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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, October 24, 1912, Image 24

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1912-10-24/ed-1/seq-24/

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LOCAL MENTIOH.
AMUSEMENTS TONIGHT.
National?Douglas Fairbanks, In
"Hawthorne, U. S. A ." 8:15 p.m.
Belasco?Aborn Opera Comique Company
"The Chimes of Normandy," 8:20
p.m.
Columbia?Henrietta Crosman, in
"The Real Thing." 8:15 p.m.
Chase's?Polite vaudeville, 8:15 p.m.
Poll's?Refined vaudeville, 8:15 p.m.
Arademy?"Happy Hooligan," 8.15
p.m
Gayety?"The Winning Widows." 8:15
p m.
New Lyceum?The Moulin Rouge
Company, in "The Toast of Paris." 8:15
p.m.
Casino?Vaudeville and motion pictures,
1:15. 3 00. 6:30 and 8:30 p.m.
Cosmos?Vaudeville and motion pictures.
1 p.m. to 11 p.m.
Arcade?Skating rink; morning, afternoon
and night.
EXCURSIONS TOMORROW.
Cars every quarter hour from 15th
street and New York avenue for Zoo.
Chevy Chase and Country clubs, connecting
at lake with Kensington line.
Welsbacb Lights, Mantels, Etc.
61? 12th st. C. A. Muddiman & Co., 1204 j
G st.
Relslnger's
Pure Rich Ice Cream: all flavors. 81.20
gal.; 60c Vz gal. 235 G n.w. Phone M.
2767. No branch store.
For Dessert Serve C onneeticut Fie.
Fresh Pumpkin and Mince are in demand
now. Light flaky crusts. Generously
tiib-d. At your grocer's.
pint Your Wait A< ? Til* Stan
Urn In mo
LAW STUDENTS TO MEET.
Will Make Preparations for the
Georgetown-Indian Game.
A mass meeting of students will be held
at the Georgetown Law School building
this evening at S o'clock to make preparations
for the Georgetown-Indian game,
which will take place Saturday afternoon
at 3 o'clock on Georgetown Field.
Justice Gould of the law faculty and a
graduate of the law school, class of "St.
will preside. Speeches will be made by
students interested in athletics and the
organizations of classes for the game
will be perfected. The team Is regarded
as in very good form at this time and the
chances of an even break with Carlisle
or a possible victory have roused great
enthusiasm in the student body.
SPECIAL TRAINING WINS.
Myron J. Jones Declares That the
Door of Opportunity Is Still Open.
Declaring that the day of opportunity
U not past, and that modern conditions
represent merely a change in the nature
of opportunity. Myron J. Jones director
of the educational department of
the Y. M. C. A_. addressing the enlisted
men of the army last night at Fort
Myer. pointed out that in former generations
it was the man of industry, courage
and initiati\e who won the great
prizes, while in these days the rewards
come to the man who is fitted for his
work by special education.
In support of his theory Mr. Jones instanced
the careers of several well known
Washington'ans, among them \?llbur J.
Carr. director of the United States consular
service; Harry Blake, head of the
structural iron and steel department of
Barber & Ross; W. R. Tayior of the
Washington office of the Postal Telegraph
Company, and A. W. Hafkness,
head proofreader of the Carnegie Inst'tution.
Mr. Jones took for his theme "The
Function of Education." telling the soldiers
of the plans of the Y. M. C. A. to
establish a branch school at the Fort
Myer reservation.
1.00 to Harpers Ferry, Charles Tows,
Summit Point and Winchester and return,
Sunday, October 27. Baltimore and
Ohio. Special train leaves Union station
5 a.m ?Advertisement.
ALONG THE RIVER FRONT.
Arrivals.
Schooner Five Sisters, cord wood from
Aquia creek, at 13th street wharf for JH.
Carter & Co.; schooner Hallle K.,
oysters from the lower Potomac beds, at
11th street wharf for the market;
schooner Two Sisters, lumber from Quantlco,
at 12th street wharf for Johnson &
Wimsatt; Bryant's shell scow, light, at
11th street wharf to load oyster sneus
for Alexandria crushing plant; tug James
O. Carter, with a tow of scows from the
Wicomico river. Md.; tug Camilla from
the mouth of the river with a tow of
lumber and oyster vessels; power boat
Daisy, at Alexandria to load merchandise
for Piscataway Creek points; sloop
Qu.cktime, power boat Rattling Joe and
schooners Avalon and May, oysters in
the shell from Potomac points, at 11th
street wharf for the market; tug Capt.
Toby, with a tow of lighters from Aquia
creek.
Departures.
Schooner Elma Stubbs. light, for a downriver
point, to load pulp wood for Washington
dealers: schooner John Fisher,
light, for Pohick creek, to load cord wood :
back to Alexandria; canal boat No. 5,
lumber, from bth street wharf for Brunswick.
Md.: schooner Etta, li^ht. for Coan
river, to load oysters in the shell back
to this city; schooner Martha A. Avery,
light, to* load back to this city; canal
boat No. 25, lumber, from 12th street
wharf for Cumberland, Md.. via Chesapeake
and Ohio canal; schooner Hallie K.,
light, for the Ragged point oyster beds,
to load for the market here; S. O. Co.
tug No. 12, towing tank barge No. 52.
light, from Georgetown for Baltimore;
schooner James O. Wright, light, for a
down-river point to load back to this city;
gchooner Elizabeth Clark for Nomini
creek with a part cargo of household
goods; flattie Neddie, from Alexandria,
with merchandise for a lower Potomaclarding.
Memoranda.
I
>?< hooner Mabel and Ruth, with lumber
from Newbern, N. C\. for thic cit>T sailed I
from Norfolk early in the week; schooner \
Mary Francis is in Aquia creek loading
lumber for the dealers here; schooner!
Virginia Dare is expected to arrive here
this afternoon with lumber from the Rappahannock
river; schooner Kathleen is at
a Potomac point fitting out for oyster
dredging work; schooner Norma, with
pulp wood from Nomlni creek, has arrived
at Philadelphia; schooner Mary Lee
of this city is chartered to load hard
coal at Philadelphia for Smithtield. Va.;
schooner Grace G. Bennett is chartered
to load lumber at a North Carolina point
for this city; schooner Eleanor Russell
lb in Chicamuxen creek to load cord wood
for dealers here; schooner Charles L.
Rhode has sailed from Xewbern. N. C.,
with lumber for dealers here.
Will Entertain Railway Men.
At the Terminal R. R. Y. M. C. A.
rooms tonight an entertainment for the
railroad men and men employed by the
affiliated companies will be held. The
program includes musical selections and
readings, and an athletic exhibition in
the * gymijasium arranged by Prof.
Beckett of the Central Y. M. C. A. The
ba?*r ball trophies for the season of 19111
will be presented by President Waters.
Hurts Head in Fall From Ladder.
Robert Green, colored, of 115 Francis
street northwest, fell from a ladder in
the public playground on B street between
18th and 19th streets northwest
> esterdav afternoon, and injured his
head. He was taken to the Emergency
Hospital. ^
-HE'S THE
/111 BET tool fi?
k^rl ICAN'T GO TO I A HI
/ m fooTMiJ JPI
-Wjl jfiAME. DEARIE; ko
(thTha^R) Ins
?? PENT THAT IW
Xj0
MR. BOSHI
, 1 1
fwFAS) fwhy YOUR POLIC
CnilEHS / -rilSilONER O0E5
STREHUOISf (KNOW WHAT THI
It FRO* / SIDE Of POLICE
TEST fb (-QUARTERS LOOf
YOU. MR. /LIKE1 OUR TOWN
mayor.. (over-run witmj
[for. re- vjujjgsjy
1 \ *
in mi in niuniinrn
AU kLUB DAIIUUtl):
Members Hear "Canned" <
Speeches. 1
ADDRESS ON NEWSPAPER :
i
Louis Wiley of the New York Times '
Discusses Problems of ,
Advertising.
"Canned" speeches by President Taft, 1
| Col. Roosevelt and Gov. Wilson and a
talk on "The Daily Newspaper." delivered
by Louis Wiley, business manager
of the New York Times, in person, were
features of the Washington Ad Club ban
quet at the New Ebbitt House last night.
The speeches by the presidential candidates
showed considerable difference of
opinion, but there were no clashes after ]
the banquet. The text of President j
Taft's address was "Popular t'nrest," j
Col. Roosevelt's text was "The Liberty ^
of the People" and Gov. Wilson's speech ^
was on "The Third Party." ^
In discussing the dally newspaper Mr.
Wiley dec.ared it the greatest advertising
medium of the age. He said, too, ?
that the extended influence o. the news- ^
paper has brought with it a finer appre- f
" no" the antv tts Dublishers owe to i
VICftViVt* Wf ??? athe
public and a superior conception of J
what is due to themselves. ;
Writers Should Be Serious. 4
"N'o writer for the multitude should
lightly discuss vital questions," said Mr.
Wiley, "should by a stroke of the pen
set class against class and engender *
hatred, or should be able to set down in
cold print any word calculated to degrade
or mislead. To the credit of s
American journalism, be it said, the
great body of newspaper writers are
inspired by feelings of responsibility, by
a sense of duty to the public they serve, j
and by respect for themselves and their ^
noble profession." T
Mr. W.ley declared that the clause in 1
the post office appropriation law enacted t
at the last session of Congress providing r
for the publication of the names of the r
officers, stockholders and circulation of
newspapers was a menace to the freedom 8
of the press. *
Urged to Build Up City. *
D. J. Callahan, first vice president of
the Chamber of Commerce, in an address s
urged the ad men to use their ingenuity ' s
to build up Washington. Grafton B. Per- j?
kins of Baltimore spoke on "Building up ' f
of Small Advertisements," and demon- J
strated that small advertisements can be ]
made attractive as well as effective. F. s
MeC. Smith acted as toastmaster. I
Each guest was presented with a copy <
of the Ad Club March by H. Kirkus Dug- t
dale, the cover page representing the j t
small ad classified page of the Washing- j c
ton Herald. 11
Money to loan at 5 and 6% on real estate. \
Frank T. Rawlings Co., 1425 N. Y. ave.? r
Advertisement. t
? s
DEFECTIVE FLUE CAUSES FIRE. c(
t
Houses at 1939-41 12th Street Dam- [
aged to Extent of $600. <
A deflective flue was responsible for a i
Are shortly before 7 o'clock last night. *
which caused about $600 damage at the t
homes of William Jackson and A. W. i
Smith. 1SJC59 and 1911 12th street north- <
west. !
The frame houses were badly damaged '
by the flames, while furniture in a back '
room of Mr. Smith's home was considerably
damaged. The fire department
kept the flames from spreading throughout
the entire two houses.
Slight Fire. :
An awning at the home of Jane Brown, i
4% street southwest, caught fire from 1
a lighted torch shortly after 7 o'clock i
last night. No. 4 engine company was !
called to the place on a local alarm and 1
extinguished the flames after but slight 1
damage had resulted.
KNOBS THC
?jr ?
WAIT TIU KNOBS )
GETS A LOOK AT I
THESE LAMPS ^
CAMILLA SAVE ME,
JUST BECAUSE I Y
PTOU) HEKTO /
GET A PUHCHIMGrj
l BAC
m m.. ' '=^4;
9 I I
*
" *" 1111' 1
WILL INSPECT SUSPECT.
Man Arrested in Detroit May Be Alleged
Slayer of Viessmann.
Detective Burlingame has gone to Detroit,
Mich., accompanied by a colored
resident of this city, to see the colored
man who Is under arrest there on suspicion
of being John Brown, alleged
slayer of Andreas Viessmann, saloonkeeper
at 3d and H streets northwest. I
The man under arrest gave his name as
John H. Palmer, but Mrs. Brown, wife
nf the alleged slayer, yesterday identified
his photograph as being a likeness
nf her husband.
The police found a colored acquaintance
>f Brown who declared the photograph
to be a likeness of the alleged murderer,
but other acquaintances thought it was
not Brown's photograph. Brown, it is
charged, stabbed his employer about
eighteen months ago, and the latter died
nearly a year afterward.
TELLS OF LIFE IN AFRICA.
Joel C. Rogers Relates Experiences
TTT^ll. Al_ . a m ?i
wna xne .native xriDes. 1
In an illustrated lecture on "Heathen
hindrances to the Gospel" at the Wash- *
ngton Foreign Mission Seminary at Ta- 1
toma Park last night, Joel C. Rogers, i
who went to Cape Town as a missionary j
'or the Seventh-Day Adventists in 1894,
:old of some interesting experiences with
:he native tribes of South Africa and of
he commercial awakening of the Trans*aal
under the Influence of "Yankee"
lnanclers who flocked there for the dianonds
and gold in the soil.
Mrs. Rogers, the missionary's wife, who 1
ilso has been in Africa for several years, i
ipoke on village life among the centra' !
African tribes.
DEMOCRATS HOLD RALLIES. j
Meetings at Upper Marlboro and
Brentwood Well Attended.
ipecial Correspondence of The Star.
HYATTSVILLE. Md.. October 24. 1912.
Democratic spellbinders began operaions
in Prince Georges county yesterlay,
when rousing meetings were held in
Jpper Marlboro and at Brentwood under
he auspices of the county central comnittee,
J. Enos Ray, Jr., chairman. Repesentative
Heflin of Alabama was the
tar attraction at both meetings, and
lis speeches aroused enthusiasm. He
was particularly severe on former Presilent
Roosevelt.
Jackson H. Ralston of Hyattsville prelided
at the Marlboro meeting, and beildes
Representative Heflin, Frank O.
jmith. democratic candidate for Congress
rora the fifth congressional district of
Maryland, spoke. Mr. Smith attacked
5 ? xx r? - 'a ?- A
rvcpicBciimtive rarran s recora in tne iasi
session of Congress, declaring that he ;
ailed to vote on the proposition to re- ]
luce tariff on agricultural imple- (
nents, but voted in the negative to pass ,
he bill over President Taffs veto. He .
leclared that Parran voted against the
ree sugar bill. (
Former Speaker of the Maryland House
>f Delegates J. Enos Ray, jr., presided
it the Brentwood meeting, held in Fire- ]
nen's hall. The hall was crowded and
he speech of Representative Heflln was
ipplauded. Democrats of Prince Georges
:ounty claim that Wilson will carry the
tounty by a small majority. They claim t
hat Roosevelt will obtain considerable i
support from republicans, thereby split- T
lng the vote, while the democrats are
injted for Wilson. Usually Prince <
Jeorges county gives a majority for the I
epublican ticket in presidential and con- 1
tressional years. t
There is quite a sentiment among the
tpper county colored people for Roose- i
.'eit, while in the lower section the col- \(
>red vote will be for Taft. In Randal!- j i
own, a colored settlement between Hy- j j
tttsville and Brentwood, It is stated that
jractlcally every voter will be for Roosevelt.
I
Thurston in Charge of Schools.
Ernest I*. Thurston, assistant superin- :
tendent of education, is in charge of the j
public and high schools during the ab- (
sence of Dr. William M. Davidson, who* <
with Alonzo Tweedale, auditor for the
listrlct. is making an inspection of the {
business methods of the boards of educa- ]
tlon of several cities. Dr. Davidson and t
Mr. Tweedale are expected to return to j
Washington next Tuesday. t
XJGHT HlP
SHE. WAUOPED "WE
AHt> IT CAME.
ON THE. HOSE .THEN
0, SHE, STARTED ON W*
]\ ME. AND TAKE IT
-X*- f&oM HANK THE/
C(r*\ NEXT <*UY
I THAT MENTlOHSjMte
^ I PUNCHING
C' VwiUCCETtig) W
BUSY COM
S. 1 CAN!-] flHE COMMISSION
EM!- JAKE WANTS A GENfcRJ
cleaning out 0
ROWDYISM AND
PtCTnR<,? SAMBLING. INSPU
^iii
Melar
By WAL1
This life we lead is far fron
goal. So long we've blown ours
ourselves for
f7=n (?7 we spin, to hi
1 ]|, ??> now we have
I doggone cold.
jflfV and moans an
and we must'
wrap around
is abroad, th
S ' tracks, and w<
greens and jt
1 for this and
mm blues; some ki
WJ guilders for 1
delve, we can
to rout; alas! there's little com
Dut! A shilling for a can of w
rats, a doubloon for a bale of ha]
And thus the winters always brir
and if we smile and dance and si
INSTITUTE SESSIONS END.
Dr. Duhring and Dr. McKim Discuss
Sunday School Work.
The closing session of the sixteenth
mnual convention of the Sunday School
Institute of the Diocese of Washingtor
was addressed last night in the parist
lall of the Church of the Epiphany bj
Rev. Dr. H. L. Duhring of Philadelphia
who is a member of the Sunday school
:ommission of Pennsylvania.
T>r rillhpino? ttrcrod 6<tn/ln?r p/>Ua?V i.u
?.. ? '"ft uunuaj avijuui ICdtll'
;rs to employ ihe flags of the internaional
code to impress upon children lr
:heir classes the call of heathenism foi
he Christian missionary. The speakei
jointed out that the young minds will
je impressed more with the realism ol
he situation by some concrete illustra:ion
than by simply being told of the
conditions. Rev. .Dr. Randolph McKim,
ector of the Church of the Epiphany,
Uso addressed the meeting, which was
ittended not only by clergymen and Sunlay
school teachers, but also by rrran$
jthers interested in the religious educaion
of the child.
At the session late yesterday afternoon
ranon de Vrles presided, and various
Sunday school problems were discussed.
$1.25 Baltimore aad Return,
Baltimore and Ohio. Every Saturday and
Sunday. Good to return until 9 a.m.
train Monday. All trains both ways, including
the Royal Limited.---Adveriisenent.
CLEANING UP POTOMAC PABK.
Mud-Digging Machine Busy Bemoving
Bureau Building Excavations.
In the process of cleaning uf? that porion
of Potomac Park used 'by San fore
fe Brooks of Baltimore in handling the
naterial excavated from the foundation!
>f the new bureau of engraving and
minting a mud-d'.gging machine is al
vork. It is removing the last of the maeriaJ
that accumulated last winter while
he river was frozen and ttse lighters
;ould not be moved. The digger is loadng
this material on scows to be taken t<
he Eastern branch. There it will be
lumped near the dredge Dewey td be
jumped ashore on the portion of the
^nacostia flats that are being reclaimed
end raised above the high water level.
A large force of men also Is employed
n grading and cleaning up the roadwaj
lsed by the teams in hauling the mateMai
from the bureau to the dumping
grounds near the United States Arraj
ingineere' storage stationIt
is stated that the work will be competed
in a week or ten days. Several
veeks ago the pier at which tfle lighten
oaded the bureau material was removed
ind some dredging is to be done at thai
joint to remove the earth that fell lntc
he hartjor.
XT AS GIVIN*
HELLO,K#
GEE,BUT <<
GOT TWO I
I'U. tex I
YOUk >Nt
Am ha
^ i #lpr~
MISSIONER.
IF HEo) rtSislTtboF
a J COME To / CAPTAIN* CO
F / HEAl>^UAR-| IS SENDING
/ 7ERS ONCE/ BRING IN ALL
'M IN A WHILE CROOKS IN
iLL 1 COULO THE COM MIS
5) EXPLAIN- 1 PLEASED AK
^ ^SITUATION} ^ ^MAKg^
/WJH
icholia
r MASON
i nice, and going brake's our only
selves for ice! And now we blow
coal. We dig, we delve, we weave,
ive a package when we're old; and
to blow it in for drugs to cure a
The northern wind comes down
d plays its same old spiteful games,
blow our hoarded bones for rags to
our frames. The Christmas spirit
e day will soon come down the
i must blow our little wad for ever
imping jacks. We blow ourselves
that, and t'other, till we have the
roners for the housewife's hat, some
:he children's shoes. We dig, we
i, we spin, to put the hungry wol'
ting in, and money always going
rhey, a shekel for some rough or
r to feed our starving thomas cats!
ig an ending to our saving scheme;
ng, we only do it when we dream.
ApyiteM 1912, by / (\ &Y\
COajeX//l<t#g?u
WANTS EXHIBITION BUILDING
\ Commerce Chamber Seeks Site foi
Railway Manufacturers.
j Plans for a building to be used for exhi
I bition purposes in connection with th<
t convention of the National Association
v of Railway Supply Manufacturers wer<
r ciiscussea at a meeting 01 a special iw
mittee of the Chamber of Commerce yes[
terday afternoon. A representative of th?
company which erected the building south
of the White House for the Internationa
Congress on Hygiene and Demography
t was present. The same company is now
. removing that building, and the commit
. tee asked for estimates of the cost of re
I erecting the building on the same site 01
some other. It was said that the cosi
[ would be approximately 110,000.
A suggestion was made that the site o1
' the old Pennsylvania railroad station a
> 0th and B streets northwest, be used foi
; the proposed building. As soon as est!
mates have been submitted to the com
mittee the matter will be taken up with
the Manufacturers' Association. The con
1 vention is to be held next June.
>
i ^
MEMBERSHIP IS GROWING.
1 Twelve Applications Passed on Favorably
by Trade Board Committee.
The membership committee of the
Board of Trade at a meeting yesterday
afternoon passed favorably upon the
twelve applications for membership in
the board. When the applicants are elected
to membership by Lhe executive committee
at its next meeting the membership
will have reached 989. The member
ship committee is confident that the 1.00C
I mark will have been reached by Novem5
ber 11, the date of the annual meeting ol
5 the board.
1 a "ciean-up day" ror the city will b?
: recommended by the committee on water
' supply in its annual report. It was de?
elded at a meeting of the committee yes5
terday.
The committee on streets and avenues
> is to meet this afternoon at 4 o'c.och
5 and will consider the suggestions made
by President Arthur C. Moses that the
5 sidewalks on 13th street between F and
- H streets, and on 12th street between F
I and G streets be narrowed and the
streets widened.
I The special committee on the protecr
tion of the flag will meet tomorrow at
12:30 o'clock.
r ^
East Washington Democrats to Meet.
| The East Washington Democratic Club
, has arranged to hold a meeting this even1
ing at the hall at 314 Pennsylvania
t avenue southeast. Among the speakers
> at the meeting will be Thomas Monahan,
Daniel Edwards and several others.
j HANK A C
U (YOU \ I
oove Jl I J
bcauts* vw"v
t^ '?
P"jr I
. >
?
ii i . II
-o?
? f ~
INSPECTOR TAIKIN'A (sHOOTING
MMISSIONER BOSW crar
OUT ORDERS To COME ALO
GAMBLERS AND
TOUR DISTRICT1 JMAMY TIM
SIONER |S NOT joL
ID THREATENS ToJ Vj~?
_JSANSFERS_^/
U/Ac rtD Pit DCh ?>l L_ I
I. | ??rw vr\i/^r\*.v M [
Alt OF MY MEN
THE TOOT BALL ~
oiitos today J=
TSmii U??
FENCERS' CLUB HAS
ORGANIZED FOR YEAR::
, Active Campaign for Coming Season
Has Been I
1 Mapped Out.
i
i ^
t At a recent meet'ng of the Washington
( Fencers' Club an organization was effect- j
ed for the coming season. The members ^
of last year's executive committee were t
! re-elected, and two new members ap- t
. pointed to fill out the number to five, 1
, the personnel of the cr remittee being j
^ Civil Engineer A C. Cum "gham, U. S.
: N.; Maj. J. D. Leitch, U. \ A.; Mr. Vic!
tor Mindeleff, Mr. R. L. ? ? ' neil and Dr. \
j S. D. Breckenridge. *
In view of the success ,5 'terming the
r efforts of the club during^Ve past sea>
son the members are feeli'?, : particularly j
I sanguine in regard to thl?competitions j
[ scheduled for the coming '5iter. Those i
who follow fencing will r'igi.11 the pos'-- '
' tion taken by members of ajf e local club
in the competition for tiE "Jusserand
trophy," the national chan?onships and i
the American team at the CjPtnplc games. 1
, In the first of these evon-J? third place
was taken by Dr. S. D. Bre*!ienridge. In
the second, third place sabers was
' taken by Lieut. D. D. Fulwn and third <
place, in dueling swords. Dr. S. D.
Breckenridge At the Olijnpic games
Lieut G. S. Patton, jr., wS: the American
representative in the *nodern pen- ]
IU.LIUUU, coming out nnn in-s*.ne total series
of five competitions tl-it constitute
this event and being fourth in the dueling
sword competition that A*as one ?.f
the five. Dr. S. D. Brecketridge was a
member of the American fencing squad,
being entered in the individual foil competition
and the individual a"o team dueling
sword competitions.
With nearly all of the bid members
back and the probability of an increased
membership. Including several experienced
swordsmen, the future outlook is more
encouraging for fencing in this city than
it has been at any time since 1907, under
the instruction of Francois Darrieulat. instructor
Salle d'Armes, 1428-1430 E street
t northwest.
f Choice Chrysanthemums
. ?also violets, American beauties and other
fall flowers in profusion at Glide's, 1214 F.
r ?Advertisement. 1
i Personal to River Men.
Capt. George Windsor, mate of the <
Mount Vernon and Marshall Hall line :
steamer Charles Macalester, has been ]
promoted to the command of the steamer ,
and has entered upon the discharge of |
his duties. (
Capt. James Marmaduke, formerly mas- .
ter of steamers of the ferry line between .
. this city and Alexandria, has been ap.
pointed mate of the Macalester, to sue- '
ceed Capt. Windsor.
! Clarence Davis of M. M. Davis & Sm. i
t boat builders at Solomons Island, Md.. is (
on a short visit to this city, and is the
. guest of Capt. A. J. Taylor, at 't>30 F 1
street southwest J
Alonzo Bryant of Northumberland
? oAiintv \T q mofo a# c/?V?aa?a??
VVUJUJ . V tk., "1U.IU Ut LI i C OVIlVUliCl UllMI' J
beth Clarke, was taken 111 aboard the ves.
sel at the 10th street wharf yesterday, 1
, and was sent to Providence Hospital for 1
treatment. 1
Capt Samuel Larmore. master of the (
s schooner Grace G. Bennett, in port here <
with lumber from North Carolina, will go
. to his home at Tyaskin, Va.. to spend a
few days while his vessel is discharging.
Capt, Alfred B. Hooper, keeper of the
light station at Ocracoke. N. C., has
1 been transferred to the charge of the
: twenty-three new beacon lights recently 6
; established in Core sound, X. C. r
; Capt. Fred White of the eastern shore t
of Maryland, has taken command of the
bay schooner Lillie O. Wells, succeeding
1 Capt. Frank Howard, deceased. t
t
Two PuBlic Health Lectures. J
Two lectures on public health will be n
given tomorrow under the auspices of the f
Woman's Clinic and the American Med- o
, ical Association. Maj. W. O. Owen will
give a lecture on "Pood and Health" at li
the Congress Heights School, at 3 p.m., r
and Dr. Elnora C. Folkmar will give the f
Mothers and Teachers' Association at the 1
Hubbard School a talk at 3:15 p.m. on r
"The Health of the Adolescent Girl.' s
}REAT TIP.
VJEU, I'VE A f V
GREAT SCHEME.' ( p
fijR ^00 TO GET I ru
EVEN, HANK. LET V
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H?w TOSSING BUT- -ED M
CS TONS1 we OF so
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CITY ITEMS.
lohn T. Crowley, 831 14th VV., Makes
-family liquor trade his specialty. Prompt
ttentlon whether you order by mail, phone
>r in person. Deliveries until 10:30 p.m.
)ld "Criterion" Rye Whiskey, $1 full qt.
Did Yon Know That Heurlch's Beers
Are Aged 6 to 10 Months
-before leaving the brewery? The oldest
ieers in America. For hea th's sake drink
laerzen and Senate. 2doz.. $1.75; (Lager,
1.50). Bottle rebate. 50c. Tel. West 16UO.
Try 8. S. Cora Care, 15e.
Throbbing corns cease to throb and
juickly disappear when you use S. S. Corn
rure. Get the original at your druggist's.
Fancy Yellow Onions, 17c Pit.; per Bn^
5c.; White Potatoes, 17c pk.; per bu..
5c.; Apples, 17c pk.; bu., 65c; Sweet Poatoes,
17c pk.; per bu., 65c; 50c Tea, any j
kind. 29c lb.; $1.00 Tea, any kind. 49c. lb.; !
Rice. 6c lb.; 5 sacks Salt for 10c; 3 Cans j
Salmon for 25c; best Comround, 10c lb.;
10c cans Karo Syrup, 8c; 3 lbs. Starch for j
10c; Black Pepper. 15c lb.; 3 loaves Star,
of the East Bread for 10c. 3338 M st. !
n.w.. and J. T. D. Pyles* other stores, 19 j
In all.
j
Fire Vai Worshiped Because of Its
leat-producing qualities. Is your heating
>lant producing? We're doctors on sick
>lants. Phone M. 385. Talcott & Poore,
410 G st.
To Insure Our Customers Quick
service we've added auto-truck delivery facilities.
Eisinger Bros., 2109 7th. Lumber.
We're Recognised Doctors oa Heat.
If you've got a sick plant phone M. 385
Talcott & Poore, 1410 G St., estimate.
All Klads of Sea Foods; Always Fresh.
Phila. Oyster & Chop House, 513 llth n.w.
Love's Combat?Life's Sweetest and
most tragic episode, 4 great reels. Virginia,
9th, F and G sts., today.
Furnace, Lstrobe and Range
repairing. Roofs repaired and painted.
George E. Gartrell. 1001 O street n.w.
Phone Your Went Ad to Tho Star.
Main
VEEDICT OF MANSLAUGHTER.
Jury's Decision in Case of William
Nixon, Colored.
William Vfvon rnlnr?i <e rnlUv nf
manslaughter in causing the death of
WHiam Stewart, also colored, according
to the verdict of a jury rendered late
last night to Justice Stafford in Criminal
Court No. 1. Nixon was placed on trial
yesterday morning to answer an indictment
for murder in the first degree. It
&-as charged he shot Stewart during a
>rawl on Gordon avenue northeast, August
13, 1911. The defense claimed the
shot was fired by Nixon to frighten his
issailants and without intention of hitting
Stewart.
United States Attorney Wilson and Assistant
United States Attorney Proctor ;
conducted the prosecution. The prisoner i
ivas represented by Attorneys B. L. Gas- |
?lns and C. S. Williams.
This is the second murder trial to be 1
lisposed of by Justice Stafford this'
.veek. In each case only a single day
vas occupied in securing a Jury, hearng
the evidence and returning a verlict.
Another homicide case will be
jailed for trial next Tuesday.
Another Bamegat Story.
"The Law of the Beach" is the title or
mother of those splendid Bamegat Beach
tories by Mr. and Mrs. Bourke. in our
text Sunday Magazine. It is the law of
he beach for these doughty life-savers to
liminate all thought of self in the
bought of duty, and their duty requires
hem to give their lives for others at
very opportunity. It is this very continled
spirit of utter self-abnegation that
lakes them such simple, crude, primitive
ellows. Now and then, of course, one
f them is sorely tried to be false to his
rust; but these instances are generally
Ittle more than temptations, and on the
ebound the whilom tempted one is more
aithful to his esprit de corps than ever,
'he story that the Bourkes have written
ound this principle is an unusually
trong one, even for them. i
VHRT!\
i<HIN<r) .
\
v \ I' t \ 7
IsgP
frnsor McCay
WAfTKonj
Ai3,TiircJ whi> is
, .'JpiSi k)H *<HIR WORK
si aRRESTI rju 0F TM?
Vp rE^J 1,m- ,SM'T ,T
SKK*! |t>EAK*E ? YOU'LL
vnJ? 1 W**CK YOU*
WiPECm' (NERVES IE TOU?J
Vliox CAREFULtJ
I if
Blank Books, Office Stationery,
Fine Writing Piwri for Prlr.te and Bu.laraA
Correspondence.
Loose-Leaf Book*, from Mr mnniti to Le-lgera.
Tlhe E. Morrison Paper Co.
OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.
lfKW PA. AVE, x.w.
Your Glasses Will Be
Scientifically Correct
?when you have them made
to order in Leese's modern
optical factory.
M. A. Leese Optical Co.. SfJ
HEALTH CANDIES 100% PUBS.
\
A AVM.AV11
40c Lb. !
Over a hundred varieties.
Each piece represent? the
output of a scientific method.
1203-1205 G St.
Cream Caramels. Milk Chocolate.
j\JEVER LATE
is when your watch is right.
Have Ramsay's experts repair ami adjust
your watch. fl
Guaranteed Mainr.prlmes. U
Ramsay's Watch Shop,
1221 F STREET.
1880?Established 22 Tear?-I812.
Advertising is
the ladder to
success.
We write the
right ads to
make advertising
qood advertising.
Star Ad Writing Bureau,
Robert W. Cox,
F. T. Hurley, Sur buikum
C C Archibald. Xry<. *
MERCHANTS WILL MEET.
Charges for Delivering Freight Will
Be Taken Up.
The Retail Merchants' Association, at
its meeting tonight in the Chamber of
Commerce, is to take up for consideration
alleged excessive charges made for
delivery of freight by a transfer company.
Members of the association have (
made complaints that recent increases
of the charges, especial.y of the minimum
rate, have worked a hardship.
The members of the association will act
tonight on the adoption of the new constitution
and by-laws of the organization.
ON A HUNT FOR BEAR.
Preston Gibson and J. H. de Sibour
Lead Party Into the Blue Bidge.
Preston Gibson, and a number of other
Washington! a ns, including J. H. ?ie
Sibour, started into the Blue Ridge mountain
fastnesses this morning from Hot
Springs, Va., to hunt bear. The party
will be gone for a week, and will be accompanied
by three mountaineers who
will act as guides.
Mr. Gibson, who has been spending part
of the autumn at Hot Springs with Mrs.
Gibson, organized the big game hunt,
with the assistance of Wit her bee Beday.
In the hunting party, in addition to the
two leaders, are Harry 6. Black, John
Inraan, Hugh Inman, Edwin 11. Fitler
and Lemist Esler.
By Farren
GOOD
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