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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, October 31, 1912, Image 11

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FOR BETTERSERVICE
Meeting to Discuss Express
Cars to Chevy Chase.
PETITION STIRS INTEREST
wa_ a t? ?_i_ n i_ .a
ivpw JMlUgC at'lVBI AW& V1CC& III
Calvert Street Also Wanted.
MANY SUGGESTIONS ABE HADE
Letter to Electric Railway Commission
Voices Views of Connecticut
Avenue Citizens' Body.
The Connecticut Avenue Citizens' Association
is expected to take up at its November
meeting the demand for an exjrress
car service between Chevy Chase
and this city.
Tho noiit inn filc.rl Ki* t! a# ro?A*rw
* f*' "H VJ \^JLI&Clia ui \_-llC* J
Chaso with the District electric street
railway commission, proposing such a
service, has aroused interest among those
who reside on the Chevy Chase line
south of Chevy Chase Circle. The bulk
of the traffic of the line is from the
liistrict side. Extension of the Calvert
street loop to Cleveland Park was talked
of during the past year, although the
Capital Traction Company officials gave
no assurance of any such action in the
immediate future.
The Chevy Chase and Columbia Country
Clubs are located on the Maryland
side of Chevy Chase Circle. They would
be benefited by any express service which
might cut off the running time by a
few minutes and allow more room in the
cars, which now are crowded during the
rush hours.
Many have become accustomed to taking
the Chevy Chase cars and riding
north as far as U st:eet and there transferring.
Others living south of the Calvert
street bridge use the Chevy Chase
cars both ways because of their running
through to the Treasuiy, eliminating the
transfer at 14th and U streets.
Adds to Congestion.
This practice. Chevy Chase line passengers
say, adds to the congestion of
the Chevy Chase traffic and is unfair, in
view of the comparatively slight headway
between the cars of the Tth street
and New Jersey avenue lines running on
U street to the Rock Creek bridge, open
to the lntra-city limit traffic.
What the Connecticut Avenue Citizens'
Association members would like to see
brought about, they say, is a more frequent
car service to accommodate the
constantly increasing population in the
suburbs to the northwest, a-new bridge
across Rock Creek at Calvert street, a
$.1000 appropriation for plans for which
r failed only at the ninth hour in the last
Congress after passage by both houses,
and a strengthening of the car bridge
across Klingle Ford Run, near Cleveland
Park.
Active members of the association expressed
the opinion today that if the
nearer communities are given satisfactory
transportation facilities they would welcome
the installation of any car service
that would bring Chevy Chase nearer to
the city from a car service standpoint.
Many Suggestions Made.
The District electric railway commission
has received a number of suggestions
regarding the Chevy_Chase service.
" The following letter received by it today ;
_ voices the views of the organizers of the
*' Connecticut Avenue Citizens' Association,
wljijjh, however, has not yet taken any
. action: *' ? ..
"If th? Jfmiorf filed with your body by
th<*.?qery Chase Citizens' Association
calls for one or more express cars between
Chevy Chase Circle and the Rock
Creek bridge. without the important inter- \ I
mediate stops, and without any commen- :
surate additional service for these inter- '
mediate communities, I emphatically protest
for myself and in the name of many j
nt h<?rs
"There are upward of 4.000 people living
in Woodlev Park, Cleveland Park, Fernwood
Heights, Chevv Chase Heights and ;
Chevy Chase, D. C., and their* vicinities
who today should have a more frequent
service than the . present schedule accords.
I hope that no action will be
taken by your commission until the
Connecticut Avenue Citizens' Association,
representing the property holders and
residents in all that territory between [
the Circle and Rock Creek bridge, have
had an opportunity to be heard. The j
association doubtless will take action in
this matter at a meeting early in November.
Wants Through Cars.
"1 suggest, however, the feasibility of 1
affording some relief- to the congestion !
of Chevy Chase traffic during the rush ]
hours by having the through cars, on j
that portion of the route between the
Rock Creek bridge and the terminus at
l.'.th street and New York avenue, perform
t xpress service, the southbound
cars stopping only to let off passengers, j
the northbound only to take on passen- j1
gers- for the Chevy Chase line, the only !
regular stop being at the lith and U i,
sirtets junction. Ample warning to other
than Chev\ Chase traffic northbound
could be afforded by pla ardr, "Chevy
Chase line only, ' at the entrance to each
car.
"Of course, the ultimate solution of
V ic v?- hftlu ? .fA K1 ?> rt? K1 i* V. ~
ii uvit v ?? J-'J uua * w in uc mc
extension <-f the U street car service to
Cleveland Park or some other point between
there and Chevy Chase Circle, in
place of the Calvert street loop, and diversion
of the Chevy Chase route south
on IStb street or 17th street from the
present 11 street tracks, but that is looking
far ahead.
"In making these suggestions, 1 do not
wish to be understood as voicing any
opposition to the inauguration of an express
service by a car or cars between
the lake and the loop, starting, say, just
: | Try This Homemade
| Cough Remedy
: | Co Ms I.lttle, bat Does the Work '
Z Quickly, or Money Refunded.
i:i?ni:iinu:??mnm;n?:???mnnmm
( Mix one pint of granulated sugar with t
I t-j pint of warm water and stir for two I
\ minutes. Put - '-j ounces of Pine* (fifty t
\ cents* worth! in a pint bottle: then add t
? the Sugar Syrup. Take a teaspoonful /
l every one. two or three hours. (
( Vol will find that this simple rem- f
< edy tiikes hold ~f .? cough m ?re uuiekly (
! Ill an anything <!se you ever used. I'su- /
ally ends a deep-seated cough inside of /
< 24 hours. Spjcudid. t n), for whooping J
| cough, croup, chest pains, bronchitis and (
( filter throat troubles. It stimulates the (
rapp^'tfe and H slightly laxative, which ,
h?Um end a cough. ,
i This recipe makes more and better ,
/ <ouffh syrup than you could buy ready '
made for $2.5u. It keeps perfectly and >
, tastes pleasantly. i
PInex Is the most valuable concentrated
compound of Norway white pine I
extract, and Is rich in gitaiacol and all i
I the natural pine elements which are so
i healing to the membranes. Other prep>
arattons will not work In this formula. \
I This plan of making cough syrup with \
Plnex ami sugar syrup tor strained \
\ honey) has proven so popular throughout
the I'nitcd States and Canada that
' it is often imitated. But the old. site- {
eessful formula has nevor been equaled,
'i A guaranty of absolute satisfaction, or
1 money promptly refunded, goes with this I
1 recipe. Your druggist has Pines or will I
get it" for you. If not. send to The *
i PIdcx Co., Ft. Wayne, Ind. I
&
Pennsylvs
*
i
i
plus
not
no c
pria
Clol
The
| priv
I
Illl , ' . * - |
witl
| patt
exct
111
III
! !
' ' I
ahead of a regularly scheduled car. If the ,
intermediate communities are vouchsafed <
adequate through and tripper service, for 1
I believe that any such additional service
would greatly stimulate the growth i
rf the section beyond Chevy Chase Clr- .
cle." 1
REYNARD IS ON THE RUN
IN MONTGOMERY COUNTY
Third Annual Field Trials of
Foxhunters' Association
on at Dawsonville.
Special C,trrespondcnc~ of The Star.
ROCKVILLE, Md.. October 31. 1913.
Many fox hunters of Montgomery county.
the District of Columbia and elsewhere
are In attendance upon the third
annual Held trials of the Montgomery
County Foxhunters* Association, which
began near Dawsonville, ten miles northwest
of Rockville, this morning. With
more than half a hundred fine hounds
entered In the various contests, and with
every prospect of ideal weather, the indications
are for three days of fine sport.
It was planned to start for the hunting
grounds at sunrise this morning, but
it was considerably later than that when
the signal was given.
All-Age Contest on Today.
The contest scheduled for today Is the
all-age. It Is a free-for-all affair, the
only restriction being that no club or
owner be represented by more than seven
dogs. The principal prize In this event
is a handsome stiver cup donated by Andrew
J. Cummings. A medal, donated by
J. Dawson Williams, will be awarded
the owner of the dog placed second, and
the owner of the dog finishing third will
get a medal donated by William F. Galther.
A medal also will be given for
the dog showing the best trailing
throughout the contest, and a ribbon to
the dog with the best note.
The feature of the second day will be
the derby. This is open to dogs under
two years of age, and the prizes are
medals and ribbons. The big event?the
pack contest?is scheduled for Saturday.
Kight packs of six dogs each are expected
to try conclusions in this race. The
prizes are cash, medals and ribbons.
* ? ? ? i * _ ? _ Ma*
Among me Dener Known (onowers 01 me
hounds who are attending the trials and
who have dogs entered are Charles H. L.
i Johnston, W. Outerbridge Spates, Andrew
inia Ave.
We Coi
?
One of the few
line of Suits ai
buyers of anyb<
langer of estab
3S.
Their name is
ching is recogniz
onlv stiniilatinr
V-^ A A M. J VA *
They made the
ilege it would gi
Th
Ch<
The Si
The 0
The sale begins
1 in a hurry. T
;ern; remarkabl;
optionally strong
J. Cummlngs, John C. Bentley, James P.
Gott, Richard F. Spates, Edmund C. Dairis,
Charles A. Clagett, Clay B. Edwards,
William Riggs, Cecil Allnutt. Joseph
Howes, George Edwards. John Magruder,
Artemus Sullivan. Charles F. Windham,
Robert Curran and others.
W WATSON BUMPS UP
ICJIiRI i Fl 1RFRM
IIVMIIMV/I III U lllkl/l 1V/11
Former Public Utterance
Proves Boomerang in His
Indiana Campaign.
Special Dispatch to The Star. i
RICHMOND. Ind.. October 31.?Gov. |
Wilson is not the only public man whose j
past utterances are coming up in this
campaign to torment and plague him. j
James E. Watson, who formerly repre- j
sented this district in Congress, and who j
for many years was well known In Wash
ington as the republican whip" of the 1
House of Representatives, made a dandy
standpat speech here last Saturday night
to a large audience of several thousand
people. It was a great argument In
favor of the re-election of President
Taft, and Watson took three hours to deliver
his remarks as only Watson can,
for his is rated as one of the very best
orators Indiana has produced in many
years.
But Watson bumped right up against a
public utterance of his. made a little over
a year ago. that caused him some embarassment
and added to the hilarity of
the occasion. October 11 and 12, 11111,
Watson was helping to entertain Vice
President James S. Sherman when the
latter spent two days in Indiana
Lambasted County.
On October 11 Watson and Sherman
visited New Castle, the city of roses,
which Is also located in this congressional
district, and the good people of New Castle
prepared a big banquet at the Nip and
Tuck clubhouse. After the (east the pro- _
gram was turned into a sort of gridiron ?
affair, and when it came Watson's turn to
talk he cut loose on Wayne county people m
and gave them a terrible lambasting, y
Newspaper reporters were not supposed in
to be within hearing distance, but half a
doaen of them were present, and, of
course. Watson's remarks got into print.
Here is what he said:
"I cannot understand how there could w
be such a complete reaction from the w
high character and quality of the good pi
old Quaker population as there la In m
\
'aka<
uldn't R
?and You
r makers of rea
nrl OvprrnatQ
I 1 V? >?/ T VI V- V v? w.
ddy's clothing 1
lishing embarr
known from
,ed as one of t
1 was that we
price so attra(
ive you, to tun
Both Su
TA Tl A
r or ivj
e Values
j
oice, <
llltc are 'n
Wll^~"roll models.
vercoats?w
; tomorrow (Fi
'hey are dandi
y effective in
I values?and \
umicu
N. C. Cor. Fifteenth
RANCHES:
1134 CwMMllMt Aw*, m. w. w35
M. E. C*r. 14th and U St*. n. w. yffy
"The Bank for
'ayne county. There are more frauds,
lore hypocrites and more scoundrels in
.'ayne county than in any other county
i the whole wide world."
Mayor Answers Watson.
About 400 men roared with laughter
hen Watson let fly that shot, for there
ere a number of Wayne county men
resent, and a former mayor of Richlond
arose and replied to Watson In a
To All th
of Wasl
You will appreciate tf
cial hours on and followii
venient locations of our si
Banking
Main bank and all b
except Sundays and lega
a.m. to 12 111. Saturday r
and 11 sts. and Conn, ave.)
On ist, 2d, 3d, 16th an
9 a.m. to 5 p.m., but when any c
legal holiday our banks will be c
ceeding business day.
To avoid any possib
the following:
Friday, Nov. 1. All our b;
Saturday, Nov. 2. All our
( except 15th and H sts. ai
Monday, Nov. 4. All our 1
k(?u
esist T1
'II 1
l 11 i iiaiin i
lly FINE Cloth
They came
under ordinary
assing precede
one end of tl
he BEST of al
would not ad^
:tive that we c
n it down. Sc
its and (
[en and Youn
Range I
r cheviots, tweeds and
The very newest efi
e single and double br<
eaves and fancy effect:
riday) morning
ies?every one
model. Good
ve can stand s
v
e People
iSniytnn!
I
ie arrangement of our sperig
pay-days, also the con- |
ix banks.
Hours:
ranches, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
.1 holidays. Saturdays, 9
lights, 6 to 9 (except 15th
d 17th of each month from
>f these dates fall on Sunday or a j
ipen until 5 p.m. on the next sucle
misunderstanding, note j
anks, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. j
banks, 9 a.m. to 12 m. and 1
rid Conn, ave.) 6 to 9 p.m.
banks. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
es Trust Co.
and H StrMta n. w.
PNi Av*. and 10th Ot n. w.
>iwih and O Ota. n. w.
SOth at. aad Pa. Ave. a. w.
All the People"
serious vein. Every one else took the matter
in a spirit of fun and frivolity, but K
didn't set well with the people of Richmond
and Wayne county.
When Watson came to Richmond Saturday
night he found that the Richmond
papers (all progressive) had dug up his
New Castle remarks and printed them in
large type In a box on the front page, and
of course every' one here bad a laugh at
.Watson's expense. A. W. T.
*v
1
mpattg
lis Opportur
Us for It?
ing sought us out to bi
to us because they kr
conditions?and there:
nts on future busines
ha.rnnnfn; tr\ tfiA ntho
I lw wuiiu^ cvy uiv v tiiv^
II the makes supplyin
yertise the name.
lid not think it fair to
) we accepted the offe
)vercoats
g Men
Jp to $30.00
AHBI m??*
A .75
_ a
??fm?>1
9
HoH
i n
JHBL
worsteds?soft-roll and permanent:ects.
wasted; plain or belted back; staple
s. The latest in fashion.
---but it must be a quic
of them. Especially <
assortment of sizes,
iponsor for them.
tThe Store
That Sells
Dress We
A r\ /4 < 4- 4 f n -? /\?r>
^ ! I I I p* ntiu UC31UC3 11 13 CLil CAI
Iff/ i I- variety is in dresses at r
I / I M *'le *atest WOI"d 'n dress d
// / / i lo A NEW CHARMECSE E>I
I / if} f satin vest, trimmed with shade
I / / j 1 buttons; draped skirt, with sash
If II { eolors are brown, taupe, navy
III i M > Copenhagen blue. Price
Ill/!/f ! \ VELVET DRESS, open front
m/Jt ' ^ anfi vef;t satin; higli neck wit
j t collar and cuffs trimmed with
Vea* j ^ tons; navy and black
[ | j ; MISSES' PARTY DRESS, mac
| ^ i graceful drapery, suggesting a n
I ^ t nier; waist hand-embroidered
I crystal trimmed; pink, blue and w
A FEW ODD SERGE DRESS
^ i day
COATS AT $22.50.
There'll be some mighty handsome long coats for women
and misses on sale here tomorrow at $22.50! Chinchillas
and fancy woolens. Sizes up to 44 bust. There's
every color and many different styles?most of them Wooltex
Coats, guaranteed for two seasons' satisfactory wear.
People all seem to like our coats?come and see these tomorrow.
BROADCLOTH SUITS, $35.00.
The Wooltex Broadcloth Suit we are selling at $35.no
is their $40.00 suit, and our only difficulty is keeping the
size range in stock. Plain, but beautifully tailored, of a
very handsome broadcloth?black, navy and brown?guaranteed
for two seasons' satisfactory wear.
TAILORED AND TRIMMED SUITS, $25.
Special Friday values. Women's and Misses' Serges,
Cheviots and Fancy Mixtures, including Wooltex Suits in
four different styles. These are unusual values, even for
Friday.
SEPARATE SKIRTS, $3.90.
Another Friday sale of our special $5.00 and $5.90 Skirts
in serges, cheviots and fancy mixtures. All colors and
all clvpc of Of)
MESS ALINE WAISTS?SPECIAL, $5.00.
A New Messaline Waist of very fine quality, witli
Robespierre collar, tucked shoulders and lace-trimmed
sleeves: black, brown and navy?$5.00.
NEW WASH SILK SHIRTS, $3.00.
Advance spring styles in Wash Silk Shirts to meet the
big fall demand; attractive navy, black and brown stripes
?famous Royal make?$3.00.
i FRIDAY BARGAINS?SILK PETTICOATS.
1 Odd lots of $3.50 to $5.00 in Messaline and Taffeta
i Silks?grays, browns, greens, blacks, navy and ?2.0 C
American beauty. Choice ? -
.
I
'1
Seventh Street.
lity
y their sur10w
we are
fnrA \x;pra in
I VI V V V VI V AAA
s at regular
t I
r?and their
g the trade.
'ou, and the
I
II
. |
f
I II I
. ?
linn
? !
i
>
V - > ? ? .
V - - -W. * J i
k sale?over
attractive in
They are
MM4- ::
:ek Is Interesting
:eptional tin:e for dress buying. The greatest
noderate cost?models for all occasions and all
esign at prices surprisingly low.
tESS, white CREPE I)K CHINE EVENING GOWN;
>w lace and waist made surplice effect of shadow lace:
i and jrirdle: new draped skirt, with pleated ftirdle cin
and *?2.2.50 an<* ends ^
KPOXGE DRESS. high neck, pleated lace
. with panel yoke, sailor collar and vest of black satin;
h heavy lace skirt with side pleats, front pane', satin trimbut
S2^.00 med, with buttons; gray and coren- qq
J' hagen *Poj*
ie of chiffon; MOURNING PRESS OF HENRIETTA,
nodiiied pan- with vest of crepe and net yoke; trimmed
and C?c oo with buttons, pannier effect skirt. Cop m
hite Witll high pleated girdle
>ES?formerly u p to $10.00 each. Fri
$6.50
SPLENDID NECKWEAR VALUES!
1% AND 2 INCH SHADOW LACE PLEATINGS; 2CC
fine quality; white and ecru. Per yard ^
SPECIAL VALUES in Shadow I>ace and Net Chemisettes,
Venise Lace Collars and New Robespierre coc
Collars?the neckwear that is different
FRIDAY BARGAIN?HANDBAGS.
$2.W Suede Bags?German silver frames?in tan. <izr
black and gray. Friday 'J
FRI DAY B ARG AIX S?(i LO V ES.
2-CLASP FINEST FRENCH SUEDE GLOVES. Regularly
white, all sizes; tan, ft1/-., (i, (Ha, 7; mode, .V*.
S%, 7; black, all sizes except 0*4- occ
Choice
16-BUTTON FINEST FRENCH SUEDE MOUt*.
QUETAIRE GLOVES. Pearl, 5*6. 5\. 7; champagne.
5*6. 3\, 7. Regularly $3.25 rair. $1-95
1-CLASP $1 WHITE DOESKIN GLOVES. Sixes 0. cor
0%, 7 and 7%. Pair 3
2-CLASP FINEST FRENCH PIQUE KID GIXJVKK.
Regularly $2.U0 pair. Black, 5*i, 6; white, 5Vi. C, , and
7, at. pair T ?
FRIDAY BARGAINS?HOSIERY
LADIES' SILK PLAITED BOOT HOSE, with lisle garter
top, high spliced heel and toe; extra heavy <?, ^
silk. Special, THREE FOR v'-UO
LADIES" PURE THREAD SILK HOHB. Regularly
SI <*> and $1.5<?. Odd lots; colors and black. Spe- ... _
cial for Friday, pair 3A
ODD LOT COTTON AND LlSIdi HOSE. Sizes H. 9%,
10 and 10%. Regularly :2fc: and 35c. Special for ,<w,
Friday, pair. ?

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