OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 16, 1922, Image 8

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1922-04-16/ed-1/seq-8/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 8

Columbia Records
and Machines
REDUCED
Our entire stock of Colum
bia Rccords, consisting of
thousands of the very best
numbers, go on sale at these
remarkably low prices:
All 75c Records.. .49c
All $1.00 Records.. .69c
All $1.25 Records...79c
All $1.50 Records.. .89c
Machines Cut 30%
Our collection of records equals
any in city. Many rare numbers.
A real chance to add to your
collection at bargain prices.
HUNTER'S
718 9ih St. N.W.
ADD VALUE TO YOUR
HOME
BY HAVING IT PAINTED
PltOPKRLY BV OI R EXPERTS.
WL K.
FERGUSON
nrc.
Ul< 9th St. N.W. Ph. N. 331-23&
r AINTINti DEPARTMENT
Gold and Porcelain
Removable Bridgework
Highest.
class dcn-l
t i s t ry at]
m oderate'
cost. Our
feather
wcight plate.
Very light
and very durable; for a short
time, $10.00.
Teeth extracted painlessly
by the "Block Anesthesia
.Method." Fillings in gold,
stiver, inlays and porcelain
veneers. Special method.
Phone M. 3695
Office hours 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.;
Sundays, 10 to 1. No charge
for advice.
Dr. H. C. Smathers
Formerly 7th Sc. K
Dr. J. M. McDonald
Dental Specialists,
933 G St.
Oxer Pearlman'a Book Shop
"40"
INDUCES
SLEEP
Humphrey's' Number "Forty" In
duces Repose, and Natural, Refresh
ing Sleep.
No Narcotic, Opiate. Dope or habit
forming drugs?Strictly Homeo
pathic.
Rlmrd Be Sleep
A Morristown, V. J.. Lad?, writes:
"I tnuk a dns* of Number "Forty" last
night and through a sharp thunder and
hjhtainj; storm, which proves for me its
p|firn?\v. ,H!?>ssf4d ho sleep and the little pel
lets which h?'lp us.'
Price. 30c and $1.00. at Drug Storea, or sent
4oa receipt of price, or C. O. 1>. Parcel Post.
Humphreys' Homeo. Medicine Co.. 1.">6 Wil
liam Street. New York. Medical Book Free.
Humphrey*' ?'SeTfnty-WTfn"
breaks tip Colds that hang on.
CORNS
Lift Off with Fingers
Doesn't hurt a bit! Drop a. tittle
"Freezone" on sua aching oorn, in
stantly that corn stops hurting, then
shortly tou lift it right off with fin
gers. Truly!
Your druggist sells a tiny bottle of
'?Freezone'' for a few cents, sufficient
to remove every hard oorn, soft oorn,
or com between the toes, and the cal
luses, without soreness or irritation.
BONO
LIQUID ?
DESTROY THE ROACHES
W bogs, fleas and moths bf
spraying with Bono Liquid. C?
tainly afFactrre. Plat SOo.
Qt. ISc- G.L ?J. 7 S. At
.'.'J .Ml.. jg
BONO.
N.Y.
3HT0
Harden Declares Countries
Must Become International
to Save Selves.
GLOOMY EASTER OUTLOOK
Co-Operation as Yet Seems Impos
sible, He Says?Discusses Meet
ings of "Internationals."
BY MAXIMILIAN HARDEN.
Germany's Foremost Publicist.
Bj Cable to The Star.
BERLIN, AprN 15.?There formerly
was an Easter custom whereby Ger
man pupils in humanist colleges
would go sinking Into the woods to
cut off willow switches with which
their masters might chastise them.
Europe's people today, however,
show no desire to prepare a means
for their own punishment. They do
not confess even to having blun
dered, but continue to place the
blame upon others. In some partB,
however, large masses, have sepa
rated themselves from the state. The
proud Roman name of proletarian
was given to the crowds who did not
serve the stats with property but
with offspring?proles?whoss lead
ers had the right to chastise the
more fortunaita classes of the com- j
munity as the old-time masters en- ]
joyed the right over their bad pupils.
"htrra>tiOB>l>" Meet.
This quiet week, devoted to the re
membrance of Christ's passion, has
brought the sound of many chasten
ing strokes. Representatives of
three internationals met in Berlin to 1
judge the earth's citizens. It was
the anniversary of the first Inter
national which emanated from the
little group of believers in the resur
rection of Christ, who attempted to I
form a Christian community without
national boundaries, which, however,,
on the eve of the second century
proved itself weak and ineffectual.
In 1864 a new international sprang
up. founded by Karl Marx. It called |
Itself the first international, al
though the founders believed they
were continuing the Galilean spirit
propagated in Rome. Had not Jesus
himself called the poorest and heavi
est laden tc Him and promised them
the kingdom of heaven? Had He not
driven the money changers from the
temple and publicly taught that It
would be easier for the camel to go
?hrougli the eye of the needle than
for a rich man to enter heaven?
Despite the noblest of principles
I Marx's international soon was the
subject of quarrels and of Sectarian
disputes.
Then came the organization or the
second international. At first it seem
ed invincible. It caused govern
ments to tremble and flourished in
the face of the strongest of police
and military opposition. Therefore
it came to be regarded by the work
ingmen as pious Christians regard
the future of the world. In July,
1914. when the horizon of Europe
already was cloudy, the leaders of
the international proclaimed that
their principles would be stronger
than patriotism, that the working
I classes would not degrade themselves
i by fratricide.
Bush to Military Support.
But on mobilization day the evil
of words was rent asunder. Men
rushed wildly to the colors and the
part v. called?to give it its full name?
"the International Revolutionary Peo
ple fo'r the Liberation of Social
Democracv." became the strongest sup
porters if the military bourgeois
government?. Even orthodox Marx
ists like the Russian. Plechanow;
the Frenchman, Guesede: the Belgian,
Vandervelde. and the anarchist. Prince
Kuropatkin. supported their country's
cause. Those who confessed Interna
tionalism, like Lenin, were exiled, or,
like Karl Liebknecht, were imprisoned
and forced to make boots.
Later another international was
started, this time in the Swiss town
of Zimmerwald. A second, considered
dead since the bolsbevist revolution
I of 1917 had forced a dictatorship on !
' the vast empire of the former czar. I
was revived and a call issued for all J
peoples between the White and Yel-i
low seas to rally to its standard.
With the war over, a third one. like
wise supposed dead, was resurrected
in Vienna. Their leaders inveighed ]
against each lother louder than the
ancient Trojans and Greeks before
a battle. The third enjoyed the
prestige of being the first prole
tarian state to influence the east?
Turkey. Persia, India. The second,
especially organized for trade anions,
was expected to insure the money
necessary for economic and social j
war. Consequently there arose a de-,
sire, to co-operate. This was the
reason for the Berlin gathering. It
has made little progress despite a
great displav of rhetoric. Co-ope ra
tion as yet is impossible, but an In
ternational mass demonstration has
been called for April 20.
Russian Viewpoint. .
The contrasting Russian viewpoint
was noteworthy. At Moscow Lenin,
speaking on the Russian economic
condition, eaid: "We are not going to
Moscow as communiats, but as busi
ness men meaning to get as much as
possible for the Russian trade." At
the Berlin conference Radek, also a
member of the soviet government,
thundered against "the capitalistic
I robber states now considering their
new plundering expedition at Genoa."
These states, so kindly spoken of, were
forced by necessity and business hope
to have intercourse with the com
munist government, which Is really
their worst enemy, but so Important,
will that trade intercourse become
that moral indignation no longer will
be possible on the part of their repre- ]
sentatives now assembled at Genoa.
Mr. Child, the American observer
I at Genoa, sees signs of the highest
culture In the old-time charming pal
1 ace where the soviet representatives
i are meeting with the delegates of all
1 Europe. But culture already Is be
coming sclerotic, and also is uncon
sciously preparing a rod for Its own
back. Unless Europe becomes Inter
national in a practical sense, aban
doning nationalism closely guarded
by militarism, there is futile hope for
happiness on Easter day, although
the bells everywhere are ringing a
Joyous spring: song:. ,
(Copyright, 1922.)
PLOWS UP SNAKE NEST.
Farmer Declares Reptiles Would
Have Filled Basket.
Special Dispatch to The Star.
LAUREL, Del. April 16.?Thomas Ja
cob.., colored? while plowing on the Elle
good farm, half a mile south of here,
yesterday plowed up a nest of black
snakes. According to Jacobs, the snakes
wouid All a bushel basket and were en
twined around each other. When Ja
cobs saw the snakes be ran Across the
field to the road and bull* a lire so as
to destroy his tracks, believing that If
the snakes were after him they would
atop their search when at the edge of
the fire.
KAY SEE KING AND POPE.
ROME, April 10.?Reports were
current in Rome today that Prime
Minister Lloyd George of Great Brit
aln, who la attending the Genoa eco
nomic conferenoe, would visit King
Victor Emmanuel and Pope Plua over
Easte. British official quarters,
however, were without definite infor
EfV&SUt;
jKDlmoAjrooth.
Refuse Insurance of Son, Slafri
In War\ on Religious Grounds
The parents of a soldier killed In
tl-e war have refused to receive in
surance checks from the Veteransf
Bureau on account of their religious
beliefs.
The case is declared by Director
Forbes to be one of the most unusual
ever handled by the bureau, and
although special Investigators have
been sent to the little home In North
Carolina, the father and mother of
Thomas Speaks, bugler In the 21st
Infantry, who was killed October 4,
1918, continue to refuse tire checks;
and the insurance money is accruing
in the bureau.
After the death of the soldier, the
Veterans* Bureau forwarded certain
forms to his parents, requesting that
they be tilled out and returned to the
bureau. There was no re?pon?e.
Within a few weeka the bureau wrote
the parents, inclosing additional
copies of these forms. But still there
was no response. This action on the
part of the bureau continued until
June, 1921, when a special Investigator
called on Mr. and Mr* Speaks rela
tive to the case.
In a personal Interview he learned
that the boy had enlisted In the Army
a minor; that the parents had been
dependent upon the boy; and that
due to certain religious doctrines they
could not accept the monthly checks
of $28.75 without feeling they 'Were
a party to their son's death. The in
vestigator could not make them un
derstand the protective side of gov
ernment insurance. They were arbi
trarily opposed to any sort of insur
ance, and ho reported to the bureau
that the parent! would under no con
ditions accept tlio money.
The investigator discovered that the
parent* had brought the body of
Thomas Speaks from France. He in
formed them that the government
was willing' to reimburse them for
certain burial expense* Incurred, and
aaked that an Itemized statement be
submitted to the bureau. When the
Statement arrived at the Washington
office of the Veterans" Bureau, it was
found to oover the erection of a tomb,
built by the boy's father, at a ooet
of $98.(5. No mention of actual buritl
charges was made, and since the gov
ernment cannot, due to legal restric
tion, pay for mausoleums and tombs
built by the deceased's family, the
Speaks family oould not be reim^
bureed for the ftS.85 expended.
The insurance money is accruing In
the bureau, and since both parents
claim dependency upon the ion, but
are unwilling to prove their conten
tion, the (10 additional per month
has never been paid.
Other cases are on record in the
bureau where checks have been re
fused because they would be tragic
reminders of the one that was gone.
And checks have been refused even
by wealthy beneficiaries, who de
olu-?l th? checks were eo email t>"cy
war* more bother than they were
worth.
WORK FOR RADIOPHONE.
Postmaster Geperal Interested in
Possibilities for Service.
Postmaster General Work Is Inter
ested In th? possibilities of broad
casting- postal information by means
of the radio telephone. During "Postal
Improvement week," beginning- May
1, it is likely that such Items may be
sent out from the radio In the Post
Office Department.
At the same time Dr. Work advises
postmasters everywhere to take ad
vantage of radio possibilities during
"Postal Improvement week" and tali
the public all about the service. The
first talk might be entitled, "The
Travels of a Letter," he suggests.
The self-satisfied people who feel
that they have nothing more to
learn, may have a lot to unlearn.
w=
We Uid Because We Specialize
A t mwMh u< experience taxd span the aaeeeeefel
kr~"'-f of tr?r M*/>00 petteeto la ten years onlj, by
Dr. Wrath and Staff of Expert, Careful,
Skilled Dentist*
All work tat without th? illfhlaat Mkhm of pels.
The: hu bean ray racord for the poet to years. ET:ry
Ui'nr that will arid to the romfort of our patient* Is
frovtded. Every Instrument must bo Ujoroujhly JiTER
LIZGD before using.
Teres* of Pays*set to Salt. Examination Preo
ClesnUnaas It on. of our many striMng fsstwe.
My perfect Baillea
roetb Will Net (Ulp
tt Dnp-H. Ottier
Bete of Tuft, H Up.
IOpoa Stmt Et?bIbc tattl ? a'Clock, and on Sindajn 10 A. M.
F. BiT Lad/ and an aids la atteadance. All work fnlly rotfaatMd 1
years. Kindly keep name and location of oar office In your mini
n w 427-29 7th Street N.W.
1/ft* WW YClO) CsIw't)
e * eualDDed
w=
LauNrfh M Bra. and ever Onsl
Co. lerreet and most thoronsrhty
? ~ ?h.iOor
equipped parlors In Washington. Ph
niHaffs. 80a fta
SI np, la fold. pO
?or, ami
porcelain.
:W
Making It Worth While
The policy upon which this business was founded?and has prospered?is the maintenance of quality?making the price as
low as possible?but safeguarding QUALITY always. Therefore, you buy here confidently and to the best advantage. It's
our pleasure to arrange terms of payment suiting your convenience.
House & Herrmann
A Splendid Dining Suite
(Exactly M Xlluitr*t?4)
Four pieces in Walnut?consisting ot
Serving Table, of inclosed pattern; Din
ing Table, with 48-inch round top, ex
tendable to six feet. Splendidly finished
and of durable construction
China Closet,
$147-50
Very Popular Dining Suite
(luotlT aa XIllltnM)
Mahogany-finish; or Walnut-finish. Consisting of four
handsome pieces ? Buffet, China Closet, with latticed
panels; Inclosed Serving Table and 48-inch Round-top Dining
Table, extendable to 6 feet. ...The deli
cate carving decoration adds a refinement
to the effect that is highly pleasing. The
construction throughout is consistently
good p ...f, ?
uin jvounu-iop Joining
*265-00
The Most Reliable
'v el-- * .<?
- .U-' *
a? - . ?? i<*!'
? ? ~ .1. t u
I V?
Refrigerators
Selected by us because of 'the well
known integrity of the makes?and the
universal satisfaction they give. They
are the product of the Challenge Re
faction they give,
frigerator Company and the Alaska Re
frigerator Company.
We have many sizes and styles of both makes
?for large and small family use and for instal
lation in house or apartment.
Galvanized-lined, Enamel-lined and Porcelain
lined; with seasoned hardwood cases or Porcelain
cases.
Refrigerators?
$| J .75 to $250*00
Ice Chests?
$8.75 to $28.50
A Whitney Go-Cart
(As niutmM)
Reed ? in Ecru finish?
upholstered in plain Rep,
cushion seat; adjustable
sliding hood; removable
back curtain; rubber-tired,
wooden wheels?*
roll edge
on body
and hood..
$29-50
..llJlllllfllja
itiwmi
?{jntinmijf
|R i mil 11 ml
Porch Rockers
(Exactly u lUortroUd)
Strong and comfortable,
able enough for the
rough weather;
woven back and seat.
Special
Dur
$4.50
Oak Chiffonier
(Exactly u ninvtratad)
Good size?with five commo
dious drawers. Very good finish
?well made in all dc-fl
tails?and we're offer-i
ing it at a price most
unusual
<?1285
High Chair
(Exactly a* lUutnttH)
White Enamel finish, with reed
back and cane seat, and fitted with
safety shelf that can be thrown
back out of the way
when not wanted for
use. Strong and dur
able -i? i.ii
$5.00
Chaise Lounge
(Exactly aa XUaatratad)
Very practical piece?useful in
every home?as well as a pleat
ing famishing ad
dition? spring up
holstery; covered
with fancy Denim.
ma a ptcst
s4875
Four-Piece Bedroom Suite
(Exactly aa nbutoattf)
Finished Walnut Color?good size Dresser, with mirror; Chif
fonier, with four large drawers and two small
top drawers; Toilet Table, with triplicate
mirrors; and Full Size Double Bed. The con
struction and finish are exceptionally good
r, with mirror; Chit
$93.50
Substantial Library Suite
(Exactly aa niostratufi)
Three-piece Suite, in Fumed Oak;
strongly constructed. Armchair and Arm
Rocker with spring upholstered seats and
both seats and backs covered with imitation
leather. Table of convenient size, with handy
shelf at bottom ?
$25-o?
Spring and Summer Rugs
A big assortment of the very newest patterns in Grass
Rugs; All-Fiber Rugs; Wool and Fiber Rugs; Rag Rugs;
Colonial Ovals; Congoleum Rug's?in all sizes from 24x36
inches to 9x12 feet; including Hall Rugs and Runners.
The latest effects in Crex Herringbone, Imperial and
DeLuxe Rugs.
Hodges' Famous Rattania, Cherokee, Abak, Kapawa
All-Fiber and Wool-Fiber Rugs.
98c to S21-50
Don't Be Misguided
Buy a
Columbia Grafonola
When it comes to real merit in "Talking
Machines," the Grafonolas have it. There are
so many exclusive points of excellence in them
that when you come to investigate you'll have
but one opinion or preference?and it'll be for
the Grafonola. ?
We have them in all the popular woods?
and in the variety of models.
Type E-2 at *85
?is one of the most attractive; fitted with the non-set stop
device, and equipped with cabinet for records. Any desired
finish. 4
You can arrange for payment upon very easy terms?$5.
cash and balance monthly.
Seventh and
Eye Streets
House & Herrmann
Seventh and
Eye Streets

xml | txt