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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 16, 1922, Image 21

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ADVERTISEMENT.
Don't Let That Cold
Get the Better of You
If that persistent cou h or cold j
!s fastened on you at this season of i
the year it may lead to serious re
sults*. Your doctor would tell you
that tho soothing-, healinp ele
ments in Father John's Medicine
are exactly what he would pre
scribe for such a condition.
The value of Father John's Medi
cine has been proven by more than
sixty-flve years of success. It
soothes and heals the breathing
passages and. because of the nour
1 ishing food elements it contains,
I helps to rebuild wasted tissue and
gives new strength with which to
j rebuild health. Get rid of that cold!
j or cough now, before it is too late. |j
"BURCHELL'S"
Bouquet Coffee
Superbly Flavored
25c Lb.
Burchell's
1325 F St. N.W.
^ Hair Goods and
Beauty Shops
Phone for Appointment
809 7th St 1771 Coi. Road
M. 8*35 CoL 1*153
"Meet V* at Belter's"
BERMUDA-CUBA
MEDITERRANEAN CRUISES
WEST INDIES CRUISES
CARIBBEAN CRUISES
CALIFORNIA AND IIOXOLXLC
Via PANAMA CASAL
Europe, Orient, South America
Steamship Ticket*?All Lines
OBER'S
Steamship and Tourixt Agency,
No. 1 Woodward Ralldlng
Phone Main 1089
LadiesKeep Your Skin
Clear, Sweet, Healthy
With Cuticura Soap
and Cuticura Talcum
Quick Relief From
Constipation
Get Dr. Edwards' Olive Tablets
That is the joyful cry of thou
sands since Dr. Edwards produced
Olive Tablets, the substitute for
calomel.
Dr. Edwards, a practicing; phy
sician for 17 years and calomel's
old-time eiVemy, discovered the
formula for Olive Tablets while
treating patients for chronic con
stipation and torpid livers.
Dr. Edwards' Olive Tablets do not
contain calomel, but a healing,
soothing vegetable laxative.
No griping is the "keynote" of
these little sugar-coated, olive
colored tablets. They cause the
bowels and liver to act normally.
They never force them to unnatural
action.
If you have a "dark brown
mouth"?bad breath?a dull, tired
feeling?sick headache?torpid liver
?constipation, you'll find quick,
sure and pleasant results from one
or two of Dr. Edwards' Olive
Tablets at bedtime.
Thousands take them every night
Just to keep right. Try them. 15c
and 30c.
| How to Make Pine
? Cough Syrup at Home
Has *o equal for prompt results.
Takes but a moment to prepare,
and saves you about $2.
Pine is used in nearly all prescrip. I
tions and remedies for coughs. The
reason is that pine contains several |
elements that have a remarkable ef
fect in soothing and healing the I
membranes of the throat and chest, j
Pine cough syrups are combina
tions of pine and syrup. The
"syrup" part is usually plain sugar
ayrnp.
To make the best pine cough rem
edy that money can buy, put 2'/i
ounces of Pinex in a pint botUe and
fill up with homemade sugar syrup.
Or you can use clarified molasses,
honey or corn syrup instead of
eugar syrup. Either way, you make
? full pint?more than you can buy
ready-made for three times the
pioney. It is pure, good and tastes
Very pleasant.
You can feel this take hold of al
tough or cold in a way that means
business. The cough may be dry, |
hoarse and tight, or may be persist
ently loose from the formation of
phlegm. The cause is the same?in
flamed membranes?and this Pinex
and Syrup combination will stop it
??usually in 24 hours or less. Splen
did, too, for bronchial asthma, I
hoarseness or any ordinary throat]
ailment.
Pinex is a highly concentrated
compound of genuine Norway pine
extract and is famous the world
over for its prompt effect upon
coughs.
Beware of substitute*. Ask your
druggist for "Z'A ounces of Pinex,"
*vith directions, and don't accept
anything else. Guaranteed to give
absolute satisfaction, or money re
funded. The Pinex Co, Ft Wayne,
Russian Influence in Fashions.
BT AlCWK RITrEJfHOUSE.
The wise should look to Moscow, or
what was Moscow, for the new in
spiration In clothes.
Paris is under the thrall of the
grand duchesses and princesses who
are begging for aid for their ouvroirs
where are supported the very poor
exiles who esoaped persecution from
Lientn. The subject is almost a mania
in Paris. It began last summer when
thp Americans were begging aid for
the devastated areas in France, and
the French were begging for the
refugees from Russia who had taken
up their habitation In Paris. If the
affair hadn't been so serious it would
have been comic.
This mid-season the great Russian
ball in Paris in aid of the exiles
brought together all society and
those who are curious of the doings
of society and the result was not
alone a goodly sum of money for
thousands who are really in a piti
able state of destitution, much worse
than the Belgians during the war.,
for they have nol an inch of land to
cull their own and no way of getting
places to work, but the ball resulted
in a mad attempt to convert all new
clothes Into Russian fashions. We
shall see much of the result from this
day on.
Already the dressmakers of Taris
are wearing the gorgeous blouses de
signed by ?he Grand Duchess Marie
I'avlovna and the Princess Ousouroff
and by seventeen other titled emi
gres who are giving their emotional
temperaments ull sway in devising
ways and means for their country
people to find a heart and a plate of
food. What with Paris under the
thrall of Russian sentiment and
Washington giving Itself up to an
other great social appeal for aid.
there Is no doubt of the influence
that such sentiment will give a tre
mendous inspiration toward the splen
did and colorful fashions to which
old Russia gave birth.
At the moment in Pkris the blouse
and the headdress of Russia -are in
the ascendancy. The former is avail
able for the majority, the latter will
tickle the fancy of those who aim to
dress brilliantly at night.
The overblouse worn by the great
Russians to create a demand for It
among fashion followers has some
what the crudity of our Indian
blouses which were advanced two
years ago. There is the same pat
terning of brilliantly colored coTTon
threads on a cream or white back
ground. The blouse la worn over the
skirt without a belt, the sleeves are
as long or short as one wishes. The
neckline Is slightly round In front and
rather high at back.
The French dressmakers who are
making a feature of such blouses
have departed from the original cot
ton foundation and substituted red
crepe de chine, also yellow and black.
These foundations, holding as they
do the bands of cross stitch and lat
tice work done In rainbow colors, give
one a sense that no mere black frock
can hope to rival such splendor. The
dressmakers are taking up the Rus
sian Idea with all the more vehemence
because it promises a break with
black by the public.
ONE OF THE NEW RUSSIAN
BLOUSES IN DARK RED CREPE
DE CHINE EMBROIDERED IN
BANDS OF VIVID COLORS IN
CRUDE DESIGN WHICH HAVE
BECOME THE FASHION IN
FRANCE THROUGH THE WORK
OF EXILED RUSSIANS.
Making the Home Attractive
BT DOROTHT ETHEL WALSH.
Modern Decorators Have Rehabili
tated the Old-Time Grill.
Do you remember the grills placed
between doorways In our grand
mothers' homes? Well, they have
come back Into fashion. Mercy, no!
not the twisted tortured affairs of
those earlier days, but modern pieces
of bright-colored wood. In other
words, they are the old-timers all
dressed up as twentieth century
misses.
And truly charming are. these re
habilitated old favoritles. So disguised
are they in their brilliant new dresses
that they are not recognizable as old
friends. That is well, for indus
triously has the present generation
gone about eliminating the poor old
twisted grills, which tried so hard to
look attractive in an earlier period of
decoration.
And horrible affairs they were. Wise
have we been in learning not to love
them.
That there are advantages in door
grills was realized by modern dec
orators. They eliminate the necessity
of buying so mucft drapery material
and they do allow more light to be
dispensed between rooms. So recalling
to mind the old styles some brilliant
mind decided to modernise it and
adapt It to present needs.
The result has been that conven
tional flowers, birds of wondrous
plumage and flat designs all bril
liantly colored have taken the place
of the scrolls of yore.
EFFICIENT HOUSEKEEPING
BT LAURA KBUCMAN.
Making Tour Own Cotton Bed
Comforti.
Several bride readers have written
to ask me for direction* for making
a cotton bed comfort. Tbe first step
is to secure a quilting frame. Have
a carpenter make you two lengths of
board (Oat clothes poles will do)
eight feet long, and two more lengths
of board which are each six and
one-half feet long. These boards
should be from two to three Inches
wide and flat.
The next step is to tack a strip of
bed ticking on each of these four
boards, the entire length, letting one
edge of the strip hang out one inch
beyond the edge of the board so that
the comfort may be sewed onto this
ticking to hold it taut when you are
ready to tuft it.
Silkateen is. of course, the nicest
material to use for the covering, but
the better grades are about 40 cents a
yard, so cotton challis is used by
many housekeepers, as this costs
around 25 cents a yard. The comfort
will be two and one-half yards long
pnd two yards wide, so this will re
quire ten yards of material for the
covering; two flve-yard lengths of the
yard-wide material will be sewed to
gether, then doubled over on Itself
lengthwise, with the cotton batting
between the two thicknesses.
A bat of cotton two and one-half
yards long and two yards wide will
probably cost you around $1.50?but
prices differ In varoius vicinities.
When you have sewed the two five
yard lengths of material together
lengthwise, lay It on the floor, spread
the bat of cotton on one-half of It.
fold the other half (lengthwise) over
the cotton and baste the material
together on the three open aides of
the quilt, over this cotton filling.
Some stores sell cotton In small
rolls, but It is best to buy It In tbe
regular quilt-slie bat whloh has not
a break In It, for otherwise the cotton
filling of a quilt is apt to separate.
Now that yon have bastsd your
covering material over the cotton,
the quilt is ready to put on the
frame. Baste the four sides of the
quilt onto the strips of ticking which
you previously tacked onto the four
pieoes of wood, using the two longest
boards for the two long sides of the
quilt, of coarse. Put four Iron damps
(any hardware store will sell yon
these) on the four corners to bold the
four corners of the frame together?
two ends of wood overlapping at?"??
corner?and rest the entire frame on
chairbacks. If you can't get the
clamps, tie the wooden ends together
with string.
Begin quilting. In grandmother a
day worsted was used to quilt with.
But housekeepers of today have found
that sllkateen Is firmer and washes
better. You will need two balls of
allkateen for one quilt. Tuft It close,
as a close-tufted quilt holds Its shape.
Three Inches between tufts Is not too
close. To get the tufts even stick
black-headed pins at Intervals along
the top of the quilt, then pull out a
pin every time you put In a tuft.
The tufting process is very simple.
Thread a large-eyed needle with dou
ble sllkateen, and push the needle
down through the comfort, pulling It
out on the other side; then push It
up from beneath, close to where it
went down, and tie twice on the up
i per side, leaving one-half-inch ends
of tied thread.
When you have tufted the entire
quilt, rip It off the frame and run
the edges together with allkateen, to
finish them off.
Price* realised on Swift * Co. salea
of carcass beef la Washington, D. 0., for wee*
ending Saturday January 14, 1922, on ship
manta Sold oat, ranged from 10 cents to 14
cent? per pound and averaged 12.28 ceata per
pound.?Advertisement.
Pea Patties.
Make a rich pie dough to which one
half teaspoon of baking powder has
been added and line patty pans with
It; when baked nice and brown fill
with peas seasoned with butter, salt,
pepper and a little sugar and thicken
with milk or cream and flour.
MENU FOB A DAT.
BREAKFAST.
Stewed Pigs and Raisins
With Cream.
Poached Eggs on Toast. Coffee.
LUNCHEON.
Crab Flake, Mayonnaise.
Bread and Butter.
Jam. Coffee.
DINNER.
Boiled Fresh Codfish With
Egg Sauce.
Potato Balls With Melted
Butter and Parsley.
Carrots and Peaa.
English Saucer Pies. Coffee.
i
PERSONAL HEALTH SERVICE
By WILLIAM BRADY, M. D.
9 Noted Phytic** and Author.
Re-Education, of Muscles in
Paralysis.
There is a legend that Annette Kel
Ierman was a cripple In childhood and
overcame her disability by persevering
exercise in the water. Many subjects
of muscle paresis (partial or Incom
plete paralysis) have found that they
can command and control the muscles
better in water.
Remember that any muscular action
in arm, leg or trunk involves trans
mission of an impulse through the gov
erning nerve and the portion of the
spinal cord that has been damaged in
infantile paralysis. Mental abstraction
or concentration may have considerable
influence upon the efficiency of this
nerve muscle mechanism. Everybody
knows how distraction of attention will
at once slow down a person's walk, for
example. Although the general rule
that a layman shouldn't try to become
too familiar with his in'ards holds
good as for the loose Insides, it is a
fact that some intimacy with the
anatomy of one's frame has a rather
wholesome influence. Thus one who
knows precisely what the diaphragm is
and does can work that muscle more
effectively than even a better de
veloped individual who Is ignorant of
anatomy. Singing teachers and sing
ers understand that. There is, then, a
kind of self-consciousness which is
good for our health. If introspection
and morbid imaginings from too much
Almanac works havoc with the health
of the credulous, that is because these
misguided folk just poke about and
dabble with their in'ards. There is no
such influence felt by doctors, who
boldly take the in'ards out and study
them. Nor are nurses injured in
liealth and happiness by the knowledge
of the interior they acquire in their
training ? provided they are well
trained.
It has been found that victims of the
characteristic paresis of locomotor
ataxia are able to accomplish more in
In the way of re-education of the
muscles If they follow out their dally
exercises while blindfolded. This
merely removes a source of distrac
tion of the attention from the exer
cises. It was by blindfolding patients
that Dr. W. J. M. A. Maloney of New
York was able to bring about much
happier results In the treatment of
tabetics (locomotor ataxia cases) with
the Frenkel muscle re-educative exer
cises than had been possible before.
There Is no doubt that the faithful
and persevering concentration of the
patient's mind and attention, free from
distractions, upon the effort to make
the movement which Is seemingly Im
possible or extremely feeble. Is a dis
tinct aid In overcoming paresis or
paralysis from poliomyelitis as well
as other diseases. The mere mentul
effort. If sincerely and regularly made
by the patient under circumstances free
from distraction, allowing the Imagina
tion to picture the limb obeying the
will and going through the movements
of the exercise at a regular, rhythmic
rate. Involves a most favorable stimu
lus to regeneration and restoration of
the nerve muscle function.
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS.
The Alloy Stains.
I am a girl aged sixteen and I
wear glasses. Where the nosepiece
rests across the bridge of my nose
the skin becomes very much discol
ored, although it is good gold. What
is the cause? The optician said I
have uric acid In my system, but I
have always been strong and well
and am now healthy aside from my
poor eyesight. (W. T. A.)
Answer?The optician has been
reading the wrong almanac. This
staining or discoloring of the skin
by jewelry has no relation whatever
with uric acid or any other acid. The
discoloration is due to a chemical
reaction of the base metal, silver or
copper, of the alloy with sulphur In
tho sweat or sebum of the skin. Sul
phur compounds are normally pres
ent in the excretions of the skin.
So everything is all right?you are
just a little more alive than some
others who do not notice stains from
jewelry. Use a drop of aromatic
spirits of ammonia on handkerchief
or cloth to remove the stain from
the skin.
Kindly define the terms "high blood
pressure" and "low blood pressure."
A friend asserts that a person who is
"full blooded" and florid in com
plexion has high blood pressure. Is
that true? (V. J. E.)
Answer?No. Most individuals who
have high blood pressure are rather
pallid, and many who are popularly
considered full blooded and who have
a florid complexion have low blood
pressure and perhaps even insuffi
cient blood or weak blood (anemia).
Appearances are misleading. Blood
pressure is the tension of the blood
in the arteries, maintained normally
by the pumping of the blood by the
heart and by the muscular and elas
tic pressure upon the blood by the
arteries themselves and by the body
muscles around the arteries. Blood
pressure may be compared with the
water pressure in the service pipes
of a municipal water system, save
that these pipes are inelastic. When
the blood pressure increases to an
abnormal degree from any cause the
individual has "high bloo*i pressure,"
which may not be, and usually is not,
of much importance?that Is, in
itself. It is silly to imagine that
"high blood pressure" is the name of
any disease condition, or that any
remedy or treatment purporting to
reduce high blood pressure will cure
the patient. It would be as sensible
CASTOR IA
In Use For Over 30 Years
H. B. P.
For Infants and Children
Alwaya bean
the
Signature of
EST
to imagine that a swelling of the eye I properly treated with a liniment
or the knee may be Intelligently or1 valve.
. I
NOTICE
OWING to the death of the
Wife of John N. Auth,
Treasurer of this firm, our
entire factory and all market
stands will be
Closed Tomorrow After
9:00 A. M.
N. Auth Provision Co.
623 D St. S.W.
Washington, D. C.
unsweetened
^aporate"
Milk
? '
^*talTu ??mrTT
Borden Quality?at the very same price
as Ordinary Brands
BORDEN'S Evaporated
Milk is just pure
country milk produced
under the most rigid
inspection and supervi'
sion. It is treated only
by heat at low tempera
ture which merely re
moves the excess water
by evaporation and sterilizes the rich
creamy milk that is left.
Typical Borden Precautions
For example, the herds from which the
milk comes are specially inspected?exam
ined regularly by skilled veterinaries and
kept thoroughly clean. In order that you
may have milk that is of
high average quality, the
milk from different breeds
is mixed so as to give the
best all-around food value.
The condensaries, where
the milk is put up in sealed
containers, are painstak
ingly inspected and an
extra-final test is made in
our laboratories of each
batch of Borden's Evap
orated Milk before it is
shipped to your grocer.
Borden's Evaporated
Milk always measures up
to these special stand
ards. You know it reaches
your pantry in the same
state of perfection.
How your grocer serves you
The production costs of Borden's Evaporated Milk
are necessarily high in view of the extra precau
tions taken in its manufacture. But American
housewives quickly learn which brand to ask for.
And nobody can afford to take chances on milk?
the most essential human food.
Your grocer knows this and while at times he pays
I?ii
more for Borden's than for
many other brands, he is seek
ing always to supply his cus
tomers with Evaporated Milk
of established superiority. He
sells Borden's to youat no higher
price. You get Borden quality at
the very tame price you would
pay for ordinary brands.
THE BORDEN COMPANY
Borden Building New York
Makers <lw of Borden't Eagle brand
Milk, Borden't Matted Milk and Borden's
Confectionery.
/3cnle4t4
EvaporatedMilk

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