service.
Music led by Thos. L. Jones, precentor; Ernest
Lent, violin.
WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, K A I.ORAM A AND
Columbia roads. Rev. W. D. Moss, minister.?
9:30. S. S.: 11. worship, preaching by Rev.
John Graham. D. D., of Philadelphia; aubject,
"The Center Cross."
GUNTON-TEMPLE MEMORIAL. 14TH AND R.
?Rev. G. Wibur Shipley, from St. Albans.
W. Va.. will preach at 11 a.m. C. E. meeting.
?:45 p.m. Prayer meeting 7:45 Thursday
evening.
FOURTH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 13TH
and Fairmont sts. n.w.: Rev. Joseph T. Kellv,
D. D., pastor.?Sabbath school at 9:30 a.m.
Communion service at 11 a.m., Revs- Samuel
W. Steele of Avon. N. Y.. presiding. Vesper
service at 7 p.m. Prayer meeting Thursday
at 8 p.m.
FIRST, THE STRANGERS' SABBATH HOME,
John Marshall pi. n.w., Donald MacLeod, min
ister.?11 a.m.. "Christian Discipleshlp"; 7:45
p.m., sons service and short address;, S. S.,
9:80 a.m.; C. E.. 6:45 p.m. All are welcome.
WESTERN, THE CHURCH WITH A WEL
come, H st. bet. 19th and 20th n.w.?11 a.m..
Rev. J. Alfred Garrett; 8 p.m.. Rev. John
Graham. D. D., of the East Park Presbyterian
Chnrch, Phlla.; "The Gift of God in Thee";
8. 8., 9:30 a.m.: C. E.. 7 p.m.; prayer meet
Ing. Thursday. 8 p.m.
CENTRAL.-PREACHING AT 11 A.M. AND
7:45 p.m. by Rev. Mr. Shannon; Sunday school
at 9:30 s.m.; prayer meeting, Thursday even
ing. 7:45. Strangers welcome.
EASTERN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, MD.
ave., 6th and C sts. n.e.. Rev. C. L. Nelbel,
psstor.?11 a.m.. preaching by Rev. James M.
Nourse of Vienna. Va.; 9:30 a.m.. S. S.; 7
p.m., C. E.; prayer meeting Thursday, 7:45
p.m.
CHURCH OF THE COVENANT,
Connecticut ave. and N st.,
Charles Wood, minister.
Tyler Dennett, assistant minister.
James M. Henry, minister of Peck Chapel.
11 a.m., the Rev. Tyler Dennett will preach.
Special music: Miss Flora McGill. contralto.
The Covenant Tent,
10th and Monroe sts..
Tyler Dennett, director.
Sunday evening service.
7:30 p.m., musical service.
Mrs. Anna Grant Fugltt, soprano.
Mr. Howard Roderick, violin.
Miss Anna C. Holden. accompanist.
8 p.m., sermon by Rrv. James McClure Henry.
NORTHMINSTER. R. I. AVE. AND 11TH N.W.,
Rev. George P. Wilson, D. D., pastor.? S. S..
9:30; sermon by Hev. Dr. Riddle, 11 a.m.;
midweek service. Thursday. 7:45 p.m.
ECKINGTON PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, N.
Cap. and Q sts.?I'reachlng at 11 a.m.; services
on church lawn. 8 p.m. All welcome.
CENTRAL PRESBYTERIAN (SOUTHERN As
sembly), cor. 3d and I n.w.?Preaching by the
pastor. Rev. James H. Taylor, at 11 n.m. and
?:4.r> p.m.: Sunday school. 9:.K? a.m.; Y. P. S.
C. E.. 0:45 p.m. Visitors welcome.
SOUTHERN PRESBYTERIAN.
SECOND. 22D ST. NEAR Q.-11 A.M.. SERMON
by pastor. Rev. II. Waddell Pratt: no evening
service. Seats freo. All welcome.
CONGREGATIONAL.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. COR.
Ktth and G sts. n.w.; Kev. Samuel H. Wond
row. D.D.. pastor: Rev. Samuel R. Swift, asst.
l?astor. Public worship, 11 a.m., sermon bv
asst pastor: subject. "MY TRIAL OF JESUS";
music by chorus choir; 9:45 a.m.. Sunday
school; 7:50 p.m., Y. P. S. C. E. No eveming
service.
MT. PLEASANT CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH,
Columbia road and 14th st. n.w.? Public serv
ice at 11 a.m., with sermon by Rev. S. M.
Newman. T>.D.; Sinday school at 9:45 a.m.:
Christian Endeavor meeting at 7 p.m. No
evening preaching service.
INGRAM MEMORIAL CONGREGATIONAL
Church (Institutional), temporary ineetlug place.
318 pa. ave. s.e., Rev. J. W. Frlziell. Ph. D.,
pastor.?Church school at 10 a.m.; 11 a.m.,
preaching and worship. Visitors cordially wel
comed.
PEOPLE'S CHURCH.
Rffv. CHARLES FERGUSON OF NEW /ollK.
author of "The Religion of Democracy. and
others will si>eak Snnday afternoon ut 4:30 on
"National Salvation" at the open-air services
In Judiciary Park. so?th of the pension office.
In ease of rain services will be held In Typo
graphical Temple, 423 G st. A cordial invita
tion Is extended.
CENTRAL UNION"MISSION.
GOSPEL WAGON SERVICE. 3D AND ~G~STS7
s.w.. at 4:45 p.m.; speaker. Rev. F. J. Lnkens;
Market space, 6:45 p.m.; speaker, Mr. Wm. L.
Spelden.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE. '
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST. SCIENTIST.
15th and R sts. n.w.-Services: Sunday. 10:50
s m.. subject. "Christ Jesus"; Sunday school.
II a.m.: Wednesday evening meeting. 8 o'clock.
Public cordially invited. All seats free. Free
reading room. 601 Colorado building.
" UNI VERS ALIST. *
CHURCH OT OliR FATHER. COR. 13TH AND
L sts. n.w. Re*. John Van Sehalck. Jr.. pas
tor.?11 a.m.. sermon by Dr. E. M. Bliss: sub
! Ject. "Oriental Religions."
FRIENDS.
THE SOCIETY OF FRIENDS. 1811 I ST. N.W.?
11 a.m. All are Invited and made welcome.
Friends (orthodox), ltth and irving.?
Sabbath school. 9:45 a.m.; meeting for wor
ship. 11 a.m.. snd Thursday, 7:45 p.m. All are
wplcome.
" OTHER SERVICES^
FREE LECTURE - SUBJECT. "THE TRUTH
Will Make You Free," by F.. E. Ward; Recha
blte Hall. 64" I*, ave. n.w.. K raday night,
7:30. G. J. S. Hunnicutt. evangelist. In charge.
HALL < "HAPEL t^NGREGATION-M~?ETS*~FOR
worship every Sunday. 2:30 p.m.. at 023 !???.
ave. n.w. All eordlallv welcomed. PHOEBE
HALL LUTTRELL. Pastor.
BIBLE STUDENTS MEET SUNDAY. 7:.^pTmT7
In r?ar hall. 3d floor. Pythian Temple; present
t'>pi<\ ??The Hidden Mystery"; undenomlns
ttonal. Seats free. No collections. WATCH
TOWER and PEOPLE'S PULPIT literature.
JylO-sa.tt
CHURCH NOTICES.
CHRISTIAN.
VERMONT AVENUE CHURCH. ? SERVICES,
with sermons by Frederick D. Power. 11 and 8;
Bible wohool, 0:80; C. E.. 7. Welcome.
WEATHER FORECAST.
Partly Cloudy Tonight and Sunday,
Probably Followed by Showers.
For the District of Columbia and Mary
land, partly cloudy tonight and Sunday,
probably followed by showers and cooler
Sunday afternoon or night; moderate
variable winds.
Maximum temperature past twenty
four hours, 89; a year ago, 63.
The storm in the gulf has passed inland
near the mouth of the Rio Grande, and is
diminishing in intensity. Strong easterly
winds, however, continue on the west
Texas coast. Another disturbance is
central near the Andros Islands, and it Is
apparently moving northwest toward the
east Florida coast.
Showers occurred within the last twen
ty-four hours in the lake region, the Ohio
valley, eastern Florida, southern Texas,
and at scattered points in the plains
states and the Rocky mountain region.
The weather is somewhat cooler in the
north Atlantic states, and a change to
much cooler weather is in progress in
the northwest. Frost formed Friday
night in Montana, and the temperature is
at or below the freezing point in the
province of Alberta, Canada.
The indications are that the weather
will be unsettled with showers tonight or
Sunday in the north Atlantic states, the
Ohio valley, the lake region and Tennes
see.
Fair weather will continue in the gulf
and south Atlantic states, except that
showers are probable in eastern Florida.
A general change to cooler weather will
overspread the lake region, the Ohio val
ley and the interior of the eastern states
during the next thirty-six hours.
Storm warnings are displayed at Jupiter
and Miami.
The winds along the New England and
middle Atlantic coasts will be moderate
variable; on the south Atlantic coast
moderate variable, except increasing
northeasterly on the Florida coast; on
the east gulf coast moderate northerly.
Steamers departing today for European
ports will have moderate variable winds
and generally fair weather, followed bj'
showers to the Grand Banks.
The following heavy precipitation (in
inches) has been reported during the past
twenty-four hours; Chicago, 1.22; Grand
Rapids, 1.32; Detroit. t.<)6; Sault Ste.
Marie, 1.64; Brownsville, 2.04; Grand
Haven, 1.06.
Records for Twenty-Four Hours.
The following were the readings of
the thermometer and barometer at the
weather bureau for the twenty-four
hours beginning at 2 p.m. yesterday:
Thermometer?August 27; 4 p.m.. 88;
8 p.m., 75; 12 midnight, 68. August *J8:
4 a.m., 65; 8 a.m., 71; 12 noon, 83; 2
p.m., 87. Maximum, 89, at 4:30 p.m. Au
gust 27; minimum, 64, at 5 a.m. August
28.
Barometer?August 27: 4 p.m.. 29.07;
8 p.m., 29.09; 12 midnight, 30.02. Au
gust 28: 4 a.m., 30.01; 8 a.m., 30.05;
noon, 30.04 ; 2 p.m., 30.01.
Tide Tables.
Today?Low tide, 12.08 a.m.; high tide,
5.13 a.m. and 5.52 p.m.
Tomorrow?Low tide. 12.12 a.m. and
12.50 p.m.; high tide, 6.12 a.m. and 6.47
p.m.
The Sun and Xoon.
Today?Sun rose 5.24 a.m.; sets, 6.38 p.m.
Tomorrow?Sun rises, 5.25 a.m.
Moon sets 1.55 a.m. tomorrow.
The City Lights.
The city lights and naphtha lamps all
lighted by thirty minutes after sunset;
extinguishing begun one hour before sun
rise. All arc and incandescent lamps
lighted fifteen minutes after sunset and
extinguished forty-five minutes before
sunrise.
Condition of the Water.
Temperature and condition of water at
8 a.m.: Great Falls-Temperature, 75;
condition, 14. Dalecarlia reservoir?Tem
perature, 81; condition at north connec
tion, 12; condition at south connection,
12. Georgetown distributing reservoir
Temperature, 70; condition at influent
gatehouse, 9; condition at effluent gate
house, 10.
Up-River Waters.
Special Dispatch to The Star.
HARPERS FERRY, W. Va.. August 28.
?Potomac clear and Shenandoah cloudy.
ARMY AND NAVY NEWS.
Army Orders.
Col. Harry O. Perley. Medical Corps,
is detailed to conduct the examinations
at Fort Logan, Col., of applicants for ap
pointments as first lieutenants in the
Medical Reserve Corps.
Maj. Edward P. O'Hern, ordnance de
partment. will proceed to the Richmond
Iron Works, Va., on official business per
taining to the inspection of material in
process of manufacture for the ordnance
department.
By direction of the President, and upon
the application of Sergeant First Class
Wolf Aisenman. Hospital Cjorps, that
soldier will be placed upon the retired
list.
Col. Lawrence L. Bruff, ordnance de
partment. will visit the works of John A.
Roebling's Sons Company, Trenton, N.
J., on official business pertaining to the
inspection of material in process of manu
facture for the ordnance department.
Maj. Charles P. Stivers, commissary,
will visit points in the vicinity of Kansas
City, Mo, for the purpose of inspecting
subsistence supplies.
First Lieut. Theodore H. Dillon, Corps
of Engineers, will proreed to the Philip
pine Islands for assignment tc duty.
First Lieut. Edward A. Stockton, jr.,
Coast Artillery Corps, will assume charge
of construction work at Fort du Pont.
Del., and Fort Mott. X. J., temporarily
relieving First Lieut. Richard T. Mc
Kenney, Coast Artillery Corps, of that
duty.
Leave of absence for one month is
granted First Lieut. Elias H. Porter,
Medical Reserve Corps.
First Lieut. Elias H. Porter, Medical
Corps, is relieved from duty at Fort
Worden, Wash., and will proceed to his
home, where he will stand relieved from
active duty in the Medical Reserve Corps.
First Lieut. I^eonard S. Hughes, Medical
Reserve Corps, is relieved from duty at
Fort I>awton, Wash., and will proceed 4o
Fort Worden, Wash.
Naval Movements. .
The cruiser Rainbow has arrived at
Cavite, the collier Alexander at Cheefoo,
the gunboat Dolphin at Gloucester, the
collier Lebanon at Norfolk, and the gun
boat Tacoma at Bluefleld.
The torpedo boat flotilla has sailed from
Gardlners bay for Newport.
The naval tug Nezinscot, which recently
sank off Cape Ann, Mass., has been
stricken from the navy list.
Naval Orders.
Midshipman II. R. A. Borchart, from the
Missouri to the North Carolina.
Midshipman A. Barney, from the North
Carolina to the Missouri.
Surgeon H. D. Wilson, from the In
diana, leave two months.
Paymaster F. R. Holt, additional duty
pay officer and general storekeeper, naval
tsatlon, Culebra, P. R.
Paymaster J. D. Robnett, from the
Olympia, and wait orders.
Paymaster F. B. Colby, from the Chi
cago. and wait orders.
Assistant Paymaster L. G. Haughe>v
from the Hartford to the Vestal.
Assistant Paymaster E. C. Little, from
naval station, Culebra, P. R.. and wait
orders.
Chief Boatswain F. Muller. to command
the Patuxent.
Chief Carpenter W. P. Harding, from
the Hartford to the South Carolina.
Machinist W. D. Sullivan, to the North
Dakota.
E. R. Von Preissig, appointment as pay
master's clerk in the navy, duty Olympia,
revoked.
II. M. Hopkins, appointment as paymas
ter's clerk in the navy, duty naval station,
Culebra, P. R., revoked. ?
G. P. Selfert, appointment as paymas
ter's clerk in the navy, duty Tonopah,
revoked.
M. P. Coombs, appointment as pay
master's clerk in the navy, duty Chicago,
revoked.
I'nited States Senator James P. Tal
iaferro of Florida is visiting relatives
in Orange county, Va., his former
home.
WANTS TO DISPROVE CHARGE
COL. DOYEN RESENTS CRITICISM
BT COMMANDER HOOD.
Desires to Controvert Statements Re
garding Discipline in Marine
School of Application.
Lieut. Col. Charles A. Doyen, the head
of the Marine School of Application at
Annapolis two years ago. when Lieut.
James X. Sutton met his death, has taken
steps to remove the stigma placed on his
record by the minority report made by
Commander John Hood, the head of the
court of inquiry which made the latest
Inquiry into the causes of Sutton's death,
and by the observations made by Acting
Secretary Wlnthrop in approving the re
port of the court. In Commander Hood's
minority report he said: "The testimony
concerning the whole deplorable affair in
dicates a state of discipline then existing
in the Marine School of Application dis
creditable to the service," etc. By the
department's concurrence in the opinion
? court and that expressed in the
minority report, the department indicated
its thorough disapproval of the lax state
of discipline shown by the evidence to
uVe?iex ? a* Marine School of Ap
plication prior to and at the time of the
death of Lieut. Sutton.
D?Le" has asked that he bp fur
I ?w th t11086 parts of th? testimony
filch form the basis of the criticism con
wm ffi". minority report and In Mr.
^ inthrop s approval of the same in order
that he may submit facts tending to show
that the court was mistaken In its conclu
sion. Mr. Winthrop has directed that
Col. Doyen be furnished with the in
formation he desires.
Commander IJood has been called upon
by the department to designate the por
tions of the testimony which influenced
him to the action he tookv which was
promptly recognized in the Marine Corps
a?Si a at the marines from the navy
side. This action is accepted In some quar
ters as forecasting a hitter controversy
between the navy and the Marine Corps,
although the heads'of the two branches
of the service already have taken steps
to prevent a feud, such as was brought
on last winter by the attempt of the navy
to eject the marines from the warships.
THE COURT RECORD.
District Supreme Court.
EQUIT1 COURT?Justice Anderson.
May agt. May; leave to withdraw cer
tain exhibits-from flies granted; complain
ant s solicitor, William H. Dennis.
t
j CIRCUIT COURT?Justice Anderson.
Heater Manufacturing Company
agt. Ohm et al.; Judgment by default
against defendant, H. C. Winslow; plain
tiff s attorney, H. W. Wheatley.
PROBATE COI RT?Justice Anderson.
Estate of Fannie G. Potts; will dated
November 23, 1908, naming Ida Orifflss,
.Robert Potts and Louis J. Potts execu
tors. filed.
Estate of Helen M. Rolle; commission
ordered to Issue.
In re Sarah E. Mangum: petition for
leave to expend income for support of
minor; attorneys, McNeill & MeNeill and
M.^ E. O Brlen.
Estate Helen B. Lane: petition of Harry
B. Lane for probate of will and letters
testamentary; attorney, Walter A. John
son.
Estate Henry Jaeger; petition for leave
to sell realty; attorney, Oscar Nauck.
| _ Estate Helen B. Lane; will dated July
'? naming Harry B. Lane executor,
filed.
Estate ?ra L. Pitney; will dated August
filed naming' Clara Pitney executrix.
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
BETWEEN N AND O AND 1ST
STREETS AND NEW JERSET AVE
NUE SOUTHEAST?Edward E. King
et ux. to Charles A. Richardson, lota
,,*42 and 143, square 744; $10.
MOORE & BARBOUR'S ADDITION?
William C. Blundon et ux. to Etta B
Jasper, lot 63. block 45: $10.
NO. 41*7 MARYLAND AVENUE SOUTH
WEST?James W. Sprlngmann et ux.
to Bernetta H. Springmann, trustee,
part lot 12, reservation D; $10.
A STREET NORTHEAST between 16th
and 16th streets?John C. Dieclimann
et ux. to Charles M. and Parthenia
Dawson, lot 49. Equare 1070; $10.
RICHMOND PARK?Northwest Wash
ington Improvement Company to J.
Lynn Yeagle, lot 38. square 2067; $10.
Same to Ralph A. Graves, lota 40 and
41, square 2067; $10.
LE DROIT PARK?Charles E. Banes to
Prank Daly, lots 56 and 57. block 15;
CHURCH STREET NORTHWEST be
tween 17th and 18th streets?James R.
Ellerson et ux. to Robert McReynolds,
lot 336, square 156; $10.
NO. 230 1ST STREET SOUTHEAST
John S. Wlnship and Marv A. Win
ship, trustees, to L. O. Maliery, lot G
square 732; $10. L. O. Mallerv to
T..r,omry,A' Wlnship, same property;' $10.
WEST HOLMEAD MANOR-A. A. Lips
comb and William H. Saunders, trus
tees, lot 2, block 1; $1,200.
RANDLE HIGHLANDS-United States
Realty Company to Alford C. -Wright,
lots 6 and 7, block 5627; $10.
527 M STREET NORTHEAST?James P
Corridon et al. to Mary Sterling, lot
42. square 829; $10.
DOBBINS' ADDITIONWohn R. Haislip
et ux. to Alice C. Davis, lot 1?8, block
17; $10.
MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE NORTH
EAST between 7th and 8th streets
William H. Shaw et al. to Henry B. F.
Macfarland, Henry L. West and Wil
liam V. Judson, Commissioners of Dis
trict of Columbia part lot 7, square
890* $1
2010 R STREET NORTH WEST?Jose
phine B. Bruce to John F. McBowie,
lot 131, square 93; $10.
2010 R STREET NORTHWEST-John F.
M. Bowie to Buckner M. and Clara P.
Randolph, lot 131, square 93; *10.
1444 CORCORAN STREET NORTH
WEST?Richard D. Simms and James
B. Nourse to John B. Erwin, lot 32,
square 20S; $3,700.
NO. 1444 CORCORAN STREET NORTH
WEST?John B. Erwin to Louise F.
Erwin. lot 32, square 208; $10.
BETWEEN 8TH AND 7TH STREETS
AND SOUTH CAROLINA AVENUE
AND D STREET SOUTHEAST?John
E. Briggc et ux. to R. Howerton
Gravatt, lot 31, square 875; $10.
HOLMEAD MANOR?John C. Newman
et ux. to Joseph R. Carr, part lot 64,
block 43; $10.
GRANT PARK?John P. F. White et ux,
to Cora B. Mason, lots 13 and 15,
square 5248: $10.
LINNWOOD ? John W. McGlennan,
trustee, to William B. Carter, lot 16.
block 8 * $10
PETWORTH?L. A. Swartzell to Edward
L Santmyer, lot 14, block 34; $10
LANIER HEIGHTS?Charles W. King,
jr., et ux. to Margaret Benson, lot
84S: $10.
NO. 307 3D STREET SOUTHEAST?
Ralph P. Barnard to Roger O'Hanlon,
part lot 14. square* 763; $2,400.
COLUMBIA HEIGHTS?R. E. Pairo to
Blanch D. Samson, lot 67. block 21:
$10.
NO. 1408 NORTH CAROLINA AVENUE
NORTHEAST?Angus Lamond et ux.
to Susanna Fairfax, lot 41, square
1055 ; $10.
When the Fight Is Won.
From Puck.
The Suffragette?Well, day-day. Yez'll
hov t' git the lunch an' dinner yersilf!
It's a watcher at the polls I am, an'
afterward I'm going* to th' Dimmycratlc
Club t' hear th' returns.
"I don't know how to refuse him."
"Then let him down easy."
"How can I?"
"Accept him, start a flirtation with
another fellow and when your flance gets
mad break off the engagement.?"Louis
ville Courier-Journal.
Yoti needn't sniff at this ogar. Fellow
smoking ont? of the same brand the other
day found a $150 diamond In It. Prettv
lucky, eh?"
"Umph-umph. Plucky, too."?Philadel
phia I.eader.
David Casseil. a retired farmer, died at
the home of his son-in-law. William M.
Engl ar-near MedtonJ, Md.. aged ninety
three years and nine months.
n in in n 1111: i * m 1111 n: i iiim i-m- i i 11 -h-h-M'-m*>i miMnimm im i 1111m
DON'T DELAY UNTIL THE
FALL RUSH.
Secure Your Home Now?See These
Safe and Sane Residences,
3210 to 3220 13th St. N.W?
Between Kenyon Street and I'ark Road,
Columfoiia Heights.
Open Every Day and Night Till 9 O'Clock.
Safe to buy from every standpoint?the value is here and the certainties of
Increase are apparent. You'll never want tq move away.
Sane construction, arrangement and finish?free from "pink tea"' decorations
and painted woodwork of various hues to catch the eye.
Every evidence at a glance of lasting durability. Erected by day's labor fno
subcontract work) by a builder of prominence and unimpeachable reputation.
NOT OF THE SPECULATIVE TYPE OK HOUSES.
THE LOCATION is all that fan be desired?high elevation, excellent surround
ings. Main car lines one square away. Thirteenth street Is a through thorough
fare?a street of prominence. Not a lonely otf-plaee to leave the family in the
husband's absence. No ravines or low grounds to create dampness and fog.
Atmospheric conditions here are perfect.
THESE ARE IMPORTANT ITEMS TO CONSIDER.
THE HOUSES?ONLY SIX?have fronts of stone and brick. Full three-story
bay windows. BRICK AND STONE PORCHES?far better than wooden struc
tures. ,
The first floor has parlor, library, dininp room, pantry and kitchen. The
massive mantels, together with the plate-glass mirrors in the library, serve to
make this a beautiful floor.
The second story has three large rooms and tiled bath.
The third floor has two large rooms and tiled bath. These fine bedrooms are
rooms indeed. Seven big closets.
THE TWO BATHROOMS are models of beauty and completeness. Expensive
fittings. Pedestal washstands. Large tubs and medicine cabinets. Perfect venti
lation.
ELECTRIC LIGHTS THROUGHOUT. The fixtures positively surpass any ever
installed in this section.
Expensive quality of paper, special imported designs.
The ?'Gurney" hot-water heating plant?best of all.
Rear stairwav of solid oak. Laundry room. Instant water heater.
GENUINE OAK WOODWORK THROUGHOUT.
Equal to your furniture in finish and quality. Beautifully polished floors.
Two-story back porch affords an unobstructed view of an entire square. This
wide, open space Is a great advantage. THE HOUSES ARE NOT "HEMMED
IN." Light and air In abundance.
THE BIG LOT extending back to this open area of ground is another valuable
asset. Stable or garage space.
PRICE. $8,230. TERMS REASONABLE.
MODEST CASH PAYMENT. MONTHLY INSTALLMENTS LESS THAN THE
PROPERTY WILL RENT FOR.
NOTE THE LOCATION?13th st. between Kenyon st. and Park road?Columbia
Heights?th<? prettiest spot in town. The houses face the east.
Open Day amid Night Until 9 O'CBock.
BELT, O'BRBEN CO., Inc.,
AGENT,
Q St. N.W.
-h-m : 1: i-H-H-:: 1 1 h t h .i-i.-;
WEEK ENDING AUGUST 28, 1909.
President Taft, Secretary MacVeagh,
Attorney General Wickersham and Sec
retary Meyer had a conference at Bever
ly. Mass., on the proposed changes In
the Sherman anti-trust act;, the President
called upon the Interior Department for
a full report upon the coal lands in dis
pute In Alaska. Postmaster General
Hitchcock decided to raise the registry
fee to 10 cents, and called a conference
of registry officials. The standing army
by July 10, 1910, will be within the new
80,000 limit set by President Taft with
out cutting off enlistments, according to
estimates made at the War Department.
Mrs. James NT. 8utton" was granted a
permit to exhume the body of her son.
Lieut. Sutton, burled at Arlington, which
was later suspended. Representative
Fowler of New Jersey, In an open letter
to Speaker Cannon, charged him with
engaging In a conspiracy with Senator
Aldrlch to prevent tariff reductions. Ed
ward H. Harriman returned to America
and went to his home at Arden; reports
of a serious Illness circulated Six men
ware killed and a number Injured as a
result of strike rioting at the Pressed
Steel Car Company's works In McKees
Rocks. Pa.
Foreign Affairs.
Premier Asquith Informed the house of
commons of the plans to build a strong
fleet In the Pacific colonies for Imperial
defense. The verdict of the Inquest Into
the death of Lord Eliot, the English noble
man. was that he committed suicide. The
Spanish cabinet caused the Incarceration
of many persons charged with taking part
in the recent revolutionary movement. The
Spanish troops in Morocco began their ad
vance against the Riff tribesmen Henry
Far man won the Grand Prix de la Cham
pagne in the aeroplane contests at Rheims,
breaking the world's record for duration
of flight and distance. The
maneuvers began; Emperor Nicholas d -
parture for the Crimea was postponed
until September 13. In the trial of the
men Implicated in the murder of Deputy
Hertxenstein, in Finland, it was adduced
that Dr. Dubrovin bribed five men to mur
der the deputy. Advices from Constan
tinople say that the Incident between
Turkey and Greece regarding Crete is
closed; Turkey will propose changes in the
insular government to the powers, f rom
150 to 300 excursionists were drowned as
the result of a collision of steamers at the
entrance to Montevideo harbor. A mar
quis was arrested as the newly elected
head of the Italian Camorra, twenty-three
members of the grand council being also,
apprehended. Severe earth shocks occui
red In the Province of Siena, Ital>.
In the District.
With a view to greater promptness and
efficiency, radical changes In the methods
of handling the correspondence and rec
ords of the District government were
recommended to the Commissioners by a
special committee. Maj. Morrow In his
annual report stated that the Washing
ton aqueduct, after forty-six years of
service is in excellent condition, with no
necessitv for any additional source of
supplv to meet the demands of the im
mediate future. Warrants were issued,
for seven retail merchants conducting
stands, in the K Street and Northern Lib
erty markets, charged with violations or
the purr food laws. The Sons of Vet
erans. U. 8. A., held its twenty-eighth
annual encampment. The Central Laboi
Union dropped from its list of affiliated
bodies Electrical Workers' Union, No. 26.
and Local 148, compose^ of linemen. The
National Guard of the District of Colum
bia arrived on transports from Boston.
The excise board granted a liquor license
to the Columbia Turnvereln. permitting
the organization to do business at Its
new home, 928 M street. Seth W. Van
Dever waa dismissed from the police force
for stealing while on duty. Alphonso
Holmes, aged twentythree, and Nathan
Holmes, thirty-three, were drowned in
the river. Among those who died
Henry Elliott Waggaman, Capt. P. P.
Faunce and Mrs. W. B. Moses.
"FREE SUNDAY" FROBABLE.
Uncle Sam's Sailors May Be Assured
? Feriod of Rest.
It seems probable that the so-called
"free Sunday" will be established irt the
navy of the United States. An order to
that effect will have a personal interest
for every officer and enlisted man In
the service. For a number of years
many commanding officers have rec
ommended it. The subject came up in
a positive way during the administra
tion of President Roosevelt, who was
in favor of an arrangement which would
do away with purely routine duties on
shipfloard Sunday. Among those du
ties is the regular weekly inspection,
for which every oi>e must be special ly
attired and paraded, with considerable
form and loss of time.
It has been pointed out to the de
partment recently that this weekly in
spection can be conducted on any day
in the week with equal benefit and
Sunday saved for relaxation. It is
planned to arrange matters so that of
ficers and enlisted men may leave their
ships, when in port. Saturday, and. In
most cases, remain on shore until Mon
day morning. That will add to the
comfort of the personnel on shipboard,
who find Sunday a day of irksome work
or useless restriction. The Sunday in
spection and the other routim- work
performed on that day have been con
tinued large% by reason of adherence
to service traditions. The matter will
be settled in a feW days.
i While engaged in her household duties.
Mrs. Mary E. Harrison, aged sixty-four
years, fell dead at her home, at Rising
lsun,.Jdd.
ITINERARY OUTLINED.
Rear Admiral Schroeder's Advice
Regarding Atlantic Fleet.
Rear Admiral Schroeder, commander-in
chief of the Atlantic fleet, has outlined
to the Secretary of the Navy the itin
erary he would advise during the fall
and early winter. The ships will con
clude their target practice in time to
reach New York September 23, in readi
ness for participation in the Hudson
Fulton celebration. After that everit it is
the aim to make ready to sail October 3
or 4 for the various homing yards of the
vessels of the fleet, and the ships are to I
remain at their respective yards for the
following eight weeks. December 1 they
are to leave the yards for Hampton
roads. Tactical exercises will be carried
out for the following three weeks, with
Hampton roads as headquarters. At the
conclusion of these movements the entire
fleet will rendezvous at Hampton roads
to give the men liberty and to make
ready for the enjoyment of Christmas,
which will be spent there. In January
the fleet will weigh anchor and sail for
Guantanamq to carry out winter maneu
vers.
BIDS FOR RAISING ROOF.
More Room Being Provided in the
Treasury Building.
Bids have been opened at the Treasury
Department for raising the roof of the
Treasury on the south and west sides of
the building so as to permit the enlarge
ment of rooms on the fourth floor. The
entire fourth floor is to be occupied by
the supervising architect of the Treasury,
and there would not be space on the floor
for the 300 employes under him if the
rooms, many of them too low for office
purposes because of the sloping roof,
were not made larger. Congress appro
priated $40,000 for the work, and this
sum is to be spent in raising the roof
and fitting the rooms up for office pur
poses. The bids submitted to the Treas
ury for the work are as.follows:"* Boyle.
Robertson & Co.. Washington. $30,150;
Henry Smith. Sons & Co.. Baltimore.
$3S,7fl0; the Charles McCaul Co.. Phila
delphia. $32.70S*; Wi'liam P. I-dpseomb &
Co.. Washington. $42.~?33: James L?. Par
sons, Washington. $40..">90; W. H. McCray.
Washington. $40..V)0: the Norcross Bros.
Co.. Worcester. Mass.. $24,930.
The two lowest bidders are the Xor
cross Bros. Co. and the McCaul Co. The
former agrees to finish the work for $24,
030 in five months, while the McCaul com
pany agrees to complete the work for
$32,700 in ten weeks, less than half the
time fixed by the lowest bidder.
Treasury officials said today that it
would be impossible to permit the work
of changing the roof to go on for five
months, and it is probable that the two
lowest bidders will communicated with
for a further statement as to the time in
which they can do the work as well as
the amount they will do the work for.
The supervising architect desires to get
into his new quarters as soon as possi
ble. and the contract will i?e finally let
with a view to early completion as well
as low figures.
News Briefs.
James Hobbs of ?Sykesville. Md..
who was injured by some logs falling
upon him at the Frank Arrinjrton lumber i
yards, died at St. Joseph's Hospital, Bal
timore.
Forty-one patients with typhoid fever
are at the Maryland General Hospital, in
Baltimore, a record number at the hos
pital. Of these ten are from tne school
conducted on the Mount Hope property
by the St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum.
Frederick William Eehr, well known as
a society man in Baltimore, died at the
home of his mother, Mrs. Robert T>ehr.
10 East Madison street, after a long ill
ness. He was thirty-eight years old.
Mrs. Catherine Groff. widow of David
GrofT. died at her home, near Middletown.
Md.. of lung trouble. She was a daugh
ter of tlif* late Randall Shafer of Middle
town valley.
John Favorite, seventy-two years old.
formerly of Creaperstown. Md., died in
Charleston. 111., after an Illness of about
ten days. i
Jacob C. Blocher. thirty-two years old.
was found dead at his home. In Meyers- |
dale. Md. He was a son of Joseph Bloch-J
er and was a native of Grantsville. Md.
Miss T?uie Elliott, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Albert Elliott, died suddenly of ty
phoid fever at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
James D. Carville in Stevensvllle, Md.
A traction engine and a large stone
crusher, owned by Clarkson Bros, of
Hagerstown. Md.. while being moved
from Blue Ridge Summit. Md., ran off of
a mountain road above Rouservllle, near
Pen-Mar. and plunged down the moun
tainside. John Ambrose, the engineer,
jumped just as the engine toppled over
the brink of the ravine.
Miss I,ottie May Miller, daughter of
John II. Miller of Hagerstown. Md., died
of heart disease and rheumatism.
Miss Ullian Travers. seventeen years
old, step-daughter of William Ferguson,
a resident o' Wagners point road, at
Curtis Bay. Md.. who was badly burned
while attempting to build a fire in her
home, iF dead.
Appearing in court as plaintifT. "Dr."
Waldeman von Kangler. 721 West Fay
ette street. Baltimore, suddenly had the
tables turned upon hhn at the western
polioe court when Justice Loden entered
a charge of practicing medicine un!?w
tully and held him for a further hearing
under $TiOO bail.
Brother Denis, for the last sixteen years
president of Calvert Hall College. Balti
more, has been extremely ill at the col
lege during the last few weeks as the re
sult of an attack of stomach trouble.
The new- water reservoir of the Balti
more County Water and Electric Com
pany on the Hillen road, near Towson.
Md.. is nearly completed. A gatehouse of
reinforced concrete 1* now being con
structed.
Mrs. E, V. Thompson of Washington.
D. C-, supervising deputy of the Royal
Neighbors of America, has arrived at
Mitchellvill?\^Md., to establish a branch
of that order. In connection with Forrest
Camp. No. 11,506, Modern Woodmen of
America.
The board of visitors of St. John's Col
lege, Annapolis. Md.. has recommended
Lieut. R. Earle Risher, U. P. A., formerly
of Denton, Md., for the detail as com
mandant of cadets at 8t. John's, to suc
ceed Lieut. E. B. Iglehart, L". S. A., who
is incapacitated by Illness.
Mrs. Anna Schmucker, wife of Mpr
gan Schmucker, of near Toms Brook.
Va., died at the home of her son. Dr.
N. F. Schmucker, at Mount Clifton.
Mrs. Schmucker was on a visit to her
son and was stricken with typhoid
fever.
Jacob Wintermoyer. a well known
clothing merchant of Shepherdstown.
W. Va? is dead after an illness of a
few days from the result of a stroke
of paralysis. He was eighty years old.
Dr. Walter S. Cockrell, near Harpers
Ferry, W. Va., died, aged about sixty
flve years. He was at one time a prac
ticing physician, but gave up the prac
tice of medicine some year* ago.
The will of James L. Gemmill has
been filed for probate in the orphans'
court of Towson, Md. He bequeaths
$1,000 to Mount Zion Methodist Prot
estant Church, the interest to be used
for the payment of the pastor's salary.
The residue of the estate is bequeathed
to the testator's widow. The will was
executed in 1892.
Mrs. Meta Roth, by her attorneys, W.
Gill Smith, C. C. Saffel and Harley
Whettle, filed a suit yesterday in the
circuit court at Towson, Md., againBt
the highway commission of Baltimore
county, claiming $20,000 damages. Mrs.
Roth alleges that while driving during
last July on Crooks lane she was
thrown down an embankment on ac
count of the bad condition of the high
way and seriously injured.
Miss Amelia C. Rappanier, the fif
teen-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Christian Rappanier of Melrose avenue,
Catonsvill%. Md., surprised her parents
Thursday by going to Baltimore, where
she was married to Eugene E. Hobson
of Oella, an attendant at the Maryland
Hospital for the Insane, near Catons
ville.
The incomplete Vinery building and
the lot on which it stands, on Granby
street, Norfolk, Va.. has been sold to
Philip Levy & Co. for $157,000. The
sale was the biggest real estate deal
made in Norfolk for two years.
The Jefferson Company has award*'.!
a contract to J. C. Nesblt & Co. for the
erection of a modern theater to cost
$30,000. which is to be built in the heart
of the business district of Roanoke, Va.
Ross D. Robinson, forty-eight years
old, grand master of the state lodge of
colored Masons, died at the McKcndree
Hospital. Charleston. W. Va.. from In
juries received in a mine three week**
ago. He was the highest paid colored
miner in the state.
Mrs. Matilda Bragunler. widow of L'p
ton Bragunler, died at the home of her
daughter, Mrs. John Kendall. Hagers
town. Md., aged eighty-six years.
Mrs Rebecca Wood, aged seventy-five
vears, died of typhoid fever, at the home
of her son, Louis R. Wood, in Mitchell -
ville, Md.
Joseph Harrison, Charles Fisael and
Harry Small, arrested at Gettyrt>urg,
Pa., by Western Maryland Railroad De
tectives Wilson and Burnett, were
brought to Hagerstown, Md., to answer
the charge of participating in a robbery
at Buena Vista.
Miss Louise Timms of Hagerstown,
Md., and Norman H. Downin of Harris
burg, Pa., were married at the parsou
age of Trinity Lutheran Church, Hagers
town, by Rev. Dr. J. S. Simon.
The Kent, Queen Anne and Cecil coun
ties fair in Maryland will be held this
year at Tolchester Beach from August
31 to September 31, inclusive.
John Kerr, seventy-eight years old. one
of the first members of the police de
partment of Baltimore, died at his home.
"?va South Bond street, of the' infirmities
of age.
Mrs. Moses F. McGee. forty years old.
died of appendicitis at her home, one
mile* from Metal. Md. She was Miss Sue
Hewitt. For many years she taught
school in Path valley.
Mrs. Sarah Virginia Morris, aged seven
ty-four years, died at Easton, Md., of gen
eral debility. About two years ago she
received a stroke of paralysis, from which
she never fully recovered. She was tl?e
daughter of the late Capt. Robert
Leonard of Easton.
After an illness of several weeks, during
which he had suffered a great deal from
diabetes. John Bernard Flood died at
Annapolis. He was fifty-four years old
and is survived by his second widow, who
prior to her marriage was Miss Fannie
Robeck, and a young son by a previous
marriage.
I*?aniel Berklite. a retired farmer and
a native of Gettysburg, died after an
illness of three weeks at his home,
Waynesboro. Mr. Berklite, mho was
seventy-nine years old. for >t number of
years lived at FoxvJUe, Frederick
county.
John 8. Gorgas died at his home at Blur
Ridge Summit. Md. He was eighty-six
years old and for the last twenty-five
years had made his home with his sister.
Miss Laura K. Brengle, sixty-eight years
old, died at the home of her adopted
brother. John B. Albaugh, rfear Groves'
Lime Kilns. Md. One sister, Mrs. Wil
liam H. Kemp, survives.
Mrs. iAvlnla Wolfe, mother of Hum
phrey D. Wolfe, died at her home at Glen
wood, Howard county, Md. She ni A
widow of Dr. J. H. R. ,Wollt,
? ?-? ^ -r <>h ^

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