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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 16, 1912, Image 8

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FAIL 10 OBEY RULE1
Lifeboat Equipment Aboard
Big Liners Discussed.
OPINION OF GEORGE UHLER
Declares No Large Steamer Has Suf
ficient Service.
PRESERVERS ARE LITTLE USE
Comment of Chief of U. 8. Steam
boat Inspection Board on the
Titanic Disaster.
None of the big ocean liners makes
sven a pretense of carrying enough life*
boats to take care of passengers and
rrew in case of a disaster such as that to
the Titanic, according to George Uhler,
;hief of the United States steamboat in
spection service.
"In the case of the big liners." said Mr.
Uhler today, "the lifeboat capacity is not
rated according to the number of persons
the boat can accommodate, but according
to the vessel's tonnage.
"Vessels of 20,000 tons are required,
?y the rules of the British maritime
?oard of trade, to carry lifeboats suf
Icient to accommodate 1,242 persona.
Jnder these rules a vessel the sice of
he Titanic would be compelled to have
i lifeboat capacity of 23,670 cubic feet,
rhich would accommodate 2,36? per
sons. The lifeboat capacity would be
>arely sufficient for the passengers
i tone, leaving the crew?officer? and
-n'en?to sink. But the big liners never
arry their proper number of boats.
Sknall Boats Comply.
"Small vessels, those rating under
10,000 tons, carry lifeboat' equipment
adequate to care for both passengers
uM crew. The big ships do not, and
nake no pretense at doing so. Their
iwners say, in effect, 'If you compel uS
o' carry enough boats we cannot carry
tassengers.* Of course, they do not
?eally say this, but their action in
seeking efforts to compel them to ear
?y a sufficient number of boats Is
?qui valent to such a statement.
"There is no doubt that tha big liners
ihould be compelled by law to carry
?nough boats to take care of-all pass en
ters and members of their crews. The
[Tatted States, however, has no JUrisdlc
Jon over British vessels and cannot
sompel them to be so equipped.
Preservers of Small Use.
"Any liner with a large number of pas
tengers, meeting with such a disaster as
he one that sent the Titanic to the bot
om, would take down with It a large pro
nation of Its passelngers and crew.' stm
>ly because Its lifeboat and Hferaft ca
>acity could not care for them, though ft
s true that all steamers of whatever size
ire compelled to carry life preserver*
?nougb to give one to each person on
>oard In case of accident. But preservers
ire of little use in a case' auctt as that of
be Titanic.
REPORT ON IE-SAM
APPARATUS DEMANDED
nspector Uhler Makes Inquiry
Regarding Equipment
on Titanic.
A quick report from the White Star
Ine on the number of lifeboats and llfs
*afts carried by the Titanic has been tel
graphed for by Supervising Inspector
Jhler of the government steamboat ln
pect on service.
NEW YORK. April"" !?.?Statistical in
'ormation of the life-saving apparatus
?f the Olympic, sister ship or the Titanic,
vas Riven out today by the bureau of la-'
ipectlon of steam vessels. Figures for
:he Titanic are not available but, as the
;wo ships are almost identical in sise, it
? not likely that their life-saving equip*
nent materially differs.
Equipment on Olympic.
The Olympic has sixteen lifeboats and
tour rafts, calculated to accommodate
,171 people. It was stated at the bureau
hat no ship Is required to have sufficient
K>at room to accommodate all Its com
pete passenger and crew list.
The Olympic carries 3.455 life preservers
tnd forty-eight life buoys, and these
qulpmenta are made In compliance with
he regulations of the British board of
rade. The United States bureau has no
?ower, except to see that each steam
hip meets the requirements of Its home
tovernment.
NOTABLES ON IP
Many Prominent Persons Were
Aboard the Titanic.
ISIDOR STRAUS PASSENGER
Others Included Col. Astor, Henry B.
Harris and W. T. Stead.
VANDERBILT NOT ON VESSEL
Mother Says He Remained in Lon
don?St. Louis Heiress Among
the Rescued.
Among1 the prominent persons on board
the Titanic were the following:
Isidor Straus, well known merchant of
New York and a member of the Fifty
third Congress.
William Thomas Stead, editor of the
Review of Reviews and Masterpiece Li
brary, and one of the most widely known
newspaper men in the world. His weekly
stories of doings in London printed in
American newspapers have caused much
comment.
Col. John Jacob Astor, one of the
wealthiest men in the world, who in 1891
built the Astoria Hotel, and later erected
an addition. The two combined are now
the Waldorf-Astoria. During the Span
ish-American war Col. Astor presented
to the government a mounted battery,
said to have cost $100,000. He served in
Cuba, and was present at the surrender
at Santiago.
Charles Melville Hays, president of the
Grand Trunk railway.
.. J. B. Ismay Passenger.
Joseph Bruce. Ismay, ship owner, and
chairman and managing director of the
White Star line, who realized his dream
of many years when the Titanic sailed
away from her dock in Southampton, and
who planned to enjoy the maiden trip of
the ill-fated vessel.- Besides be'tfg chair
man and managing director of the White
8tar Line, Mr. Ismay was president of
the International Mercantile Marine Com
pany.
Washington A. Rpebllng, who completed
the building of the Brooklyn bridge after
the deatto of his father.
Henry Burkhardt Harris, the theatrical
mfcns^er, who is well known in this city,
having married a Washington girl. Miss
Irene Wallach, who formerly lived at
2d street and Indiana avenue northwest.
Mrs. Harris accompanied her husband
when, he boarded the Titanic at South
ampton.
Mrs. Astor Is Safe.
KEW YORK. April 16.?The White
Star line Informed Vincent Astor, son
of Qol. John 'Jacob Astor, this morn
ins that his stepmother, Mrs. John
Astor, with her maid, had been
saved and that they hoped to hear
later that CoL Astor had. been rescued,
f Mrs. Cornelius .Vanderbilt, mother of
Alfred Gwydne Vanderbilt, announced
last night that her son, who was re
Krted on board the Titanic, had not
arded the ship in England, but was
still in London.
Heiress Is Rescued.
ST. LOUIS. Mo., April 16.?Miss
Georgette Madill, reported among the
saved in the Titanic disaster, is one
of the city's youngest heiresses. 8he
is fifteen years old. By an order of
court a year ago she was awarded an
annual "pin money" allowance of $7,500
to pay <or her clothing and education
until she became of age.
Miss Madill is the principal heir of
Judge George A. Madill, who is a promi
nent banker of this city.
Cincinnati Woman Survivor.
CINCINNATI. Ohio, April 16. ? Mrs.
George M. Stone, mentioned In the list
of the survivors of the Titanic, is from
this city. 8he had been visiting a daugh
ter in Cairo, Egypt, for the last year.
H. R. Rood on Steamer.
SEATTLE. Wash, April 10.?Hughes R.
Rood, vice president and general manager
of the Pacific Creosotlng Company, whose
name appears in the list of the Tltanlc's
passengers, is a wealthy resident of this
city, who. with his wife, had been spend
ing the winter on the continent. Mrs.
Rood and her maid were to sail later. .
HAWAII FOB TAFT.
Delegates From the Islands In
structed for the President.
NEW YORK, April 1&?John J. D.
Trenoe, chairman of the committee of
special organization of the National Re
publican League, has received the follow
ing from J. P. Cook, chairman of the
Taft Republican League of Hawaii:
"Taft League victorious. Delegates
Kuhio. Frear, Renton, Rice, Baldwin and
Moir instructed unanimously for Taft."
News of Titanic's Loss Fol
lows Reassuring Reports.
DEMAND FOR PARTICULARS
Crowds Besiege Newspaper Offices
and Steamer Headquarters.
OFFICIALS LITTLE TQ OFFEE
Insurance Associations Staggered by
Confirmation of the Disaster.
Conflict in Rumors.
LONDON, April 16.?The news of the
loss of the steamship Titanic and the
probable drowning1 of more than a thou
sand of her passengers overwhelmed Lon
don today. Those who had friends
among the passengers or crew had gone
to their homes last' night, after a day
spent. In eager inquiry, relieved and re
assured by the late evening dispatches,
I which declared convincingly that the ves- j
? sel was still afloat and proceeding to
Halifax.
j Londoners were sure all was well until
the authentic tidings came this morning
of the disaster that had overwhelmed the!
great ship. The news, published in a
few late editions of the morning news
papers and in early editions of the even
ing newspapers, spread rapidly and con
I sternation resulted. This was particu
I larly true at Lloyd's.
Pitiful Scenes Witnessed.
Throughout the morning the crowds
I which besieged the newspaper offices and
I the headquarters of the White Star line
increased in size. PitifUl scenes were
witnessed, as men, women and children,
unable to get information as to relatives
or friends, left the crowds wtih tear
stained faces.
I Officials of the White Star line had lit
tle to offer them beyond dispatches ldentl
1 cal with those cabled to the newspapers
from New York. These were to the ef
I feet that a considerable number of res
I cued passengers were aboard the Car
I path la, and that a few more might have
been picked up by the Virgiinian. The
I announcement that the steamship Cali
fornian was remaining in the vicinity ot
the wreck also gave hope that some more
I survivors might be found.
The list of the rescued began trickling
into the newspaper offices during the
I morning, cabled from New York. Every
name was eagerly scanned by waiting
thousands of people, the list bringing Joy
to some, dismay to others.
Lord Ashburton Not a Passenger.
| Lord Ashburton and Norman C. Craig,
I member of parliament, whose names apr
I peered in some of the published lists of
first cabin passengers, did not sail en the
Titanic. Lord Ashburton is on his way
to America on another steamer. The
family of J. Bruce Ismay, managing di
rector of the White Star line, received
no direct news from him, but the ap
pearance of his name in the list of res
cued posted by the papers brought great
relief to his friends and relatives.
A wireless dispatch received today by
I the firm of Pears, soap makers, and
timed 1:20 yesterday, said merely. "All
welL" It was unsigned, but was believed
1 to be from Thomas Pears, who, with his
wife, was among the Titanic's passen
I gers. It came via the liner Potsdam, but
there was no Indication as to where it
was originally sent from. It1 may have
I been dispatched before the Titanic sank,
but nevertheless it gave relief to the
family, who believe that Mr. Pears Is
aboard one of the steamers which reached
the scene of the disaster yesterday.
Underwriters' Obligations.
I The underwriters at Lloyds were stag
gered at the news, but it is declared that
I the insurance on the lost vessel is so
evenly distributed that none of the un
I derwriters Is likely to be hard hit. The
I reassuring cable dispatches received yes
terday had sent the reinsurance rate
down to 25 guineas per cent, and the
underwriters closed up at night hopeful
that all was well.
I When they reopened this morning a lit
tle business was done at 90 guineas, but
the rate was quickly raised to 05, which
is known as a "total loss" rate.
The exact amount of the property loss
I was hard to ascertain today. Under
writers stated that they could not say
accurately what securities were on board
the ship as yet. It was generally esti
I mated, however, that the cargo of the Tl
I tanic would represent a value of Ap
proximately $12,500,000. Of this total
I $750,000 was retained by the White Star
I Company at Its own risk and the balance
I was placed on the insurance market in
London, Liverpool, Hamburg and else
I where.
FIRST AND SECOND CABIN
SURVIVORS ON CARPATHIA
CAPE RACE, Newfoundland, April 16.?The steamship Carpathia, which is
believed to have on board all the survivors of the Titanic disaster, started
early today to send by wireless to this station the list of the Titanlc's sur
vivors. Great difficulty was experlentted, In; getting many of the names cor
rectly, and more than a score of names- as made out here did not appear at all
on the Titanlc's original passenger list, but it is believed that many of these
are passengers who booked at the last moment. The receipt of the list of the
first-cabin survivors required nearly more than six hours' effort. So far as the
names check up correctly the following saloon passengers of the Titanic are
safe on board the Carpathia:
ANDERSON, Harry.
ALLEN, Miss E. W.
APPLETON, Mrs. E. W.
ASTOR, Mrs. John Jacob and maid.
BARSWORTH, A. H.
BARRETT, Karl.
BAXTER, Mrs. James.
BRAYTON, George A.
BECKWITH, Mr. and Mrs.,R. T.
BEHR, Karl H.
BESSETTE, Miss.
BISHOP, Mr. and Mrs. D. H.
BLANK, Henry.
BONNE LL, Miss Caroline.
BOWEN, Miss G. C.
BOWERMAN, Miss Elsie.
BROWN, Mrs. J. M.
. BROWN, Mrs. J. J.
BUCKNBLL, !Mrs. William.
CALDERHEAD, E. P.
CARDELL, Mrs. Churchill.
CARDEZA, Mrs. J. W.
CARDEZA, Thomas.
CARTER, Miss Lucille.
CARTER, Mr. W. E.
CARTER, Mrs. William E.
CARTER, Master William.
CASE, Howard B.
CAVENDISH, Mrs. Turrell W., and
maid.
CHAFFEE, Mrs. H. F.
CHAMBERS. Mr. and Mrs. N. a
CHERRY, Miss Gladys.
CHEVRO, Paul.
CLARKE, Mrs. Walter.
CROSBY. Mrs. E. G.
CROSBY, Miss.
CUM MINGS, Mrs. John B.
DANIEL, Robert W.
DAVIDSON, Mrs. Thornton.
DEVELLIERS, Mrs. B.
DICK, Mr. and Mrs. A. A.
DODGE, Mr. and Mrs. Washington and
son. . ,
DOUGLAS, Mrs. Fred C.
DOUGLAS, Mrs. Walter.
FLYNN. J. F.
FORTUNE, Mrs. Mark, Miss Lucille,
Miss Alice.
FRAUENTEAl* Dr. Htenry and Mrs.
FRAUENTEAL, Mr. and Mrs. T. G.
FROUCHER, Miss Margaret
FUTRELLE, Mrs. Jacques.
GIBSON, Mrs. Leonard.
GIBSON, Miss Dorothy.
GOLDENBURG, Mrs. Samuel.
GOLDENBURG, Miss Ella.
GORDON, Sir and Lady Cosmo Duff.
GRACIE, Col. Archibald. ! /?
GRAHAM, Mr.
GRAHAM, Mrs. William.
GRAHAM. Miss Margaret E.
GREENFIELD, Mrs. Lee D.
GREENFIELD, Mr. William B.
HARANBR, Henry.
HARDER, Mr. and Mrs. George A.
HARPER, Henry S. and man servant
HARPER, Mrs. Henry 8.
HAUSSIG, Mile
HAWKSFORD, Henry.
HAYS, Mrs. Charles M. and daughter
Margaret
HARRIS, Mrs. Henry B.
HIPPACH, Miss Jean.
HOGEBOOM, Mrs. John C.
HIPPACH, Mrs. Ida S.
HOYT, Mr. and Mrs. Fred M.
IS MAY, J. Bruce.
LEADER, Mrs. A. F.
LINES, Mrs. Ernest
LINES, Miss Mary C.
LONGLEY, Miss G. F.
MADILL, Miss Georgietta A.
MARSCHAL, Pierre.
MARV..*, Mrs. D. W.
MIDDLE, Olivia (?).
MINNIHAN, Mrs. W. E.
.4INNIHAN, Miss Daisy.
NEWELL, Miss Madeline.
NEWELL, Miss Marjorie.
NEWSOM, Miss Helen.
OSTBY, E. C.
OSTBY, Mrs.
OSTBY, Miss Helen R.
OMOND, Mr. Fiennad.
PEUCHEN, Maj. Arthur.
POTTER, Mrs. Thomas, jr.
RHEIMS, Mrs. George.
ROBERT, Mrs. Edward S.
.ROLMANO, C.
ROSEBAUM, Miss Edith.
ROTHSCHILD, Mrs. Martin.
ROTHES, Countess of.
SAALFELD, Adolphe.
SALAMAN, Abiaham.
SCHABERT, Mrs. Paul.
SEWARD, Frederick.
SHED DELL, Robert Dougtas.
SILVERTHORNE, R. Spencer.
SILVERY, Mrs. William D.
SIMONIUS, Col. Alfonso.
SLOPER, William T.
SNYDER, Mr. and-Mrs. John.
SPENCER, Mrs. W. A., and maid.
8TENELIN, Dr. Max.
STENGEL, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. E. E.
STEPHENSON, Mrs. P.
STONE, Mrs. George M.
SWIFT, Mrs. Frederick Joel.
THAYER, Mr- and Mrs. J. B.
TAUSSIG, Miss Ruth.
TAYLOR, Mr. and Mrs. E. Z.
TUCKER, Gilbert M.
WARREN, Mrs. F. M.
WHITE, M*s. J. Stuart
WICK, Miss Mary.
WIDENER, Mrs. George D., and maid.
- WILLARD, Miss Constance.
WOOLNER. Hugh.
YOUNG. Miss Marie.
List of survivors whose names do not
appear on the original sailing list, prob
' ably includes a large number of those who
took the ship at Cherbourg:
BASSINA, Miss A.
BURNS. Mrs. G. M.
CASEBERE, Miss B. D.
CHAMDASEN, Mrs Vlctorine.
DANIEL. Miss Sarah.
DE8ETTE, Miss.
DRAUSHENSTED, Alfred.
EMOSK, Philip.
FLEGHEIM, Miss Antoinette.
FRANCATI3LLI, Miss.
GOOGHT, James.
HELVERSON, Mrs. A. O.
HONER, Henry R.
MAMY, Miss Ruberta.
NELICARD, Mme.
LAVORY, Miss Bertha.
LESNEUR, Gustave J.
PAN HART, Miss Nanette.
RENAGO, Mrs. Mammain J.
RANELT, Miss Apple.
SERERECA, Miss Augusta.
STEFFANSON, H. B.
SEGESSER, Miss Emma.
SMITH, Mrs. F. P.
SLAYTON, Miss Hilda.
SHADELL, Robert Douglas. '
SMITH. Mrs. Lucin P.
WARD, Miss Emma.
THOR, Miss Ella.
TUCKER, Mrs., and maid.
Some Question As to Identity.
WIRELESS VERSION. PROBABLE MEANING
Abbott, Mm. Rose
Andrew*. Mias K. T.
Ohibinade, Mrs. B.
Douglas, Robert
Ellis, Miss
Kenchem, Mias Smile
Mrs. N. Aubert
Miss Cornelia I.
Mrs. E. B. Chlbnall
Mr. or Mra. W. Doug
lass, or Mrs. V. C.
Douglass
May be Miss Eustasia.
Possibly Mrs. F, R.
Kenyott.
Possibly Mr. and Mra.
E. N. Kir ball.
Probably Mr. or Mrs.
P. R. Kenyoa.
Probably Mrs. 3. Ltad
atrom.
Probably Frank D.
Millet.
Rocerson. Mr. J, Mrs. Practically certain tkis
Arthur. Miaa Emily is Ryerson family of
B., Miss Susan P., Philadelphia.
Master Allison, and
maid.
Kimberley,
i. Ed
Mr end
Mrs
KcanyaiaB, F
Ltadatrem. Bigrid
Mile
SECOND CABIN PASSENGERS SAVED.
The names of the rescued second cab
in passengers so far as they check up
with the Titanlc's published list, are
as follows:
ANGLE. William.
ABELSON, Hanna.
BALLS. Ada R.
BISS, Miss Kate.
BEANE. Edward.
BEANE, Miss Ethel.
BENTHEM. Miss Lillian.
BRYHL. Miss Dagmar.
BYSTROM, Mrs. Karollna.
COLLYER, Mrs. Charlotte.
COLLYER, Miss Marjorie.
CHRISTY, Mrs. Alice.
CHRISTY, Miss Julia.
CLARKE, Mrs. Ada Maria.
CAMERON. Miss.
COLLETT, Mrs. Stuart.
CALDWELL, Albert F.
CALDWELL, Mrs. Sylvia.
CALDWELL, Aiden G.
DREW, Mrs. Lulu.
DAVIS. Miss Agnes.
DAVIS, John M.
DURAN, Fiorentlna.
DURAN, Ascuncion.
DAVIS, Miss Mary.
DOLING, Mrs. Ada.
DOLING, Miss Elsie.
FAUNTHROPE, Mrs. Lizzie.
GAR8IDE, Miss Ethel.
HEWLETT, Miss Mary D.
HARRIS. George.
HERMAN, Mrs. Jane.
HERMAN, Miss Kate.'
HERMAN, Miss Alice.
HOLD, Miss Annie.
HART, Mrs. Esther.
HART, Miss Eva.
HARPER, Miss Nina.
HAMALINER, Anna and son.
HOCKING, Mrs. Elizabeth.
HOCKING, Miss Nellie.
JACOBSOHN, Mrs. Amy.
KEANE, Miss Nora.
KELLY, Miss Fannie.
LAROCHE, Miss Louisa.
LEITCH, Miss Jessie W.
LAMORE, Mrs.
LOUCH. Mrs. Alice.
LEHMAN. Miss Bertha.
MELLINGER, Mrs. Elizabeth and
child.
MALLET, Mrs. A.
MALLET, Master Andrero.
NYE, Mrs. Elizabeth.
PHILLIPS, Miss Alice.
PAILAS, Emilio.
PADRO. Julian.
PARISH, Mrs. L.
PORTALUPPI, Mrs. Emilio.
QUICK, Mrs. Jane O.
QUICK, Miss Wennie O.
QUICK, Miss Phyllis O.
REBOUF, Mrs. Lillle.
RI DSD ALE, Mrs. Lucy.
RUGG, Miss Emily.
RICHARD, Mr. and Mrs. Emile and son.
SINCOCK.. Miss Maude.
SMITH, Mrs. Marion.
TROUT, Miss Edna 8.
WEISZ, Mrs. Matilda.
WEBBER, Miss Susan.
WRIGHT, Miss Marion.
WATT, Miss Bessie.
WATT, Miss Bertha.
WEST, Mrs. and two children.
WELL8, Mrs. Addie.
WEj-JJS, Miss J.
WELLS, Ralph.
WILLIAMS, Charles.
? Survivors whose names do not appear
on the original sailing list:
BROWN, EDITH.
BROWN, T. W. S.
CHARLES, W. M. E.
CARMACrON, R^NARDO K. M. ?
DRJSCOLL, MISS B.
FORM DRY, MISS ELOIN.
GERRCAI, MRS. MARCY.
HEALY, MISS NORAH.
HANSON, MRS. JENNIE. I
HOSOSONS. MASSEFAME.
McGOWAN, MISS ANNIE.
McDEARMONT, MIS8 LETITIA,
MARE, MRS- FLORENCE.
PENSKY, MISS ROSSI.
SKELIERY, MRS. W. N.
TROUT, MRS. JESSIE.
fforao Question as to Identity.
WIRELESS VERSION. PROBABLE MEASIXO
Becker. Mrs. Alien, Undoubtedly the wme
Miss Ruth, Miss as given in oiling
M?rr Master Rich* lbt undpr bioci
Mary, Maater turn A Belker
ard- and three children."
"Juliet. Mr. Leroehe." Mm. Joseph Laroche
??Mr La roc tie Slmone." and Slipon I^rocl*.
M^Anaa. M*. Wl& LaMlgen.
Marshall. Miss Kate. Mra. Marshall. ..
Mange, Mr. Paula. May be Mra. wimam
Mallcroft, Miss MllUe. Miss
Mellora, J. N. May be William Mel
lew. ^
V.?rae!l Mrs. Adella. Mrs. Klcbolaa Kasaer.
Oi'han.; PVn^r JT Thom.s OTenh.11!.
Rosen Mia* Ellaa. Sflina Rogera.
Blhrun. UtM Bjnlj. Ulll. SU.en.
Chaplains in Congress
Refer to Wreck in Prayers
The chaplains of both houses of Con
gress alluded to the Titanic disaster in
their invocations today. Chaplain Pierce,
in the Senate, asking the comfort of the
Almighty in the affliction, prayed:
"Almighty God, our Heavenly Father,
who art the confidence of all the ends of
the earth and of them that are far off on
the sea, our hearts are overwhelmed
within us because of the sore distress of
our people, and the sad fate that has
overtaken our brethren in the great deep.
In all their afflictions we are afflicted,
and to whom may we turn, O Lord, but
to Thee, who art our refuge and our
strength and a very present help in
trouble. - _
"Thou art the eternal God and Thou
art our refuge, fliou hast been our dwell
ing place in all generations. The sea is
Thine and Thou hast made it. Though
Thou slay us. yet will we trust in Thee.
Comfort our hearts. O God, and gracious
ly grant that neither height nor depth
may separate us from the love of God,
which it in Christ Jesus, Our Lord. For
Thy name's sake, hear our cry and an
swer our prayer." ~ ^
Chaplain Couden, in thp House, prayed
for more stringent laws for the protec
tion of travelers by land or sea, as well
as for those exposed to fire and flood.
Bed Cross Contribution to China.
The American Red Cross Society has
cabled $4,000 to China for famine and
revolution sufferers, making a total of
$124,000 since January 1.
(Continued From First Page.)
on the Carpathia had been rescued. Early
dispatches gave ground for at leairt *
faint hope that the Virginian had found
and taken on board additional survivor*
The wireless messages stating that the
Virginia and Parisian reached the scene
of the wreck too late to be of service,
and that the former was proceeding on
her voyage, removed the final shred of
hope for such additional rescues. But
the fact that 800 had been saved whose
names had not been transmitted buoyed up
the hopes of friends of those still missing.
From the moment of arrival In Wash
ington late last evening of the first real
news of the disaster to the Titanic, the
newspaper offices, telegraph and cable
companies and the offices of the various
transatlantic lines represented here were
besieged with Inquiries from relatives and
friends of Washington people thought to
be on board the wrecked vessel.
Entire City Stricken With Borrow.
(Last night's terrible tidings, coming on
the heels of the messages to the effect
that all had been saved, threw the entire
city Into horrified som ?. Under every
electric light In the ouwntown section
groups of men and women, mainly thea
tergoers, stopped to read the awful news
contained in the newspaper extras.
William B. Silvey Perhaps Lost.
Mrs. W. B. Silvey of the Wilmington.
1811 Wyoming avenue northwest,
whose son and daughter-in-law, Mr.
and Mrs. William Beard Bilvey of Du
luth, Minn., were passengers on the
Titanic, received word from New York
this morning that her son was prob
ably lost, while -his wife's name ap
pears upon the list of those saVed.
Mrs. Frances S. Deshler of the Wil
mington, a daughter of Mrs. Silvey,
told a Star reporter this afternoon
that she had received a telegram from
the White Star line headquarters
stating that Mrs. Silvey is saved,
but no information could be had
regarding Mr. Silvey. The latter was
born in Washington and attended the
public schools here, but for the past
twenty years he has been living in the
west. He is a well-to-do real estate
operator.
It had been the plan of Mr. and Mrs.
Silvey to visit Washington upon their
return to New York. They first ob
tained passage on the Olympic, sister
ship of the Titanic, but met with some
trouble that made it necessary to take
another steamer. Mrs. 8ilvey, according
to Mrs. Deshler, had entertained doubts
about returning on the Titanic, fearing
that something might happen on her
maiden trip. Their eighteen-year-old
daughter. Miss Melville Silvey, who is
attending college at Farmington, Conn.,.
was to have met the Titanic at the New
York wharf.
Carters of Philadelphia Safe.
Mrs. Stilson Hutchins of this city re
ceived a long-distance telephone call from
Baltimore this morning that her cousin,
Mrs. Lucille Carter of Philadelphia, and
the latter's husband and two children
were saved.
"I received word they are on board the
Carpathia," Mrs. Hutchins says, "but I
hardly know whether I can believe the
report or not." The report came from
Mrs. Polk, mother of Mrs. Carter, who
resides in Baltimore. Before her mar
riage Mrs. Carter Was Miss Lucille Polk.
The Polks and Carters are well known
in Washington.
Francis Davis Millet of Washington and
New York is an artist of international
reputation and rice chairman of the com
mission of fine arts appointed by President
Taft. Mr. Millet maintains a studio in
Washington at 1836 Wisconsin avenue
northwest, and resides at 2000 O street.
His work on the fine arts commission,
which was vested with the power to rec
ommend the improvements planned for
the beautlfication of the National Capital,
has made him well known in this city
and throughout the country as an artist
an* lanscape architect. He had been
abroad attending to Important work in
Rome.
EVERY MEMBER OF CREW
LIVED AT SOUTHAMPTON
Town Stunned by News ef
Disaster, and Sad Soenes
?re Witnessed.
SOUTHAMPTON, England, April 16.?
Distressing scenes have been witnessed
throughout the morning at the White
Star offices here, which have been throng
ed by the relatives of the crew of the
Titanic.
The town is absolutely stunned by the
news of the disaster, which is the great
est blow that Southampton ever has sus
tained.
Every member of the crew had his
heme here, and a large portion of them
were natives of the town.
PASS ANXIOUS NIGHT
Scores of Persons Besiege
White Star Line Offices. .
LEARN LITTLE DEFINITE
Many Inquiries Are Made Concern
ing Maj. Butt's Fate.
PRESIDENT TAFT TELEGRAPH!
No News of Henry B. Harris, But
Wife's Name Is on List
f
of Survivors. \fi>
.li
NBW TORK, April la?All throug*
the night the offices of the White Star
line and the newspapers were besieged
by scores of persons anxious to leaifc
the fate of relatives or friends on board
the Titanic, while a flood of telegrams,
cablegrams and telephone messages
was received, bringing esger inqulriib
from different parts of the country.
Officials of the White Star line hgfc
little news to impart. Wireless operaAofk
worked through the night trying to sefM
and pick up calls from the scene of the
disaster. The wireless was handicapped
in the early morning by a thunderstorm,
which finally silenced wireless transmfe
ston for a time. ?.
Gradually the names of the rescued be
gan to come through by wireless by wg|r
of Cape Race from the Carpathla add
were posted In the company's offices.
There were some who scanned the lists
and turned away with faces showing
hopes realised, but many who csane were
disappointed and grief stricken. A squad
of police and sn extra force of clerks
were called to take care of the Inquirers.
Ask About Xaj. Butt
Repeated calls were made for Informa
tion relative to the fate of Maj. Archi
bald Butt, President Tail's military aid,
who Is returning from a visit abroad.
President Taft telegraphed the company
early in the day, and was promised im
mediate word If anything of a definite
nature regarding Maj. Butt was received.
Vincent Astor, son of Col. John Jacob
Astor, remained up through the night
trying to learn the fate of his father.
Word came that Mrs. John Jaoob Astor,
his stepmother, and her maid were safe
aboard the Carpathla.
Members of the Guggenheim and Straus
families had representatives at the White
Star offices throughout the night In an
ticipation of some definite word being re
ceived concerning Isidor Straus and Ben
jamin Guggenheim, who were among the
prominent passengers on the Titanic.
These names were not in the survivors'
lists received up to 8:80 o'clock.
Numerous Inquiries were received re
garding the fate of Henry B. Harris, the
theatrical manager, and his wife. The
list shows that Mrs. Harris had been
saved, but no word came regarding her
husband.
Bays Carpathla Has 675.
Vice President Franklin of the Interna
tional Mercantile Marine Company, said
today that he had heard that the Cunarti
er Carparthla would arrive here Thurs
day evening, and that his information
was that there were 675 survivors of the
Titanic on board. Mr. Franklin said
that he did not expect to receive any fur
ther wireless mesage from the Olympic
on this side of the Atlantic and that Capt.
Haddock, of that steamship, would soon
be in position to send all his wireless re
ports to the London office.
A cablegram from London received at
the ateamship offices in the night, con
cerning the fate of Sir Cosmo and Lady
Duff-Gordon, remained unanswered until
this morning, when it was definitely as
certained Sir Cosmo and Lady Duff-Gor
don were among the passengers taken
from the Titanic and now on board the
Carpathla.
Long distance telephone calls came from
Philadelphia throughout the night, inquir
ing for the many society folks from that
city aboard the Titanic. The name of
Mrs. George D. Widener of Elklns Park
was posted as among those on board the
Carpathla. The names of her husband
and her soft, Harry Elkins Widener, did
not appear ameng those saved
UTAH DT FOR REPAIRS.
Warship Slightly Damaged in Col
lision With Merchant Steamer,
NEW YORK, April la?The battle
ship Utah steamed into the navy yard
here today for repair of slight Injuries
sustained in a collision yesterday with
the Merchants' 11ns steamer Condor be- .
tween Green point and Gravesend bay.
The Utah's Injuries are so slight thst
It was at first thoucht no repairs
would be necessary. The collision oc
curred in the fog.
The Condor also was slightly dam
aged.
SOME OF THE PASSENGERS ON THE TITANIC WHO ARE AMONG THE MISSING.

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