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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, December 23, 1921, Image 3

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FORCE 1ST FAIL
Vice President Declares Rule
i of Reason Should Gov
ern Nations.
Jl.v th? Associated I'ress.
NEW YORK. Deoember 23.?Efforts]
to establish an international jurisdic
tion under any sanction of force have |
always resulted in failure. Vice Presi
dent CoolidKe told the New England I
Society at its annual dinner last night, j
"but this cannot mean," he said, "that,
as in domestic affairs, so in interna- I
tional affairs, the rule of reason shall i
not apply."
This, to me, Is the great proposition I
of Washington," he continued. "It is
the consuiuniation of ideals which, it
?e may claim first found their prac
tical application on the stern shores
?r .New England, yet by the very New
?England theory which expresses them,
are acclaimed to be the common herit
age of all mankind.
Mayflower Soils On.
"The problems of the nations are to
Jield, not to conflict, but to Confer
ence; not to force, but to reason.' he
said. "The voyage of the Mayflower
is not done. Her course is set. With
en ever-increasing cargo ot ideals
Jit hieved she is sailing oil. bearing the
iiope and ministering to the welfare
the world. Over her. in the
prophecy of their ancient pastor, John
Kobinson, there is breaking forth
Jiiore light. It is the increasing re
lJance of the higher law.
"The great meaning of New Eng- I
. nd has been the part it lias played
in the establishment of a responsible |
representative form of government I
lounded on the independent con
science of tlie individual citizenship.
"I'ne independent conscience of the
individual." he later declared, "flnds
Mil exaggerated counterpart in the
independent sovereignty of each na
tion.
legislature* Should Be Free.
To the early settler of New Eng
land. Vice 1'resident Coolidge de
clared. belonged the credit for the
?Hoiking out and putting into prac
tice of the solid, the substantial and
i stable form of representative
government.
The federal Constitution "was but
si beginning of tile triumphs of that
lorin of parliamentary government
Avuich New England nourished and
sustained for more than 150 years "
lie said.
"Triumph on triumph has followed.
Irom the establishment of the re
public of France and the isritish re
Sorni bill ot 1832 down to the newly
formed republic of the ancient em
pire of t'hina and the recently freed
nations of continental Europe.
"From these great benefactions which ]
Jiave accrued from representative par
liamentary government, there follows
Hie obvious necessity that legislatures
Bhould be free, that they should be un
der no domination save the obligation to
serve the public welfare. Seeing the
great Tunction they perform alike in
state and nation, t'.iey mav well con
tinue the worthy objects of admiration
and confidence. Wherever legislative
bodies have been lowered in the public
estimate, the foremost- duty of tile peo
ple is to seek their re-establishment
?tnd restoration.
Hole of Reason.
"The souic?j oi auuiority, the source
of liberty, lies in the people themselves,
but the safest repository of necessary
public authority, tlie firmest and
stanchest guardians of liberty, are the
lepiesentative parliamentary "bomes of
the world. Unless through them there
? an be provided security against tBe
Juie of force, and a guarantee of the
aule of reason, it cannot be provided
<it all.
"One of the most difficult problems
for the legislator of the present day is
to distinguish between the advocates of
private interest and public welfare. Un
SPECIAL NOTICES.
TURKEY-SHOOTING MATCH AT SEER'S
farm. Silver Spring. Dec. 24, It o'clock. All
welcome. Come and get a turkey for 50c. 23*
ITICE?THE ANNUAL MEETING OP THE
shareholders of the Second National Rank.
Washington. I). C., for the election of direc
tors for the ensuing year and for the trans
action of such other business as muy be prop
erly brought before the meeting, will be held
fit the bank, at 12 o'clock, noon, on Tuesday.
Jan. 10, 1922. Polls will be open between
the hours of 12 noon and 2 o'clock p.m.
VICTOR It. DEYRER. President.
THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE STOCK
}?olders of the Commercial National Rank of
"Washington. D. C., for the election of direc
tor* for tin* ensuing year, and for the trans
action of such other business ns may be prop
?rly brought before the meeting, will be held
ait the bank at 12 o'clock, noon, on Tuesday,
January 10, 1922. The polls will be open be
tween 12 and 1 o'clock p.m.
. JAMES H. RAPEN, Cashier.
WE ARE NOW IN OIK NEW FLA NT?J
l.uilt especially for our business. Let us reuo
late your BOX-SPRINGS, MATTRESSES AND
lMLLOWS. '
BEDELLS FACTORY.
Main _ 610 E n.w.
OITICE OF THE FIREMEN' S IN8URANCfe j
l on pany of Washington and Georgetown, 7th
jiud Louisiana ave. n.w.?Tlie stockholders
??f Hie Firemen's Insurance Company of Wash
3"npk>n and Georgetown will meet at the office
?m Monday, January 2, 1D22. for the purpose
??f "'lecting thirteen directors for the ensuing
year. Pulls open from 11 a.m. to 12 noon.
ALBERT W. HOWARD. Secretary.
THE ANNCAL MEETING OF THE STOCK
3'"i?lers of The Farmers and Mechanics' Na
tional Rank of Georgetown, I). C.. will be
at the banking house. 31st rind M sts.
n.*w.. Washington. D. t\. on Tuesday. Jan
uary 10. 1922. for the election of director*
lor rhe ensuing year and fpr the transaction
of such other business as may properly come
lWnre the meeting.
The polls will be open from 12 o'clock noon
until 1 o'clock p.m. Respectfully.
H. L. SELRY. Cashier.
THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE 8TOCK
l.olders of tlie Lincoln National Rank for the I
election of directors, and such other business I
n< may properly come before the meeting, will j
i*? held at the banking house Tuesday, January i
JO. 1922. between 12 m. and 1 p.m. Rooks
lor the transfer of stock will be cloned from
lJccember 20, 1921. to January 11. 1922.
ALRERT S. GATLEY. Cashier.
?JRAND AND UPRIGHT PIANOS FOR RENT*
f'.anos taken In aa part payment on Victrolas." I
IUGO W0RCH. 1110 G n.w. Kranicb ft Bach j
? nd Emerson piano*. 1
CHAIR CANING. $1.50 UP; SPLINT~CAN
Ing, upholstering parlor auites. fireside chairs, i
dining room chairs. Call, phone or drop pos
tal; will bring samples. '
CLAY A. ARMSTRONG.
Franklin 7483. 1233 10th n.w.
CHRISTMAS TREES
Thousands of fine cedar and pine, located In
Fairfax county. Va. Make your own selections
??n the ground and carry them away st 10c
Choice trees In all siies delivered at 30c each!
Wholesale only. Main 4108 or Adams 2708. 25*
USEFUL GIFT8 AT PLEA8TNG PRICES-^
Books. Ribles, stationery, cards, calendars
uiaries, can be found at PURSELL'S. 807 G !
st. n.w. 1
We Rejuvenate Old Floors!
VERY REASONARLY, and will be glad to'
lurnish you with prices. ?. 1
OUR HOLIDAY SPF/CIAL?$125.
for new hardwood floors (up to 430 sq. ft
enough for usual living room, dining room and
hall) holds good only on orders received up to
January 1.
C ADAMS 203 BARRISTER BLDG.,
rviy/vivio 635 F St. Tel. M. 1457.
House phone Frank. 6347.
ADAMS PRINTING
Is away above the average. II
never fails to please.
HIGH GRADE. BUT NOT HIGH PRICED.
THE SERVICE SHOP
BYRON S. ADAMS,
We Do Small Printing*
Jobs Exceedingly Well
The National Capital Press j
1210-1212 D st. u.w.
After the Holidays
get 1n touch with Casey ard 1st htm Install
m n "Areola Heating System.*' so *as to have
the house comfortably warm for the rest of
ths winter. Installed on small monthly pay
ftnents.
"Hits it dons right?Get Casty."
Cascv A: Co ,207 14th ST- N W
Cy OC VXJ# Phones Col. 155 snd 1131
Plumbing, Stsamfltting sod Tinning.
*ANTl?-*6 Ckkkf a tAJftOAb brfuS.
Bitors from Washington to Philadelphia snd
K#w Tort. SMITH'S TRANSFER AND 9T0E
^G1 00.
SEES CHINESE PROGRESS
IF PARLEY IS SUCCESSFUL
Dr. Tsao Believes Rapid Strides
Will Be Made, But Says Advance
Would Come Anyway.
The assurance that if the^ present
conference is a success China's devel
opment will go forward with rapid
strides was expressed Wednesday night
by Dr. Yun Sing: Tsao, assistant secre
tary general of the Chinese delega
tion, at a meeting of the Women's
City Club. "If the conference is a
I lailure China will eventually find her
j self, become unified and work out her
own rehabilitation," he said, "but ^it
j will be a slow and arduous process.'
The future of the Japanese and Chi
1 nese nations must be so closely inter
related, the speaker declared, that
perfect understanding and fairness
in all dealings with each other will be
essential for the progress of both.
"China does not want any of her de
mands granted unless they are based
on justice, but we believe that asking
the return of sovereign rights is only
fundamental justice." he continued.
Dr. Tsao spoke also of the famine
in China, declaring that lack of
transportation facilities was chiefly to
blame, and he spoke of the great
work being done by the American
Red Cross in building roads to make
it possible to transport food to the
starving.
SPAIN INCREASING NAVY.
I
Nation Anxious to Be Greater
Factor in Mediterranean.
MADRID, December 22.?In an edi
torial today regarding the develop
ment of the Spanish navy. El Debate
praises the action of Minister of Ma
rine Cortina for continuing, the pro
gram laid down in 1915. The newspa
per says that if succeeding gov
ernments pursue this policy patrioti
cally Spain will possess, when it i?
completed, a minimum naval force in
relation to her category as a Mediter
ranean power, but that it will carry
weight in future international trea
ties and agreements.
Atlantic Co?Nt Line ? A ugroat a,
i Charleston, Savannah?through service daily.
tJffice. 141K H st. n.w. Phone Main 7800.?
I Advertisement.
PRESENTS FOR CHILDREN.
| Christ Child Society to Make An
nual Distribution Today.
Poor children of Washington will re
ceive presents of 2,300 garments and
350 pairs of shoes from the Christ
Child Society today, during the so
j ciety's 'annual distribution of necessa
ries for the poor.
It is expected that more than 1.300
children will be benflted by the gifts.
! less this distinction be made, representa
tive gov ernment. as we have established
1 it in America, fails, and public authority
I will be vested not in the hands of
those who are entitled to be desig
1 nated as public officials, but rather j
j in the hands of those privately
selected to serve a special interest.
Service of ?w UnRlBnd. j
"There is little .danger that modern j
parliamentary bodies will fall under
I the domination of the most powerful
of executives. If action be wise,
there must be leaders; if it be
tive there must be organization, but
always as the result, not of prejudice,
not of coercion, but of reason. There
must be no domination either of one
man in office or ten thousand sup
posed men at the polls. T.his stand
ard is maintained throughout America
to a greater extent than the public,
I m-lfSUN?wSe England has performed j
one service which was greater than
another, it has been to lead in free-j
insr men from the dominion of a force;
imposed from without, and bring them |
under the dominion of that reason !
which speak* from wUhm. It^ teach
ings have liberated man from ever>
Hervitude, but laid on him. e^r>
duty."
SPECIAL NOTICES.
vnTICF"~ 18 HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE
annual meetinK of the shareholders of The
riSk, National Bank of Washington D C..
for the election of directors and the transac
tion of such other business as may come before
the^ meeting, will he held at the tanking : bouse||
on Tuesday. January 10. WL-. The [* us wm j
remain open from HVpmJvVj r.ahier
o'clock noon. U. ^ 1-LLM1NO. lasnier. _
THE PROVIDENT LIFE AND TRUST COM
PANY OF PHILADELPHIA.
N.W. Corner 4th and Chestnut^ Sts., Phila
delphia. December 21. MCI.
TOD^rE K'l^Wco^K
| AHJpecSdLm"Viiijr of the policyholders of!
The Provident Life and Trust Company of!
I Philadelphia will be held at its office j
above address on WEDN ES I> A Y. TJJ J* 1
DAY OF JANUARY. 1922, AT 12 OtLOl.lt
i NOON, for the purpose of voting for or against;
the approval of a certain Plan for the acquisi-.
I tion bv The Provident Life and Trust Company
of Philadelphia of its capital stock for the,
benefit of its policyholders and the conversion .
of said Company into a mutual life insurance ,
company Under the provisions of the Act or j
Assembly of the Commonwealth of Pennsyl
vanla. No. 103. approved April 20, 1921. ihia.
Plan has been adopted by the Directors and
approved by the Insurance Commissioner of
Pennsylvania ami by the stockholders of the
Company. Copies of the Plan may be had,
upon application. , , i
By order of 1 'lF.oN^RD C ASIITOV. I
Secretary. I
TOE ANNUAL ELECTION OF OFFICERS
and directors of the American Building As?o-j
ristlon will be held at their offl.-e. .?? B at. '
B.e., January 5, l!>-2. between the hours of 2
o'clock and 7 o clock p.m.
CHARLES TL KINDLE. Secy. j
AT A REGULAR*MEETING OF THE BOARDj
of directors of the American National Bank
held Thursday, December 22nd, the usual dm- 1
dend of 2 per cent was declared on the capital
stock, payable January 3, 1922. Transfer ?
books to be closed from December 27th to <slst, ,
inclusive. . !
A SECOND PAIR OF GLASSES j
which can be kept at the office, will prove a
gift of great convenience to "dad." |
Claflin Optical Co., 1314 G st. j
Opposite Epiphany Church.
Formerly Cor. ?th and T tot 32 Ylin, I
otflre Huura: 7 'o 5; Satnnlavn. 7 to 1.
OUR BUSY SEASON !
is not confined to the Xmas holiday period, j
Cash-conserving prices on Mill work. Trim Wall
Board, etc., keep Barker's on the go at all
Porch Columns in Clear White Pine and Fir.
Geo. M. Barker Co., Inc.
?49-631 N. Y. a?.; 1817 7th. Tel. M. 1W.
PROTECT YOUR HOME
Let u< rej/tir that leaky roof
before the bad weather aeta in.
R. K. FERGUSON, inc.
1114 9th 8t. Phone North 231-232.
Rooflng Biperta.
171 rvAD C WAXED, *2; CLEANED OB I
rLUV-Zuo r.finished bj electric machine.
R. E. WASH. 4(8 8 at. n.w. Nor'h 3600. ja2?
Tin Roofs?Slag Roofs
B BP AIRED AND PAINTED.
Call Main 760.
Graf ton&SonJnc^Tr.^d,ISl7?*
"Heating and Roofing Kxparta 85 Yaara."
A New Roof With a Brush
When yon aae Liquid Aabeatoa Rooting Cement.
I will apply aame and guarantee roof At*
rear, from all leaka. Alao aold In bulk.
Tinning. Gutter, and Spouta. Prompt aervlee.
Mtdiaon Clark. 1814 Pa. ate, a.e. Line. 421*.
We W;.1I Furnish Stock,
SO-lb. bond, . nd print 500 each, Letterheads,
Envelopes and Blllheada, 1,500 in all, for $9.50,
The Duplicating Office
14th and Pa. ave. auw. Phone Main 8271.
OT TT?T*\T\ Snow and sleet show up
OnEJJU the faults. Phone for
Fixes Roofs ?MkloThrTn.w. Main 314.
ROOFSREPAIRED!
?High wlnda loosen many a roof and
the next rain la bound to cause leaks and
ruin. Is your roof safe? Better let our
experts look it over.
fDOWn A n Roofing 1416 F at. n.w,
~&\UCompany. Phone Main 14.
The Shade Shop
W. STOKES SAMlflONS.
830 13th St. ,T3ft.
Let Us Suggest a New Kind
of Window Shades
DEMOCRATS SEEN.
0PP0SEDT0 PM1
Formal Stand Awaits Ex
pression From Underwood,
However.
BY DAVID LAWRENCE,
The majority of the democrats In
the United States Senate are opposed
at present to the ratification of the
four-power pact between the United
States, Great Britain, Japan and
France with respect to the islands of
the Pacific.
Until Senator Oscar Underwood,
democratic leader and member of the
American delegation, which signed
the treaty, has an opportunity to ex
press his views there will be no
formal opposition to the pact.
If the treaty were submitted to a
vote today it would pass by a com
fortable margin, notwithstanding the
democratic opposition, as for the mo
ment the line-up Is hardly different
from that which developed when the
last treaty with Germany was ratified.
The foregoing analysis of the sit
uation comes from democratic leaders
who have the highest respect and af
fection for Senator Underwood, but
who insist that it was a mistake for
1.1m to sign a treaty phrased as am
biguously as they believe is the four
power pact. Opposition to the treaty
was not very pronounced at the out
set. But the unmistakable fact is
that the developments of the last two
days have been harmful to the treaty's
prospects.
Growing Opposition Seen.
The discovery that the treaty in
cluded the mainland of Japan and that
the United States actually agreed in
secijpt session to an interpretation
which covered the islands of Japan
proper within the scope of the pact
has unquestionably had an effect.
President Harding's own misconcep
tion of what the treaty covered has
been responsible for the turn in demo
cratic sentiment and for a growing
opposition among republicans. Even
the most ardent supporters of the
President will concede that the situa
tion has hardly been improved by the
discussion over the ambiguity of the
phrases in the treaty covering the
mainland of Japan.
Already there is talk of reservations
to "clarity." but Senator Lodge is re
ported in Senate cloakrooms as hav
ing said that any reservations would
"ruin the treaty." The democrats
who are unalterably opposed to the
pact, even with reservations, pre
bound to hiake the most of Senator
Lodge's attitude if this should prove
to be his ultimate conclusion, for it
was Mr. Lodge who insisted upon a
long series of reservations to the Ver
sailles treaty and contended that Pres
ident Wilson had fair warning of the
Senate's attitute in the round robin
which was circulated just after the
covenant was published.
To this the democratic leaders re
ply that no opportunity was given
for study of the text of the treaty be
fore it was signed and that the meas
ure was negotiated In secret session.
The democrats plan as one step in
their campaign against the treaty to
call for the proceedings of the secret
sessions in order to learn what other
things the American delegation may
have agreed to besides the French and
British interpretation that the main
land of Japan was covered in the pact.
May Answer Through l'ndrrwo?d.
To this sort of tactics it is not only
probable but most likely that Presi
dent Harding will answer through
Oscar Underwood, democratic leader,
who as a member of the American
delegation is presumed to be aware of
everything that transpired. Those
democrats who anticipate that Mr.
Underwood will be committed to vote
for the ratification of the treaty in
sist that he Is the last man in the I
world to ask anybody in the Senate i
to vote against his convictions, as he
himself has maintained the same right
in the past and has encouraged inde-j
pendence of action.
The feeling has been growing among
democrats that Mr. Underwood made a
mistake in accepting membership on
the American delegation, In whose de
cisions he represented only a minority
voice and over whose actions he had
so little to say. since he has not been
a member of either the committee
which negotiated 'the naval agree
ment or the four-power pact, and was
in the position of having to accept
what his three republican colleagues
did without being able to adopt a dis
senting course.
Has Faithful Friends.
Mr. Underwood, however, is sur
rounded by a faithful group of friends
in the Senate who will support him on
the four-power pact as they did on
the German treaty. The danger to
ratification lies rather in the possibil
ity of a democratic coalition. Sena
tor McNary of Oregon, republican,
wants reservations. Senator Kenyon
of Iowa, republican, is reported as un
decided.
Senator Hitchcock of Nebraska,
democrat, who voted for the German
treaty and indicated some time ago
that he might favor the four-power
pact, is inclined to be open-minded
about the new treaty and await the
outcome of the whole conference be
fore reaching a decision. Senator
Johnson of California, republican, is
In his native state now keeping his
ear to the ground there. Some demo
cratic senators think Mr. Johnson will
support the treaty in order to assure
himself of administration support in
his campaign for re-election next
year, as there have been rumors of
Herbert Hoover enterfng the race
against Mr. Johnson. Those who know
the C41if0i*nia senator best ridicule
such an assertion and insist that he
will make up his mind on the four
power pact irrespective of political
consequences.
(Copyright, 1821.)
CONSUL W. W. CORCORAN
LAUDED FOR HEROIC DEED
Washingtonian 111 of Pneumonia in
Boulogne, Due to Rescue of Lad
From Drowning.
Cable advices to friends here In
forming them of the cause of the
illness of William Warwick Corcoran
of this city, American consul at
Boulogne, have revealed the fact that
the "handsome Englishman" who
s-aved the life of a boy drowning in
the sea near the cliffs of Boulogne
sur-Mer was Mr. Corcoran himself.
Mr. Corcoran at present Is con
fined to the consulate with a serious
case of pneumonia. It developed that
he was the man described as "th*
handsome Englishman" who refused
to give hi? name and made a quiet
departure after leaping into the sea
and rescuing the drowning boy.
It was originally thought that tha
recurer was an English visitor to
Boulogne. Mr. Corcoran was trans
ferred to Boulogne only a short time
ago after a critical illness with
tropical fever in Madras, India
He made a commendatory record
during the world war as a first
lieutenant in command of a machine
gun battalion In the Argonna, where
he was gassed. Upon entering the
consular servioe after the war, he
was first sent to Bombay, India.
For CoMs, Grip or Iilocm
and a? a Preventive, take Laxative BROMO
(JUININB Tablets. The genuine bears the atg
nature of K. W. Qrore. (Be aore you get
BROMO.) 30c.?Advertisement.
GOING TO CAVALRY SCHOOL. |
Lieut Col. Harry N. Cootes. 3d Cav
alry, at Fort Myer, Va.; MaJ. George B
Hunter, office of the chief of cavalry.
War Department, and MaJ. Thomas F.
Van Natta, military intelligence divi
sion, War Department, have been or
dered to take a course of Instruction at
the Cavalry School, Fort Riley, Kan.
LOUDOUN COUNTY LEADS
IN ARMAMENT INTEREST
No Other Section of Country So
Thoroughly Organized, Re
port Here Says.
To Loudoun county, Va., is ascribed
the honor for the most intensive or
ganization in the interest of limitation
of armament and other purposes for
which the international conference
here was called, by a report made yes
terday by the National Council for
Limitation of Armaments.
No other section of the country, ac
cording to the report, is so thoroughly
organized. Every man. woman and child
living in the county is eligible for
membership in the county council for
limitation of armament, of which
Mrs. H. J. Hoge is chairman. Three
county editors form the publicity
committee. Presidents of the two cham
bers of commerce are on the speakers'
committee. The. membership commit
tee is formed of former service men.
Within ten days, recently fourteen
meetings were held in the county. A
prize essay competition has been
started in schools and Mrs. Rachel
Davis Dubois has just completed a
week's speaking tour in the county.
Organizations already represented in
the council are the Farmers' Club, the
Home Club, the Book Club, the Pur
cullville Women's Club, the Women's
Christian Temperance Union. the
County Teachers' Association and the
Episcopal. Meihodist, Presbyterian
and the two Quaker congregations.
Statement of Attitude Has
Been Issued by Backers
of Arms Limitation.
;
Necessity of an international eco
I nomic conference for the adjustment
| of an international economic crisis,
affecting America as well as other
I countries, was emphasized in strong
I terms in a supplementary statement
of attitude by the general committee
! on the limitation of armament, an un
I official organization, to create senti
1 ment in favor of the arms conference,
issued today.
"What other way has been or can
be suggested?" the statement asks,
referring to the solution of interna
tional economic problems. "And there
can be no international economic con
ference without the participation and
j leadership of the United States. Amer
ica must lead.
Propose* London Meeting.
The London Chronicle, semi-official
organ of Lloyd George, declares that
Great Britain should appropriate the
plan for an international economic
conference. From a purely British
standpoint much would be gained by
a conference assembled in London
with the United States on the side
lines?an American delegation par
! ticipating without a vote or responsi
| bility.
"Such a conference would witness
the continuation of the struggle be
tween France and England, but the
country which had taken the initia
tive would have the advantage. Al
ready the Chronicle stipulates that
Germany and soviet Russia should be
invited from the beginning?auto
matically increasing the anti-French
forces by these two powers, which
makes French acceptance of such a
scheme most improbable.
'America holds the economic bal
ance of power. There is no other
force in the world capable of putting
an end to the political balance of
power, which, as long as the funda
mental financial and commercial
problems, reparations and debts re
main unsolved, will keep national
enmities alive and make half the
world an armed camp, in spite of
partial and temporary disarmament.
"Without entering into any purely
European or near eastern questions,
America, acting for our own trade
and financial interests, will be able,
within reasonable limits, to dictate a
plan of co-operation among our
debtors and customers.
World Ready for Orders.
"America is the majority stock
holder in the world's supply of gold,
credit, liquid assets and goods ready
for immediate use and delivery. The
world is not only ready for our or
ders, within the limits of reasen: it
is anxious to have our leadership.
"An international economic confer
ence called by America, under our
conditions, could exert no pressure
whatever on the United States, even
were all the other invited nations
united?an utterly improbable as
sumption. It could only be the means
of launching an American plan of
co-operation, in accord with Amer
ica's selfish interest, to aid in the
rehabilitation of nations which are
our debtors and customers.*'
HEADS HOLY NAME BRANCH.
T. J. Crowley was elected president
of St. Margaret's branch. Holy Name
Society, at the annual meeting of the
organization at St. Margaret's Church.
Seat Pleasant, Md. Other officers
elected were C. H. Brewer, vice presi
dent; G. M. Lloyd, secretary, and Rev.
F. A. Schwallenberg, spiritual direc
tor and treasurer of the society.
HOUSES WIRED
IMMEDIATELY
Superior Workmanship
ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR
Phone N. 8349
Rent a Ford or Dodge
DtIt. it yroiMlf
North 122
_ ford Ou Battel 0*.
SJL On. Mtfc ud W H.W.
HOUSES
Pinbket ul llararalihci
FOR BENT
Trtm IIM Ttt Utntk U?
JOHN W. THOMPSON * CO*
INC.
HI lBth St. Hals 147?
Original
Caramels
620 9th N.W.
Exquisite Hand-Paint
ed Boxes and Baskets,
filled with luscious As
sorted Chocolates and
Bonbons Reasonably
Priced.
Place Orders Now
PRESIDENT SIGNS
RUSSIAREUEF BILL
Secretary Hoover to Rush
Grain to Starving Victims
Within Ten Days.
President Harding* has signed the
Russian relief bill, which carries ap
propriations of $20,000,000 to be* ex
pended under the supervision of the
American relief administration. The
funds become immediately available.
American grain is expected to be'
moving to Russia for the relief of the
famine-stricken population of that coun
try within eight or ten days, Secretary
Hoover announced yesterday.
Purchase of the grain, for which an
appropriation of $20,000,000 is made in a
bill on which action by Congress was
completed yesterday, will start today,
Mr. Hoover said. In the meantime, the
Commerce Secretary announced that
negotiations arc in progress between
the American relief administration and
the soviet government for an arrange
ment by which the soviet authorities
would use the remainder of the un
pledged gold taken from the old Rus
sian imperial treasury in importing
foodstuffs to aid famine relief in the
Volga basin. Tht* negotiations have
been in progress for some time and are
proceeding satisfactorily.
ItuNnia Miint Do Full Share.
Funds held by the soviet, which would
be available for this purpose are be
lived to approximate $10,000,000. The
American relief administration, Mr.
Hoover said, has strongly expressed the
view that the American people cannot
be expected to contribute charity on a
large scale unless the soviet authorities
also expend their every resource in
mitigation of suffering among the Rus
sian people.
On completion of legislative action,
accomplished through the adoption by
the Senate of the conference report,
the bill for Russian relief was sent
to the President. The measure he has
signed authorizes the President to pur
chase through sueh agency as he may
designate in the United States for trans
port in American ships corn, seed
grain and preserved milk for the dis
tressed of Russia.
Shipping Board to Co-Operate.
Bids will be received at the Grain
Corporation in New York today for
supplying grain to ships at N'orth At
lantic ports for shipment to Russia.
Mr. Hoover said. The Shipping Board
is prepared to co-operate in shipment
of foodstuffs.
"Distribution of the food purchased
under congressional authorization,"
Mr. Hoover said, "will be in the hands
of the American Relief Administra
tion. Kxcept for refugees, the major
distribution will be confined to the
Volga famine district, and it is not
expected to do any general relief in
other parts of Russia. The entire
overhead expenses will be borne by
the private resources furnished to the
American Relief Administration, so
that not one cent of the appropria
tion will be absorbed in either per
sonal or any other expenditure ex
cept for actual purchase and trans
port of food."
Sixty girls who have applied for
admission to a training* college at j
Swansea. Wales, for next year, bear j
the name of "Jones." i
Open Evenings
Circulating Library
A|I the Latest Books
PEARLMAN'S BOOK SHOP
933 G St Only
[ Our Special :
Christmas Offer!
? ?of a complete set of <
? high-grade attachments <
? FREE with every Hot- ,
y point cleaner, expires to- ,
morrow. Take advan
tage of this to make her 4
a real present.
* You are sure
* her gift
is right
When,
it's i
Hotpoint^
Also?
All Electric
Lamps Reduced
Beantifnl HANDEL I.ampa.
with hand-painted jtlamt
nhadm. .Specially priced at
S14.50 op.
All JilKh.gndr ALHCO
Lampa?floor, bridge, piano,
ete? In wrought Iroa and
other metaln similarly re
duced.
Electrical Appliances
Percolators, $10 up
Chafing Dishes, $10 up
Toasters, $6.75 up
Boudoir
Sets, $7.95
Curling
Irons, ?
$6.50 up
Gifts of Pleasing
Practicability
Or the?
ELECTRIC
WASHER
HOVARD pF0| .FY Sa&NX
'mElZClJUcSC&lS*r
806 12th St. N.W.
Phones Mcin 1130 or JlSl
SPECIALISTS IN PLAYED PIANOS
O JD*MXL -m EMjMONS s S.VJTH
qjUeMOLIj&cq
^Pashin?"ton's AEOLIAN HALL - Twelfth and G Sireels
3i?invay Duo-Art Pianolas Veber Ouo-Ari Pianolas Aeolian Voca.Uon.3
OPEN EVENINGS UNTIL XMAS
NOT TOO LATE
Musical Suggestions to Help
Xmas Shoppers
Special Notice
We guarantee to deliver any Piano, Player
Piano, Music Roll Cabinet or Phonograph pur
chased up to 6 o'clock Xm?ts eve. We have pre
pared fully for this Xmas rush, and will see that
no one is disappointed.
Entire Building Devoted to Music
OUR BIG XMAS
Save $40.00 On
A Vocation
A little over a year ago the price of this
Vocalion was $135.00
It Is Now Offered At
SPECIAL
S95
Made and guaranteed by the Aeolian
Company, manufacturers of the Steinway
and Weber Duo-Art Pianolas.
This is one of the most remarkable
Phonograph bargains ever offered. A Genu
ine VOCALION with the great Aeolian
name back of it.
The terms are such that any one can
have one for Christmas.
PAY NOTHING DOWN THIS YEAR
?simply purchase a few records, and we will make immediate delivery.
Begin to pay for the Vocalion February 1st.
OTHER SUGGESTIONS
Baby Grand Piano prices from $695.00
Shoninger Piano (regular $525.00 value) $395.00
Aeolian Player-Piano (price last year $745), $595.00
Steinway Duo-Art Reproducing Piano $2,500.00
Aeolian Duo-Art Reproducing Piano $795.00
Music Roll Cabinets prices from $25.00
Phonograph Record Album (special) 95c
(LEATHER BOUND?HOLDS 12 RECORDS)
VOCALION RED RECORDS
Three Big Hits of the Hour
14261 JS
14262 ??
14263 JS
"Good
Dance
f Ka-Lu-A?Fox-Trot ? 'f rom
Morning. Dearie"?Selvin's
Orchestra.
Blue Danube Blues?Fox-Trot?From
"Good Morning, Dearie"?Yerkes'
I S. S. Flotilla Orc/iestra.
/Tuck Me to Sleep?'r ox-Trot?Jockcr's
i Dance Orchestra.
I Wabash Blues?F*ox-Trot?The New
' port. Society Orchestra.
("Stars?Fox-Trot*?'Wiedoeft's Califor
! niarfs.
?(April Shower?)?Fox-Trot?From AI
j Jolson's "JBcwnbo"?Wiedoeft's Cali
I fornians.
You'll Know it by its Color
Christmas Selections
A-2402Q Adeste Fideles (Confe All Ye Faith
f ful), 10-inch $1.25
Colin O'More, tenor, an/ti Shannon Four
B-24020 Christmas Carols-'-It Came Upon a
Midnight Clear; There 'Came Three Kings.
10-inch * $1.25
The Cathedra) Quartet
A-14244 The Children'* Christmas, Part I.
Qjristmas Eve. Qfream of Santa Clans.
10-inch 85c
Aeolian fconcert Band
B-14244 The Children's Christmas, Part II.
Christmas Me.rning. The Awakening.
10-inch 85c
AeojGar* Concert Band
A-14033 Brighten tiie Corner Where You Are.
10-inch 85c
Hiolhcr Rodeheaver
B-14033 I'm Coming Home, Mother's Prayers
Have Folltjwed Me. 10-inch 85c
Homer Rodeheaver
A-14054 Holv- Ohost with Light Divine, 10-in, 85c
Ree/L Miller and Royal Dadmum
B-14054 J/^us Saviour, Pilot Me, 10-inch, 85c
/ Shannon Four
A-14092 ^aw Ye My Saviour, 10-inch 85c
/ Nevada Van der Veer
B-14*92/ Shepherd, Show Me How to Go,
10-i/tch 85c
/ Lloyd Simonson
A-14^10 Silent Night, Holy Night. 10-inch, 85c
Nevada Van der Veer
85c
Playable on All Phonographs
E-14110 Oh. Holy Night. 10-inch
Charles Harrison and Male Quartet
A-14111 Joy to the World, 10-inch 85c
Stellar Quartet
B-14111 Hark the Herald Angels Sing,
10-inch 85c
Stellar Quartet
A-14184 The Old Refrain (Viennese Popular
Song), 10-inch 85c
Marie Dawson Morrell
B-14184 Chant: Nobody Knows de Trouble I've
Seen, 10-itich 85c
Marie Dawson Morrell
A-14186 Ninety and Nine, 10-inch 85c
Charles Harrison
B-14186 What a Friend We Have in Jesus.
10-inch 85c
Reed Miller and Charles Hart
A-14211 Throw Out the Life Line, 10-inch, 85c
Helen Clark and Elliott Shaw
B-14211 Hymn Medley No. 2, 10-inch 85c
Jesus Shall Reign; Safe in the Arms of
Jesus; Guide Me, Oh Thou Great Jehovah
Shannon Four
30104 Ave Maria, 10-inch $1.25
Marie Sundelius
52018 Elijah, Oh Rest in the Lord, 12-inch, $1.75
Marguerite D'Alvarez
52013 Forza del Destino?Pace Mio Dio (Mercy,
Oh, My Lord) in Italian. 12-inch $1.75
Rosa Raisa, soprano

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