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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, November 26, 1913, Image 12

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1913-11-26/ed-1/seq-12/

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Georgetown Ends Its Foot Ball Season Tomorrow in Game With Holy Cross
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SB
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i
\
GOOD FIELD TRIALS HELD.
National Capital Club Has Interest
ing Event at Bradley Hills.
The inaugural trial* of the National
Capital Field Trial Club were held at
Bradley Hills, Md., Monday before a
good sized crowd, and were very suc
cessful, as the dogs could be seen al
most constantly throughout the different
events. Following are the results:
Open derby stake?Blue Diamonds
Frank, a <vhite and liver ticked pointer
?log, and King Bell Boy were the first
brace run. The pointer ranged wider,
but they were about equal in speed.
After . running thirty minutes and 110
birds being found were ordered up.
Keen Whitcstone, a white, black and
tan setter dog, and Trump Itodney, a
black, white and tan setter dog. were
the next brace cast off. Kmii Whitc
stone had a little the better of the
heat. No birds were found and the j
dogs were ordered up.
Blue. Diamonds Frank and Bell' Boy,
having shown to better advantage, were
< as<t off In the ' third and tinal heat.
This was a nip and tuck race, first one
dog and then the other had an ap
parent advantage, but after running
thirty minutes and no birds were found
the judges awarded the prizes as fol
lows: First, Blue Diamonds Frank; sec
ond, King Bell Boy; third. Keen White
stone: fourth. Trump Kodney.
? 'pen. all ages?Bob K.. a white. Mark
and tan setter dog. and Beau White
stone. a white, black and tan setter,
were the first brace ca?t off in this
stake. Bej^n appeared to have more,
speed and range,, but birds were not
found unti! after dogs were ordered up.
Don, a white and orange fetter dog. an.!
Count (Jladstonc tilcave, a white, black
and tan setter dog, were the -next brace
iast ofT, and the spectators were treated
t.j a grand heat Both dogs broke away
fast. Count having a little the better of
it The dog* were in ??rder along a strip
?.f wood*, and Don found a covey of
birds in grand style. After the birds were
flushed. Don made two single points
Count did not find any birds, and after
turning thirty minutes the dogs were
ordered up.
Topsey, a black, white and tan female
^:ter. and California Bell Boy. jr., were
the next brace cast off. This was an ex
cellent heat in ground tfork. both dog>?
going strong at the end of thirty minutes.
They were unfortunate, as birds were not
found.
Blue Diamonds Frank, the winner of
derby stake, and Kob K. were put
down. Both ran a good race.
SAFETY
RAZOR
BLADES
SHARPENED
WHILE YOU WAIT
134c
EACH.
In
Don't waste money by throwing
away jour dull blades?bring them
to French.
Onr wonderful new electric ma
chine will make them sharper than
new.
Teslefi to
a
424 9th St. N.W..
*
VIRGINIA WILL MEET
CAROLINA TOMORROW
Orange and Blue and Tarheels
Are to Play Final Foot Ball
Game in Richmond.
i
/
j Special Dispatch to The Star.
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va., November
I -w.?The Virginia team left here yester
day at 12 o'clock for Richmond, where
, it will meet North Carolina In the last
l Kame of the season. Thanksgiving day.
Carolina's -team has had four men of
| Princeton's 11)12 varsity working all sea
i son with this one game in view, and will
put forth every efTort to win, as it has 1
not recorded a victory over the Orange I
and Blue in more than six years and |
Virginia has been considering arranging
a stiflfer game for the iinal contest as
soon as the present contract wKh the
Tarheels expires. Reports from Chapel
ill are to the effect that Carolina has
taken on quite a good deal of confidence
since Virginia was defeated by George
town, and its followers are now will
ing to bet even money on the outcome
of the contest.
Tol Pendleton, who was on hand at the
game between Georgetown and Virginia,
said that unless the latter team played
much better foot ball than it did then
ho was looking for Carolina to win by
at least ? two touchdowns.
Virginia will present practically the
same l?ne-up that started against George
town. except that Flannagan may replace
: White at left end, and either Word or
' Mayer will likely start at left half in
I place of Randolph. Word was hurt badly
| in the early part of the s.easori. just when
? he was beginning to show varsity caliber,
; but has entirely recovered now,- and se-'tns
i to be p aying in old-time form. He lives
! in Richmond, and wili have a sreat many
j fri? n-ls in -the stands Watching his work
; if he play s.
i A<")Ut students will accompany tin*
t. am. and they, with t?n? squad, will be
entertained by the Richmond uiuiwui
Thursday night.
Virginia has lost ouly one game so far!
this season, that one being to George- I
town, and the success of the present sea- I
I .s"ti depends on the result ol the Katne
j ith Carolina.
JACK JOHNSON WRESTLING.
His German Opponent Used Unfair
Tactics and Narrowly Escaped Mob.
P.YR1S, November 28.?Jack Johnson's j
Paris debut as a wrestler occasioned a
riot last night. When the colored pugi
list appeared at the Xouveau Cirque
against the German wrestler I "rbacli,
Johnson secured the llrst two fuJls. and
(j jritig these bouts I rbucli was mad*- the
object of a hosti e dentonstration on ac
count of his unfair tactics.
In the third bout Urbat'h suddenly
struck Johnson a violent blow in the
face. The blow did not seern to affect
Johnson in the least. He only laughed.
The crowd, however, became enraged.
I and hundreds of men rushed upon the
stage. The Genr?aii sought safety in
fll?ht.
The riot prevailed for half an hour, dur
ing which time the police made ? number
of arrests. _
A
GEORGETOWN U.
PLAYSLAST GAME
Blue and Gray Eleven Meets
Holy Cross in Final 1913
Contest Tomorrow.
NORTHERNERS LIKELY
TO SHOW GOOD TEAM
Worcester School Is Generally Rep
resented by Very Capable Aggre
gation?Aggies Play P. M. C.
BY H. C. BYRD.
Georgetown will close its foot ball
season tomorrow. The Blue and Gray
eleven is to meet Holy Cross in a
pame which, if won, will give it a clear
title to the championship of the Cath
olic colleges in the east. While this
title is somewhat vague to an outsider,
it is nevertheless one for which Holy
Cross, Fordham and Georgetown will
fight as desperately as for the cham
pionship of any section.
Whether or not Georgetown will be
able to defeat the Worcester eleven is
very questionable. There is no doubt
that it will be against a more capable
eleven than any it has yet faced, with
the exception of those which represent
ed the Naval Academy and the Indians.
Holy Cross is nearly always repre
sented by a foot ball team the equal
of any secondary college eleven, and it
plays the majority of its games against
colleges much larger than itself. Some
thing of the kind of schodule played
by Holy Cross may be known when
it is stated that the team has met i
Yale, Harvard and Princeton this sea
son. besides playing its other games.
Any team which can go through a
schedule of that kind is certain to be
very formidable.
Just .what kind of condition Georgetown
will be in when it faces the New Eng
landers tomorrow is hard to tell. Of
course, the Blue and Gray did not sus
tain any serious injuries in the Virginia
game, but it is always a very difficult
matter to get the men into shapfc
again after the relaxation which natural
ly follows the big game of the year. It
will be remembered three years ago that
V. M. I. came within the barest margin
of beating the Blue and Gray after it had
lost to Virginia 36 to O. and Virginia
had been beaten by Georgetown the
previous week by 15 to 0. If Georgetown
is back in the condition it was when it
met Virginia, it will give Holy Cross a
hard struggle, but if the men have not
yet gotten back into shape the odds will
favor the visitors.
The game will begin at 2:30, and the
gates will be opened at 1 o'clock. Wey
mouth of Yale will referee.
The Nationals and Vigilants, two inde
pendent foot ball teams which have been
claiming the championship of the Dis
trict, will meet tomorrow in a contest to
decide the supremacy. The Vigilants have
the heavier and more experienced play
ers. but the Nationals are figuring that
they have a chance to win. The game
should be sharply contested.
The Maryland Agricultural College
eleven will leave tomorrow morning for
Chester, Pa., where it will meet the
Pennsylvania Military College. The
Farmers realize that they are pitted
against the best secondary team they
have faced this season, the Keystone
state boys not having lost a game and
having defeated the strongest secondary
elevens in that section. The Chester ag
gregation won from St. John's by 27 to O.
while the Aggies could win by a margin
of only 13 to 0 from the same school.
CINCINNATI DROPS TINKER.
Jtanager and Board of Directors
Fail to Agree on Terms.
CINCINNATI, November 26.?It was
I officially announced by the board of di
rectors of the Cincinnati base ball club
late yesterday that Joe Tinker, man
ager of the team last season, would
not manage it during the season of
1914. Inability to come to terms with
Tinker is given as the reason for
reaching this conclusion. The official
statement follows:
"The officers and directors of the Cin
cinnati Exhibition Company desire to
announce that they could not come to
a satisfactory agreement with Mr. Tin-,
ker to act as playing manager for the
Cincinnati team next year. The ques
tion involved did not pertain to salary.
Mr. Tinker seemed to believe that he
was entitled, if lie again assumed the
position as manager of the Reds, to
usurp all the authority vested by the
stockholders in the executive officers
and the board of directors of the com
pany. Under these conditions these di
rectors decided not to re-engage Mr.
Tinker as manager of the team for
next year.
"Who the manager of the team will be
is a question for the future, and will be
taken up and considered at the proper
time."
Lincoln A. C. Ready.
The Lincoln A. C. foot ball team is in
condition after a few days of hard prac
tice to meet the Roseda'e eleven in their
annual struggle tomorrow morning at
the latter's grounds, 17th and Rosedalc
streets northeast, at 10:.*50 o'clock. Both
teams will go on the field with about
the same average weight. Capt. Murphy
of the LJncolns would like the following
men to report on the field not later than
10 o'clock. D. I#awrence, I>. I^awrence,
I*. Murphy, W. Murphy, F. Seehow. A.
Seebow, Rusoe, White, Cole, Melclier,
Dean, Koontzr, Barns, Manscy. Craw
ford ajui Riley.
?
iJanny Huffman. former American
League play<r. it in reported, is a bidder
for the Bridgeport franchise in the East
ern Association. Danny inak>-? his home
1 in Bridgeport, is well iixed financially and
would be a popular magnate. If Hoffman
takes the club he will act as his own
j manager and play an outfield position.
G. W. U. AND C. U. TO
HOLD MEET JOINTLY
A xlalrmrnt wan Klveu nut ibln
morning by the president of the
athletic ?H?oclaiion of the (irom
WHNhlnglan linlvernHj, Alvtn
llrown, that the annual Indoor
traek and flrld game* would take
III are an uanal. It wan Mated that
(he meet would |?robnhl> |?e held
under the joint auspice* of lath- .
ol'e I ahrrnlt> and tieorite Wanb
iniclon. negotiations now being;
carried /on with that end In view.
Several Informal confereneea
hate been held between repre
sentative* of the two institution*,
and It la thought that a deflnite
arrangement will be eoacluded
within ? day or tn?.
DEPOSED AS CINCINNATI MANAGER.
JOE TINKER.
OFFICIAL AMERICAN LEAGUE
PITCHING RECORDS, 1913.
Compiled by Irwin M. Howe, American League Statistician.
FIVE FULL GAMES OR MORE.
Walter Johnson leads the American
League pitchers so easily in the official
averages, based on the percentage of
earned runs per game, that he virtually
stands out by himself.
The remarkable feature of these
figures is that Cicotte, the veteran Chi
cago pitcher, is next to Johnson, close
ly followed by Russell and Scott, two
other Chicago pitchers. Joe Boehling
is sixth in the list, and next to Boehling
comes Joe Engel, who leads some thirty
odd pitchers. Engel pitched effectively, so
far as allowing earned runs, to score is
concerned, but his wildness caused him
to lose many games.
In compiling the pitching averages the
pitchers are ranked according to the
earned runs made off them. Earned runs
were charged, according to announce
ment from the American League offices,
whenever a run was made by any com
bination on base hits, sacrifice hits,
bases on balls, hit batsmen, stolen bases,
wild pitches or balks^ When a fielding
error or passed ball figured in the mak
ing of a run. it was not charged against
the pitcher, and the records omit runs
made after an error on a play which
would have retired the batting side if
correctly executed.
So. of Innings At bat.
Date. Pitchers, club. games, pitched. Opp.
1 JOHNSON, Wash 47 346 12*2
2 Cicotte. Chicago' 42 2?7Vi 1'83
3 Russell. Chicago 51 316 1141
4 Scott. Chicago 48 :S12 1108
5 W. Mitchell, Cleve 35 217 MJ2
C BOEHLING. Wash. ... 38 236'i 861
7 Steen. Cleveland 22 12S',? 474
8 Bender. Philadelphia... 40 237% 9*3
9 Falkenberg, Cleveland. 39 275% 1023
10 Gregg, Cleveland 44 28." 1000
11 Wood, Boston 22 145% 528
12 Leonard, Boston 42 2<50 932
13 Allium, St. Louis 11 51% 181
14 Shaw key, phila 18 111% 445
15 HamHton, St. Louis... 31 217 816
16 Caldwell, Now York... 27 164% 5??Q
17 Zarolock, Detroit 17 70'i 20.
18 Walsh, Chicago 16 08% 375
lft Blaruling. Cleveland... 41 214 831
20 Plank, Philadelphia.... 41 242% 901
21 Ford, New York 33 237 88S
22 R. Collins, Boston 30 24<i% 901
23 Bedlcnt. Boston 43 259% 978
24 Benz, Chicago 88 15o% 575
25 McDonnell, New York. 35 ISO 662
26 Brown. Philadelphia... 44 239% ttt2
27 Pubnc, Detroit 36 242 1000
28 Kahler, Cleveland 24 120% 443
29 McHale, New York 7 48% 184
80 RNGEL. Washington... 30 165% 51*9
31 R. Mitchell. St. Louis. 33 245% 955
32 Moaeley, Bast on 24 110 390
S3 Willett, Detroit 33 241% 7S2
34 Baumganicer. St. L... 38 254% 943
35 G. Foster. Boston .... 19 08 257
86 Fisher, New York 45 245% 1030
87 White. Chicago IS 103 3*1
3S GROOM, Washington . 37 205 1010
89 Keating, New York... 28 151% 580
40 "M. Hall, Detroit 30 164 <K3
41 Wel'man, St. Louis.... 39 251% 931
42 C. Hall, Boston 35 104% 415
43 Lake. Detroit 28 127% 536
44 Stone, St. Louis 18 91 352
45 J. Bush. Philadelphia.. 3!) 201% SOI
46 Leverenz, St. Louis.... 30 202% 7</7
47 O'Brien. Chicago 22 10H 407
48 GALLIA, Washington.. 30 92% 3*3
49 8ctraits. New York.... 38 192% 745
50 Warhop, New York 15 02% 2,16
51 Mullin, Detroit-Wash.. IS 100% 432
52 HTGHES, WaFh 36 129% 510
53 Houck. Phl'adelphla... 40 175% 688
54 WyckofT, Philadelphia. 17 61 % 240
55 Onllop, Cleveland 23 97% 301
56 House, Detroit 43 84 1*7
57 Anderson, Boaton ..... 10 07 227
Hits
by
opp.
230
222
247
249
150
20O
1<>6
208
236
254
116
252
52
93
197
131
66
91
236
208 .
.243
239
255
142
162
1?9
228
115
49
124
2B5
105
229
207
64
244
106
258
146
141
262
97
147
94
193
16ft
124
85
197
69
122
130
144
19
103
10
84
Runs
by
opp. ER.
64
77
89
96
56
84
51
50
82
10*1
54
108
24
41
95
57
82
37
82
84
108
89
102
65
90
97
111
61
21
75
111
56
122
119
36
113
58
118
77
81
122
64
05
45
97
81
68
66
105
42
62
81
89
12
58
47
51
42
48
65
04
45
54
35
58
68
71
87
65
13
29
67
44
19
28
61
70
70
72
80
46
64
77
78
41
16
56
82
40
83
88
24
87
40
95
54
60
95
40
50
36
50
58
44
38
80
26
48
68
81
30
48
51
38
Hit
bats
man.
?
2
8
9
8
10
4
O
6
14
8
5
8
3
?
9
4
4
2
6
4
0
6
2
7
10
8
2
1
11
5
0
12
11
4
8
4
6
o
2
4
6
O
7
4
10
0
12
7
14
6
5
3
1
1
BR.
38
68
85
89
SS
77
50
54
89
121
61
94
13
50
83
60
23
37
77
55
53
37
67
68
00
91
90
82
10
85
&
88
84
28
71
42
81
51
60
00
47
25
45
65
89
49
46
69
33
43
61
122
15
32
17
21
SO.
243
119
126
155
139
110
57
139
165
167
123
143
13
47
101
87
27
34
57
145
72
89
122
77
72
66
75
41
11
70
68
61
58
78
36
92
37
156
S3
.69
79
48
33
37
78
SO
56
40
77
11
SO
59
66
8
31
lO
32
WP.
3
5
4
3
7
7
4
7
13
9
8
6
2
??
5
1
0
6
5
4
4
0
2
4
3
10
11
2
2
4
4
6
5
1
1
9
99
i
10
11
1
4
??
5
4
0
1
6
11
Balk
0
0
0
O
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
O
0
0
0
0
o
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
o
0
0
0
3
1
o
o
0
0
0
1
o
o
0
Q
0
o
0
0
0
o
0
0
0
0
o
o
o
0
o
0
Aver.
ER.
.perG.
l.W>
1.61
1.85
1.85
1.87
2.07
2.11
2.19
2.21
2.2*
2.2s
2.29
2.30
2.35
2.37
2.41
2.44
254
2.67
2.59 I
2.00
2.72
2.73
2.74
2.75
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.94
. 3.01
3.01
3.02
3.10
3.11
8.1S
8.23
3.20
3.23
3.23
3.29
3.41
3.48
3.51
3.50
3.57
3.60
3.60
3.73
3.74
3.78
3.93
4.05
4.14
4.36
4.41
5.17
6.00
COLLINS DECLINES OFFER
Athletics' Second Baseman
Turns Down Fortune in Re
fusing Federal Berth.
PHILADELPHIA. November 26.?
"Fifty thousand dollars? That's a lot of
money. But it's not enough. I can't
think of a sum large enough to Induce
me to leave Connie Mack, the man who
made me."
That was the answer Kddie Collins,
king of second basemen, made to an
offer of $50,000 for three years' labor
ill the Federal League. Abe L. Einstein,
a Philadelphia n. who represents the
outlaw base ball organization, made the
proposition to the Athletics' star.
The contract which was presented to
Collins called for a yearly salary of
$15,000, or If45.000 for the trio of sea
sons. To guarantee the payment of this
princely stipend, the $45,000 was to be
placed in any bank selected by Collins,
where it would draw interest. At the
same time an arrangement was to be
made by which he could write semi
monthly checks for $1,250 during the
playing season. When the three years
had ended, it was pointed out to Eddie
that the interest would increase the
amount to more than $50,090.
Not Seriously Considered.
"I really didn't give the proposition
serious thought," said Collins last night
when seen at his home in Lansdowne.
"Mr. Kinstein assured me that it was!
absolutely legitimate. That's all I know
about it. lie offered to take me to the
bank I would name and show me that
he meant business.
"Fifty thousand dollars In three
years listens big-. And we all like the
money. There are two reasons why I
did not consider the offer. The first
is Connie Mack. What I am in base
ball today he made me. I cannot bring
myself to believe that an offer could be
made sufficiently large to induce me
to leave the Athletics as long as Con
nie wants me. Then, again, I would not
want to desert organized base ball to
go with an outlaw league without giv
ing it long and serious thought."
Collins would be a big card for the
Federal League. He was recently de
scribed as "the most valuable base
ball player in the world" by no less
an authority on the game than John
J. McGraw. manager of the Giants.
Kddie plays base ball with his brains
as well as his arms and legs, and his
place in Mack's one-hundred-thousand
dollar infield would be hard to fill.
Other Players Approached.
The king of second sackers is not
the first player to be approached by
the Federals. Even now. other play
ers are considering tempting offers
to jump organized base ball. Collins'
immediate refusal of the fifty-thou
sand-dollar bait speaks volumes for
the lumest dealing of Connie Mack and
the high regard in which he is held by
his players.
"I know of nothing about any offer
being made to Kddie Collins." said
Manager Mack last night. "If true,
though, 1'ni mighty glad to know that
he refused it so quickly. I have every
confidence in my boys."
Mack refused to discuss the at
tempts of the Federal Leaguers to at
tract major leaguers. His attitude
seemed to be one of those "I should
worry" bra.nds.
Krichell Sold to Buffalo.
KANSAS CITY, November 26.?Catcher
Paul Krichell of the local American
Association club, was sold last night
to the Buffalo team of the International
l.cague. Kansas City obtained Krichell
from the St. Louis Americans last
winter. .
Manager Fred Clarke of the Pirates is
quoted as saying that Willie Keeler was
the greatest hitter of them all* when it
came to fooling the opposition. There
are greater straiglit-away hitters than
Keeler. admits Clarke, but Willie was the.
best on the little short cboys^ just over
the intield. J
<
HAS NO DEAL ON
FOR RUSSELL FORD
I
Griffith Denies He Offered
Moeller and Boehling
for Spitbalfer.
DOES NOT INTEND TO
LET ANY PLAYERS OUT j
Fans Believe Howard Shanks Will
Have Better Breaks With the
Bat Next Season.
BY J. ED GRILLO.
A story which is printed in a New
York paper this morning to the effect |
that Manager Griffith of the Nationals i
is trying to make a deal for Russell (
Ford, the Yankee's spitball artist, is i
emphatically denied by the Nationals' j
boss.
According to this yarn. Griffith is
willing to give Joe Boehling and Dan ;
Moeller for Ford, while Carrigan of i
Boston and Birmingham of Cleveland
are also competing for Ford with offers I
which on the face of them look absurd.
"I have never given Ford a thought,"
said Griffith, "and I haven't any inten
tion of making a deal for him. If
ever I offered Boehling and Moeller for
Ford I would consider myself ready
to have my head examined. I propose
to stand pat with the players I have on
my list. I may add some players, but
I do not propose to let any of those
who have shown ability go. I can't
understand how such stories are start
ed. Ford has never entered my mind.j
and so far as letting either Boehling or'
Moeller go, why that is out of the
question."
Artie Hofman. once one of the Cubs. '
who was recently let out by Nashville, '
is slated to play first base for the San
Francisco club next season. Hofman
tried to get a job with one of the major
league clubs, but was turned down, and
decided to go to the coast.
Local enthusiasts are hoping that Man
ager Griffith will give Howard Shanks
another trial next spring. The fans be
lieve that the time has come when the
Monaca outfielder will hit his batting
stride, and they blame ill luck for his
showing to date. Shanks, no doubt,
has suffered much by reason of his
inability to get many hard-hit balls into
safe territory. Time and time again line
drives from his bat have been hit right
at one of the opposing fielders, and it is
figured if Just half of th?5e had gone
safe that he would have finished with a
very creditable batting average.
It is believed that luck will take a turn |
for him next season, and that he will j
hit well enough to assure him of a regu- !
lar position in left.
Griffith, too, has hope that Shanks will
show Improvement in his batting, and, re
gardless of what may happen in the way
of getting another outfielder, Griffith is
sure to hold on to Shanks and give him
another chance.
POTOMAC, FAMOUS RACER. DIES
Won Futurity, Flatbush and Law
rence Realization Stakes.
AMSTERDAM, N. Y? 'November 26.?
Potomac, one of the most noted
thoroughbreds of his day, is no more.
The renowned horse has passed away
at the Sanford Hurricana stock farm.
He was twenty-three years old. A son
of St. Blaise and Susquehanna, he was
one of the best of his day while rac
ing, and he played an important part
in turf history.
Potomac was brought to the races by
August Belmont, and he was winner
of the Futurity of 1890. The same year
tie was winner of the Flatbush.
As a three-year-old Potomac raced
under the silks of the late M. F.
Dwver, and he met with a full measure
of success, taking the Lawrence Reali
zation as his best performance. He
also was winner of the Spindrift, a
sweepstakes at Brighton Beach, and
the Barnegat stakes at Monmouth
Park. During his four-year-old season
he won four races under the silks of
Mr. Dwyer. and at the close of that
year he was purchased by the late Gen.
Stephen Sanford.
I
I
I
I
I
Piedmont Q.uality means
Highest Quality?Unchang
ing Quality.
Year after year the same
ripe, mellow tobacco, the
same perfect workmanship,
the same pleasure and satis
faction*
Imitators have despaired of
ever equalling Piedmont
Quality. Whole coupon in
each package.
L
JO I
Jjfci?oc flc
VALUABLE EFFECTS
FOUND IN STADIUM
CAMBRIDGE. Mass., November
26.?Nearly $10,000 worth of val
uable furs, jewels, pocketbooks
containing large sums of money,
hats and other personal effects
repose in the vault of the Har
vard Athletie Association await
ing identification by their own
ers. The articles, which include
a fur coat valued at $800. were 1
forgotten by spectators at the
Harvard-Yale foot ball game in
the stadium last Saturday.
Trusted employes of the asso
ciation, who went over the stad
ium after the game, collected the
rich booty.
MEET AT PITTSBURGH.
Federals to Plan for a Eaid on the
Major Leagues.
PITTSBURGH. Pa., November 28.?A
letter vote, closed at noon yesterday by
representatives of the Federal League se
lected Pittsburgh for their regular meet
ing place, to plan for the raid on big
leagues for material. The session will
start next Saturday morning. A finan
cial plan will be outlined.
Secretary W. T. McColloch of the
local club received the official notice last
night, and is making plans for the enter
tainment of the visiting Federal League
officials.
While the plans for next season and
the talk of forfeits will play a big part
in the meeting here, the real purpose is
to take up the question of making induce
ments to the major league players. The
plan will be worked on the mutual benefit
scale. Two men will be in charge of
the securing of the players, while the
men, when secured, will be drawn for by
lot. with all clubs participating.
The rule adopted at the western meet
ing. at Indianapolis, provides that if a
player is transferred he will not receive
less money than he signed for. nor at
any time during his playing in the Fed
eral I^eague will he receive less than his
original contract.
Every club in the league will be repre
sented Saturday.
Backer Traded to Giants?
NEW YORK, November 26.?Reports
of a deal between the New York and
Brooklyn National I>eafrue clubs, by
which Nap Rucker, the star left-hander
of the Superbas, is to be traded to the
Giants for Charley Herzog and Rube
Marquard, were persistent in base ha'l
circles here last night, although officiars
of neither club could be found to con
firm them. It is known that McGraw
has long been anxious to get Rucker.
Always the Same?
Tharp's
Berkeley Rye
812 F St. N. W. Phone Main 277.
Special Private Delivery.
THE BARTRAM ELECTRIC GARAGK.
Tel. W. 4.V. N. H. A*". and M Kt. X W.
STEVENS-0URY?A
T. LAMAR JACKSOH.
14th and R Sts. N.W.
Telephone North 3863.
and
POTOMAC MOTOR CAR CO..
Tel. N 3000. 1236 Oki.
THE HKSut.u? A? TX? CO.
Tel. N. 4521. 1127 14th St. m.w.
Olds mobile 1914
*Tk? Greatest gli-(jU?ilf
Car Brer
Pollock Car Corporation.
Tel. M. 7837. 1018 Codo. ???.
The Luttrell Co.. Dupont Circle.
SERVICE STATIOW. 1214 X. g in. M.W.
Pullman King.
Standard Electric.
Win. P. Barnhart & Co.,
Tel. N. 2019. 1707 14th St. STY
URVIN T. DONOHOE
' Auto Supplies.
We clean carbon out of your motor
while you wait. 75c per cyliqder.
1803 M St. N.W.
Phone N. 2?18.
CADILLAC
BAKER ELEC.
The Cook & Stoddard Co,
112R-40 CONN. . "R. Pb?ii? N "Bid.
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1407 H at. n.w. Ptan- Mill ??ft.
Rambler Mitchell
MaxWell
H. G. LEAUV. Jr., Agpot.
TEL. X. 44S4. 1321 14th ST*. X.W
1914
f ulij *quip;>ed; eleeu.c tuvt* t.'S
mure csr. $850.
Overland-Washington Motor Co.,
Tel. M. 691C. 129 14th ft N.W._
BASE BALL BRIEFS.
If Bergcr fails to win the second-base
job with the White Sox next spring ther?
is a cliance that he will goto'tlis Venice
club of tlie Pacific Coast league.
I>ike Cleveland. Roosevelt, Wilson and
others. John K. Ti- ht jumped fmni gov
ernor of a stale to the presidency.
j Several American I-ex-sue critics a>:*
'that Jor- Boehling wus greatly aidrd !? '
| luck w hen lie won eleven straight gain
Did any one ever li? ar of * pitcher v . m
nir.g even two successive xames links
he had at least an even break upon the
luck?
Jim Thorpe is being groomed by Mc
Graw for outfield duty, but it will b?
another year before the iJttle Napoleon
attempts to play him regularly. Thorpe
is in need of experience and a better bat
ting style, in which McGraw is drilling
him. The Indian athletic marvel is o\er
anxious to "murder" the ball when he
steps to the plate, and the Giants' man
ager is doing his best to have Jim over
come this failing. Also, Thorpe's bass
running must be improved.
Charles Schmidt, the former Detroit
catcher, was recently mulcted of
damages by' a jury at Fort Smith, Ark.,
for an assault upon a neighbor named
McLaiignlin. who sued for He al
leges Schmidt broke his jaw and inflicted
other Injuries that confined him to his
bed for several Weeks. The trouble be
tween Schmidt and McLaughlin arose
over the latter hitching his horse and
wagon in such a itoaltion that passing ve
hicles had to pass over Schmidt's lawn
and parkins, the pride of Schmidt's homo.
Happenings ^poridom
BT J. ED OBULO.
The announcement that Joe Tinker will
not manage the Cincinnati team next
season, coming: as it does after it was
supposed that he had again been in
stalled in the position, is one of the sur
prises of the present winter.
Notwithstanding the fact that Tinker's
regime in the last campaign wag a pro
nounced failure, it was announced several
weeks ago that he had been retained for
the coming season. The matter appar
ently was all settled, and Tinker was be
lieved to have taken charge of the team's
affairs again. While it is understood that
there was no misunderstanding regarding
the salary Tinker was to draw, it is plain
that the board of directors of the club in
sisted on placing certain restrictions on
his authority, and when he refused to
submit to these he was immediately de
posed.
If these are the facts. Tinker is not to
be blamed for the stand he has taken. No
man can be a successful manager of a
team unless he is in absolute control. Just
as soon as it is neeesary for him to con
sult any one regarding his plans of run
ning the team he is doomed.
No intimation is given as to who will
be appointed in Tinker's place, and it is
questionable whether Tinker will remain
with the team as a player, having an
nounced that he would never consent to
play with a team which he had man
aged.
Danny Moeller took the air for the ball
more times than any other player in the
American League last season. On 106 oc
casions the Washington outfielder heard
the umpire call him out and took the
shortest route to the bench. To him be
longs the left-handed honor of the sea
son's greatest fanner.
But as a compensation he is well up
among those who walked. His seventy
two free trips do not come close to the
year's mark of 102 set by Shotten of the
Browns, but they do not put him far be
hind Eddie Collins, second in this event,
with eighty-live, and Donie Bush, who
ties Jackson for third honors with eighty.
Gus Williams, one of the hit-it-a-mile
boys, took second whiff honors with
eighty-nine. Ty Cobb struck out thirty
two times, Jackson twenty-six and Speak
er twenty-four.
than an advertising effort, and it is to the
credit of Collins that he is not even giv
ing it serious consideration. The Federal
League has threatened to make a fight 011
the two major leagues by raiding them of
their stars. This campaign will most like
ly consist of making ridiculous proposi
tions to various players without any in
tention of fulfilling thein, but which will
serve to give the newcomer a lot of no
toriety. 1
A star ball player when tempted to ac
cept such a proposition would want the
SoO.OOO deposited to his credit in some
bank, and it is a safe guess that there is
not a club in the Federal League which
could carry out this part of the con
tract. 1
It i9 understood that all the major
league clubs have agreed to wait until the
last week in January before sending con
tracts to their players. No club will at
tempt to sign a player before that time.
The fact that SO per cent of the members
of the fraternity will not talk business
with their employers until they are re
leased from pledges does not appear to
worry the magnates one bit. Under the
surface, however, there is a rumor that
many players already have accepted
terms verbally and that m> matter what
may be the outcome of the fraternity's
demands for reforms, they will sign con
tracts as soon as they receive them.
There haH been some flirting with the
Federal League people, but the latter
have been unable to show enough real
money to cause dissatisfaction among the
players belonging to organized base ball.
Arthur Shafer of the Giants has spiked
the rumor that he did not intend to report
to McGraw next spring. Shafer, who is
wintering in California, says that his eon
tract with the New York club has another
year to run and that he will be one of the
first players to put in an appearance at
Marlin, Tex., next spring.
The alleged offer of $50,000 to Eddie Col
lins by the Federal League to leave the
Athletics must not be taken seriously.
Tlie chances are that if Collins wanted to
accept such a proposition he would be
turned down. The offer is nothing more
Belmonts Arc Victors.
The Belmonts (colored) foot ball team
defeated the Teddy Bears eleven by the
score of 1- to 6, Sunday. The feature
was the line-charging of Ambrose Jack
son, J. Green. D. Rogers aud J. Brown.
Manager Joe Birmingham announces
himself as a candidate for first base next
season. Joe better have a care. Jake
Stalil. Hal Chase, Frank Chance, Harry
Davis and George Stovall were unable
to play first base and mauage at the
same time.

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