OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, July 02, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1912-07-02/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

WEATHER.
Fair tonight. Wednesday un
settled; not much change in tem
perature; light southerly winds.
ht.
The Star is the only afternoon
paper in Washington that prints
the news of the Associated Press.
closing mew york pArr
stock quotations I AUij 13
No. 18,906.
WASHINGTON, D. C., TUESDAY, JULY 2, 1912-TWENTY PAGES.
? *
ONE CENT.
WILSON NOMINATED
FORTY-SIXTH BALLOT
OCEAN ? CROSSING BALLOON
BLOWN TO ATOMS IN AIR;
YANIMAN AND CREW KILLED
Terrifying Spectacle High Over Sea Is Wit
nessed by Thousands of Spectators
on the Beach at Atlantic City.
FLAMES HIDE SHIP FROM VIEW
BEFORE IT PLUNGES INTO OCEAN
Bodies of Four Victims Located and the Other One
Recovered?Miss Harriet Quimby, Aviator,
Falls to Death From Monoplane With
W. A. P. Willard at Boston.
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., July 2.?While 3,000 spectators stood
too startled to utter a single sound the big dirigible balloon Akron
was shattered by the explosion of the gas bag and blown to atoms at
0:38 this morning, a half mile off shore over Absecon inlet.
Melvin Vaniman, who had built the airship, with the idea of fly
ing across the Atlantic ocean; Calvin Vaniman, his younger brother;
Fred Elmer, Walter Guest and George Bourtillion, his crew, were
instantly killed.
The dirigible was sailing at a height of 1,000 feet and had been
1 the air since 6:15 o'clock when the accident occurred. She was a
quarter of a mile south of Brigantine Beach, which is across the inlet
from this city. The huge envelope, containing thousands of cubic
feet of gas, was rent by the terrific force of the explosion, probably
caused by expansion from the sun's rays.
iG BAG BURSTS NEAR MIDDLE,
FLAMES HIDING SHIP FROM VIEW!
The gas hag burst near the middle. A
mass of flames hid the ship from view.
For a space of possibly ten seconds the
hslf-million-dollar dirigible was Invisible,
while the air about the spot where it
had been hovering seemed to be ail
flames.
The fire dissipated, and then the ship
outlined against the sunrise was soon
to fall. 12ke a plummet. First the under
structure, or car in which were pinned
the unfortunate men, held in by a mesh
work put on after the second trip of the
balloon three weeks ago, unable to es
cape, broke away from the envelope. It
upended; the bow turned first in a slow
arc, then it reversed suddenly and
plunged downward. Directly above,
twisting in a long spiral, was the gas bag,
a smok.ng mays of rubber and silk, with
flames shooting out from a dozen sec
tions as it collapsed. It fluttered a mo
ment and then streaked down after the
car.
In the descent something which ap
peared to be the body of a man shot out
to the left of the wreckage and hit the
water before the rest of the descending
masf. It was reported that this was the
be dless body of Calvin Vantman.
All Bodies Are Located.
48:2" (a.m. a message was relayed ashore
ti n rescuers that this body had been re
10' ered. With it came the statement
iron <"apt. Lambert Parker of the Abse
op federal life-saving statioc that this
fa3 true, and that the other four mem
>ers of the crew were entangled in the
rr? ckage beyond reach for the present,
in eighteen feet of water. Efforts are to
be made to drag them to the surface.
T housands of persons from every part
if the resort are gathered along the in
let. Boardwalk and about the Vantman
.ottage, just across from the hangar, at
he inlet, where Mrs. Vaniman has col
apsed and is unconscious from the shock.
A physician is in attendance.
T ?e sreatt-st excitement prevailed for a
tin ?. Boats were darting out from the
.nl-1 and all along the shores of the
th< ouyhfare and beach. Police reserves,
wh - helped to launch the craft, which
la: ?d along gracefully until the accident
>c< Tred, kept the crowds from about the
lman villa.
F> IGHT SECOND SHIP
HAD TAKEN THIS YEAR;
SHAPED LIKE A CIGAR
T le flight this morninf? was the second
(hat the ill-fated airship had taken this
?>ar. After tinkering all winter on the
i*> Vaniman took the Akron out for a
h? t flight Saturday morning, June 1. At
,rta time the balloon was nearly wrecked
?y iume of the mechanism going wrong,
>u it was safely landed at the hangar
si out serious mishap.
1 e longest flight the balloon made was
as- fall, when it spent the greater part
?f he day in the air in the vicinity of
city. At that time the gas in the
was not sufficient to keep the big
|h constantly in the air and it had to
pa le several landings. During the Win
er Vaniman improved the ship through
?ssons learned in that flight. In appear
in' e the Akron was not unlike the Amer
ca, in which Walter Wellman and VanJ
nf i attempted to cross the Atlantic
>c? in in October, 1910, but there were
nt tv differences In the construction of
h< airship which collapsed today. The
;a. bag was thirty feet longer than that
|f the America, but was smaller in dl
ur iter. The dimensions were: Length
>f bag. 258 feet; diameter, forty-seven
ee . The bag was made of a composi
tor of rubber and was constructed in
Jhlo.
I Car Similar to America's.
(Beneath this immense cigar-shaped bag
tas the so-called car, similar in shape to
fe America's, but longer, perhaps 150
et long. The bottom of the car was
? posed of a round steel tank about two
in diameter and about 100 feet long.
f lis unk was stored the gasoline. The
car was connected to the gas bag by
steel tubing of light construction. On i
top of the tank was built a platform of
two-inch boards and on thiB rested one
100-horeepower motor, two SO-horse
power motors, one 17-horsepower motor
and a small dynamo. The 100-horsepower
motor was used for the two forward ver
tical propellers and the other two large
motors for the two pairs of orientable
propellers. These propellers could be
turned from the horizontal to the vertical
and were to be used to raise or lower the
height of the airship. The small motor
and dynamo were used for electric light
ing and to furnish power to the wireless
outfit. Some of the supplies of the ship
were also stored on this platform. In
the forward end of the platform were the
steering wheel and gear for controlling
the rudder and the stabilizing planes fore
and aft.
The sleeping accommodations for the
crew consisted of hammocks strung ud
In the car.
Disaster Shock to Residents.
The disaster came as a shock to the
people of Atlantic City, who had come to
know Vaniman very well. For a week
past the Intrepid airman had been plan
ning to make another flight and only
waited for favorable winds. Last night
conditions appeared satisfactory and he
notified the city authorities that he prob
ably would make a flight at sunrise to
day. At daybreak the conditions were
s?ll favorable and the word was given
A hundred policemen and firemen were
summoned and sent up to the inlet to as
sist in getting the balloon out of the im
mense hangar. Their duty was to hold
on to the ropes of the ship as she was
carefully warped out of the big shed.
Hundreds of persons who expected the
flight saw the Akron come out of the
hangar for the last time. The operation
was a simple one and the big bag was
brought out without difficulty. Once clear
??*h.e.whedu. Van,lman Jumped into the
car of the ship, \j-here his other four men
had already gone, and he gave the word
to let go.
Instantly the ship rose, slowly at first
8??,ng fr?m.end to end. Then she
rose rapidly. Vaniman appeared to have
complete control and after circling about
over the inlet and on the mainland the
ship s nose was pointed out to sea The
maneuverings of the great aircraft con
stantly attracted additional people, and
the upper end of the beach and Board
walk were crowded with people when the
disaster occurred.
BODIES COULD BE SEEN
HURTLING THROUGH AIR,
DECLARES EYEWITNESS
An eyewitness of the disaster told this
story of what he saw:
"When about 1.000 feet in the air I,
saw a sudden puff of smoke from the
forward end of the great gas bog. In a
minute It exploded.
"To those who have witnesses the
many flights of Vaniman this one &eemed
at the start more successful than any
yet attempted. The crew seemed to have
better control than ever before. Starting
out from the hangar, the ship rose slow
ly from the ground and passed easily out
over the wat^r of the inlet, grazing the
masts of the fleet of yachts anchored
there.
"Vaniman and his crew were cheered by
a number of fishing parties at the in
let, about to start out for a day's sport.
The whistles of a fleet of motor boats
sounded a God-speed" to the airship and
its crew.
"After getting up about 300 feet the
ship made a complete circle of the
waters of Grassy bay. Apparently Vani
man was making a test of the air cur
rents.
Thousands Witness Plight.
"The airship passed over the Royal Pal
ace Hotel and then flew over the
southern section of the city. By this
time the word had quickly spread that
the ship was in the air and thousands of
residents and visitors flocked to the
Boardwalk to witness the flight. Soon
<Oontinued on Seoood Pace.)
CLARK LEADERS
IN FIRM STAND
AGAINST WILSON
Think Speaker Received Shab
by Treatment at the Hands
of Col. Bryan.
WILL CONTINUE FIGHT .
FOR INDEFINITE PERIOD
Martin W. Littleton Says Tammany
Men Are in Resentful Mood.
"WAX FIGURE" SIMILE HURT
Delegates All on Edge With Fatigue,
Anxiety and Uncertainty as
Long Deadlock at Baltimore
Shows No Signs of Break.
BY N. O. MESSENGER.
BALTIMORE, July 2.?Awak
ening, as if from a horrid night
mare, with the recollection of yes
terday's and last night's turbulent
and trying sessions in mind,
the conventioners find un
changed conditions this morn-!
ing. Did you ever see, or
in imagination picture, a log
jam on a northern river? Well,
take the mental photograph for a
simile of this situation. Dead
lock is too ladylike a word to ap
ply. What you want is something
rough, rugged, dangerous to de
scribe the plight these people are
in. Men's primeval passions are
aroused. Revenge and hatred rule
them. They "see red" and their
fingers twitch to get at one an
other's throats.
Delegates Nervous or Tired.
Everybody is on edge with fatigue,
anxiety and uncertainty. People are di
vided into two classes?those who would
jump into the air if a lead pencil were
dropped beside them and others who alt
listless and dull-eyed?feeling themselves
but chips on the tide of' fate, drifting
they know not where, and not caring.
Deadly determination to stop Wilson
short of striking distance of success
marks the attitude of the Clark men.
They feel that Speaker Clark received
dirty treatment at the,hands of Bryan,
with Wilson as the proposed beneficiary,
and the Clark managers declare they
have a sufficient number of men pledged
to stay here until a certain unmention
able place freezes over before allowing
Wilson to get the nomination.
You remember Dockery of Missouri, the
former representative in Congress who
made so much trouble for the department
clerks a few years ago? He is a Clark
lieutenant, and goes around exhorting the
hosts to stand pat.
"We will stop Wilson or any other man
Bryan puts up," said Mr. Dockery. "Bry
an will not be allowed to put that insult
on Clark and get away with it."
Tammany Is Sore.
Martin W. Littleton of New York says
that for once Tammany is in a resentful
mood. As a rule, harsh words do not
disturb Tammany; it is all in the day's
work, and comes out in the wash.
But Bryan's darts got under their hide
this time, not because of invective, but
for another reason. They don't mind at
all being called thugB, highbinders and
such terms as usually go in politics, but
when Bryan referred to them as "Mur
phy's wax figures" he hurt their feel
ings.
Today is scheduled as "Underwood's
day in court." They are talking as I
write, in the early forenoon, of giving
the Alabaman a try-out. If he cannot
make a good showing there ia indication
of his throwing his original strength of
112 votes to Clark.
It is two to one that the Underwood
men will not go to Bryan's candidate in
any event. Bryan has been weaker with
democrats of the south than in any other
section outside of Tammany's bailiwick
and they don't fancy him much, anyhow.
Will Throw Illinois to Wilson.
Roger Sullivan, leader of the Illinois
delegation, said this morning he would
throw the Illinois delegation to Wilson
on an early ballot. He was ready to do
it last night, but the Wilson men, un
willing to prolong a session when their
man was losing ground, adjourned before
he could complete the arrangements.
The Clark men say that Sullivan is do
ing a monstrous act In throwing the dele
gation. In the Illinois primaries Clark
beat Wilson by 110,000 majority. Clark's
men went to SulUvan this morning and
remonstrated with him, but he was ob
durate.
"1 am getting tired of the whole per
formance," said Sullivan. "We are ham
stringing the party for November and I
want to end It."
When the convention assembled at
noon the Wilson managers were Intent
upon making their last stand. They figure
that on three or four ballots they can
run their string up to within 170 votes
of the requisite two-thirds.
Marshall for Vice President.
They hope that when they come that
close to it the temper of the convention
will be such that Wilson' will be given
the nomination out of sheer despair. In
that event Marshall of Indiana is sched
uled for Vice President.
In opposition to that view is the stout
contention of the Clark men that Wilson
shall not have it under any circum
stances.
Frankly, none of the leaders at this
hour will venture a prophecy. Men's
tempers are worn to a razor's edge, and
(Continued 00. Second Page.)
*
. *
Table of Vote on Each Ballot
E
O
M
<
a
x
h
a
S
<0
e
o
*
>?
c
"8
a
u
a
9
?
S
a
1
n
*
Q
s
?
g
Sail...
8rd...
4th...
6th...
6th...
7th...
8th...
Oth...
10th..
11th..
lath..
13th..
14th..
15th..
16th..
17th..
18th..
18th..
90th..
21st...
22nd..
23rd...
0
84th..,
25th..,
28th..
27th..
28th..
28th..
88th..
31st . .
32d...
440%
448%
441
443
443
445
440%
448%
. i
.4
84th.
35th.
37th.
38th.
38th.
48th.
41st.
434 ..
44th.
45th
48th
452
558
554
548
554%
553
552
551
545
535
532
512
508
500%
407%
408
483%
480
488%
488%
455
448%
448%
447%
447%
433%
484%
432%
425
|423
424
308
84
324
330%
345
340%
351
854
353%
351%
352%
350%
1354%
354
358
381
382%
382%
382%
381
358
388%
305%
308%
300
402%
405
407%
406%
437%
436
460
475%
(477%
477%
470%
404%
406%
406%
408%
301%
501%
400%
602
620
633
800
117%
111%
114%
112
110%
121
123%
123
122%
117%
118%
123
115%
111
110%
112%
112%
125
130
121%
118%
115
114%
115%
108
112%
112
112%
112
121%
116%
110%
103%
101%
101%
88%
I
100%
106
106
106
106
88%
80
87
148
141
140%
136%
141%
135
120%
130
127
31
20
28
20
20
20
28
28
20
2D
20
20
22
14
14
14
20
20
20
20
20
10
17
14
20
20
20
28
20
20
%<
28
28
27
28
27
25 )
1
12 I
31
31
31
31
31
31
31
31
31
31
30
30
80
80
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
7
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
h
4>
m
0
X
a
h
V
X
2
2
1
2
2
%
3%
:::::
i
4
1
2
2
2
2
*
*
a
m
u
o
a
k
1
1
1
1
1
1
s
?
fa
9
>
e
%
%
i I'
1
2
5
43
45
43
43
43
38
38
38
30
30
28
28
28
28
28
28
28
28
28
28
27
27
27
8%
3%
BUSINESS LOSS BY FIRE
ESTIMATED AT {600,000
Blaze in North Adams, Mass.,
Believed to Be of Incen
diary Origin.
NORTH ADAaTS, Mass, July 2.?One of
the most disastr ous fires that ever visited
North . Adams destroyed a large section
of the heart of the business district early
today with an estimated loss of $600,000.
The Empire Theater, Wilson's Hotel, the
Empire apartment house and Sullivan
Brothers' furniture buildings were de
stroyed.
For a time it was feared taht several
other buildings would be burned, but
hard work by the combined fire depart
ments of Adams and North Adams
checked the flames.
Police Theory.
The police have begun an investigation
of the theory that the Are was incendiary.
Starting in the kitchen of Wilson's Ho
tel, the fire made rapid progress, and
when the firemen arrived was beyond
their control. With few exceptions the
hotel guests were able to reach the street
unassisted, but most of them lost all
their personal effects.
From the hotel the flames spread to and
destroyed the Empire apartment House,
a four-story brick structure. The Empire
Theater next became the prey of the
flames and was a total loss. The theater
had a seating capacity of 1,400. Sullivan
Brothers' furniture store and warehouse,
located in a seven-story building, was
burned to the ground.
Loss by Tenants. ^
Occupants of lower floors in the Sullivan
building lost considerable property. Tut
tle & Bryant, dry goods dealers, suf
fered damage amounting to ?90,000. Sul
livan Brothers, a corporation of six mem
bers, were the principal sufferers. Their
loss is partially covered by insurance.
HAKE MURDEROUS ATTACK.
Orientals Fire Fifty Shots at Coun
trymen While They Slept.
NEW YORK, July 2.?A regiment of po
licemen scoured Chinatown for several
hours today in an attempt to ar
rest a party of orientals who made a
murderous attack on several of their
countrymen who were asleep on the roof
of a Doyer street tenement early this
morning. Nearly fifty shots were fired
by the attacking party, all of whom es
caped. There was only one casualty,
a tong leader named Ohu Fong receiving
bullet wounds which will probably prove
fatal.
When the police reached the tenement
roof they found eight-Chinamen lying on
their backs <Yiear a low coping. It was
first thought that all were dead, but ex
amination showed that they were merely
prostrated by fright. They had taken
refuge behind the coping t* escape the
volley of shot*. ^
UNDERWOOD IS WITHDRAWN,
GLARE RELEASES SUPPORT
Movement for New Jersey Governor Begins
When Illinois Deserts the Speaker
on Forty-Third Ballot.
WINNER GETS 990 VOTES,
CLARK 84 ON LAST BALLOT
Fitzgerald of New York Moves to Dispense With
the Roll Call and Cheers Sweep the
Convention Hall.
CONVENTION HALL. BALTIMORE, July 2.
?Woodrow Wilson of New Jersey was nominated for
President by the democratic national convention today
on the 46th ballot. He received 990 votes; Clark, 84,
and Harmon, 12. Two delegates were absent. At 3:3^
o'clock the nomination was made unanimous.
This result was expected as soon as the fifty-eight
votes of Illinois were switched from Clark and cast for
Wilson on the forty-third ballot. These desertions from
the Clark forces were followed by many others.
By the time the roll call had been about one-third
completed Wilson had gained seventy-three over his last
vote.
Virginia cast 24 votes for Wilson amid a storm of
cheers.
West Virginia added her 16 Clark votes to Wilson
amid tumultuous cheers. Meanwhile Connecticut,
Louisiana and Michigan had contributed to Wilson's
growing list, taking the votes from Clark. Although no
choice was made on the forty-third ballot, it was felt
that the nomination would come soon.
v ?
Wilson gained 108 votes on the forty *third ballot, the first cast'
today, and the predicted break seemed at hand. Illinois' 58 dele
gates propelled the movement, and gains were made also from Con
necticut, Idaho, Iowa, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, North Caro
lina, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Hawaii.
While the forty-sixth ballot was being taken Senator Bankhead
took the platform and withdrew Underwood as a candidate,
Bankhead spoke amid breathless silence. He said Underwood
had entered the contest hoping to be the nominee. But his chief
desire was to eradicate every vestige of sectional feeling. That had
now been demonstrated by the liberal support given the Alabama
candidate. He would not be a party to the defeat of any candidate.
"But I think the time has come to recognize that he cannot be
nominated in this convention, nor can he be used to defeat any
other candidate/' Bankhead proceeded.
At 2:31 Senator Stone announced the release of all Clark dele
gates.
Senator Stone said he was certain Wilson would be nominated
by acclamation. Stone said delegations were perfectly free to vote
for whom they chose. But the Missouri delegation would vote for
Clark on all ballots regardless of what others might do.
Mayor Fitzgerald took the platform to withdraw Foss and go
to Wilson.
Representative Fitzgerald of New York moved to make the nom
ination by acclamation. This met with opposition and the roll call
proceeded.
STORY IN DETAIL OF PROCEEDINGS
AND SCENES IN THE CONVENTION
When the convention met today .exact
ly one week after it was first assembled,
the Identity of the presidential nominee
was as much in doubt as it was at the
Initial session.
At 12:09 p.m. Chairman James took his
place on the platform. At that time
there were many vacant seats on the
floor. James' voice, worn by a week of
shouting, was husky as he announced
the Rev. George T. Grose of Grace M. E.
Church of Baltimore as chaplain of the
day. Rev. Mr.>Grose prayed at length.
The clerk of the convention announced
another extension of time for the vali
dation of railroad tickets held by dele
gates. Yesterday an extension to July
10 was announced and today's announce
ment extended the time until July 15.
At 12:15 Chairman James directed the
calling of the roll for the forty-third
time. There was a general impression
that today's session would ? find some
means of breaking the deadlock.
In Arizona, on the forty-third vote,
Clark lost one vote to Bryan.
Connecticut showed a gain of two for
Wilson. They left the Clark column. In
Idaho Wilson gained one and a half.
Illinois Switches to Wilson.
The hall was quiet as Illinois was
reached. When Roger C. Sullivan of Chi
cago announced: "Eighteen votes for
Clark, forty for Wilson," there was great
cheering.
Chairman James pounded the table with
his gavel and finally quieted the uproar.
"Illinois, under the unit rule, casts
fifty-eight votes for Wilson," he an
nounced, and another cheer greeted the
shift.
This gave Wilson a clear gain of fifty
eight votes in Illinois. The New Jersey
governor continued to gain. In Iowa he
added 1% to his total vote.
When Kentucky was called and the
vote announced, twenty-six for Clark,
one of the delegates demanded:
"I want to know if Kentucky can vote
for Wilson if a majority o? the delegates
desire to do so?"
Gov. McCreary, chairman of the dele
gation, argued that the instructions of the
Kentuckians would not allow a break.
The Wilson men did not press the point,
although evidently confident of a vote In
the delegation.
In Louisiana Wilson gained two, and
In Michigan eight additional votes wers
obtained.
New York stopped what for a few min
utes looked like a Wilson landslide. Rep
resentative William Sulzer announced the
New York vote as ninety for Clark a?
heretofore. This dispelled all hope of a
nomination on this ballot.
North Carolina added two extra fetes
to the augmented Wilson count.
When Virginia was reached Senator
Swanson arose to explain the state's vote.
He asserted that at a caucus this morn
lns: the delegation had decided to enforce
the unit rule for the first time. Wilson
had had a majority of the vote and the
state's twenty-four - votes were cast for
him.
The Wilson adherents cheered the Vir
ginia vote, but from the Clark forces
there went up a shout of "Ryan and
Bryan." Thomas F. Ryan, who was de
nounced by William J. Bryan, is a mem
ber of the Virginia delegation.
The disorder wan quieted, only to break
out with renewed vigor as the entire
Clark vote of sixteen in West Virginia
went over to Wilson. In Wisconsin Wil
son gained one more.
Wilson Gained 108 Votes.
The forty-third vote gave: Wilson, 002;
Clark, 329: Underwood, 98%: Harmon, 28;
Foss, 27; Kern, 1; Bryan, 1: absent, l\j.
This gave Wilson a gain of 106 and Clark
a loss of 101. Underwood lost 5%.
The announcement of this vote startsd
a Wilson demonstration.
"Come on, you Wilson." yelled the Jer
sey delegation, as they leaped to thsir
chairs.
The ballot left Wilson with 124 votes
short of the necessary two-thirds to nom
inate.
Once more the call of the roll began. It
was the forty-fourth ballot, and Wilson
in the beginning gained one in Arizona.
Colorado climbed aboard the "band
wagon," giving Wilson a gain of nine.
This made the vote 10 to 2 for Wilson,
One of the two was Mrs. Anna B. Pltser.
sister-in-law of Speaker Clark.
In Idaho on this ballot Wilson lose half
vote, but lie gained two as Indiana"*

xml | txt