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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, August 26, 1920, Image 16

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J.V
TARES' SLUG TAXI i
DRIVER. TAKE CAR
. j
Chauffeur Hit in Jaw With
Hammer by Men, Who Flee
i With Machine. *
Pavid April, 62S Lamont street, a
Public hacker, was attacked, thrown
from his car and left unconscious by
the road in Potomac Park last night
by two men who. a little while before,
had engaged him to drive them
around the city "to see the sights."
The small amount of gasoline in the
tank prevented the theft of the car.
for after throwing the chauffeur from
the seat the two men started away in
the direction of Virginia, across the
High way bridge, but deserted the car ]
when the fuel ran out.
April, who had bis car parked in
front of the W'illard Hotel, was engaged
by two men. who came from
the hotel, to take them to the station. 1
Reaching I'nion station piaza nc w ct.-.
directed to drive into Potomac Park.
He stopped his car to enable the pass*
ngers to view the bureau of engraving
and printing. One of them hit
him a Mow with a riveter's hammer,
smashing his jaw. while the other hit
him on the head. He was thrown from
the car and left stunned by the roadside.
Par Found Near Reach.
Rater a passing motorist found him
and took him to Emergency Hospital,
v here lie recovered and described his ^
assailants to Detective Baur. The
car later was found abandoned near r
the bathing beach.
Arthur Oogjen. 1.167 C street south- *
west, was held up by four negroes at 1
4 Vi and M streets southwest last
night. Oogjen said he was passing 1
along the street on his way home. '
when suddenly a revolver was J
pointed at him and he was surrounded 1
by four men. .
Oogjen gave them two one-dollar
bills and a check for $40. The check *
was madf*payable to Thelma Oogjen.
Thirteen women's suits, in a sample
case, were stolon from in front of a
7th street store yesterday. P. F. g
Rerner. representing a Philadelphia 'T
it-**. tr?M thp nolice of the theft and j
said the stolen property was valued
at $450.
Wade M. Furron, Irvington. Ky.,
reported $120 was taken from his
hotel room Tuesday night. John J.
McKinley, Cleveland. Ohio, also an
occupant of the room, told of the loss
of four $50 victory bonds. /
Robbed . Watching; Pickpocket. a
J. O. Harvey. Brunswick apart- r
ments. passenger on an electric car r
returning from the Rockville fair last '
night, was rohbed of his poeketbook ?
while making a transfer at Wisconsin Q
avenue and O, street. It is said that j
two pickpockets were "working" the h
car, and Harvey's attention was attracted
to one of the men when his j
poeketbook was "lifted."
The man ran from the car and dis- a
appeared. His hat was dropped and p
is held by the police. lj
A woman's coat was stolen from an o
automobile near 12th and F streets 0
last night. Mrs. Vera Robertshaw, t
SI 9 Rock Creek Church road, owner of t
the garment, valued the stolen coat at
$110. E
Harry Perskin. 1257 Columbia road, 1;
was arrested yesterday afternoon by E
Capt. Lord. Lieut. Brown. Sergt.Curry
and Detectives Wilson, Kmanuel.aitd
Rone of the sixth precinct, and C
charged with making handbooks on
the races. He was reieaseo on a
$3,000 bond for his appearance in ?
I'olice Court. Charles . I'ersktn. his \
brother, furnished bond this morning "
in the sum of $3,000 ta .appear for J
trial on a handbook charge. ?
Arthur G. Johnson, colored. 1703 8th 7
street, was arrested yesterday aft- t
ernoon by a squad .of sixth precinct 1
policemen and charged with violating *
'the law against making handbooks. =
He also was released on bond.
Not many years ago Argentina had
to import its flour. Today it sells
wheat to the world, the value of the
annual harvest amounting to more
than $300.000.000.
DOORBELLS
Bozzen ?t.t types Annunciators J
Installed and Repaired.
Phone Col. (1701. R. A. HALES. 2413 18th n.tr.
(EDMONSTON'S?
Home of the Original |?
FOOT FORM Boots and pi
Oxfords for Men, Women jjjj
B a
I Store Closes at 3 P.M. jjj
I Saturdays S
1 Final Call |
I Remnant |
1 Shoe Sale 1
a The entire balance of 3
S the short lines go on sale jjj
coinw fnr' a miirlc I
Pi. i\l X-?* * * 9 f -X ?
"wind up." jg
I I B
Women s
Footwear I
Small sizes, 2/* to |||
5, in medium and nar- J
row widths. ^
Pomps The 1
and High 1
Oxfords, Boots, (S
$2.65 $3,151
?Remember, the stock is S
limited and get in early. S
EDMONSTON I
& CO. 1;
lIncorporated > '
Andrew Betz, Manager 9
1334 F Street I
Adrijsera and Authorities on fH
All Foot Troubles
* jImiiMIBIBBm
* * - - * - - * - * ~
' N
hi '
MO CHILDREN PUT
ON ROAD TO HEALTH
' 1 *
American Relief Work Results
Described by R. A. Kleindienst,
Now Rack in Washington.
' &a fc'
- ^8M ^k
-'/ JSB^L
jm \\^jgpF^ ;.v|&^K _
R, .%. K liKI % D1K \ ST.
Raymond A. Kleindienst, son oj
Samuel Kleindienst, is now at his
arents* homo, 1019 8th street northeast.
after having: been in the kov'rnment
service in various parts oi
Jurope since March, 1919.
Mr. Kleindienst. who was an em>loye
of ihe United States Food Adninistration
at the time he went to
3urope in connection with the
Armenian relief commission, is tweny-two
years old. He has severed
lis connections with the government
lepartment and is soon to enter the
commercial field in New York city.
He sailed on the steamer George
Washington with President Wilson
ind his party March 5, 1919. He
erved with the Armenian relief comnission
in Paris as an assistant to
lerbert Hoover. Later he assisted
lugh Gibson. American minister to
Joland, in setting up the American
egation at Warsaw. In June of last
eat- he rejoined the Armenian reief
commission in Paris and resumed
lis duties on Mr. Hoover's staff. He
oined the Kuropean Children's Relief
administration in August of last year
lid left for London.
He went to a new position as field
epresentative in 'Czechoslovakia in
tctober, and January 10 last he was
ppointed in charge of a relief or
- *: A rt KL, ~ _1
dui^diiuii ill oiu va i\ i a. -rv.-< 1110 ?uii\
ras finished there, he left July 20
or London, where he remained until
lis recent return home.
Speaking of the work accomplished,
fr. Kleindienst said 500.000 children
ietween six and fourteen years of
ge were restored to their normal
ealth by activities of American relet
organizations. A child welfare
rganization was created as a part
f the Czechoslovak government and
he general food shortage throughout
he country was relieved.
While in Europe he visited France,
Ingland. Germany, Poland. Switzerind,
Austria. Czechoslovakia, Italy,
telgium and Holland.
ILERKS URGED TO DILIGENCE.
Employes of the pension office were
rged today in a communication from
he chief clerk of the bureau to be
iiigent in handling the immense
lumber of pension-cases which have
icen filed as the result of recent ex
ansions of the various pension acts,
ipproximately 30,000 claims have
leen filed. Thesa.do not include claims
or annuities on-the part of retiring
government epiployes.
The
SO
Our entire sto
ers. Saving near
mer time appeale
and showed us tf
inefton for a dov
stock of overcoat
as ever building J
this purchase, wh
The (
FallS
* *'
While
They
Last
Open All Dc
And
Kuppenh
By Pure
*3i
Reduced from $t
- ' . i .
Established 1889
I
%
MUTT AND JEFF ISLIPWG)
fl CCKTAtMLT\
ewe OF [ AW>* CIAT \
TMO&C, l TM?i SM-e. I
JEFF, \ MwTT Ott> ]
THeVRC / T "DCAftf
A y\ / TAWe TM'S J
y OMC^/ ...
?! 7^^
Ji? ..
INDUSTRY STEADIER
A.F.L REPORT SAYS
I
Officials Conclude Labor of
Country Is Returning to
SfahHizeri Path.
That the country has returned to
! a stabilized industrial path is the
conclusion drawn by officials at the
| American Federation of Labor here
! from the monthly nation-wide survey
by organizers with headquarters in
1 each state.
For thp past month reports from
every section of the country, wit'K
j exceptions'dotting the map here and
there on account of local disturb-i
ances. bear the message to headquarters.
that "employment is steady."
The general tone from the entire
country contained in these reports
is that working conditions have improved
in nearly every line except
the building trades, where shortage
of materials is impeding progress.
Steady Employment Report.
From the "following cities the
"steady employment report" was received
:
Birmingham. Ala.: - Little Rock,
Ark.; San Francisco and San Mateo,
cam.. i^enver, coi.; .jacnsunvnie,
Fla.: Macon, Ga.; D&nville, 111.;'Gillespie,
111.: T>es Moines. Iowa; Topcka.
Kan.: Paducah. Ky.: Bangor and
Portland. Me.: Worcester. Mass.; Kalamazoo.
Mich.: St. Joseph. Mo.; Manchester.
N. H.; Albany and Syracuse.
N. V.; Durham. N. O.: Columbus, Ohio;
Tulsa. Okla.; Wilkes-Barre, Pa.;
Knoxville, Tenn.; San Antonio, Tex.:
Salt hake City, 1'tah; Montpelier. Vt.;
Everett, Wash.; Grand Rapids, Wis.,
and Porto Rico.
In Little Rock, Ark., and Castleford.
Idaho, the open-shop situation is being
presented as antagonistic to uniorf
employment, according to the organ izers.
and employment is not" steady.
In the report from Little Rock, Organiser
L. W. Lowry declared that
the board of commerce of that city
was advertising for strike breakers.
Short Mir of Materials. *
In Springfield. 111., the situation is
reported as" "not steady/' especially
House of Kuppenheimer Clo
LD 0
ck of overcoats at prices tha
ly 50% by purchasing- winter
d to the saving sense of the :
lat we could stand out as a
/nward cost of living if we
s to sell at' an old-time price
for the future, the trustees r
ich we will'close out at this ;
Starting Tomorrow at 8 A.M
"Irpafosf- Sale n
: Winter 6
$37so
$60 to $80 Values
iy Saturday to Meet Trasteet
Immediate Clearance
You Can Save as N?
eimer Suits for
basing Right Now at T hese 1
$J0 I, $4
>7.50 to $62.50 Reduced
All Alterations Free of Charge
IOI3 PENN. AVE. NA
%
The Store Where Quality Con
j
-Anyway, the Little Fell
L';j 0K, ip, (pftoot
IwMlf ^ 1 CAMTA?.ouPeS
. - '"t: - y . j.,
Puts Locust Tree
In Holt of Fame
For Mrs. Wilson
Thr lint tree plaitfd In
honor of Mrn. Wotxlntw Wilton
wan nominated today for a
plnrr In the hall of fame for
treen of the Amerlean Koreatry
1 Aaaoelation by Krneat Want,
who reportn to the aaaoeiatlon
that he ha a planted n honey
locmt tree In Butternut Grove
, . on Thornapple river near HaatInga,
Mirb., in honor of the wife
?#. B. <-4 * U lUon
; -1 1
irnthe building trades lines, on account
of a shortage of materials. Other
trades are "fairly steady."
Providence', " R.v I., organisers also
reported that employment is "not
' vety . steady."
Prom national and international officers
of organizations reporting in behalf
of their mother unions in various
crafts encouraging reports were
received, it is declared.
William Dobson of the Bricklayers,
Masons and Plasterers' Union said
that the total membership of that organization
at present was listed at
70.000; that the state of employment
in general was good and that in many
places labor conditions have improved
about 20 per cent.
James M. O'Connor of the lithographers.
reported a "very good" state
of general employment.
ALUMNI FLAN FEOGEAM.
A program of activities for the coming
season, including the holding or
dances on the first Saturday in each
month, beginning October 2, was outlined
last night at a meeting of the executive
committee of the Business High
School Alumni Association at the school.
Preliminary plans for a minstrel show
for the benefit of a lunchroom at the
institution were explained. The first
dance will be held at 2400 16th street
northwest.
VOLCANO MELTS SNOWS.
^TEXJCO CITT. August 25.?Volcanic
activity in the crater of Mount
Popocatepetl Is increasing, and steam
is rising ftom the crater and is melting
the perpetual snows on the slopes
of the mountains, Recording to reports
received here.
thes
'UT~|
t found ready buy
wearables in summen
of this town?
big force in Washcould
get another
. As Grosner's are
eadily consented to
idjustment time.
r
f New
'Coats
| For
Your
Choice
I *
i' Demands for .
\uch on
Fall Wear
K M
I wo races ,v r
42=
from $65 to $70
FD
mt$
%
i
low Is Ten Cents to the G
A /j FTTuoofe \ r
\ I AT this c
) J . IcAMTAuwPe'.
1 IT'S NO \
l 7
' 1^
I
PEN LEAGUE ANNOUNCES
INTERNATIONAL BOARD
.
Literary Association Also Names
Other Committees?Miss Barnard
Describes Chester.
The newly organized National Pen
League and International Literary Association
met last night at the home
Miss Clara Barnard, HOI 21st street, and
announced the appointment of the international
committee which will promote
the work of the organization.
Mrs. Florence Stoddard, president,
presided.
The international committee follows:
Prof. A. A. Stoughton of the University
of Manitoba, western Canada;
Roy Babbitt. Argentine Republic; Miss
Margaret Clark, Mexico, and Miss A.
F. Phillipps, Cuba.
Work of the interstate committees
have already been started in New
York, New Jersey. Pennsylvania, Delaware,
Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky,
Tennessee. Georgia, Florida,
Arizona and California.
The chairmen of other committees
are: Entertainment, Miss Clara Barnard,
chairman; Miss Bertha F. Wolfe,
vice chairman: Ossip Perelma. Press
committee, Harry B. Hunt, chairman;
Mrs. K. J. Fenton, vice chairman.
Ways and means committee. Alexander
McNeil, chairman; Mrs. Eva Griffiths,
vice chairman; Miss Dick Root.
Col. Eugene Heron, Miss Ellen Collins.
Miss E. Gifsin. Dr. ti. Riley. Mrs.
A. Neale, Leonard Wilder and Mrs. R.
Beck. Printing, <*. H. Greathouse,
chairman; Mrs. A. A. McNeil, vice
chairman. Program. Miss Dick Root,
chairman; Mrs. Samuel Burleigh Milton,
vice chairman. Library, Mrs. A.
A. McNeil, chairman; Mrs. Annie
Wilder, vice chairman.
The old English town of Chester was
described by Miss Barnard. Her travel
talk of the town in the days when she
lived there formed a feature of the
evening's entertainmentApproximately
one-half of all the
people in the world live in China and
India.
You will alw;
price at
JL
Standards ar
time qua
know ar<
?
Seventh Street
' ' ' i
% <4 . _
ood, Thanks to Mutt.
JuiTE so,quitcA jj| Ul *:' *
so! But mutt, U MLMh ,
Voo'Re <w <>
LUCKlR^Rt [IB &
COCK, I , *1 1
CALL'S XX^ ' ^ ^ ^ *N
EXCHANGE STATUS BARS
SCANDINAVIAN TRADE
Trade of tlio I.'nited States with (
Scandinavian countries has practically
stopped, pending reopening of the
Russian markets and- a more favorable
exchange situation, Norman F.
Anderson, trade commissioner at Copenhagen.
has advised the Department
of Commerce.
After the armistice, Mr. Anderson
said, Norway, Sweden and Denmark
loaded up with merican goods, expecting
resumption of trade with
Russia, but unsettled conditions in
that country have left the imports
Uii luvil uaiiuo onu 1.11V. j <111- v ?1,1 stocked.
The outlet to Germany also
has been cut off, he added,. because
of the failure of many German firms
to live up to their contracts and the
efforts of the German government to
equalize the exchange rate by a
virtual embargo on interchange of
goods.
Great Britain is rapidly taking the
place the United States occupied in
trade with Scandinavia during and
immediately after the war, Mr. Anderson
reported. British merchants
are willing to extend three to four
months' credit, while Americans do
not offer such favorable terms. Bxr?l"?
1 n fTe tl* it h flroo t Urita in iu rint o a I
unfavorable as with America, he said.
American firms and banks are Establishing
connections in the Scandinavian
countries, Mr. Anderson said,
and what amounts to the groundwork
for future trade with Russia is
being laid by business concerns who
expect to develop tbe Russian market
when conditions permit.
GERMANS TO WITHDRAW.
BERLIN. August 26.?Announcement
that German security police will bp
withdrawn from the entire plebiscite
area of Upper Silesia and replaced by
"plebiscite police" has been made by
the burgomaster of Beuthen, according
to newspaper dispatches received
here. In the meantime, a civic guard
composed of an equal number of Poles
and Germans will be formed at Beuthen
and in other localities, it is said.
liillliW
Mjjfl IS
HVH^R ^ k. jfli
k iX'Q \ ? * "?l -V mm <#T fJ
ITH * I" * ???? ***f j|l |
Lifetime ]
ays find that Lifetime Fi
which it is safe to buy.
* . t . I
e never lowered to ere;
ility is at all times maintain
e buying their Lifetime Fuj
Mayer's Auj
Lifetime !
MAYER
Opjright. 1920. by H. C. Fisher. Trade mark
registered f. s. Pat. OCT.)
(you've got cmLV CftE^) L|j| (EM
lCAMTiM-OUpe THM'S I j jf v
BAt>, BuT LOOK AT I LIIIJ
>o\ Me-fwe 6oT /
a HuNt>ftet> of / [JB
V_ <ESN!! twin* I ?
\v ^ s
WANT JAPANESE EXCLUSION.
HONOLULU, August 26.?Hawaiian
Island American Legion delegates to
the national convention to he held in
Cleveland, Ohio, next month, sailed
sKop,o
PaiK & E
nbver ready i
Y( KNITTIl
8 CROCHl
? BEAD B.
8 BEADS
8 BAG TO
8 EMBROI
8 BRAIDS
8 BUTTOh
3fi LUNCHl
iy And many other items
? that you may find diffic
c style or color elsewhere.
mm' *mm * am' *
- ....
Furniture
urniture is always sold
ate an impression of Io\
ed. That is why Washii
rniture, economically durin
gust Sale of
Furniture
. & CO.
?By BUD FISHER
^NSecT? JI
bf . K
I '*
I for the United States todav* with inl
fctructfons to vote for the absolute ex
elusion of Japanese from the Unite
States, but to defend th-p riftlit t
American-born Japanese to citizer
ship. in
fldj
to serve you! %
1G YARNS A
vt5
IT COTTONS <?
AG PATTERNS Q
DERY SILKS 33
ION SETS ?Q
in a goodly assortment afl
ulty in locating just the
WWOWKWMWOwwOWW
r . - i
\ ' .
k
I
p
i
t
at the lowest
v price. Lifelgtonians
who
sr
o
?
J
Between D and E
*
*

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