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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, July 06, 1911, Image 12

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1911-07-06/ed-1/seq-12/

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li /t/l
permit
| TO SMOKE
; Uou cut
1 ?
(t'cm/citciMc
,5 cents
I | | | | t | I | | I | I I | I | t t t-l
TrTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTlITi
J- J
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
J TO OLD QUEBEC
+ ? The ?|iiaintcst French
+ city in America.
+ ? Niagara falls, Toronto,
* Thousand Islands. Rap
+ ul< of the St. Lawrence, ^
+ Montreal. Quebec. Lake *
+ . f
+ Champlain. Lake Iteorge, +
?f* . T
+ Saratoga Springs and the +
??? Hudson River, are all +
X included in the 12-dav +
; +
X personally-c o n d u cted 4.
+ tour of the Pennsylvania
+ Railroad. )?
+ ? Leave Wednesday, j
+ August 9. J
+ ? R<?und-trip rate from "t
T T
+ Washington, covering +
+ necessary expenses, ^
t $114.78. +
Ask Ticket Agents lor +
booklet, or address B. M. +
Newbold. D. I*. A., i^th +
and <i Streets. Wash- +
?f*
+ ington. D. C. +
+
Shcteet Ifeubteff!
fist the Original and Ganuina
HORLICK'S
MALTED MILKj
Tha Food-drink for All Agos,
F'>r Infant*. Invalids and <?rowing < hildren. j
Pure Nutrition, up-building ibe whole body.
Intigvnles tb? nursiat; mother and the aged. !
Mich in.Ik. niallfd grain, in powder form. '
A quick lunch prepared in a min- j
ute. Take n<> substitute. Ask for
HORLICK'S.
IN Xo niMBINK OR TBI ST.
I
II
4?
+
+
-}?
+
+
MlIBUiSiia. HEISTEB & CO.
I
1
ARCHITECTS
WASHINGTON. D. O.
BABY'
VOICE
Every woman's heart thrills at the
i
coding and prattling of a baby, and
motherhood i-> her highest and purest ;
joy. Vet the suffering incident to '
tliis great consummation of her life's
de-ire. robs the anticipation of some
of it^ sweetness. Most of this can
be avoided by the use of Mother's
Friend. This great remedy prepares !
the expectant mother's system for
? 1
the coming event, and its use makes '
her comfortable during all the term, j
Mother's l:riend assists nature in
gradually expanding all tissues, mus
cles and tend >n?, it strengthens the
ligaments, keeps the breasts in good
condition, and brings the woman to
the cri-1 - in healthful physical condi
tion. The regular u-e of Mother's j
Friend Ic-sens the pain when baby '
comes, and as- n- ? 9
sures a quick and i /J TfiKto
natural recovery !TVjf r?\
fA j-, j ? ?! ; P.
for the mother. L J
For sale at drug stores Write for
free book for expectant mothers.
BKADF1FLD REGULATOR CO..
Atlanta. Ga
\
GIRLS DROWN IN ICE POND.
I
Four Waitresses at Mount Pocono
Hotel Meet Death.
SCR AN TON, Pa.. July Four wait
rrgsc* at the Hole! Meadow.-idr. Mount
J'ocono, were drowned yesterday in an
1: e pond near the hotel. Two other wait
ress* acre rescued unconscious. The
dead are:
Annie Oaia. aged eighteen, Olyphant.
Mamie Craig, aged twenty-two, sister
of the former.
Catherine M Loughlin, aged twenty
two. IMttston.
Mrs Uzzie Bcullen, aged twenty-four,
'I roop.
The two who had a narrow est ape are
Mary Purcell, aged twentv-one. and l.or
eita Fisher, aged sixteen, of Scranton.
? The si\ sat on the inner cdg?? of the
fc/nd, wi'ere the water is twenty-five
fc* in depth, and. removing shoes anil
stockings. began to paddle iti the water,
which- was within easy reach of their
f<*et.
Annie <'rais slipp?*d into tlie pond. Her
sister grahltetl her, and was dragged in.
The girls struggling in the w:iter cluteh
r?l at the Kirls on the dam, ani the let
ter. or si?me of theni. clutched at the
drowning girls to rescue them, with the
result that all six in a very few moments
were righting frantically to escape drown
ing. Their cries brought help from the
hotel, and two of the girls were rescued.
The bodies have t?een recovered.
Big Oil Well Burning.
Tl'l.SA. Okla , July What is said to
be the greatest oil well in Oklahoma is
on Are in the Osage Nation, and oil is
burning at the rate of l.V> barrels an hour.
The fire started Tuesday night from a
lantern carried by A. K. Timblin. an cm
p'oye- He was instantly killed by the ex
plosion.
The well is the property of the North
western Oil Company. The loss is al
-cady heavy, and all efforts to extinguish
a flames ha\e proved futile.
YOUNGSTERS DISPORT
AT CAMP GOOD WILL
"Old Oaken Bucket" and the
"Swimmin' Hole" Add to
Their Pleasures.
The old o?ken buekot.
Tho iron boiiml buokot.
Thf nvwK fOTeiwI bucket.
Which bung at "(Jood Will.''
In the years to come certain citizen*
of Washington, now residents of Camp
Good Will in Rock Creek Park, will re
miember the old oaken bucket which
hung in the well there, and never forget
this one scene of their childhood, made
happy through the efforts of the summer
outings committee of the Associated
Charities and the charitable folk of the
National Capital, who gave of their means
that the little folk of the courts of the
city as well as others of different loca
tions who rarely if ever smell the aroma
of the country tields might be happy for
a brief space.
Any who may believe that money given
to further the effort of the summer out
ings committee is not well spent are ad
vised by the committee to visit Camp
<Jood Will and see the little folk, re
leased from the hot streets of the city,
clambering to the well, there to pull the J
old oaken bucket to the top, filled with
sparkling cool water, and quench their
thirst.
Few Sturdy Children.
These little people are in rare instances
sturdy children. How the conditions un
der which they have been reared have
told against them can be no better illus
trated than yesterday when invariably
during the examinations, as each little
one came before Dr. Ramsburg and an
swered the inquiry made as to age, the
remark of the physician would be "un
dersized."
Today everything is activity at the
camp. There were games and other
amusements. Many went to the "old
swimmin* hole." while others trooped in
every direction under the great trees* in
tent upon having the ttme of their young
lives until the call came for the noonday [
meal. The mothers in the party whicu
came from Georgetown yesterday and ?
formed the advance guard of seventy-tive
to the camp sat about the grounds and
seemed to enjoy every moment of the
time. A small number of high chairs
have been provided for the babies, as.
well as go-carts, but an additional num
ber of each will be needed shoortly. Big j
arm chairs also are in demand at the
camp.
BILLS TO PREVENT FRAUD.
Two Provide Penalty for Corruption
at Elections of Representatives.
Means for the prevention of fraud or '
corruption in the election of representa- j
tives to Congress are proposed in two bills
introduced in the House by Representa- !
tlve Caleb Powers of Kentucky, once a !
conspicuous figure in his state's guberna- !
torial election troubles
In one bill Mr. Powers proposes a fine |
of from $1,000 to $3,000, or from one to j
three years' Imprisonment for intimida- j
tion of voters at any primary or general 1
election, tor the use of money or for !
threats in securing votes, A Eecond bill
provides that there be created a commis
sion of the House of Rer resentatives. con
sisting of three civilians, to investigate all
elections.
No Tetanus Due to Fourth.
ALBANY. N. Y., July tk?For the first
time in the history of the state depaf
ment of health no cases of tetanus ha\
been reported as a result of Fourth <
July celebrations this year. There we
eighteen cases a > ear ago.
"The Palais Royal is giving things away," she said
The Remark of Oirae of the Vast NuinrBll>er of Enthusiastic Vasstors Biere Yesterday.
Prior to the "Opening" of the Greater Palais Royal in September a great clearing sale takes place?now going on. "(living things away" is being illustrated on a'l live floor*
Thanks
Kind Words and Appreciation.
One dear old lady braved the
heat of yesterday and told of her
keen memory of the bargains of
fered 18 years ago. just before the
Palais Royal moved from Penn
sylvania avc. to this, (1 street cor
ner. She said: "I find yon are
giving things away again, and
may the coming Greater Palais
Royal open as auspiciously and
be proportionately as successful
as the present store."
Giving Away Flowers and Feathers.
He 9c 119c 38c
W ere 19c. Were 25c. Were 50c.
| Giving1 Away Thing's?Again Tomorrow.
H Visit the Second Floor for the Following Bargains:
M I
2 Table Linens, 39c 53c 83c
?4 *
0
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\
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|This $ 11 Sailor, 59c.
The St.50 Hats are reduced to $1.00:
j the $2.25 1 lais to Si.50 and the S3.00 Hat4;
^ to $1.98. All are Knox Shape Sailors
Were 75c.
And think of only 98c for. Bendel's famous imported shapes
?hats retailed at S5.00 and np. The Pa'ai? Royal's famous mil
liners at your service, so that you and they can rejoice in creat
ing beautiful hats at laughably little cost."
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Giving Away Wssh Dress Goads.
6c 7c ll 2c
ll 9c
All Standard Makes.
Was 50c. Was 75c. Was $1.00.
The Palais Royal has distributed enough of these Table
Linens during the last 18 years to reach a long distance around
the world. The famous 50c Mercerized Satin Table Damask?
reduced to 39c yard. The famous 75c Satin Table Damask, 70
inches wide, is to be reduced to only 53c yard. The Pa'ais
Royal Si.oo Extra Heavy German Silver Bleached Table Dam
ask?to be only 83c yard. Now learn of the Pattern Cloths and
Napkins.
the latest-moment
Collar is only 13c.
styles. The Sai\>r
Standard Makes. I sually 10c t?> 37 .>c Yard.
Look and tind Dress Gingham> in colors that are guaran
teed both Min and water proof?at only 'v yard. Look for low
liest of Figured Batiste and Lawn?at only jc yard. Look for
Imported Chiffon Voiles?at 19c instead of 37'.>c yard. Look
for genuine "Flaxon." "Sherrettc." Imported Dimities and Swis*
at 12c instead of 25c a yard and up. < io to second floor.
Laces, Embroideries and Veils.
Blnk ami Colored Japanese Km -
broldered I .ace !!anrts: up to h?
Inches wide. Some were $2.oo
yard
50c
$1.25 Dozen Napkins. 980.
$1.50 Dozen Napkins, Sr.39.
?S $2.50 Dozen Superfine Damask Napkin^ Reduced to $1.75.
$1.50 Pattern Cloths. $1.19. $2.00 Hemstitched Cloths, $1.49.
Hotel proprietors, .heads of institutions and the homes of
Washington arc generally familiar with the Palais Royal's Ta
ble linens. Famous for attractive appearance and durability,
these linens have grown in fame daily. Any reduction in the
prices attracts enthusiastic buying. Tomorrow's offerings will
create a vast distribution.
H^c Muck and Turkish Towels, II He
7c for Usual tic Towels.
25c Towels. 21 c.
39c Towels. 29c.
The lowest prices on rec
ord for 18 years?for these
standard Towels.
Picture Hats. $3.50 and S^.co. Were $10.00 I p.
The Summer Girl's Picture Hats?the bewitching creations
she wears on special occasions, many of them with trimmings
alone wofth twice the price now asked for the hat. A good in
vestment?if only to secure rarely beautiful flowers, feathers and
ribbons that can be later used for other purposes.
White Wash Waists and Skirts.
59c $1.00 $2.<QX0>
Were $1.00 and Up to $3.98.
The usual $1.00 W aists and Skirts at 59c
are good bargains, of course. The prizes, how
ever. are the Waists reduced from $2.00 and
up to only Si.00 for choice. The Waists re
duced to S2.00 are only more elaborate?not
daintier.
See These Skirts?Have Them Tried On.
The S1.00 Skiris reduced to 59c are. after all, only Si.00
Skirts. Try on the Imported Rep Skirts?reduced to Si.75 and
$2.00?designed, cut. sewed and pressed by expert men tailors!
See and try on the $5.00 Skirts reduced to S3.98. and the Im
ported Bedford Cord, Pique and Linen Skirt* reduced to $5.00.
Regular and extra sizes are here.
Mail Orders Promptly and Intelligently Filled.
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Colorod Silk Embroidered All-over
sa.??
I>aees; IS and 2*? inches
wide. Some were Sit yard
Cotton Nottingham Lace Hand
some lilet effects; up to 10
inches wide. Some were i-?c
yard
Cotton Cltiny T.ace Bands and
Edges: up to Inches wide.
Some were 25c yard
Yalencicnnes I^aces, Edges and In
sertions: 12-yard pieces. Some
were $1.00
IN-lnch Swiss and Cambric Corset
Cover Embroideries; some were,
.'lie yard
4."i-inch Net Flounclngs; floral de
signs; all colors. Were $1.00
Nainsook Kmbroldered Yokes for
Son n?, corset cov ers and 11
chemise. Some were Ulfc* each... " ***?
Real Irish Crochet Medallions.
Some were 25c each
2J-itii h S? is> \ll-over Embroider' .
large and small patterns, in cxelei
ami t>lind effects Some were
yard
Fancy I >oiil<|e-edKe Embroidery
loons; sotne Irish crochet ef
7Vc
?ial
Inches wide.
? "<dor>*d
25c
and
7c
rl In
25 c
*or?et
119 c
4c
fects; ti |t tn
Were .Vie yard
Batiste and Chambray
broidery Robes. Sunn
were *is
White Swiss Embroidery
semi-made. Some were
Choice lot of Fancy Mesh
all colors; plain and with d"ts. worth
from 7T>c to .?1 yard; in lencths of 1.
1V? and i1^ yards, for 25c
length; 2">c and .V>< values,
length
Chiffon Cloth Automobile Veils, two
tone effects, with drawstring, tit any
size hat; also Double Chiffon Clotli
Veils: 2 vards by l't >aids. all colors
and combinations; also Novelty Em
broidered Veils : all colors;
values from to $5.'.?S ...
Net Yells, with tibbon border; all
eolors: 1*2 yards long. Some
w ere SI
2Hc
Kin
S7.98
Kobe.*;
SS.03
Yelling;
13 ?c
$11.98
Jewelry Department Bargain Spots.
Hat Pins?all the 25c and .Vic im
ported kinds; in peari. jet. arnetnyst
and p?-arl combination and sapphi-e
clusters; small and large tj ?
effects
Long 25c Shell and Bead Chains, g;-,
a curious creation from Italy
Turquoise Neck Chains, just the
right size anr] a perfect blue
color. Were '-."?c
The "Three Wise Monkeys" of
Japan, for the desk, the mantel or
the curio cabinet, representing the
golden rule of the orient, teaching us
to hear no evil, speak no evil.
see no evil. Reduced from 25c...
Post Card Picture Frames, in bright
brass tinish and moire effect. 9,.
Complete with glass. Were i'ic..
Shell or Amber Hair Barrettes.
plain, carved and fancy. Were
25c i ..................
Tinsel Persian Belts Made from
inch elastic, in .i combination
of gold, silver and color-.
Were $1?0
33c
Jet Hair Barrettes?All good shapes,
in the best styles. Were jj
Sparkling Bar Pins White Stone?,
amethyst, coral and sapphire;
mounted in silv> r. Were l.Y ....
5c
Pearl Pins?Large horseshoes, bow
knots. wreaths and hearts. r] fl _
Were to utk*
Black Silk Fans?All new goods;
some folding effects that can be car
ried in vour handbag. *5^
Were 1*.'c J ^
Black Beaded Elastic Belts?The l>est
of new r>oe values are in- tl (ft
eluded 11VC
Cloth-hound Books at Reduced Prices.
The Palais Royal, G & 11th.
.<1.00 The Sorrows of a Show
Oirl" l.V
7:ic "Cynic's ?*a!endar' loc
75c "Sonnets of a Budding Bard"..15c.
50c "The Jungle Baby" 10c
25c Stationery, ioc.
A pretty picture top cabinet, con
taining 24 sheets of pearl white,
linen-finished writing paper, and 21
envelopes to match.
$1.25 "Congressman Puntphrey". l!?c
SI.:_*o "Dalton's Complete Bridge"...'Ulc
.Vic "The Frozen North' bk
25c "Simple Life" toe
VIC "A Woman's Confession" l.V
*1.25 "White House Cook Book". 55c
Initial Stationery, foe.
Each sheet stamped in blue. Not
a!l initials, therefore reduced fr 'in
25c to only <ic.
CHILDREN' AT CAMP GOOD WILL AWAY FROM HEAT OF THE CITY.
AltltlVAI. OF MlMK OF THK VOl
tlKHTS.
MILK AND ICE SHORTAGE.
Chicago Faces Famine as Result of
Continued Hot Weather.
CHICAGO. July ?>.?C'hi. ajjo is facing ao
ice and milk famine as the result of the
continued hot weather.
The heat has cut the supply of 1c# 50
per cent. All the large companies report I
that they are unable to meet the demands]
of the large consumers. Yesterday a min- 1
imum demand of :i0,<)00 tons was met by
the companies with the delivery of 15.000
tons Independent divers took advantage
of the situation?to raise the retail price.
The problem which puzzles the ice com
panies most Is that of getting Ice into the
city. The extreme heat has been respon
sible for a Kh-'nkage of approximately :i0
per cent, as against to per cent.
Milk dealers are predicting the great- j
est shortage In the supply of milk ever
experienced in the city.
CURIOUS LITERARY BLUNDERS.
Sun and Moon in Fiction?Mistakes
in Arithmetic and Geography.
Fran th?> Youth's Companion.
The haste with which 8ir Walter Scott
produced the greater number of his
novels doubtless accounts for the numer
ous blunders, such as those first pointed
out by his literary kinsman, Robert
Louis Stevenson.
In "Rob Roy" two horsemen, riding on
urgent business, are made to take six
days to cover a distance of 100 miles,
whereas on another occasion the same
horses cover fifty miles In a single day.
Stevenson also called attention to 81r
Walter's glaring mistake In "The Anti
quary," where the sun Is actually caused
to set In the eastern heavens. But care
ful worker that he was, Stevenson him
self, to use his own words, "came to grief
over the moon" in "Prince Otto."
More than one witter has described the
moon ns riding high in mid-heaven wh'le
in the crescent stage, a condition of
things impossible on any night' of tlie
year.
Another blunder relating to the moon
its to be found In the familiar lines of
Charles Wolfe on "The Bur.'al of Sir
John Moore.*'
We hurlr-d him darkly, at deatl of ni?ht.
The aoda with <?n(- bayonets turning.
By thi' ?truisxlliig moonbeam'* inlety light.
Ami the lantern dimly burning.
Some captious critic, doubtful of the
accuracy of this description, consulted
the nautical almanac for the date of the
burial. This showed conclusively that the
moon was then barely a day old, and
therefore quite Incapable of shedding any
appreciable light, misty or otherwise.
Victor Hugo puts into the mouth of
Charlemagne 'in "Aymaillot" the words,
"You dream like a scholar of Sorbonne."
That famous institution was founded in
1254. 4.V> years after the days of Charle
magne.
Errors of geography in Action are num
erous enough. The graceful romancer
?: \\ 10I.I. IMUN?; \ KUSHIKU HI !Jil>
Sir A. T. (Juiller Couch in his first pub
lished story, "Dfad Man's Rock," placed
Horn hay on the c-ast coust of India in the
Bay of Bengal, whereas g< ographers agree
in locating it on the western shore.
Rider Haggard committed a queer blun
der in "Jftfs." A simple matter of arith
metic upon the data supplied by the novel
itself shows that a character therein had
grown up and become the father of two
children before he was in his teens.
One French novelist used a number of
puppets, each labeled with the name of a
character In the story. Whenever a per
sonage died or was killed In the course of
the narrative the doll representing that
character was removed from the rest to
avoid any accidental return to life. A
most effective finish to one of this author's
novels had to be rewritten when It was
discovered that some one by accident or
design had mixed the "dead" dolls with
the "living," with startling results.
Had Thackeray employed some such de
vice in "Henry Esmond" he might have
avoided the resuscitation of the venerable
Dean of Winchester, who writes a letter
in chapter nine, some time after his
decease had been announced in chapter#
six.
Defective School Children.
From Anierlran Medicine.
The enormous number of defective
school children should not alarm us too
greatly. Bad as It all Is, there Is plenty
of evidence that It is an old, old phenom
enon?as old, Indeed, as man himself?
but now more evident because there are
more people. It Is less In rural districts,
though still present, and aa the population
Is now largaly urban, It is quite natural
that th# proportion of defectives should
Increase, though as a matter of fact there
Is no evidence that It has. B'g cities are
modern affairs and that Is why their phe
nomena are being discovered, but the ac
<;OOI) MVIKItlAI. KOH 'I'llId Utl.l.
TEA n.
counts of London ?ome centuries ago
showed a deplorable number of defec
tives, probably far greater in proportion
than in New York now. Though it is ap
palling that there should be nearly a
?juarter million diseased school children,
yet the defects are of minor things, while
formerly they were severe. The seat of
most of the trouble is said to be malnu
trition. but it is not nearly so bad as in
Kuropean cities of the last century. That
is. the new facts must not cause undue
pessimism, but rather the reverse, for
they show that though there Is an im
mense preventive work ahead of us. the
progress made in a century or even a
half century has been enormous. Opti
mism is in place, even if we are sure that
perfection Is unattainable. Moreover,
our preventive work is rapidly becoming
more and jnore efficient now that we are
learning the exact conditions and their
causes. ? . .
The Hotel Clerk.
From the St. l/ouis Times.
It used to be said that the hotel clerk
was a lordly person, who would conde
scend to speak to you if you approached
him In the proper spirit of humility, and
that lie always left you enough to travel
out of town with when he submitted
jour bill. I-ike all traditions, this one
may have had some sort of basis in years
gone by; yet how different conditions are
today! The hotel clerk of the present is
the original dispenser of the glad hand.
At least, that is the prevailing type. That
Is the kind of clerk who stays, and is al
ways identified with the best hostelries.
He is a student of human nature, and he
realizes more quickly than the guest
just how to deal with individual
cases. He knows instantly when he is
confronted by a man with limited means
whose success depends upon his making
a brave showing, and he exacts no toll in
the way of confession when such an ap
plicant comes to his desk. He finds a
room at the right rates, and permits the
guest to believe that he is getting by with
his stall, and Is quietly amiable. The
hotel clerk Is a destroyer of the blues
when the traveler is thinking of Mollie
and the babies. The clerk says a word,
or tells a story or remembers a face, and
the man away from home suddenly re
alises that the hotel is hts? home, and
that he needn't be homesick at all after
ha has written a letter back to Oska
loosa or Green Bay.
$
*r
4
-jw
4
MEN'S NBiLl
GE SHIRTS, made
of percale and
madras: sizes 14
to IS in the lot.
A many $i.no
brand* included.
Remnant sale.
"It pays to come from any distance."
Kivr
MEN .* P\NTS.
odd pair* loft
from rmvnt sales;
*2 pair" in all.
including s I /. ?? *
from 32 to 42
waist. Sold for
>2.??t and up to
$4 I'll. Retii'iatit
sale. a pair.
2tyc &ve> an^ St. SoE. gj ji ji 0
Remnant Sale Fridav
J
?*
4
|
4
$
4
4(
?V
4
ii
4
3
4
4
MEN'S NECKWEAR. washable four 'n
hanils: white and color*: Lie values. ==_
Each. ... a?C
STRAW HATS, for lioys and children; ail
sha|?cs and sixes in llie lul; sold up fl (D*/"
to Remnant sale 11
ItoVS' WASH SI ITS: sold it|< to 'J.TJr
7.V. Iv -i;iii-iiit salt*. each
IT HAMMOCKS: headrest. cushion and
side aprons: i?d?l for SI.7Y Rem
nant sal.', each 3r?t>
WOMEN'S NECKWEAR AN1> KELTS,
values. 2.V and Remnant fl'jltl/*
salc. choice H ?> /2*
i yjc
sa
SATIN ami TAFFETA RIBBONS:
width*: 1 to 2'j all colors;
values to 12V*c. ,\ jard
WASH BELTING. while mid fancy; sold
for 1.V yard. Remnant sale. a s^
le lit: tli
I.ACE HOSE, for misses and children,
black ai.il tan: sites .*? 7'?: sold for
cu and
Clioiee. .
Remnant sale, a pair
1I.\NDKER? 'IIIEl'S. for worn
?Uildren. Remnant lot.
""'2%c
98c
CHINA MATTING REMNANTS, good
lengths: sold for 1!'<- and 2."?- yard.
Reiituan! sale, a yard 7*%*
CHINA ANl? ,IAP MATTING. 2 V. 2;i.- and
trades: In rolls of 2" yards. JJ9
Remnant sale, a roll
WINDOW SCREENS: wdd for 2.V.
:!T?e and hardwood and S'.ier.vtsMl steel
frames; some slightly imperfect. jj
CHOICE OF ANY SCREEN f.OOR; near
ly ail sires; sold from $1.50 to
$2.2-Y Remnanl price
is G A LVA NIZED WASHTI BS. three
sizes; rllglttly Imperfect; sold from "T)(n)<~
4:n- to 70c.' Remnant sale, each
lc TABLE HO' "SEFI' RNISHINGS; mostly
hardware and voodeuware. Value# up to
2."..- for ONE CENT.
WIJITE CHINA PLATES, dinner and
breakfast sizes: also Press-cut Glass Sugar
Bowls, Cream Pitcher*, Spoonholders. Can
dlesticks, etc.: 10e and 15c ijlilfti 21/ g
Slhoe Dept. Remnant
Lots.
WHITE CANVAS LOW SHOES, for in
fants and children: also Strap Pumps;
broken sizes: slightly Rolled: value* <] *>_
up to $1. Remnant sale, a pair 11
LITTLE GENTS' SHOES, best $1 grade,
in sizes I(? to 12'j only. Remnant g/TJ)^
sale, n pair wyS/
BAREFOOT SANDALS. for children and
misses; .">!#<? and ?>!*? grades. Rem
LOW SHOES AND
PI'MPS. for women: broken sizes; fL.Vi
and $2.0rt values. Remnant sale, a
LOW SHOES, for boys and little gents;
gnu metal, tan and patent eolt;
S1..-.0 and $2 values. Remnant sale,
Remnants a.nd
Lots of Dress Goods
and Domestics.
12'. ? LAWNS. ORGANDIES. GINGHAM*
AND LININGS; lengths 2 to 10 yard* f
Friday, u jard 5C
t:.e ani? it*e snEriim:p cue* k si ii
im:s pacific sf.roes i?iAt;oNAi.s.
Freneli Percales. Cro.s-bar Musllna O*/ _
all good length". Frida>, a yard O / 2**
LOT OF HI CK TOWELS. ?7_
large *iz<-. Friday, each J k
l.OT OF TOWEI. CRASH; regularly / _
sells at S>- Friday sale, a >ard .. MK*
SI MMF.R PORTIERE*; all of our ?l
rabies from re--ent sale* Friday. * XX,~
a pair 'flVC
Big Savings on Wom
en's, Masses' and
Children's Apparel.
ELEGANT SILK t'OI LAKI* I?RIJ<M>.
haiidsoiiie st\ lt>s; s >M up to
JI2MI. Friday at. ..
Hi:AI TIFI'l. SII.K MIESSES. taffetas,
im^fisiillncs. ?atilis. fonlards. rtr. ? va'
lies troin *l."> to ?Jo Ri uiti.in't
sale, choice
S'5.98
WOMEN'S AXI> MISSES' WASH
SKIRTS. while. ?ii"pb< rd cheek* and
plain black: sold ut> to >2..V> r?-u ^L(T?
ularly. IC**t:m.int sale
WOMEN'S FINE H \S|I DRESSES,
all-over embroidery, cotton batiate. etc ;
values to Renniaiit sale,
choice
"? $1.98
lft DOZEN FINE WAISTS, all orer em
broidery, flue lingerie ai.il tailored
effects: sold from #1 to *l.:-i. Frl
day at
FINE TRIMMED HATS, for women;
worth up I" *!<?. Friday Item ? fl *jQ
nant sale, choice ^ ? / O
ST. DOZEN FINE LAWN DRESSING
SACQI I.S. many pretty colors
K*'liiiiaut sale
'. 19c
nant sale, a pair
WHITE CANVAS
l."VO PAIRS CORSETS. American La,lr.
R & G. <^. B . La France and W. U.; va'l
ues to $2. Friday Remnant sale. *
a pair OVC
LARGE I.OT OF CHILDREN'S WASH
DRESSES, ginghams, percale., chainbraya;
sold up to ?1..V> I'rlilai Reniiant
hale OyC
Ml SLIN I NDERWI.AR. bohiis, skirts,
chemises, princess slips, combina
tion suits; values to $2. Remnant OO
sale OOC
Well Worth Reading,
In our next Sunday Magazine: Illus
trated riong Xo. 15, "Silver Thread..
Among the Gold." Illustrated by Chase
Emerson; the first of a series of stories
by Gelett Burgess, entitled "Who Was
Belle Carillon? A New York Arabian
Night's Entertainment": "Dollars and
Sense of Humor," by Lew Fields;
"Walled City Life," by K. F. Junor,
M. D.; "Penelope of the Mil!." entry No.
133 in our prize story competition, by
.N'nthan Haskell Dole; the sccond story
in the short series h>i L. J. Beeston, en
titled "The Poisoned Chalice," and ti e
final installment of ' The Frivolous Sec
retary," by Mrs. Jacques Futreile.
He Meant Well.
From London Opinion.
Lady? I must ask you to take back thst
parrot 1 bought somu time ago. He
shocks all my friends by his dreadful
language.
Fancier?Ah. you've got to be careful
'ow you talk before 'im. 'Es t?nibl#
quick to lcarnf

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