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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, November 12, 1912, Image 17

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harvarton;
a formal looking
collarfor informal
wear. The parol
lei lines of this new style
make it entirely dis
tinctive.
It's a great favorite with col
lege men everywhere. Snappy,
Stylish, Effective. "YALE
TON" is the same collar but
lower.
Both made with the famous
"Slip-Over " Button-holes,
ami Patented "Lock-that
Locks."
Q&ost inAtpcrrca
mm 2 for 23c. Quarter Sizes ?
n Good dressers consider HARVAR- mm
mmm TON,with SIMPLEX the small-bosom tmr
LION Shirt, a very smart combi- ?"
2 nation. ^JJ
" United Shirt ft Collar Co.. Makers, Troy, N. Y.
Michigan 4(D).
$1,740 DELIVERED.
MICHIGAN MOTOR CO., IXC
Tel. W?st 213. 1230 Wisconsin nve. n.w.
I9f$ CemtMry Electric
Inotf. mechanical perfection. service, com- ,
fort. value combined in the "Century." Itn ;
iifiUate deli Terr.
M. E. PEARSON.
Tot. N. -VM7. 170". Ifith *t.
i*U-ISMrtliii Sllcit tiaigac
HUDSON. colombia.
. HUPP-YE ATS
ELECTRIC COUPE.
The. Dupont Oarage Co.,
Sale* Braaeii. 1321 Uth st. a.w.
Phone North MB8.
PALMER=S1NGER
"SIXES"
$2,000. S^.ooo.
far* for Tho?e Who Discriminate.
WARRINGTON MOTOR CAK CO..
TStl 14th Bt. n.w. Phone North 1J~$C.
THE PALACE CAR OE THE ROAD
LITTLE
*69<V0n. FULLY EQUIPPED.
THE HENDERSON-RO WE AUTO CO.,
1127 Mth st. n.w. Phone N. 4521.
Several 1912 Warren Cars.
KBW AND DEMONSTRATORS. ALL MODELS.
bargains. QUICK PURCHASERS.
Warren Agency;
c.
Tel. N 2013. 1610 14th ?t. u.if.
"The Easiest
Riding Car
in the World."
potomac MOTOR CAR CO..
Main 3283. 1313 H st. a.w.
THE CAB OK YOCR DREAMS,
THE "HENDERSON."
NONE BETTER BUILT.
THE PREMIER.
Oaastltate America*. Beat. Immediate Del1?erte?.
MATHESON MOTOR CO.,
Tel. M. ."WW. 1220 New Yo-s ?e.
MILLER BROS. AUTO AND SUPPLY HOU3R
1105-07 14th ?t. n.w. Tel. N. 4170.
AUTO SUPPLtES
WHOLESALE AND retail.
We carry a full line of auto acceaaorlM aad
?uppilea.
the Washington motor car
EQUIPMENT CO.. INC.,
Tel. M. 7870. 1317 N. T. ??
Congressional Garage Co., Agts,.
628 Pa. Ave. S.K. Tel. L. 1631.
EAMBLES.
MITCHELL.
. B. Leary, jar., Agent,
tel. X. Mt. 1317 Uth ST. N.W.
BARNARD MOTOR car CO..
*?l. N?rt* I WW. 1?12 1?t* ?t. *.?.
1913 OVERLAID Cars.
RoatUter*. Touring Car* :inU Ih-!>vpry Wagons
Rancine From $'.**) to $1,500.
Overland-Washington Motor Co.
Tel M. aoie *2".? 14*li *t. n.w.
The Luttrell Co., Dupont Circle
^DETROttri^ECfRiC
AND APPERSQN CARS.
EMERSON & ORME,
14u7 II XT. N.W. PHONE MAIN 7885.
~ ? ^thank^iving week
o 17^
conn. ATE, at L.
MOTZ ITees
For Electrics and Light
Delivery Cars.
Imperial Motor Co.,
Tel. N. M7. 1112 Conn, aye, a.w.
CADILLAC,
8AKER-ELEC7SIC.
THE COOK & STODDARD CO.
1138-4Q conn AVE N.W. Phone No-th 7810.
Frank Chance's beat word for Johnny
Kvers as ills auceesjtor was a predk-tion
that the Cuba would be in the second
division :n 191U.
EXCITING FINISHES
Closest Contests of Fall Cam
paign Seen at Pimlico.
MR. TEAHAN CELEBRATES
Jockey Pilots Ivabel to Victory.
Fred Mulholiand's Win Is Most
Thrilling of All.
BALTIMORE, Md., November 12?The
j closest set of finishes of flat races to be
j stage,-! during Maryland's fall campaign
of the sport occurred yesterday at Pim
lico. There were five events, and each
was won by a nose, head or neck Each
race was a thriller and brought applause
from the spectators. This is how they
finished:
First race?Virile, nose; I.awsuit, neck;
Lace.
Second?O Em, neck; Troy Weight.
Third?Ivabel, neck; Joe Knight, neck;
Yellow Eyes.
Fifth?I.eochares, head; Briar Path.
Sixth?Fred Mulholiand, neck; Henry
Hutchinson.
There were other exciting moments, but
perhaps Fred Mi:lholland'e victory in the
last race was the most thrilling. Last in
a field of seven starters at the h&lf-mile
post and at least a doze:-, lengths from
the leader. Jockey Butwell started hia
ride on the old fellow.
Rounding the far turn of the mile and
forty yard race, Fred Mulholiand slowly
worked his way up and when the turn of
the home stretch hove in sight Butwell
took Mulholiand through an opening to
the rail. From then on Mulholiand ran
as he never ran before, and when the
wire was reached he beat Henry Hutch
inson by a neck, with Colonel Cook two
lengths away.
All Dope Upset.
Before the race public sentiment seemed
to surge to Colonel Cook and Henry
Hutchinson, but the wise followers of the
ponies did not hesitate to let Mulholiand
carry their money. The Squire was away
first, with Lord Wells close up ard Col
onel Cook third. The two leaders began
to fall back on the far side and Henry
Hutchinson got in a commanding posi
tion. The Kraft horse did well for the
remainder of the distance until Mulhol
iand upset all dope.
The most popular victory of the after
noon was when Ivabel led the field home
in the third race, which was at six fur
longs. Incidentally, the victory proved to
have more sentiment attached to it be
cause Jockey Teahan, who was injured
Wednesday iast. rode the winner. Ap
plause was showered upon horse and
jockey as they returned to the judges'
stand.
Three thoroughbreds stood out more
prominently than the rest, they being the
winner, Joe Knight and Yellow Eyes, and
that was the way they finished, necks
separating them. Ivabel was the quickest
to get going and Joe Knight was not far
away. Yellow Eyes broke slowly and had
to be taken around the field by MeCahey
all the way. Joe Knight shot to the rail
entering the homestretch, but the Ben
Strome colt never could get to the win
ner.
Coligny has run his last steeplechase.
Henceforth this twelve-year-old lepper,
who wojr the Owners' handicap event, the
fourth number on the program, will be
on the pension list of hjs owner, J. H
Lewis. ^
Old Fellow Takes Pace.
Colignv took pace until the last time
around approaching the far turn, when
he moved up strongly and in a drive
around the turn, over the last jump and
to the wire more than held his own, win
ning by a length and a half from The
Prophet, who beat Shannon River by two
lengths. Shannon River was full of run
during the early stages, but on the last
lap was disposed of by Buckthorn and
The Prophet.
The opening race was for two-year-olds
owned in Maryland, Pennsylvania, Dis
trict of Columbia, Virginia and West Vir
ginia The distance was five and a half
furlongs, and the race was won by J.
Davi<* Virile, a long shot, twenty or more
being possible against the colt's chances
of winning. Virile won Monday a week
ago, with McTaggart in the saddle. Hold
ers of a mutuel ticket received $77.UO for
a two-dollar purchase.
The favorite was Col. Ral Parr's Lace,
who won the other day in a similar event
at six furlongs. However, yesterday Lace
did not run her race, being slow to get
started, and the best, she could do was to
finish third, with <'apt Cassatt's Lawsuit
in the place position. Virile was slow
to get started, but once on his way passed
everything between him and the goal,
lawsuit was coupled with Flying Fairv,
and the former set a fast race all the
way.
Caught at Last.
When- I>eochares, one of the best two
year-olds of the season, annexed the fifth
race, which was at five and a half fur
longs, It was announced that the young
ster would be sent Into winter head
quarters. Leoohares was slow to begin,
and was taken around the field by Jockey
MeCahey. In the meantime Briar Path
and Tarts were having a duel from the
barrier, but the latter was finally raced
into submission, and It looked as if Briar
Path would win until caught by Leo
chares in the last couple of strides. Tarts
managed to iast long enough to finish
third.
What a difference the last stride makes
applies to the finish of the second race,
which was at a mile and forty yards. An
other jump at the finish would have re
turned Troy Weight a winner instead of
O'Em. who got the decision by the scant
est of noses. Spin was a length back of
Troy Weight to show. The early pare was
set by spin, who tired on the far tide of
the track.
O'Em then assumed the lead and re
tained it until the wire was reached.
Troy Weight made a strong dash for the
winter feed in the last sixteenth, and beat
Golden Castle by a length to show. Gold
en Castle ran an even race throughout.
ANNUAL GAME.
To Be Played Between M Street High
and Armstrong Tech.
The annual game of foot hall between
the M Street High School and the Arm-j
strong Technical High School will be
played at the I nion League Park next
Monday at p.m. This game is the
tn-st known scholastic game that is
played among colored teams in the east,
and is usually a spectacle of superior at
traction. Both teams are trained to the
minute, and it is hard to say which eleven
has the edge on the other. M Street has
been undefeated this year with victories
over the strong Storer College team the
crack Howard Academy eleven and the
Manassas Institute team. Only one of
the three put the M Street boys on their
mettle, that of the game at Harpers Fer
ry. in which brains defeated brawn.
Armstrong has been much handi^pped
this year for many reasons, chiefly be
cause of minor injuries, but the team is
rounding about nicely with Coach Robin
son, a foot ball expert, putting in some
time to get the boys In shape for their
ancient rival and victors of last year
President Horace Pogel of the Phillies
has not allowed his troubles to interfer*
with training plan* He says the Phillies
will do their spring work at Southern
Pines, N. C.
PICKING THEM OFF. :-o-: By Ripley
Capt. Jim Thorpe's Redskins
Lead Ail Others With
Total of 416.
Capt. Jim Thorpe and his Carlisle team
mates are the first to pass the 400 mark
in scoring. The Redskins by beatir.(g the
Army Saturday mounted to the 416 mark,
while 56 points have been tallied against
them.
There are two teams in the 30:> class,
Princeton and Vanderbilt, the latter re
ceiving the first defeat of the season, by
Harvard, Saturday.
The scoring records of the teams fol
low:
PENN*.
Gettvsburg 35? ft
F. and M. 35? ?
Dickinson IB? ?
Urslnus 34? 0
Swart hinore? 3? 0
Brown 7? 3<J
Lafay*tte 3? 7
State 0?14
Michigan 27? 21
Totals 160? 78
HARVARD.
Maine 7? 0
Holy Cross 19? 0
Williams 26? 3
Amherst 46? ?
Brown 30? 10
Princeton 16? 6
Vanderbllt 0? 3
Totals 153- 22
CORNELL.
W. and J 3? 0
Colgate 7? 13
Oberlln <?? 13
New York L'nl. 14? 6
State 6?29
Bucknell 14? O
Williams 1<>? 24
Dartmouth 9? 24
Totals 54?loy
VANDERBILT.
Bethel 105? 0
Maryaville 100- 3
Roae Poly 54? O
Georgia 4? - 0
Mississippi 24? 0
Virginia 13- 0
Harvard 3? 0
PRINCETON.
Stpveiw 05?
Rutgers 41 ?
Lehigh 35?
Virginia Poly... 31?
Syracuse 62?
Dartmouth 22?
Harvard 6?
New York L'nl. 54?
0
6
o
0
o
7
l?i
0
Totals 310? 29
YALE.
Weslevan lO?
Holy Cross 7?
Syracuse 21?
Lafayette...... 16?
Army ???
W. and J 13?
Brown 10?
Total*.
83
6
21 ?
40?
Totals 345?
?SWABTHMORK.
Vlllanova 27?
Lafayette
Penn
Navy
Johns Hopkins.
Urslnus 20 -
Lehigh 0
Totals 136
LAFAYETTE.
Muhlenberg.... 20? 3
Swarthmore.... 0- 2a
Yale 0- 16
Urslnus 14? 0
Penn 7? 3
Swarthmore.... 0-22
Bueknell 0? 0
Syracuse 7?30
12
0
o
3
C
it
0
3
IS
48 - 74
Totals
NAVY.
Johns Hopkins.. 7?
Lehigh 0 ?
Swarthmore.... 6 -
Pittsburgh 13 -
Wem-rn Res.... 7 ?
Burkii"ll 7?
Totals 40?
Bl'CKNELL.
.Hillmiin Acad.. 41
Wyoming Sein.. 49 -
Pittsburgh 6?
St. Bonavcnture 39 -
GOTMtl O -
I.afayette 0
Nsvy 17
Totala 152?
STATE.
Carnegie Tech.. 41 ?
i W. and J 30?
Cornell 29
Gettysburg 25
Penn 14
INDIANS.
Albright 50? 7
Ijpbiinon Val'y. 45? 0
Dickinson 34? o
Vlllanova 65? 0
W. and J o? 0
Syracuse 33? 0
Pittsburgh 45? 8
Georgetown.... :'.4? 2"
Toronto 49? 1
Lehigh 34? 14
Army 27? 6
Totals 416? 56
DARTMOUTH.
Bates 26? 0
Norwich 41? 9
Mass. State.... 47? 0
Vermont 55? 0
Williams 21? 0
Princeton 7? 22
Amherst 60 - 0
Cornell 24? 0
Totals 281- 31
LEHIGH.
Albright 33- 0!
Delaware 45? Oi
Princeton <1? 35 i
Ilaverford 55? 0 I
Navy 14? rt
Urslnus 12? 0
Indians 14? 34
Swart hmore 3? 0
Totals 176- 60 |
BROWN
Colby 3? 0
R. I. "Aggies". 14? 0
Wesleyan 6? 7
Penn 30? 7
3
14
21
6
O
17
61
Harvard 10? 30
Vermont 12
Yale 0?
71
101
VlUanova 71?
Total* 210?
F. AND M.
Rutgers 20 -
Penn O?
St. John's 0?
Albright 13?
Johns Hopkins.. 10
Haverford 23 -
Dh-kinson "
Mnhlcnbtrg
Totals 73?
GETTYSBURG.
Penn 0
I,eban?n Valley. 6
Urslnus 6?
Mt. St. Mary's.. 7?
State
Muhlenberg
Delaware
0
0
o
7
14
0
7
28
0
0
M
0
0
0
Totals 75? 61
ARMY.
Stevens 27 - O
Rutgers 19 ? O
Yale 0-- 6
Colgate 18 ? 7 j
Indians ' 6- 27
Totals 70- 40 i
DICKINSON.
Indians 0? 34
Penn 0? 16
St. John's 6? 6
P. M. C 31- 0
I-ebanon Valley. 53? 3
F. and M 6- 7
Catholic Univ... 52? 0
o
0
35
19
7
3
0
6
7
35
O
21
O.
0? 25
7- 38
27? 0
-lltl
Totals 148? 66
MICHIGAN.
Case 34? 0
Mleh. "Aggie#". 55? 7
Ohio State 14? 0
Syracuse 7? 18
South Dakota... 7? 6
Penn 21? 27
Totals 138? 58
SYRACUSE.
Hobart 12? O
Yale 0?21
Indians O? ;c;
Princeton 0? 62
Michigan 18? 7
Rochester 28 - 0
Lafayette :}0 ? 7
Totals 88?130
HAVERFORD.
Delaware 14? 0
Stevens 9? 0
Lehigh O? 53
F. and M 0-23
St. John'a 0? 13
Trinity 0? 32
Totals 23?123
W. AND J.
Cornell 0? 3
Indiana O? 0
State 0?30
Carnegie Tech... .52? 0
Yale 3?13
Marietta 34? 0
Western Reserve. 17? o
Totals 53
URSINUS.
Williamson 45? 0
Albright
Penn ?
Gettysburg ... .21? 6
Iiafayettc 9?14
I/Chigh
Swarthmore 0--14
Totals 72-80
PITTSBURGH.
Ohio Northern?22? 9
Westminster .... 13? 3
Bin-knell 9? rt
Indians 8?45
Navy 8?13
Notre Dame O? 3
Maryland 04? 0
Totals 113-70 F. and M 7
GEORGETOWN.
Randolph-Macon .39? 0
Mt. St. Mary's. ..27? 0
Wash, and Lee... 20? 0 Swarthraore 0?27
A. 4 M. of N. C.48- - 0 Indians 0?65
Indians 20?34 Catholic Univ....20? 7
North Carolina.. .37?10 Mt. St. Mary's. ..23? 0
Washington 84? 0 State 0?71
Totals 106?16
MUHLENBERG.
Lafayette 3 20
New York Univ.. 2 - 6
Hlllman Aead'y ..28? 0
Webb Academy. .55? 0
Delaware 21? 0
Gettysburg 38? 7
Totals 154?33
VILLANOVA.
Totals
.275?44 Totals 43?170
The veteran Nig Perrine, who captained
the champion Missoula team of the Union
Association the past season, may get into
higher company next year, for Victoria
of the Northwestern League is said to be
after him.
Missoula in the Union Association has
signed a .high school pitcher named Ar
thur Smith, who stands 6 feet 5 Inches.
It Is expected that he will be big enough
when grown to meet the requirements of
even Bill Armour.
i
BATSMEN WHO STAND CLOSE
TO PLATE ARE BEST HITTERS
Stepping Away From Rubber Usually
' Means Exit From Fast Company,
Says John McGraw.
Special Dispatch to The Star.
NEW YORK, November 12.?"Give me a
natural hitter and I will make a ball
player out of him," is the often-repeated
prescription of John McGraw, the mah
ager of the Giants, when discussing the
requisites of a big leaguer.
Few good hitters have been manufac
tured. Like poets, painters and other
artists, they are born, not made. The
latent talent lingering there is to be de
veloped. To continue along the McGraw
line of thought the manager of the Giants
has built a base ball club out of a lot of
batters, and has won pennants with it.
There are certain faults a batter can
correct that will improve hitting.
The cardinal sin of batting is "stepping
back." Many a youngster comes into the
big league in the spring with his heart
full of hope and stimulated by the same
ambition to climb which actuates men in
other walks of life and goes out in the
fl^ld and does sensational work. Then
comes the real test.
"Take a turn at bat," says the man
ager.
The recruit walks up to the plate and
the acid test is usually applied ilrst. The
manager directs the pitcher to "shoot a
fast one at his bean." If the man steps
back from the plate he at the same time
steps back from the limelight, because
his chances of big league associations go
with the foot.
"He puts one foot in the water pail" is
the verdict of the manager, and it is the
player's death warrant for fast company.
Suppose, however, that he is clumsy in
the Held and handles the ball awkwardly,
but when he comes to the plate he steps
up toward the "bean ball" and ducks only
his head after he sees that it is not going
to break and curve over the plate.
Batters Born, Not Made.
"There's a guy that's got the stuff in
him," declares the manager, and he holds
to him and sets about making a fielder
out of the recruit. Many a man has come
to the Giants in just tills way.
I>arry Doyle was far from a polished
performer at second base when he joined
the Giants, but one look at him in action
at the bat was enough for the keen-eyed
McGraw. The Giants often tell of what
the New York manager said after Dan
Brouthers, the scout, had brought his
find to the Polo Grounds.
"There's a guy that's a hitter," re
marked McGraw. "He falls away on hjs
back and hits them. It won't make any
difference to him whether the pitcher is a
left or right-hander." And it doesn't.
Larry stands up there at the plate and
follows the ball with his eye and punches
at it. He is what is known as a natural
hitter and a free swinger, the acme of
batting perfection. It is hard for most
left-handed hitters to bat southpaw pitch
ers.
Larry was very rough in his stick work
when he first came to the Giants, bring
ing with Him many tricks of the "honey
suckle circuit." For instance, he used to
throw his bat after he hit the ball, and
frequently he was not particular where
he aimed it. They call it "sllngln' the
bat" around the lots. Finally so many
catchers complained about this unpleas
ant habit of the New York second base
man that a rule was made in the league
that whenever a batter struck the catcher
j by the careless manner in which he placed
the bat after hitting the ball he was out
of the game ipso facto, as Cicero used
to say.
Larry, who has no respect for the con
ventions and niceties) of the big leagues,
promptly got a stout piece of twine and
tied his bat to himself after he had been
removed from three or four games for
bouncing the willow off the more or less
resilient shins of several catchers, to the
great detriment of the shins.
"I guess that rule was aimed at me,"
he remarked, "but I fooled them."
Larry still grabs ofT ,bis cap when he
makes a more extensive hit than a
sngle and rushes around the bases with
it in his hand. He is one of the most
picturesque battere in the big leagues,
and one of the most effective. He is now
a polished fielder. but it was his remark
able hitting which first obtained for him
the job on thA Giants. ?
Many batters who have no desire to
step back when they first move into the
league get "beaned" and are plate shy
ever afterward. That is the ultimate
test of gameness in a ball player. To get
"beaned" is to be hit in the head with a
fast ball, and it always means going to
sleep, the duration of the nap depending
upon the speed with which the ball is
hurled and the susceptibility of the
"bean." Sometimes it results in two
days in the hospital, spent in a state of
coma.
After such a terrifying experience a
man is naturally timid about standing
up to the plate when the ball is again
kimed for the head. Being aware of this
fact and keeping a carefully compiled
list of the "beaned" boys, many pitchers
have acquired the unsportsmanlike, habit
of throwing the first ball at the head
of the^e men, who have been "beaned"
once. This is to drive them away from
the plate. There is little sentiment in
base ball.
Many men have been "beaned" and
have come back strong. Roger Bresna
han. formerly the Giants' catcher, was
hit in the face with a pitched ball when
the Giants were playing Cincinnati sev
eral years ago. and it made extensive
alterations in his face. He spent some
time in a hospital, but when he came
out he was up there batting just as
strongly as ever, and never considers how
many are shot at his he^ul. The pitchers
have long since abandoned the practice.
JAPANESE CUE EXPERT WILL TRY
. FOR 18 2 MILLIARD CHAMPIONSHIP
KOGI YAMADA.
One of the most Interesting figures of the 18.'J billiard championship contest,
which starts tonight in New York city, will be Kogi Yamada, the Japanese
expert, who traveled all the way from his native land to enter the contest.
Those who have had tho opportunity to watch his play say that he will be no
mean competitor for the title.
I
A Simple Lathering is all the
Preparation You Need for a
Velvet-smooth Gillette Shave
TTMSCARD your old-fashioned soft
^ blade razor. Get a Gillette. You
will shave in one-third the time.
You will save all the bother?the stropping and honing?
the pulling, scraping, roughness and irritation.
Just a simple lathering?plenty of lather, well rubbed in,
as usual.
The Gillette Blade is the sharpest, smoothest shaving
edge ever made?the most lasting.
You want the Gillette Blade ? the adjustment ? the angle
stroke.
Get a Gillette. Take it home. Shave with it.
Stop at the first good Gillette window you see?Standard sets,
$5; Pocket editions, $5 to $6; Combination and Travelers' Sets, $6 to
GILLETTE SAFETY RAZOR COMPANY, BOSTON
$50.
Gillette Blades?tw<? sizes of packet, 50c and $1.00.
Stropping
N? "?'t
PHYSICAL FITNESS FOR BUSINESS HEN
AS A GUARD AGAINST ILLNESS.
By Frank A# Gotch, Wor
That fat, flabby man who contracts
pneumonia makes another inhabitant for
the cemetery. He has about as much
chance as a tallow candle in a seething
furnace.
I dare say these bewhiskered germs are
stalking all of us every moment. Some
are taking a ride down our throats in
our steaming coffee. Some are getting
into our lungs with each breath. Others
are ever hiding in the ice we consume. A
germ is my idea of eternal persistence.
The army of the Potomac never put
up a more valiant scrap than our blood
and tissues are set to every day.
Resistance Is what counts, and re
sistance is physical cleanliness. Adipose
tissue is not clean. It is vile refuse. It
is the sewage of the body, corked up, a
banquet for the bacilli.
Doctors are fine fellows. The more of
them who starve, the better off the hu
man race will be. This Isn't as harsh as
it seems. Doctors are necessary largely
[d's Wrestling Champion*
because of human ignorance. The man
who permits his body to 6ink Into decay
that he oould Indefinitely prevent is the
most Ignorant of men.
Stop_ being a fatalist. That is a lax
man's "creed. Believe you have the right
to live to a reasonable old age.
In exercising, remember that it is not
essential that you become very strong.
Don't try to overdo what your body can
stand. But make yourself fit enough to
keep your waste and repair operating
nicely. Then when the germ hordes come
trekking through your tissues they won't
find a camping ground. Only tfhen you
are "all run down'' can they attack you.
Oxygen, as supplied by. full, deep
breathing, is one aid. Walking, tennis,
golf, horseback riding, dumbbells. Indian
clubs, the wall pulley, etc., are other aide.
A little regular physical exercise daily,
good baths and rubdowns, will unite in
keeping you on the earth's surface a con
siderable period.
Prevent sickness. That beats getting
cured. Stave off illness by being "in
shape." Think it over and get busy, be
cause good health is the most depend
able asset nature ever put in your path.
FOBWABD PASS FEATURES.
Game in Which X Street High De
feats jffanami Institute.
In a slow and uninteresting game M
Street High School foot ball team de
feated the Manassas Institute eleven by
the score of 22 to 0. Rector and Greene
of M Street were the stars of the day,
and played consistently throughout.
Other players did well, but the heat of
the afternoon prevented any show of
dash on the part of either team. Both
teams scored their longest runs and
most distance off plays in which the for
ward pass was the chief feature. Rector
was especially lucky in making tallies
for M Street* After four minutes of
play it was seen that the Virginians
could do nothing against 1C Street's
line, and on M Street's turn to carry
the ball a touchdown quickly resulted.
Shortly after Manassas tried to kick out
from her goal line, the kick was blocked,
an iM Street player fell on it, but the
referee mistook the player for a Ma
nassas player and ruled a safety, which
none corrected and was allowed, although
later when the matter was broached the
official decided that it should have been
a touchdown for the M Street boys.
The game was clean and the best
sportsmanship resulted. Line-up:
M Street. Position. Mibihii.
B. Brown Left end Bryant
F. Randall |Capt.I>eft tackle Dowaeli
E. Johnson Left guard Fletcher
J. Brown Center Hawkin*
Samuels Right guard Fitahuth
D. J one* Right tackle Jasper
Lewis Left end Watvon
Greese Quarterback Rice
Talbert Left halfback <Capt.) Clay
Rector Right halfback Laws
Tansimore Fullback L. Johnson
Referee?Mr. E. B. Henderson. Umpire?Mr.
B. Washington. Linesman?Mr. A. Brown.
ft
ishermen |
10% to 60% reduction on Brand- X
now Fishlnr Tackle. Tour oppor- ?"
tuntty to complete your outfit at p
unheard-of reductions. It will
pay you to Investigate.
LIVE BAIT. Now York Blood
Worms. 28c dosen. ,.
Mad Toms, 40c dosen.
New hardware department
Nat'l Sporting Goods Co*|
424 9th St. N.W.
Robert B. Volkmer. 5c
Hardware
WTOU need aome little ar
ticle of hardware around
the home, phone us or
drop poetal and we'll xad
It to you rl?ht away, and the
price will be lower than else?
where.
Etadneenr and machinists' supplies
NATIONAL
Machinists' Supply Co.
520 12th St. N.W.
Mall ? pbOM orders |hn prompt
Jamestown
Jockey
Club
Norfolk, Va., Nov. 13-30, 1912.
Modern (M Palace St?akn* tram
Washington Dally. 6:45 p.a?.
Special Lam-rate Week-end Tleketa. in
cluding ArconsMdatJoaa at Fa mow
CHAMBBRLJN HOTEL
?& CITY TICKET OKFICK
Norfolk * Washington Steamboat Co.

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