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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, June 09, 1918, Image 3

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SPECIAL NOTICES.
WHEN HEATING PLANTS
are overhauled by our
ttrts they ere to be depended on
for rijrht service.
I J. COLBERT. 821 F ?t. M. 8016.
RENT?THE LARGEST AVAILABLE
ta Washington present time; Concordia
and E sts. n.w., center of the city,
less office, lodges, societies, balls or
Wtddlngs. Inquire
429 8th st. n.w. 10* .
_ 8200ND REGULAR MEETING OF THE
Ita Gamma Alumnae of Washington will be
at Beverly Court, 1738 Columbia road,
NESDAY. Juno 19, at 7 p.m. All Delta
wnoai In Washington are cordially invited
to be present. Those expecting to sttend are
naksd to notify Miss KATHARINE HERR
MAyy. at the above addrens.
PANAMA HATS CLEANED. BLEAl'HEl# A-M)
BLOCKKD BY EXPERTS.
VIENNA HAT FACTORY,
4S5 11th ST. N.W.
^ZANOS FOR" RENT ? PURCHASE MADE
within one year, rent allowed. HUGO WORCH,
12M G, Agent for Kranich & Baeli and Emer
aaj Pianos. Vlctrolas and Grafonolas.
ROOF TROUBLE
?Call up the "Ironclad Roofers."
IRONCLAD Company. Ph. Main 14.
NEWS PRINT PAPER. CUT TO ANY SIZJC,
la any reasonshle quantity. Rousoaablc price.
Apply PRE8S ROOM. Star office.
"I NEVER DISAPPOINT."
It's Good Business
?to nse good printing. Adams Printing ]
Is high grade, but not high priced.
THE SERVICE SHOP,
BYRON S. ADAMS
Vou Will Get Jasst the I
Eyeglasses You Need
From Leese.
u
| We have a Big Modern Optical Plant
en the premises. It is equipped to make
Just the kind of Eyeglasses you need.
M. A. LEESE OPTlCAL co
614 9th ST.
WINDOW SHADES ? the
better kind?at factory prices.
The Shairfe Shop,
Electric Fans.
We sell, buy, exchange and rent
electric fans.
ELECTRIC CONSTRUCTION CO.,
1223 N. Y. AYE. N.W 12*
Altogether Buy W. S. S.
|We Will Repair Your Roofs.
R. K. Ferguson, SrM.'n ??:
PALMISTRY.
UK. DAOUD. THE SCIENTIFIC PALMIST I
AND VOCATIONAL ADVISER. Fee. $1. ONLY
BY APPOINTMENT. Phone Nortb 1130. f
~ ? 1822 Q st. n.w.
MRS. R. LUSBY,
Palmistry. Impresslonsl Life Read- I
Fes. SI and S2. Positively ladles only, j
until 9:80. Closed Sundays. 1019 11th j
PROF.. STEVENS, Palmist.
tUVTES MIND OF PSYCniCS. Budlnfi. $1.
_ 925 F STREET N.W.
SARA. SCIENTIFIC PALMIST AND
paychic from New York. Now at the Savoy.
14th and Girard n.w. Complete psychic read
ings, S3. Scientific palmistry. $2. Only by
appointment. Phone Columbia 7470. "The
?err best reading I ever had."?Ella Wheeler
Wlfcw- ;
RIIPAH ELDON, WHOSE WONDERFUL
knowledge of the science of palmistry is at
I tractin* the attention of the entire public.
I Zlandreds are visiting her, and each and every
I Mi accords her the highest praise. Fee. SI.
I^Aonrs, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Cor. 6th and G n.w.
" PROF. POST EL,
PALMIST and ASTROLOGER.
; aad SI Readings. 9Q4 14th St. N.W.
NEW BELGIAN PREMIER
GIVES AMERICA THANKS
Common Cause Is Foundation for |
Fruitful Relations When
? Peace Returns.
M. Gerard Corrman, the new premier
of Belgium, informally notifying: Sec
retary Lansing: yesterday of his ap
pointment, expressed the profound
gratefulness of the Belgian people for
the aid given them by the United
States, and declared that the fact that
American and Belgian soldiers now
are fighting side by s>de Is an "aus
picious harbinger" of the fruitful re
lations of the two countries when
peace comes.
"Summoned by his majesty the king
to take in hand the conduct of affairs
of Belgium," said the message, "I
Wish to link to the notice which I
hereby have the honor to give to your
excellency the renewed homage of the
profound gratefulness of the Belgian
people for the invaluable benefac
I tions lavished upon them by the
I Washington government during the
r-^flgantic war that is convulsing the
1 world.
"Our soldiers are fighting with the
Intrepid American phalanxes in the
oause of justice and liberty. That co
operation in the strenuous struggle
Is the auspicious harbinger of the
eordlal and fruitful relations of our
twe countries on the morrow of peace.
rl take pleasure in offering with this
the expression of my sentiments of
(rut regard for your eminent per
sonality and of special sympathy for
the great and mighty people of the
United States.'' ,
ECONOMY IS PRACTICED
IN CLOTHING THE ARMY
Damaged Garments and Worn
Shoes Being Repaired and Hade
Pit for Be-TJse.
S Damaged garments and -worn shoes ?
are being ^'paired and re-used In
lui* numbers by the Army, a sum
mary- -f t, -the accomplishment of the
QosKsncsster Corps' reclamation di
vision, Issued last night, shows.
Wires and mothers of men in serv
loe employed in a base repair shop at
Fort Bam Houston fitted for re-use
a* average of *.000 garments per day
40rtar May, and new shops for Sim
ular work are being established at
' various places. Nearly 170,000 pairs
?f Shoes war* repaired in April, while
aalvssrlnff of garbage, waste and
metals has shown profitable resulta
Mobile laundries to travel with
troops In France have been devel
oped, the statement adds, following
suooessful operation of stationary
laundries at camps within the United
States.
THIS PHONkumAPH
With Sli Selections
ONLY
$4.98
Come early snd be sure of
yours. None delivered at this
Y law price.
T. P. COLLEY & SON,
1209 G St. N.W.
POLICE FORCE
FADING AWAY
Vacanoies Number 150 in
Full Strength of
Only 800.
THIRTEEN MEN QUIT JOBS
The resignation of thirteen mem
bers of the force during the past week,
while only two men were appointed,
leaves the police department facing a
more serious shortage of men than at
any time since the beginning of the
war.
The full strength of the department
should be 800. There are now 150
vacancies.
Resignations of Week.
Among those who resigned during
tho past eight days was Detective
Henry A. Cole of the eighth precinct,
who received a commission as first
lieutenant in the Quartermaster
Corps of the Army. Cole was in the
Army prior to his appointment to the.
force October 25, 1904. j
Another was Jacob P. Freeh, who i
was detailed for some time at the j
White House and who recently has
been acting as sergeaant in the fifth
precinct. Freeh has been on the
force since 1901.
Policeman J. T. Owens, colored,
ninth precinct, resigned a few days
ago after seventeen years' service.
Policeman Ira E. Keck of the second
precinct, who also auit last week, has
been on the force since 1908. Traffic
Policeman M. A. Morris, stationed at
9th and G streets, resigned to ac
cept a commission as second lieuten
ant in the Army.
Private Howard B. Miller of? the
fourth precinct, who has been on the
vice squad for the past year, also
tendered his resignation last week.
Other policement who resigned after
comparatively short terms of service are
J. E. Phillips of the third precinct,
A. A. Martin of the fourth. M. F.
Geary of the first, W. H. Lambert, jr.,
of the first, Stephen F. Goggins of
the eighth, J. S. Matthews of the
seventh and Joseph Junghans of the
third.
Not Enough to Idve On.
Several of these men stated in their
letters of resignation that they could
no longer support themselves and
their families on the salary the police
department pays.
Maj. Pullman stated last night that
he realized the time has passed when
members of the force can live
on the salaries the department has
to offer. He said action by Congress
to increase the policeman's pay seem
ed to be the only way to stop resig
nations. The major called attention
to the fact that more than sixty for
mer members of the force are now in
the military service.
New men on the force receive only
$990 a year. When promoted to class
2 they receive $1,188, and when they
reach class 3 after eight years of
service they are paid $1,260 a year. I
In his latest report to the Commis- j
sioners, Maj. Pullman asked that the 1
new men be paid $1,080 a year, class i
2 men, $1,200, and class 3, $1,320. |
These increases were included in the !
District appropriation bill, which has j
passed the House, and is now await
ing action in the Senate. Maj. Pull
man feels that if these increases are
granted less trouble will be expe
rienced in getting tiew men.
The two appointees last week were
B. C. Abell and Rocco Collasanto.
SECRETARY DANIELS
CALLS FOR NURSES
Urges Becruits for '"Legion of
life" Jn Military and
Naval Hospitals.
Secretary Daniels yesterday Issued
an appeal to nurses to enroll with the
Red Cross for service In the Navy
Nurse Corps and to young women to
enter hospital training schools so that
nurses can be released for war work.
"The Red Cross campaign for
nurses," said the appeal, "Is a matter
of Importance to every man or woman
connected with the Navy, not only for
the present crisis, but for the future.
We are learning in the midst of war
that the human material of these
United States is Its first asset, its dear
est treasure. It Is necessary for our
future as well as for the present need
of those whom , we have loved and
sent that we shall Immediately in
crease the legion of life-?the trained
nurses?in the great military and na
val hospitals."
Dependable
Military Footwear.
Boots and Field
Boots, 28 to 36.
Shoes, 10 to 15.
Puttees, 5 to 17.50.
Spurs.
Officers' Sox, 75c.
- ARTHUR BURT CO.
1343 F St.
Army Outfitter* for 10 Tears.
k
SOLDIER AT FRONT
LAUDS COMERS
No "Meatless Days" in His
Regiment, He Says.
Cheered by Peasants.
Graphic stories of life at the front
are told in a letter to J. B. Spalding,
1232 U street northwest, from Sergt.
Victor M. Denis of the 69th Machine
Gun Battalion, son* of August V.
Denis, a former Washington business
man. Sergt. Denis lived in Washing
ton a number of years, but later
moved to Brooklyn, N. Y., where he
enlisted at the outbreak of the war.
The letter says, in part:
"Our bunch has been in some
skirmishes, and, as the 'old 69th'
stands for, we have done a good bit
and 1ip.ve come out on the top. It is
needless to say that some casualties
have occurred, for you will find in
every skirmish some one has to be
sacrificed. But our men are of that
opinion and feeling that if they were
allowed to do what they want to do
they would go right through without
any let up, man after man.
Praises Conservers at Home.
"We will surely be able to tell a
great deal to the folks back in the
U. S. A. who are also doing their bit,
but in a different manner. W<5 can
all appreciate it, for while you are
having meatless days we are not. As
the old saying goes, 'The Army moves
en its belly.' It surely does, for if the
men haven't? enough in their stomachs
they can't do what is expected of
tl'em. The conservation of food back
ho^e is a lifesaver for us over here.
"1 can readily understand how
Washington is increasing in popula- ?
|tion on account of the increase of
clerks, and I guess they are not all
young fellows, either, are they?
"I note the weather conditions you
aro entertaining. Quite different from
what we are having. The sun shines
often, the grass is nice and green, all
I the flowers and trees are in bloom,
and there is nothing better suited for
the eye to perceive than spring in
France, for it surely Is one beautiful
country.
In Devastated Village.
| "We are now located in a devastated
! village of about seventy-five houses,
three roads and no inhabitants. Every
one here Is an American soldier. So
it is impossible to buy our usual
breakfast of eggs, which jye have
been . accustomed to. I would never
think of eating less than six eggs in
omelette form, with bread and coffee.
Of course that is not the govern
ment ration, but we used to buy them
from the townspeople.
"All of the French peasants with
whom we have come in contact have
treated us royally, and we surely did
make use of them last winter during
our four-day hikes with packs, and
snow a foot deep, and if one of us
dropped out we knew we would freeze
for no one was coming after us to
pick us up. That is some feeling, and
many a day it was just 'grit' that
pulled us through. We had to make
our own pathsf for the roads and
fields were covered with snow, and
the only way we knew we were off
the road was a small embankment,
which one would never know was
there until he ran into it.
On Horse Under Fire.
"During our last time in the
trenches I had & fairly good job. I
was riding on horseback between
posts, night and day, dodging all
kinds of fire. Some nights were as
dark as pitch, and my old horse just
|'Stum-bled along, for the poor old fel
;low couldn't see what was in front of
him. The road was all shell-torn, and
more shells were coming over, but I
and my comrade (the horse) pulled
through one week fine and dandy. It
was more luck than anything else
that nothing happened to either of
us."
LAWMAKERS MUST NOT DRINK
Louisiana Legislature Thinks It
Should Practice What It Preaches.
BATON ROUGE, La.. Juno 8.?By
the terms of a resolution unanimous
ly adopted In the lower house any
prohibition member of the general
assembly "who shall be known to
partake of any alcoholic liquor dur
ing the present legislative session
shall be brought before the bar of
the house or senate and receive a
severe reprimand from the epeaker
or president of the senate."
It was added that "no class of peo
ple should impose restrictions upon
their fellow-men that they them
selves are not willing to comply
with."
Five British and Seven Ger
; man Seaplanes of Large
Type ClashJ
EACH LOSES ONE MACHINE
By the Associated Press.
THE HAGUE, June 8.?Five British
and seven German seaplanes of the
largest type fought a battle Tuesday
evening: off the Dutch coast, accord
ing to a Tereschelllng dispatch to the
Handelsblad. One of the German ma
chines was observed to fall in flames
into the sea. One British machine was
forced to descend, but landed safely.
Another British air machine, which
had descended to the surface of the
sea for repairs because of a defect
in the propeller, two hours before the
battle, was later set on fire by its
flvo occupants, all of whom waded
ashore and gave themselves up for
internment. The crew included two
Canadians.
Three Successive Battles.
The British machines were a squad
ron of Ave seaplanes which started
Tuesday afternoon on a reconnolter
Ing expedition off the northern Dutch
coast During (he afternoon they had
met A squadron of five German alr
d fflctflty nh thre dr?V? "" wl,hout
counters. e succeasive* en
t-.Z?}6 G?rmans, however, returned
fv y seven seaplanes. A llve
h? Snfan""1, in Edition to
an machine which fell in
flames, another German w'as brougit
Tt7 to Attack Cripple.
t> ^ Br,*,sh machlne' commanded by
ber of ?' BUffal?' N" Y- a mem"
ber of the Canadian Plying- Corps, de
veloped engine trouble and was
forced to descend to the surface. En
attack'th? cripple""'^ attemP??S
he*SlS
Germans were driven off hI thh?
squadron of liree SeSl!rCed that a
reconnoitering over the Nor;hWh"e
Two of the BrifUh in ui 1 down,
stated, were forced to anihVV," WaS
the Dutch coaat, becaum? 8e to
trouble, and the fee
COTTON TRADE PRICES
TENTATIVELY ARRANGED
Steps to Stabilize ,the Business
Taken at Conference in
This City.
Steps to stabilize the cotton'trade
and prevent undue hardships on the
manufacturers and distributers pend
ngcompletion of price-Axing nego
tiations were taken here yesterday at
a conference between the price-Axing
committee of the War Trade Board
and the war service committee of the
National Council of American Cotton
Manufacturers.
Under a tentative plan outlined to!
be operative If the negotiations for a
price agreement are completed, prices
on all sales made on or before yester
day for delivery previous to next Jan
uary 1 would remain as shown in th^
saes. Prices on all sales made on Sr
after June 8 for delivery subsequent
Wtn?n September 30 would be sub
ject to revision to accord with prices
agreed upon by the price-Axing and
manufacturers' committees
On all sales made for delivery after
S? A,"JanuarV11. tile prices agreed upon
by the committees are to be the prices
regardless of the fact that the sales
may have been made previous to June
8. It Is understood that all prices for
so-called spring, 1919, business will be
subject to revision. e
.
The Majestic
Rotary Washing Machine
For Families, Hotels, Laundries and
All Who Have Washing to Do.
Washer
?run by water power.
Just put the clothes in
the washer, turn on the
water and go about your
ordinary work and the
clothes will be washed
perfectly.
Price, $17.50
BARBER & ROSS, 11th and G Sts.
? ?
The best, most durable and
lightest running Rptary
Washing Machine made. The
Tub is made of selected Vir
ginia White Cedar. The
hoops are the celebrated weld
ed Galvanized Wire Hoops, so
strong they cannot break and,
being embedded in grooves,
cannot fall off.
The Majestic Washing Ma
chine will wash overalls,
blankets and heavy garments,
or lace curtains and other
lelicate fabrics, perfectly and
.vithout injury. Large fly
wheel?roller-bearing.
Price, $10.50
The
Success
FIRST AMERICAN "ACE"
IS WOUNDED IN FRANCE
Father Receive* Word That Lieut.
Douglass Campbell Is Not
GOLPENTAL.E, Wash., June 8.?
Prof. W. W. Campbell of Lick Ob
servatory, at Mount Hamilton, Cal.,
who is here to study the phenomena
of today's solar eclipse, received a ca
blegram from France today stating
that his son, Lieut. Douglass Camp
bell, an American aviator, was
slightly w*ounded. Campbell is the
The cablegram brought Jittle in
formation beyond the fact that young
Campbell was wounded in action and
that his injury was not serious.
When informed several days ago of
his son's latest exploit in bringing
down his sixth enemy airplane. Prof.
Campbell said that his son is a good
athlete and. chauffeur, quick to de
cide and quick to act wit/.out fear.
When a friend spoke of the dangers
of the aviation service, the scientist
said:
"A man's life should not be meas
ured in years, but by what he accom
plishes. My son's letters say he is
happy to be over there."
The honor of being known a^ his
country's first aviation "ace" was
earned spectacularly by Lieut. Doug
lass Campbell on May 31. It was a
twenty-minute air battle in which his
opponent refused to surrender, but
accepted instead the alternative of
being shot down by the American.
Lieut. Campbell sighted the German
at a height og 4,500 meters. The Ger
man tried to escape when his am
munition became exhausted, by flee
ing toward his own lines. Campbell
got on his tail and signaled to him
the opportunity of landing safely on
French soil. The German declined.
"I did not like the idea of shooting
him down when he was not fighting,"
Campbell said later, "but I could not
let him get away."
A stream of incendiary bullets end
ed the German's career.
Campbell downed his first enemy air
pilot on April 15, his scond on May
21 and his last three during the sub
sequent ten days.
Badly Hurt.
first American "ace."
Ten thousand women of New York
city are to be enlisted in a women's
police reserve corps.
D.C JEN WANTED
TO FIGHTJNTANKS
Special Effort Begins Tomor
row to Induce Locals
toEnlist.
Beginning tomorrow a special ef
fort will be made to induce men of
Washington and vicinity to enter the
United States Tank Corps, the unique
fighting unit that is training men to
handle American tanks against the
Germans.
Those interested are requested to
call at the office of the director of the
corps in the Mills building, Pennsyl
vania avenu-3 and 17th street.
The corps is at present one of two
fighting branches ti%at are open for
induction of men ol draft age. it is
stated. Men of enlistment age, from
eighteen to tweniy-one and thirty
one to forty-one, are volunteering in
equal numbers, while many oh duty
in other branches are asking for and re-?
cciving transfers.
The principal demand is for tractor
and heavy auto truck drivers, auto
engine and machine gun mechanics,
qxyacetylene welders, wireless buz
zer operator.0, cooks and gen
eral or specialized mechanics. There
is also a demand for university and
college men who have the physique,
stamina, initiative and personal force
and fearlessness to qualify them as
machine gunners, or to handle guns
of heavier caliber, and as tank com
manders. The corps, as shown by the
call, requires a personnel composed
largely of artisans [ or technically
trained men, supported by a substan
tial number of soldiers.
Camp Colt, on the Gettysburg bat
tlefield, is the training station of
the corps, to which scores of men are
being assigned daily.
"By converting the American farm
tractor into a fighting tank." said
an officer on duty at headquarters of
the corps in the Mills building, "our
British allies not only produced a
mighty engine of yva.r, but they gave
men of unusual dairing and executive
ability an opportunity for brilliant
service as well. In no Army could
be found men of higher type than
those who are to serve in the United
States Tank Corps, which will un
doubtedly make a record that has
been typical of the American fighting
man since the republic was founded."
Haft Schaffner & Marx Clothes; nothing else?
"Raleigh Haberdasher's
Talking"
AND here's the
message w e
want to get to you
stylish young men.
One of the smart
est styles for spring
/ and summer is the
military sport suits with
the seam at the waist line.
Hart Schaffner
& Marx
have just sent us a fine se
lection in all the new col
orings. You'll like the way
it "comes in" at the waist
line and flares at the skirt.
You'd better see
this "live" one.
$30
Copyright 1918 Hart SchafTaer & Mara
Raleigh Haberdasher
1109-1111 Penna. Ave.
Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes; nothing else?
?2ZE2EE^^&!zzmmzzsmmzzzzzzmmmmzzEBm2z^imzzzmBmmLZZzz2B2zai2mmmmzBZEzzm2Ezzz&mzBmzEBmm2Z2Z2zzzmnzmBBZBZzzBm&
all-Money
99
?Till closing time Wednesday
night the People's Drug Stores.
are proving TO YOU that they're
capable of supplying every need, of
the proper quality, at a price
that's a real surprise for LOW
NESS!
AFTER THE SHAVE OR BATH
you will enjoy the cool, de
lightful fragrance of
Graham's B orated Violet
Talcum Powder
Soothing:, healing with th?
sweet odor of fresh violets.
Contains boric acid. * f\
Full poulid. Sprln- I Ur
kle-top boxes
Three Stores on 7th Street.
gTT Here's an array of special fea
?~D tures with "snap" and "punch"
to them! You've three days to get
everything you need for some time
to come. Get them while these
small prices hold the boards!
WHEN YOU TAKE ASPIRIN
oe on the safe side and be
sure it's a reliable
AMERICAN-MADE
ASPIRIN
Ours are manufactured ir
Philadelphia t?y Smith.
Klein & French. S /\
Bottle of 100 5- 0yC
grain tablets
Store No. 1,
7th & K N.W.
Store No. 2
7th & E N.W.
Store No. 3 .
14th & U N.W.
Store No. 4
7th & M N.W.
Store No. 5
8th &HN.L
D-licious?Healthful
Hershey's
Cocoa
The purest and
nost satisfying.
%-lb. can.
15c
2 for 27c
When Yon Have a Cold,
Chills or Fever, Take
BABEK
No experiment. It has MADE
GOOD for 35 years! Contains no
arsenlo, quinine or other habit
forming Ingredients.
At All Peopfe's Stores
Our Stores Are~Yieadqaar
ters for
Stylish Bath Caps
Made of best grade of rubber In
the new smart modes so becom
ing to the wearer. Get one now
and enjoy the bathing much
more.
19c to 59c
FAMILY REMEDIES
Remarkably Low Priced!
Absorbine, Jr.,
$1.10 and $1.98.
Albotine, Rus
sia mineral oil,
85c.
Borax,
Mule-Team,
12c.
20
lb?
Bromo Seltzer,
10c, 20c, 38c, 78c
and $1.19.
Blaud's Iron
Pills, 15c.
Babek for ma
laria; 60c size,
49c.
Bliss Native
Herb Tablets, $1
size, 83c.
Castor! a,
Fletcher's, 25c.
Cutlcura Oint
ment, 23c, 45c
and 85c.
Doan's Kidney
Pills, 53c.
Fairchild's Pep
gin, 49c and 89c.
Gets-It, 19c.
Harper's Head
ache Remedy,
10c, 29c< 49c and
89c.
Hu,mphre\y's
Remedies, 23c
and 85c.
Kohler's Head
ache Powders,
10c and 23c.
Lavoris, 23c,
45c and 89c.
Lysol, 23c, 45c
and 85c.
Lactopeptlne
Elixir, $1.15.
Mother's
Friend. 79c.
Maltine Prep
arations. $115.
Morse's Pills,
zoc.
Nujol, 59c,
Vinol for the
loss of weight,
$1.00.
Phillips' Milk
of Magnesia, 19c
and 39c.
Poslam, 45c and
$1.75.
Pierce's Pre
scription. 98c.
Peroxide, pint,
25c.
Hood's Sarsa
parilla, $1.20 size,
98c.
S. S. S. Blood
Purifier, 85c and
$135.
Make Your Straw Hat
New With
BE-BE-KO
STRAW HAT DYE.
Not a bleach, but a dye for
changing straw hat ^ f
colors. You should try A I
it. Any color
? TEETH WILL TELL?
Better Use
Lyon's Tooth Powder
and Paste
And they will serve you longer.
Bad teeth make bad *
health. Regular 25c J[" C
If Your Hair Is Get
ting Thin Use
Barnard's
Eau de Quinine
A delightful hair
tonic that arrests
dandruff and fall
ing: hair. Healing
and soothing to the
scalp. Regular 50c
si*e,
39c
Moth Balls or
Flakes
Poiand,
17c
Hand and Nail
Brushes
Solid wood
backs. Choice,
19c
Straight Razors
Guaranteed
perfect,
89c
Eye Shades
Relieve glare
and protect eyes,
10c
$1.00 Gem
Safety Razor
Complete with
blades,
89c
Hot-Weather
Necessities
Mum 21c
Odorono Toilet Water
for the prevention of
perspiration odors,
23c, 45c
Odor Sweet will prevent
all odors from perspira
tion, 1-ounce jar...25c
Ever-Sweet, 25c size. 19c
De>o-dora, an A. D. S.
product, prevents all
odors from excessive
perspiration 25c
Meritol Vanity Cream pre
vents and stops per
spiration 25c
Amolin Powder, small
size 23c
Sorbatol Powder prevents
perspiration odors; also
an excellent remedy for
tired sore feet 25c
SMOKE
TuricUhTropblc) ,2c pk*" B
$?? )?"*?-?
Monte Christo (Treasurers)
7c; 3 for 20c; box of 50, $3.25
Monte Christo (Standards)
9c; 3 for 25c; box of 50, $3.75
Monte Christo (Perfecto
Grande)?10c straight: box
of 25 $2.25
Girard (Brokers)?10c; 3 for
25c; box of 50 $4.00
Girard (Benefactors)?2 for
25c; box of 50 $4.90
CANDIES
Atlantic Cream Mints,
lb, ................35c
Lady Helene Chocolate
Covered Cherries, lb.49c
Lady Mildred Assorted
Chocolates, lb 39c
Cretonne Chocolates,
?fruit and nut centers,
lb. ...............49c
Samosets Chocolate,
lb 60c to $1.50
Romance Chocolates, lb.,
80c to $1.25
Send YOUR soldier a pack of
Env-O-Letters
Combination envelope and
paper. Makes writing easy
in camps. Fine for you, too.
25c
package ......
15c
Bring Coupon
P. D. S.
A sure killer
for bed bugs.
Wltfc Coupon
Only.
15c
There's Only One Way to Secure a Satih Skin
Apply Satin Skin Cream,
Then Satin Skin Powder
35c Size, 29c
Bring Coupon
Ideal Chlorate
of Potash
Tooth Paste
with coupon only
15c
Thermos Bottle
Pint sire; guar
anteed perfect,
$1.75
Sterno Stoves
Burn "canned
heat,"
65c
Gem Safety
Razor Blades
7 in a package.
28c
Men's Combs
High-grade
hard rubber,
25c
ICE TEA
A delloloua drink
It mad. with our
Spealal Tea.
ft lb.
29c

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