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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, August 22, 1914, Image 4

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THE EVENING STAB,
WASHINGTON.
SATURDAY August 89, 1914
THEODORE W. NOTES Editor
Til* Eranlaff Btu *?wrp?p?r Company.
B'I* Inc.. nfflc* nth St. and Prnnf^Imiili AreDOe.
New York Office: Tribune Bnlldlnr.
Chlcac<? Offlop; First National Bunk Building.
European Office: 3 Refi-nt St.. London. England.
The Fvenfne Star, with the Sunday moraine .
edition. 1? delfrered by carrier* within the City I
?t 45 cents per month: daily only. 25 '-ent* per j
month: Sunday only. 20 r^nts per month. ord<*rs ;
may he sent by mall, or telephone Main 2440. i
Collection Is made by carrier at the end of each ,
munth.
Pnynble In advance?by mall. postaee prepaid:
t?a!ly. Sunday Inr-l'-d^d. one month, ?*) <ent?.
I>ai!y Sunday excepted, one month. 40 cents.
Saturday Star. $1 year; Sunday Star. |2.40 year.
Enter??d as second rlas* mall matter at the port
office at Washington. D. C.
f^"Tn order to arold delays on account of
personal absence letters to THF. STAR should
not l?e addressed to any Individual concerted
n-lth the office, but simply tn THE STAR, or to
flip Editorial or Business Department, according
to tenor or purpotte.
late War Development!.
War developments are meagerly re
ported, although fighting is in progress
over a wide area. The latest disclos
ures are that the allied forces have re
taken Tirlemont, Belgium, from the
Germans, thus possibly breaking
through the line which has already en
veloped Brussels and perhaps isolated
Antwerp; that the French, though vic
torious in lower Alsace, where they
have retaken Muelhausen, have met
with a check in Lorraine, retiring be
fore a large German force south on
Metz, which they were seeking to in
vest; that the Russians have massed
an army, stated at fully half a million
men, on the German-Austrian frontier
and are now moving forward; that
mobilization orders have been issued
In Italy, obviously as a response to the
Austrian assemblage of troops on the
frontier.
These developments do not material
ly change the situation. Germany has
penetrated into Belgium and occupied
the capital, levying heavy war assess
ments upon the inhabitants of both
Brussels and I-iege. France has occu
pied a portion of lower Alsace and
Russia is in actior at last. Absolutely
nothins: \s known regarding the
strength of the English and French j
armies presumably awaiting the Ger- j
man attack somewhere west ar.d south j
of Brussels. **tter si'en^e prev^iils re- '
srarding the whereabouts and activities j
of the British North se i flee: Reports
have been recently put'ishe-.i :r. German- l
American papers claiming the destruo- j
tion of large numbers, of British war- i
ships?one asserting that nineteen had '
been sunk by Zeppelins and another
that no less than thirty-nine had been
destroyed The extreme unlikelihood
of these reports is attested by the fact
that there is no interruption of ship
ping and cable communication with
England. If as many as xeven the
smaller number of British ships had
been sunk the German navy should by
now have had command of the North
tea and isolated England.
The coming week will probably bring
Important developments. Japan's ulti
matum to Germany expires tomorrow.
Italy may be soon forced into decisive
action. The land campaign eanno'
fall to show some indications of the
relative strength of the German and
allied armies. Russia must begin tr
demonstrate whether she Is to be a
strong or negligible factor In the war
and finally the' continued silence re
garding the British sea forces may be
broken by ihe announcement of action.
The Canal Waits on Peace.
Tt is a remarkahle fact that the isth
mian canal, completed by the United
States after such difficulties have been
overcome, and with an enormous expen
diture of money, should be thrown open
to the commerce of the world Just at a
time when that commerce Is all but sus
pended by the great war of the powers.
Had the canal gates been opened six
months ago a heavy stream of traffic
would have begun immediately to flow
through them, or two months ago, or per
haps even a month ago. But with a sud
denness that has no parallel In the his
tory of mankind a blight has fallen rpon
the world's trade. Ships of all nations
are tied up In neutral ports or home
ports, afraid to venture to seaj. Freights
are practically suspended In every direc
tion. A paralysis has seized the business
world and the canal waits for custom al
most as a shoo in a deserted city.
But all this will soon change. Traffic
will begin to move in all directions in a
short time, as the war activities are con
fined to the land or as one or the other
side gains dominance over the seas. It
Is unthinkable that there should be a
prolonged suspension of ocean freighting
on the score of possible Interference by
the cruisers of the hostile nations. Al
ready there Is some resumption of ocean
transportation, but not In the direction
Of the canal. The coastwise trade, how
ever, must speedily be started, for the
vital needs of great multitudes of people
depend upon the use of the sea for their
supply.
Perhaps it Is well that the canal starts
with a slight demand upon it, for thus
the work of operation will be perfected
without strain, and the chances of mis
haps will be lessened. It is fairly cer
tain that when the war menace has been
removed the volume of sea traffic will be
enormous and the canal will be subjected
to great pressure. So In one sense Its
opening is as timely as could possibly
have been devised. Had the makers of
this waterway had prescience of the great
disaster of well-nigh universal old-world
war they could not have timed their task
With more dramatic effectiveness.
Economists may yet find & way to
apply the enormous sums expended for
guns and bullets to the production and
distribution of food supplies.
The Hew York Republican!.
The three aspirants for the republican
nomination for Governor of New York
are District Attorney Whitman, Job E.
Hedges and H. D. Hi n man, all well
known In the state, and all equal to
the duties of the governorship Their
personal characters are of the highest.
Mr. Whitman has scored heavily in the
office he now holds. Tackling graft and
far graver offenses in their strongholds,
he has punished offenders, and made the
path perilous for their would-be follow
ers Not in many years has any public
prosecutor in New York thrown such a
scare Into the orlminal classes. Faithful
and most efficient In a few things, he
should be set, his friends claim, over
many and higher things. He should prove
to be a strong man in the race.
Mr. Hedges is an attractive man o{ wide
personal popularity. Two years ago he
ran for governor against such odds as
made his defeat certain. Now, his friends
assert, when things have changed and
ais party's proapocts are bright, he should
be rewarded for the beating he then took
willingly In the party'* name. He has
table wit almost equal to Mr, Depew's,
and. like Mr. Depew, has suffered some
what In sober-minded circles because of
it. He is a capital stumper, and will now
work hard in that field for Votes.
Mr. Hinman, an experienced and able
man, is at a disadvantage growing out
i of a little fl!rtation with Mr. Roosevelt
about the indorsement of the bull moos
efs. In order to recommend himself to
I Mr. Roosevelt, he came out in an attack
; on Mr. Barnes, only to find himself ac
cused of repudiating one boss in favor
of another. So he wad forced to say in
effect that If elected governor he would
be no more Mr. Roosevelt's than Mr.
Barnes' man. But the episode was a
blunder, and Mr. Hinman's candidacy is
heavily handicapped by it Moreover, his
health is poor, and his canvass may suf
fer somewhat from that cause.
If we may assume, then, that the race is
between Mr. Whitman and Mr. Hedges,
the republicans will have a candidate |
equal to and worthy of the governorship
no matter which is nominated. Nor will |
there be any danger of boss rule at Al
bany if the republican candidate is elect
ed. One of the best guarantees against
boss rule anywhere is a man in office
who understands his duties and respects
himself; and both Mr. Whitman and Mr.
Hedges are competent and have sand.
The republican spirit shown at the Sar
atoga meeting was high, and if it can be
kept so until November the state may be
returned then to the republican column.
The National Government.
This Is from The Star's news columns
of Friday:
"Tho program of the administration re
garding the ocean traffic, which has been
interfered with by the European war. is
shaping ltsflf very clearly, with the ex
ception that the naval affairs committee
of the House seems to have found a
snarl that may prevent the House from
voting a heavy majority in favor of the
merchant marine bill.
"The bill to allow foreign vessels to en
ter American registry and become Ameri
can ships was the first step; the war
risk insurance bureau in the Treasury
Department was the second step. If
those measures do not tempt American
shipbuilders and capitalists to regain
American supremacy on the seas, then
the government's ship-buying plan may
have to be put in operation.
."'Isn't that a radcal move?' an old
time democrat was asked today.
?? 'Yes; but we've had to swallow a lot
of things lately that we always said were
bad for us,' said he."
Here is a man with the courage of
his condition. Asked to choose between
theories he has been cherishing and ad
vocating for years, and necessities sud
denly produced by the great war, he sur
renders his theories. Any port in a storm.
A storm is raging, and may increase In
violence and continue for a long time.
We are not as yet directly in its track,
but most uncomfortably near. If the
wind shifts, who may say what the effect
on us may be?
Truly have some political leaders been
swallowing a lot of things lately. Their
gullets are greatly enlarged. Nearly any
thing could go down now.
The performance did not begin with the
war. For nearly eighteen months it has
been going on. Tariff theories and prom
ises have disappeared?have gone down
with dull thuds. Where be the gibes now
about protection and the high cost of
living? What rhetorical extravagances
were committed in that name!
Where, too, the gibes now about big
business? Whose views are more im
portant or more welcome today at the
seat of government than those of our
captains of industry?bankers, manufac
turers, and general Investors? Who Is
proposing to put them in stripes, with
or without a trial?
Who stands on the housetops splitting
the air with vociferations that "the best
government is that which governs least '?
Who is not advocating measures which
call for the unprecedented .exercise of all
the strength the national government pos
sesses? Who does not want that strength
increased if necessary to protect Ameri
can interests in the present emergency?!
Who doubts that if our difficulties grow
the means to meet them will be pro
vided?
Hamiltonians and Jeffersonians are;
working together today on a Hamiltonian
basis All recognize the inestimable value
of a strong?the strongest?central gov
ernment?a government which stands for
something both at home and abroad. Ask
the cotton planter, the tobacco grower,
the corn or wheat producer. Ask the
friends of a merchant marine, suddenly
increased in numbers beyond calculation.
It that gifted man of Scotch extraction
one Alexander Hamilton?is taking the
same interest as a shade in the Elysian
Fields In American affairs that he took
while on earth active in the flesh, he is in
a very comfortable frame of mind today.
He did not foresee this particular strain
on us, but he did foresee, and foretold,
that the larger we grew the greater would
be our need of central power and its
exercisc.
The mikado shows a deposition to for
sake the secrecy and seclusion once asso
ciated with his exalted rank. He may
yet be found delivering a public address
or shaking hands with the populace on
stated occasions.
The purchaser who has neither time
nor inclination for economies is the oncf
on whom the price booster depends for
support and encouragement when protest
arises.
Internal reforms that several countries
are establishing may prove far more im
portant as results of the present terror
than any rearrangement of geographical
lines.
Like the picturesque little figures in the
toy barometer, William Barnes and
Charles Murphy take turns In stepping
to the front and going to the rear.
A nation may consider itself fortunate
if the only result of hostilities It is com*
pelled to feel Is a comparatively mild war
tax.
The Japanese are described as having
understood the art of censoring long be
fore they fully understood the art of
modern printing.
The home-coming prominent citizen now
has something to discuss when the enter
prising interviewer greets him at the
dock.
Saperflnoni Car Stops.
Announcement la made that In the In
terest of more rapid transit on B street
the car stop on the west side of 9th has
been abolished and passengers traveling
west on transfers at that point will have
to board the cars at the east side of the
Junction. This Is a sensible move, which
should long ago have been made. Cer
tain other traditional car stops are still
maintained In this city which might Just
as well be eliminated. Some of the so
called Are stops, too. might with perfect
safety be cut from the list One of these,
for an instance, Is on Sth street west, at
the corner of I. Southbound cars are
compelled to stop before crossing the
Massachusetts avenue tracks, from which
point a perfect view is had of a wide
stretch of street, including the fire engine
house between 4th and 6th on Massachn
[setts avenue. There Is no possible ob
struction to the vision, and yet the south
bound cars are compelled to stop also
before crossing the I street line, as a
precaution against collision with Are
apparatus. If the motorman has not
seen the engine before he crosses
the Massachusetts avenue tracks at
this point he will never see It.
Yet this stop has been maintained for
several years, although attention has been
called to it as supernumerary. Now that
the public utilities commission is consid
ering: this question of stops, it should go
carefully through the list and cut down
to a minimum the places where the cars
must absolutely stop, with, of course, a
full reckoning of the public convenience.
It is as easy for the transferring passen- i
gers to take the westbound car at Oth
and F at the east side as on the west side,
and traffic will be relieved of a double
Impediment.
Although inventors have failed to make
war so terrible as to render it impossi
ble, there is still hope that they have
made protracted strife out of the ques
tion.
A Pope whose sympathies were so keen
that the realization of war hastened his
death must be remembered with univer
sal respect as one of those who truly
loved their fellowmen.
There is no hope for the household econ
omist who Insists on figuring French
champagne and Russian caviar in the
simple home meal.
If difficulties in shipping wheat become
too serious, the Kansas farmers may
have to take charge of the country's rail
roads themselves.
John Chinaman is developing aspira
tions that may lead him to demand rec
ognition as one of the ticket-takers at his
own open door.
Among the market disturbances may be
noted a terrific slump in the demand for
guidebooks.
SHOOTING STARS.
BY PHII.AXDER JOHNSON.
A Mind-Changer.
"Of course a wise man may change his
mind."
"I should say so," replied Farmer
Corntossel, "Jes" to prove It, I have voted
republican, populist, democratic, prohibi
tion an' progressive."
Question of Direction
If I should laugh at you. my friend.
The Jest Is good and there's an end.
But If. oh. friend, you laugh at me.
The Joke Is surely hard to see!
Musical Appreciation.
"Yes," said Mr. Cumrox, "we spent a
lot of money teaching our boy Perclval
| Claude to play the violin. But it was
wasted."
I "Doesn't he play?"
"Yes. But If he knew anything about
music he'd realize how It sounded and
wouldn't."
A Stoic.
"Lady," said Plodding Pete, "would
you mind letting me have some mustard
or some horseradish 7"
"What for? I haven't given you any
thing to eat."
"No one knows it better'n me. But I'm
a member of the S. P. C. A. an' harbor
no grudge. That dog of yours has Jes'
bit a piece out o' my leg an' I want to
give him some seasoning."
Expanding an Excuse.
"My grandmother's funeral ?" began
the office boy.
"Yes. yes," replied the good-natured
man. "But is there any excuse for your
mistaking the bail park for a cemetery?"
'No. But she put It In her will that I
was to forfeit my inheritance If I ever
missed a chance to root for the home
team."
The Slighted Visitor.
Miss Happiness came callln' when the
day had Jes' begun,
A-lookln' fur an answer to the smllln" of
the sun.
She brought a gentle message In most
every sort o' key.
From the slngln' of the robin to the hum
mln" of the bee.
But I said, "I'm rather busy an' I haven't
time to play.
If you should happen "round, I hope
you'll call another day."
Then Trouble came an" told a tale of
glory an' of strife.
He sneered at birds an" blossoms an' the
uneventful life.
He dragged me by the collar through the
fields of discontent.
He kep' a-stlckln' to me, no matter where
I went.
rm thlnkln" of Miss Happiness, whose
smile Is hard to win,
An' how she came a-callln' an" I wouldn't
let her In I
Art Will Suffer.
Prom the Boston Hinacrlot.
Interested persons are urging the gov
ernment at Washington to use its In
fluences to preserve the art treasures of
Europe from destruction during hostil
ities. Men versus art Is an old con
troversy : but the destruction of both men
and art leaves no doubt of where civilisa
tion stands. It will Indeed be a terrible
added price If the cathedrals, chateaux,
art museums and ancient public buildings
through the war zone suffer from the
chance shells of bombardment. Prevent
ing the destruction is another matter. If
the walls of Namur shade a venerable
church, nothing but demolition can be
expected even of the most altruistic of
foes. We can only congratulate our
selves that vandalism of ancient build
ings will not be tolerated by a modern
victor, and that the Napoleonic days of
replenishing the art galleries of the con
queror by force of arras are gope.
The County Fair.
From the Pittsburgh Dispatch.
The Immortal county fair for 1914, or
the mighty thought of It, Is ripe and
farmers are taking a final and anxious
look over their fields to make a note of
the largest corn, pumpkin and squash and
melon, the orchards for the tnost marvel
ous of apples and pears, the vines for the
biggest bunches of grapes and the fields
and stables and sties and folds for the
bo vines, equlnes, ovines and swine that
will be sure to entice the blue ribbon;
while the housewife Is delving amid the
mysteries of breads and cakes and Jams
and quilts and dollies, and crochet and
thread work fine as the laces of Spain or
Belgium.
Millionaire Ambassadors.
From the Philadelphia Bulletin.
Hereafter there will be fewer sneers at
the millionaire ambassador. The per
sonal funds of our wealthy diplomatic
representatives In the European capitals
have been available for the succor of
many stranded tourists In a degree of
liberality that sometimes has involved
considerable self-sacrifice. Now Ambas
sador Herrlck caps the climax of service
by personally guaranteeing the charter
fee of two steamship* to trine needy
tourists home.
r
Reduce the High Cost of Living
BUY OUR STANDARD
COAL
EVERY TON A BARGAIN (
W. H. MARLO W
Main Office, 811 E N.W.
HORLICKS
Against ' Against
Substitutes - Imitations
GettheWell-Known 1^1/'^
Round Package
MALTED MILK
Made in ffie largest, best
equipped and sanitary Malted
Milk plant In the world
We do not make "milkproducts??
Skim Milk, Condensed Milk, etc*
But the Original-Genuine
HORLICK'S MALTED MILK
Made from pure, full-cream milk
and the extract of select malted grain*
reduced to powder form, soluble in
water. Best food-drink for all ages.
MTASK FOR HORLICK'S
Used all over the Globe 4
ai*%emevi *jvdaJtun/wn
_malth) ?*?/
?s3?
Atlantic City
and Return
Sunday, August 23
SPECIAL TRAIN
Leave Union Station 7:15 a.m.
Returning, Leave Atlantic
City 6 p.m.
Free transfer through Phil
adelphia included.
BALTIMORE&0HI0
Children?Half Fare.
Appeals to those who
know?who think?who
realize that what they
eat is vitally important
to health.
Wholesalers Only,
922-928 La. Ave.
(iiiiiiiiiiinnimmiuniiii
HAVE YOU A LAZY LIVER?!
If you have diary spells, poor
appetite, headaches and frequent
fits of despondency? you may
be sure that your liver la at
the bottom of all the trouble.
Dr. Pierce's Golden
Medical Discovery
ON TABLET OR LIQUID FORM)
III Promotes the proper flow of di
III festive juices, thus toning up the
III ?*ora"?h and revivifying the liver.
HI Pimples sad boils are eradicated.
lllniIII|IUHHHUiiiii""i???iMPfi
est Delivery Wagons
) ?and smart Carriages?the latest mode
at special prices.
T.E. YOUNG, ^rXrfp^^e.0,7?
Yow Horn? Will
[email protected] Afcfcmdtiv?
?if you employ our skill
ed workmen to plan and
execute the interior deco
rating. We work quickly,
thoroughly and artistic
ally.
GEO. PLITT CO., Inc.
1218 Connecticut Ave.
MSCRAY
Ref:rigeraiord
KVOWS EVERYWHERE FOB
SUPERIORITY.
Built in All Sizes for Every Re
qnirement. Prices Reasonable.
McCray Refrigera f orCo-ph^e m". si?'
Take Advantage of
Clearance Prices
AND SAVE MONEY.
All Fans reduced.
Carroll
Electric Co.,
514 12th st. n.W.
"Test our Serriee.**
Phones M. 7320-7321.
BEAL ESTATE LOANS.
MONEY TO LOAN
ON REAL ESTATE SECURITY.
ATTORNEY. Room 7. Warder bldg.,
9th and F *ts. n.w. Telephone Main 4003.
TO LOAN--$2,000, $2,500 AND UPWARD AT 5%
INTEREST IN HAND TO LOAN ON D. C.
REAL ESTATE. ALSO OTHER SUMS AT
HW/c. COMMISSION. 1ffc.
LIEBERMANN & HAWN. 1421 F ST.
MONEY TO LOAN ON REAL ESTATE ONLY,
In sums of $500 to $1,500. Box 416. Star office. ?
MONEY TO LOAN?$250 TO $500,000 ON D. C.
real estate. Several large trust funds, 4ft to
5 per cent. All transactions conducted with
economical consideration tor borrower?.
WM. H. SAUNDERS & OO.,
Southern bldg., 807 15th st. n.w.
I HAVE FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY GILT
EDOE 6% notes, any amounts, secured by first
deed of trust (mortgage! on D. C. real estate.
Personal attention given all matters.
D. H. ROLAND DRURY,
Southern bldg.. 15th and H sts. n.w.
SECOND TRUST.
Money to loan at 6% on District real estat*.
Any amount from $200 to $5,000 on first or
second trust, in straight notes or monthly pay
ments. Takes only t ree days to make them.
paul v. Mitchell & oo.,
718 14th st. n.w.
WANTED?$3,000 3 OR 5 YEARS. 5% INTER*
est. on Brookland property: worth over $6,000.
Box 222. Star office. 25*
MONEY TO LOAN ON D. (J. REAL ESTATE?
Lowest rates of Interest; most advantageous
terms. Large loans a specialty.
F. H. SMITH COMPANY. 1408 N. Y. are.
MONEY TO LOAN ON D. C. REAL ESTATE.
b% INTEREST. PROMPT REPLIES AND
ECONOMICAL CONSIDERATION FOR BOR
ROWERS.
MOORE & HILL (INC.), 1420-22 H ST. N.W.
MONEY TO LOAN ON REAL ESTATE AT
lowest rates. Special privileges with respect
to prior payments. TYLER & RUTHERFORD,
730 15th st. n.w.
MONEY WANTED.
RELIABLE PARTY WANTS TO BORROW A
sum of money at once: will pay 5% and glvo
good security. Address Box 53. Star office. 25*
WANT TO BORROW $150; INTEREST AND
terms arranged; will give chattel mortgage on
furniture. Address Boi 839. Star office. 22*
LOAN WVNTED
On business property situated on the most prom
inent business street between 9th and 14tn sts.
Will accept a loan of $12,000 or $15,000, so
cured by first mortgage.
The property Is assessed at orer $20,000.
Address A. C. W., Star offlee.
MOVING. PACKING 6 STORAGE
GET OUR ESTIMATES ON ABSOLUTELY
FIREPROOF STORAGE, PACKING & MOVING.
UNITED STATES STORAGE CO..
418 10th ST. N.W. PHONE MAIN 4229.
AUTO DRAYAGE CO.
Special CUT RATES on light and heavy
hauling of every description. Phone M. 8977.
419 10th st. n.w. T. R17890. Mgr.
Fireproof Storage
^ Estimates Fnralihd
Household Goods.
840 Separate Locked Rooms
$2.00 Per Month and Up.
Merchants' Transfer & Storage Co.
920-922 E St N.W.
Phone M. 6900.
WE WILL STOKE YOUR FURNITURE FOR
$1.00 per load.
SAFETY STORAGE 00..
1540 7th st. n.w. Phone Col. 8S1-T.
WASHINGTON SAFE DEPOSIT 00. (Inc.),
916-18 Pa. ave. n.w.
FIREPROOF STORAGE.
Rooms. $2 mo. up. Phone Main 261.
Estimates furnished.
FREE MOVING FOR STORAGE.
Oall N. 4315 or N. 1840 for estimate#. 200
separate rooms. SMITH'S TRANSFER AND
STORAGE CO., 912 S st. Night ph. N. 6992.
STORE YOUR FURNITURE, PIAN08, ETC.,
at WBSCHLER'S, 920 Pa. ave. n.w. Rates
reasonable. Estimates cheerfully given. Phone
1282.
WE ARB CONTINUALLY ADDING
To our equipment to Insure careful handling of
your Furniture. China and Bric-a-Brac.
PACKING?STORAGE-SHIPPING.
Large Padded Vans and experienced men.
Get our ^"tlmate: Phone M. 2010.
ERIE';*!? rrrur???, 1220 n st. n.w.
?obwatd & 3L?tlbr?$
New York~WASHINGTON=Paris.
ENTERING UPON THE CLOSING WEEK OF THE AUGUST SALE OF
FINE FURS AND FUR GARMENTS
With Values and Assortments Still Equal to Every Demand, and of Far
Greater Importance to Our Patrons Than Ever in Any Preceding Sale.
fin the beginning of this sale we announced
it would be for a limited time only?the
month of August. Now we come to the la>t
week, and the offer of such low prices will
not be renewed again when the month closc-.
AT THE BEGINNING OF THE
FUR SEASON OUR FURS WILI
BE MARKED FROM 25 TO
33/3 PER CENT HIGHER
THAN THE PRESENT PRICES.
^The savings which we quote are genuine
and the Furs upon which they are quoted an
also genuine. There are many grades of
each kind of Fur, but our selections hav<
been carefully made, and our qualities arc
perfect in all respects.
LONG COATS AND SHORT COATS
Coats in which the present modes of drapery and
flounce are portrayed; cape coats; coats that can be
converted into capes; Balmacaan models that ripple
in back; belts which can be removed; rounded or
square fronts; directoire models with their novelty
style.
GENUINE SEAL COATS.
August Sale
Prloes.
$185.00
$195.00
$210.00 .
Regular Season
FrleM.
$250.00
$275.00
$300.00
HUDSON SEAL COATS.
Auffwt Sals
Prices.
$85.00
$95.00
$120.00
$125.00
Begrnlar Season
Prices.
$115.00
$135.00
$175.00
$200.00
NEARSEAL COATS.
August
Prici
$62.50
$65.00
$65.00
$67.50
$75.00
Bsgular Season
Prices.
$85.00
$85.00
$90.00
$90.00
$100.00
$150.00
$225.00
$800.00
$350.00
GENUINE PERSIAN LAMB
COATS.
AlfUt Sals
Moss.
$100.00
$185.00
$200.00
$250.00
BLACK CARACUL COATS.
August Sals Bsgnlar Season
Prices. Prices.
$50.00 $75.00
$60.00 $80.00
$65.00 $90.00
$76.00 $100.00
$82.50 $110.00
$85.00 $116.00
$87.50 $125.00
$100.00 $150.00
NATURAL MARMOT COATS.'
a Bsrolar Ssaaom
Pilose. Prices.
$37.50 $55.00
45.00 $<5.00
60.00 $80.00
80.00 $120.00
$6
$8
What We Guarantee:
That styles are authorita
tive; the correct modes for
fall and winter.
Qualities to be the highest
?all perfect.
Workmanship to be that of
skilled designers and furrier*.
All skins to be perfectly
matched in texture and qual
ity.
Savings from 25 to 33;.;
per cent.
Conveniences of the Sale:
All Furs bought in this sal<
will be stored and insured i
our Vaults, free of charg?
until cold weather comes.
A reasonable deposit will
reserve any selection untii
further payments can In
made.
If you have any Furs that
need repairing or altering w<
will do the work now at
greatly reduced prices.
Fur Sets and Separate Muffs and Scarfs.
There is an exceptionally wide variety of Fur Sets and Separate Muffs and
Neckpieces in numerous styles.
BLACK LYNX MUFFS, $23.50, $27.50, $32.50,
$39.50, $45.00. Regular prices from $30.00 to
$65.00. SCARFS, $15.00, $16.50, $22.50, $32.50,
$35.00, $39.50, $42.00. Regular prices, $20.00
to $60.00.
POINTED FOX SETS, $49.50 to $85.00. Regular
prices, $77.50 to $115.00.
MOLE SETS, $32.50 to $92.50. Regular prices,
$45.00 to $125.00.
Third floor, G st.
NATURAL SKUNK MUFFS. $27.50 to $50.00
Regular prioes, $37.50 to $75.00. SCARFS.
$16.50 to $50.00. Regular prices, $27.50 to $78.50.
BLACK SKUNK MUFFS, $19.50 to $29.50. Reg
ular prices, $29.50 to $40.00. SCARFS, $10.75
to $25.00. Regular prices, $15.00 to $35.00.
HUDSON SEAL MUFFS, $12.50 to $35.00. Reg
ular prices, $18.50 to $47.50. SCARFS, $10.00
and $15.00. Regular prices, $15.00 and $20.00.
Closing-Out Prices on
Dainty Summer Dress Fabrics.
Many excellent values are offered in our Cotton Dress Fabrics, from which we have select
few here noted. In most cases the quantities are limited so that purchases should be made in:
ately if you wish to avoid disappointment.
65c Crepe Albanas, 38c yard.
White, pink, blue and gray fabrics, with the
pretty small floral designs so popular this season
printed in contrasting tones; 27 inches wide.
25c English Crepe, 12^c yard.
A small assortment of the popular wide
striped design, in gray-and-white and tango-and
white.
35c Novelty English Suiting, liy2c yd.
White ground with tiny lavender checks; a
very dainty and desirable weave and pattern.
25c Striped Voiles, 18c ya *d.
Black-and-white Striped Voiles?the modish
design and combination color; excellent quality.
35c Imperial Crepe, 25c yard.
A white check weave of summery daintiness
with pink, blue and lavender designs printed in
two-toned colors.
$1.00 Crepe Eponge, 50c yard.
This fabric has the crepy corded weave m>
much in vogue this summer with raised stripes in
pink and lavender.
He addition to the above there are several other items too small in
quantity to permit of enumeration, but just as attractive in value.
Second floor, G st.
Woodward & Lothrop.
ADOGRAM
No. 19
We would sooner trade
with friends than strangers
any day in the year.
Newspaper advertising is profitable because
readers believe in their paper. It is part of their
daily life. They look on the advertisers as
familiar friends?and it is human nature to
patronize friends rather than strangers.

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