OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, October 27, 1918, Image 13

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1918-10-27/ed-1/seq-13/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 13

SEPTEMBER TRADE
HITS HIGH LEVEL
Both Imports and Exports
Above Corresponding
Months in Past.
For the sixth time during the pres
ent yeir the value of the imports
of merchandise for the current month
has exceeded those for the cor
responding month of any previous
year, and for the fourth time this
year the value of the exports for the
current month has exceeded those for
the corresponding month of any pre
vious year, according to the Depart
ment of Commerce.
Imports for September were $262,
000,000, an increase of nearly $*J6,
t'00,000 over September, 11)17, but a
decrease of $10,000,00?> from August
this year. For the nine months end
ing September, 1018. the imports were
$-.322.000. ?Hh>, an increase of $40,
<?00.000 over the corresponding period
of 1917.
Exports for September amounted to
$.V?o.uOO.OOO, an increase of nearly
$100,000.0<H> over September. 1017, and
S20,00o.tMw over August, 1018. Ex
ports for the nine months were $4.
?~?61,000,t*x?. a slight decrease as com
pared with last year, but an increase
of $f;iO.4M?o.0?M> over the corresponding
period of two years ago.
Gold and Silver.
Tmports of gold were $2V?00,000 dur
ing September and $r?i>,500,000 for the
nine months. Exports of gold were
$X2SO.<?00 ayi(| $34,260,000 for the two
periods, respectively.
imports of silver were $7,17^.000 for
September and nearly $50,<>00,000 for
the nine months, while exports of
silver amounted to $10^500,000 and
$ 165,000,?mh>, respectively.
Breadstuffs exports for September
showed a value increase of almost
100 per cent, the total value being
$S7,6.r>6.279, as compared with $30,050,
658 for tho corresponding period last
year. Last month mineral oils ex
ported totaled 263.841,657 gallons,
representing $30,304,963, as compared
an itli 200,687,535 gallons and $16,809.
051 for September of last year. Meat
and dairy products exported in
September, 1917, were valued at
$32,114,704, while last month their
value was $56,254,407, or about 66%
per cent increase.
The valuation of cotton seed oil
Phowed a decrease of 40 per cent for
September of this year, as compared
with the corresponding period last
year. While the exportation of cot
ton for September of this year showed
a reduction in the number of bales,
the value was greater than the
value of the greater quantity ex
ported in September of last year.
Exports for Nine Months.
Exports for the nine months ended
September of this year showed an
increase over the corresponding period
last year of breadstuff's, cotton seed
oil. meat and dairy products. Cotton
exports fell off slightly. Notable
among the increases was that of meat
*nd dairy products, the value this
> ear being estimated at $719,331,961,
as compared with $331,917,077 for the
corresponding period last year, an in
crease of about 117 per cent.
PENALTY FOR GERMAN
U-BOAT ACTS PROPOSED
Council of Chamber of Shipping in
Britain Opposes Setting Free
of Seized Craft.'
LONDON*. October 26 (British Wire
less Service).?German ships should
. not be set free after tho war, "to ex
tend their share of the world's carry
ing trade and s^ profit by the losses
which their government, by means
mainly piratical, had inflicted upon j
the ships of the allies." This plan is I
urged upon the British government in |
a resolution adopted l?y the council of j
the chamber of shipping of the United |
K ingdom.
The council points out that heavy i
losses have been suffered by shipping |
companies at the hands of the tier- j
tnans. Half of Germany's shipping is i
I declared to be in neutral or other!
ports, and Germany may have added j
to It by construction or purchase dur- i
ing the war.
The allied countries, the council i
says, will lind themselves short .of j
ships for some time after the war, aWd j
it declares that while Germany can- j
not make restitution of all shipping;
sunk, there is no reason why she ]
should not make restitution in kind to j
the extent to which she is able.
Shipping taken over from Germany,1
the council suggests, should be dis-;
tributed among the allied countries in;
proportion to their losses. Each coun
try should dispose of the tonnage
among its subjects for cash. One
British company at the beginning of
the war had ten passenger steamers.
Nine have been sunk by the Germans
and the other captured. The council
declares it is inconceivable that as
long as there is an enemy ship in ex
istence the Germans should be per
mitted to have that ship while the
steamship company which has lost all
its ten boats is unable to resume its
old trade. ,
AGREEMENT ON MILITARY
BILL RATIFIED BY HOUSE
Tho House yesterday adopted the
agreement between the Senate and
House conferees reached late Friday on
the deficiency military appropriation
bill carrying nearly seven billion dol
lars.
The provision in the House draft
giving the Secretary of War authority
to acquire land for the construction
of hospitals, 'w hich was eliminated by
the Senate, was the subject of compro
mise, which would give the Secretary
power to construct hospitals, but not
tie authority to condemn land.
Appropriations for the purchase of
land for rifle ranges at Fayetteville.
X. C., and near Louisville, Ky? elim
inated by the Senate, were not rein
stated.
The compromise agreement carried
authority for the use of an unexpended
balance of about $48,000 for the new Na
tional Guard of the District. This was a
Senate amendment on which the
House yielded.
Another Senate amendment carrying
an appropriation of *20,000 for the
"Washington city post office was strick
en out. the House conferees declining to
yield. .
ARGENTINE ACREAGE CUT.
A decrease in the estimated acreage
planted in wheat in Argentina is
noted In a report received by the De
partment of Commerce from Consul
General William H. Jtobertson at
Buenos Aires. The wheat acreage,
which has just been planted, is esti
mated at 17.000.000 acres, a decrease
ef 900.000 acres from last year.
^The oats iicreaije in the South Amer
ican republic is estimated at 5.000.000
acres, a decrease of 220.000 acres. The
total planted to linseed, the report
eaid. is estimated at S.ioo.uuo acres.
? acwaul lfcVBOO acre*
tl 7.50 MINIMUM PRICE
FOR NDVEMBER HOGS
Jump in Prices for Pork, lard and
Bibs Besults From An
nouncement.
CHICAGO, October 26.?A minimum
of price of hogs for November has
been fixed at $17.50 as the daily, av
erage for packers' droves. A mini
mum of $16.50 has been fixed for all
other hogs except throw-outs, which
consists of hogs under 130 pounds,
stags, boars, sows and skips.
As packing house products have
been selling on a basis of $16.50 for
hogs, the announcement today of the
new basis for November resulted in
a big jump of prices for pork, lard
and ribs.
Peace Talk Lowers Corn.
?While the new price basis probably
will mean an advance in the price
to consumers of pork and pork prod
ucts, such as >ham, bacon and lard,
it was explained in a summary of
the conference issued here that the
peace talk, with its vision of a corn
market flooded by low-priced corn
from Argentina and South Africa,
had reduced the market price of that
cereal from 25 to 40 cents a bushel.
The consequence of this, the summary
said, was a near panic among hog
raisers, who saw similar declines in
the prices of their market animals
and therefore rushed their stock to
market.
The Department of Agriculture, it
was said, had information that,
whereas supplies of hogs had in
creased about 8 per cent over last
year, the past three weeks had seen
an increase of 27 per cent in the
number of hogs sent to the seven
leading live stock markets. Other
factors in failure to maintain the
October price basis were given as
curtailed consumption, due to in
fluenza and the reduction of the pack- i
cr(>' labor supply.
Pork Exports Jump.
Exports of pork products in Octo- I
ber were given as 130,000,000 pounds,
as compared with 52,000.000 in Oc- I
tober, 1917. For November the food
administration has ordered exports
of 170,000,000. These facts were cited
as proof of the necessity of radical
measures to maintain the large pork
production which the food adminis
tration has asked.
The statement also argued that the
enormous shortage of fats in the
central empires and neutral countries^
would result in a tremendous demand
on this country after the war, be
cause no great reserve of pork sup
plies exists outside the United States.
Therefore, it was pointed out, alarm
among hog producers as to the effect
of peace was without warrant. The
conference also concluded that at
tempts to hold the price of hogs to
the price of corn would work to the
disadvantage of pork producers, and
! therefore the agricultural advisory
| board, through a subcommittee, and
specially invited swine experts will
help the food administration and
packers to determine export prices
at regular intervals. Since these for
' eign orders will be placed on the
basis of cost of hogs to, packers, it
is cxpected. the statement said, that
the result will be a general stabili
zation of prices.
inmiyMD
GALLS FOR MOUE FUNDS
Dr. Hott Gives Season for Appeal
? fop Big Oversub
scription.
The great increase in the number of
American soldiers now on foreign
soil is the reason for a recent state
ment by Dr. John R. Mott, director
of the united war work campaign, in
which he said that the fund should
be greatly oversubscribed in order
to amply take care of all the men
in the service by the'seven organiza
tions joined in the drive.
His Seasons Outlined.
A few# of Dr. Mott's reasons are
outlined in the following extract
from a pamphlet Issued to the state
campaign directors. "The budgets of
at least three of the seven organiza- |
tions united in the forthcoming cam- I
paign were based on data assembled i
last spring, when it wai-r thought j
there would be not more than 1.000,
000 American soldiers in France by
November 1. As a matter of fact, the
number there by that date will be
more than 2,000,000. When those bud
gets were made, moreover, it was
thought that the total number of
American soldiers on both sides of
the Atlantic by next summer would
not exceed 3.000,000, whereas our
military leaders arc now preparing
for an American Army, before the
end of next summer of between 4,
000,000 and 5,000,000.
Cites Expansion of Navy.
1
! "Because of the marvelous expan- ]
sion of the American Navy. When I
America entered the war we had less ,
than 70,000 men in the Navy. There
are now over 600,000 sailors and ma
rines and the number will be greatly
increased. Relatively, the organiza
tions which are uniting in their cam
paign have neglected the Navy, but
it is their desire to help this arm of
the service as much as any other, and,
therefore, a much larger sum of
money will be needed for this purpose
than is now included in their respec
tive budgets. This war. unlike others,
is not alone a war of armies and
navies, but a war of entire peoples.
Plea for Woman War Workers.
"Because the burden of this war
falls so heavily upon the women of
America and the allies, who have
taken the place of men in countless
occupations, the facts concerning the
needs of women affected by war con- i
ditions convince us that a much larger
financial provision should be made on
|their behalf than the budgets of our
organizations contemplate." I
Blotchy Skin
Man? a time yea have looked into
the mirror and wished that your (kin
would be like other people whom you
know, "without a blemish." Wash
D. D. D., the lotion of healing oils, over
your pimples or blotches tonight?and
wake up in the morning to find then
t<mtl A 83c bottle will pi*e you relief.
Why doc't you try D. D. D. today?
D.D.D.
Hie Liauid Wash
A to Z CLEAN-UP SALE
A once-a-month bargain festival, offering seasonable and wanted
merchandise at tremendous money-saving advantages, emphasizing
our lower-than-elsewhere prices and demonstrating our underselling
ability. LOW RENT MEANS LOW PRICES!
Lot "A"
New Trimmed
HATS
Worth to $5.9S
$3.69
Two biff tables fall
of Fine Silk Velvet
Hats in numerous
shapes and styles, in
black and colors.
DRESS SMARTLY?SHOP HERE?SAVE MONEY.
ErpHMi
-24 11,7th St. N.W. wIp
ASK FOR STAMPS?VALUABLE PRESENTS FREE
Lot
"B"
(VELVET HATS & TAMS
/ Good quality velvet hats with neat
i pink or blue facings, in several
I shapes, untrimmed. Several pood
' styles in velvet tarns, nicely m^dc.
'1.19
Lot "C"
39c Dress
GINGHAM
24c Yd.
Lot of Neat
Plaid or Check
Dress Ginghams:
fast color, 27
inches wide.
Lot "D"
49c Silk
MULL
27c Yd.
Black. white,
pink, blue and alL
colors of Fine
Silk Mull.
inches wide.
Lot "E"
45c Worsted
YARN
35c
Purple, khaki,
turquoise, navy,
white, etc.. in
one-ounce hanks
!>r balls.
Lot "F"
15c Talcum
POWDER
8c
Brighton Tal
cum Powder, in 4
scents; full-size
cans.
Lot "G"
Brassieres
or Corset
Covers
12c
Neatly made,
in all sizes with
dainty embroid
ery trimming.
Lot "H'
Women's Fall
COATS
$8.88
One rack of
Stylish Fall
Coats, belted,
pockets, large
plush or fur fab
ric trimmed col
lars. y
Lot "I"
Serge or Silk
DRESSES
$7.98
Women's and
Misses* New Fall
Serge or Stylish
Silk Dresses, in
navy, black and
stripes. Sizes to
40 only.
Lot "J"
Women's Fall
SUITS
$8.88
Of good heavy
wool 6erge, with
dependable satin
linings. Small
quantity and sizes
small.
Lot "K"
59c Baby
BLANKETS
49c
"White with col
ored flakes and
borders; size
30*40.
Lot "L"
$1.50 Bungalow
Aprons
97c
Good quality
percales, light ot
dark grounds,
pocket and bound
edges.
Lot "M"
Lace Curtain
STRIPS
55c
Beautiful half
pairs Lace Cur
tains : values to
$5 if in pairs;
o5c each.
Lot "N"
50c New
<ECKWEAR
29c
Women's New
Fall Neckwear in
separate collars
ar sets.
Lot "O"
Women's $3.08
SWEATERS
$2.50
Black or white
only. Part-wool
Sweaters, shawl
collar and pock
ets.
Lot "P"
Bovs' Cordurov
SUITS,
$5.95
$7.50 Values
Extra, good qual
ity corduroy, made
up well and sure
to please. Under
these high-price
conditions, this ia
an exceptional bar
gain. Sixes 6 to It.
Lot "Q"
$1.50 Guaranteed
ALARM CLOCKS
$1.19
Lot "R"
rt
Women's
$4.50
SHOES
$3.29
Women's Black
jor Tan. Vici Kid
Lace
Lot "S"
39c Red
15c
Just six Lam
brequins. in red
with neat flow
era and fringed
tide and front.
Lot "T"
Women's
Knit
PANTS
39c
Heavy - weight
Unbleached Cot
ton Pasts, light
fleece; sixes 36
and 38.
LotMU"
Boys*
Flannel
BLOUSES
95c
Good Gray
Blouses, full cut
and good make.
Sixes 7 to 18.
Lot "V"
Men's
Slip-over
SWEATERS
$3.35
-JCan-coIor Slip
DTer Sweaters,
good weave and
quality. AH sixes.
Lot "W"
Hen's Flanael
WORK
SHIRTS
$1.75
Gray, Tan and
Blue Work Shirts,
made with two
pockets. All aixes
15 to 17H.
Lot "X"
Values to $3 in
HOUSE
DRESSES
$1.50
Fine quality ging
hams, percales, lin
enes, in "Blllie
Burke" or belted
styles. Sizes to 40
only.
Lot "Y"
$2 Tan Kid
GLOVES
Lot "Z"
GIRLS'
DRESSES
W.rtk to
CM
$1.69
Beautiful fast
Color plaid ging
hams in numer
ous styles, and
sixes from 6 to
13 years.
We Sell for Less Because Wtfre Oat of the High Rent District
n.T. GOODS MARKED
IN PLAIN FIGURES
ONE PRICE
TO ALLi -
Real Furniture Bargains
? buy ON CREDIT ?
ALL GOODS MARKED
IN PLAIN FIGURES
S , ? ____ ?
Buy Christmas Furniture Gifts Now at The National and Save 25%?0toF
Room Size Tapestry Rug This Massive 3-Piece Bedroom Suite $
m r ? l . i_; i?_ i_ ..JaL
Just an illustration
of the money you can ?P
save on Rugs in the
Out of the High Rent
District.
21
.75
2i-yard Nottingham QA
Lace Curtains; special xt w
?Consisting of massive mahogany or bird's-eye maple Dresser, with
swell front drawers, and large 22x28 inch French bevel plate mirror,
with Chiffonier to match, and beautiful 2-inch post satin finish Brass
Bed, guaranteed lacquer; special.
.75
Six Dining Chairs
Solid Oak?Upholstered Box Seats
$1922
Terms,
50c
A Week
These handsome Dining Chairs are built of solid
oak?in rich golden flni.lh?pleasing in design?
made with box seats and braced legs?seats are
upholstered in best grade imitation
leather, which looks exactly like
leather. SET OF SIX ?Special
Sale price
$19.75
St Fumed Oak Den Suite
3-Pc.
?Consisting of well made Armchair and Rocker
with tempered steel spring construction, upholstered
in best grade brown imitation leather and nice Fumed
Oak Table with drawer.
Terms, 75c
$
.95
Extra Special
1,000
\
Brooms
Extra Special!
This beautiful
25x50 inch
Rag Rug
Bedroom Suite $
3-Piece
Solid Oak
?Consists of a 2-inch continuous post baked
Enamel Bed, Chiffonier and Dresser with shaped
glass mirrors. Just the suite to fit up that spare
room for the U. S. workers who want to be taken care of.
52
.75
Sale of Odd Wood Beds
!
ii.
J
:\
Hi
These
from suites in
mahogany, walnut,
golden oak and
ivory, in Colonial,
William and Mary,
and Queen Anne
Periods; values, $25
to $60
This 6-ft. Colonial
Extension Table
A handsomely
polished golden
oak Colonial 6-ft.
Extension Table,
with 3 extra
leaves
$io.95
This 3-Pc. High-Grade Square Post
Bed
Outfit
?Consisting of 2-inch
square post White
Enamel Bed with
round fillers, guar
anteed Link Spring
and reversible top and
bottom Felt Mattress
.75
I!1,
34
The Store
That Saves
807 7fhSt
H St.
'ii'
?iH
II
i'il
'jfi
1
i!

xml | txt