OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 02, 1924, Image 4

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1924-04-02/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 4

4
SINCLAIR ENTERS
NOT GUILTY PLEA
Permission to Withdraw
Plea Within Ten Days
Granted by Court.
• v • .jiity" «;if the pica entered late j
yesterday aft -rnnon by Harry F. Sin- j
rla i millionaire oil magnate, when I
airaigned before Justice A. Hoeh
ling in Criminal Division 2. on the in
d> tmcnl returned against him yes
terdaj for alleged contempt of the'
United Stales Senate, in refusing to
answer questions put to him by the
committee on j»uh!ie lands und sur
veys. j
Martin W. Littleton, of tounscl fur]
the aci'UFi-d, waived the reading of |
the indictment, and. after the plea j
bad b< .il entered, obtained permis- ■
-ion f .lustice Hoehling to withdraw ■
the pit a within ten days and file a do- I
mum r < r other paper attacking the]
validm of tie indictment, as: he may
1.. ised. With Mr. Littleton as
out se wi'iv .1. \V. Zrvely and (!. T.
Banjoul of Ho New York liar. Local j
com:,-. I will l>. ia taincil later. Mr. i
Li Ul* ton si a ted,
SS.l'iK) tinil liivrn, ,
W e desir-d to inert the situation ]
I>r. n»p:l; : , Mr. Littleton when i
a.sKc*l why i; preferred to plead at j
this time
Mi. Son lair , hen gave bail of
-a.0n... w ith the Fidelity and Deposit
I’ompatiy of Mar} - land as surety, to ;
, np. a e for i via I. ' j
TP. 0.l t icnaie. on hearing from I
ids counsel, o. parted from New York I
it t»y.stenlas morning and reach
ed Washington shortly after 3 o’clock. |
He t\«:.t it once to the courthouse I
• and to il.. i.ftin of United States At-I
t- rn. v 'Pinion, where he arranged to
make his idea, instead of waiting un- |
l: I a la i ei' date, as is customary in j
Criminal vases.
Would Expire April 12.
s'|r.e l l l l tin defendant take the full I
t- 11 (I ivs !i which to tile his demurrt r ]
0 . iji, i an:.!- U on the indictment, the j
tin. would expire April 12. In that I
.• \. I. aring to; the demurrer would
prrdiahlj In scheduled f> r \pril IS or
t eoijfi might Pt asked To iissigti a
spi • e l d te for the arguments on tlu
d' rear! • :
RUSSIA BACKS ARMS |
LIMITATION PROJECT
T'diitcherin Believes Plan Could :
Be Carried Out With League's ,
Participation.
Pr the Aw-viioi p-ess.
GKNEVA. April _’. Limitation of j
armament- sliould 1 separated from!
the question of tin establishment of 1
an international organization for the |
prevention of war. .M. Tchitclierin, j
Russian soviet minister of foreign i
affairs stated in his reply to a re- J
quest of the league of nations for •
Russia's viewpoint on the pact of I
mutual gnarantees elaborated at the ■
lii-i assembly of the league.
M. Tehitcherin objects that the pact*
does* not separate tlte two questions.]
Me dedans that limitation of arnia- '
merits is so grave and urgent 'that it •
is imperative the problem be treated;
immediately, separate!. and indfc- '
rie'idenilv, ft other questions. He j
' tors an international conference for;
fixing l!i- maximuin strength of the!
s adding armies and na\ es and aerial |
foret-.s of eaeii state, taking as a •
basis the area of its territory, popu- (
lotion and public r» venue, and taking'
into account special local eonsidera- I
t ons. . I
General Limitation Plan,
it i insisted by M.-Tehitcherin that!
gen r 1 limitation of arms could be]
Carried out without the participation i
of (he league of nations and objects t
to any scheme implying measures of}
restraint being exercised by any in- I
ternutional authoritv against any!
particular sla'< . which, he say's!
would mean an international dictator- '
ship. The soviet foreign minister j
v arris tin league of nations that dis-I
armament and avoidance of war can-!
rot b- achieved, even partially, with- i
out t!,. participation of tli esoviet j
repn Mi
VETERANS IN “HOLY Ci TY” I
Walter Reed Patients to Take Part ;
in Play. !
War veteran patients at Walter Reed
Hospital will have parts in the forth
coming production of "The Holy City,”
* * be given at the President Theater '
>r one week, beginning Sunday, as j
Roman and Halibut soldiers. Mem-]
1 ~ts of the Catholic University Glee i
' mb also have volunteered to jiartici-'
pare in the ensemble.
Miss Elizabeth Bogan, musical diree
i .rof the St. Pa trick's Players, and Prof. •
C. A. Benson, leader of the male choir,
lave determined upon Massenet’s]
"Mary Magdalene” as the most ap
propriate incidental music to ae.com-,
"any the entire action of the play, j
The orchestra of the Catholic Daugh- j
i era of America will provide the!
in.-U’itmenia 1 music heard off stage.
-== . = REYEM SHOES . i
|— ■ -■
To be "CORRECT"
\ rdf m every detail—is the
■ requirement of every
Jji a cy
ers |
ENGLISH I
ldS&' LOUNGE
SUIT
S fr% MS —J AC K E T—SOFT ROLL
/ if ; ? FRONT AND STRAIGHT.
I- . LINE BACK—EASY FIT-
I ' —WAISTCOAT SIX BUT-
I -r 1-1 TONS. HIGH CUT AND
I.: BLUNT BOTTOMS.
.nj —TROUSERS HIGH ENG
tt; r/i LISH WAISTBAND AND
1 J WIDE LEGS.
S 3O to $ 75
Meyer’s Shop
1331 F Street
Everything for the Well Dressed Matt.
' MALLORY HATS ~ =• j
| BERWYN WOMAN FILES
FOR HOUSE SEAT RACE
I
| Mrs. Virginia Peters-Parkhurst
j Runs as Democrat for Place Held !
by Sydney E. Mudd.
j By (Si" Associated Press.
I BALTIMORE. }ld April 2 —Mrs. j
i Virginia Peters-Parkhurst of Berwyn, •
| Print*' Get was county, again is a
'candidate for Oongress.
: She riled her papers as candidate for
1 the democratic nomination from the
i fifth congressional district yesterday
} in Charles and Prince Georges coun
i ties.
j Two years ago she filed similar I
i papers. l*ut subsequently withdrew. (
j The fifth district is normally re
| publican, the present representative.]
Il Sydney K -Mudd. living iti his sixth j
term
Airs'. Pari.hurst said she would run
on the straight democratic platform j
and would work for clean government
• against the present state of corrup
tion and graft. She is an ardent dry.
Born in IHS2 in the District of Go
lumhia. Mrs. Parklmrst is a daughter
of the !atc Charles Wright Geddes <if
t Baltimore.
I
I LA FOLLETTE HOLDING
WISCONSIN BY 24.112]
(Continued from First Page.)
1 I
1 to Gov. George S. Sllzor for the demo- )
jcratle nomination,
i I'nited States Senator Kdge, former I
j Senator Frelinghuysen and former !
! Gov. Kdward C. Stokes ar,- among the j
i republican candidates fur delegates at I
I large who favor, Coolidge.
KLAN CANDIDATE WINS.
j
’ Tulsa Democrats Defeat Republi
j can Opponents.
j TPLSA. Okla.. April 2.—The demo
i eratio city administration of Tulsa,
j backed by the Ku Klux Klah. was re-
II elected in entirety over the republi
can and anti-Klan ticket in yester
day’s election.
Final returns gave Mayor Herman
, Newblock a. majority of 4.545 over
i John It. Hadley. The incumbent re
j ceived 10,994 votes against 0.419 for
* his opponent lake majorities were 1
! polled by all those on Newblock’s *
I ticket.
! The election was the first test of
; Klan and anti-Klan strength since
martial law was invoked here last
year by former Gov, .1, C. Walton to j
end outrages which ho attributed to i
the Klan.
JOHNSON TO TALK IN OHIO. !
j
: Senator to Stump State Week End- !
ing April 23.
j CLEVELAND. Ohio, April 2.—Sen-j
| ator Hiram W. Johnson will open his (
] campaign to capture the Ohio dele- !
• gation to the republican national)
■ convention with an address in Can- j
! ton April 12. State Senator George j
‘H. Bonder, his state manager, an- j
no tin cod last night. The following *
1 week he will stamp the state, clos- I
j ing his campaign with a mass meet- [
j ing hero a day or two before the pri- j
j mary. April 23.
Requests to the national republi- j
' can resolutions committee to include {
i the equal rights principle in its plat- !
; form will be made b> the National ]
, Woman’s I’arty. National’and state:
i ofiiccrs-of the organization will meet j
here June 9 and 10, preceding the!
] republican national convention. y
tint is Is Favorite.
HUTCHINSON, Kan., April 2.—With |
! peace and harmony on the floor of j
I the democratic state convention as- I
] stired by party leaders, the indorse- j
• mi nt of Gov. Jonathan M. Davis for !
President was predicted when the!
I convention opened today. Col. Sam •
j Aiuidon. Wichita. leader of the j
i MeAdoo forces, has announced his j
• partiality to the governor “as long
i as there is a chance for him.”
—-
RESIGN IN MONTREAL, i
I j
1 President and Three Directors of
i Tram Line Give Way.
MONTREAL, April 2.—Resignation
i of William C. Finlay, president of th
! Montreal Tramways and Power Com- ;
j pativ. Ltd., and three f.-llow- directors, j
j Hon. .f. W. Wilson. Hon. George G. j
j Foster and J. Maclntyre, was an- ;
i i,oiinoed yesterday.
Their departure leaves the boardi
j in full control of new officers elected !
} at the last annual meeting.
—— .
; There are more than 200,000 pro- i
; during oil wells in the United States, j
, located in twenty-two states.
' I ■■■■■■■■■■■■■ I !
! Polished Floors
of Hard Wood
—la til. smoothed and polish
ed in the liest manner. An
experience of thirty years in )
lids special work Insures i
right results. Telephone
North AASk
J. M. ADAMS
1503 Connecticut Ave, j
THE KVEXtXU STAR, WASIiINCi'I’O.N. L>. (J., WKDNKSDAV, APRIL 2. 1924.
{SECOND MAN KILLED
IN ELECTION BRAWL
)
!
i Fight Blamed on Efforts of Wets
i to Retain Saloons in Chi
cago Subnrb.
By the Associated Press
CHICAGO, April 2.—A socond killing
in Cicero in twenty-four hours broke
the morning quiet today, following the
turbulent village election yesterday,
: when one man was killed and numerous
j persons wounded, beaten or kidnaped,
i some of the victims being women,
j Hie dead; Joseph Smith, a chauffeur;
j shot and killed in a brawl; Frank Ca
jponi. alleged emissary of a beer-running
IT-mg’. shot by Chicago police.
Smith was killed in front of a road
house early today. How far village poli
tics may have been involved the police
art- uncertain. Caponi was slain yes
i terday by the police summoned to the
village to help keep order,
j . * tcero. a city within Chicago, staged
i its first partisan election in six years.
Incumbents Are Hr-F.lr.-trd.
| After election officials, surrounded
j by armed guards, had counted the
j ballots, while policemen and deputy
| sheriffs patrolled the streets, it was
j announced that all republican ineum
. bents, with one exception, had been
re-elected by majorities of from 700
! to 900.
j Caponi died with a dozen bullets I
j in his body when he opened (ire on i
| a group of detectives who left an]
automobile to question him and his !
companion. The police declared Ca- |
Poni’s band had been imported by a
"wet” faction desirous of maintaining 1
saloons iii Cicero.
The village’s hectic • election day i
smarted Monday night, when two dent- !
ocratic candidates were slugged.
jCarly yesterday a band of men drove !
all voters and election officers except '
one woman from a voting place, and |
in the melee two election officials |
were shot. A bystander was wound
ed when detectives fired on Caponi.
late in the day. when a policeman
and one of the candidates had been
kidnaped, more than I"" policemen
and deputy sheriffs were sent to the 1
j distriet while votes were counted. 1
Several hundred men and women j
were terrorized and many of them !
punched and kicked when two score |
gangsters raided a dance held by
j persons affiliated with the losing sac- |
; lion in another election in Leyden j
j township.
CARLIN SEES UNDERWOOD'
| AS DEMOCRATIC CHOICE
I Regards Senator From Alabama as j
‘•Most Available Candidate*’
i
at TMs Time.
t
Senator Underwood of Alabama is
(generally regarded at this time as the
j most available candidate who can be (
•nominated by tho democratic party, i
! Charles C. Carlin, chairman of the !
[national Underwood campaign com
■ mittee, declared last night, basing his 1
! conclusion on “reports from various |
| states.”
Mr. Carlin said it is believed the
i Maine delegation “will be unanimous
I for Underwood when il reaches New
! York.” In New Hampshire, he con
j tinned, the majority are for Senator
I Underwood, while the minority is dis
posed toward Gov. Smith. The Arizona i
'delegation, as elected, he continued, is j
f nninstructed. “Our information from j
'the most reliable sources is to the)
'effect that the delegation has been
! polled and that six of the twelve are j
: favorable to the candidacy of Senator
! Underwood, four to MeAdoo and two j
uncommitted, but disposed toward
f Underwood.” Mr. Carlin explained that (
' Arizona is entitled to six delegates, but j
j elected twelve with a half vote each.
i MARRIED IN NEW YORK.
: Mayor of Winston-Salem and Bride j
Depart on Honeymoon.
NEW YORK, April 2.—Mtas Mary
Walton Ruffin, daughter of the late W. •
C. Ruffin of Winston-SaJem, N. C., and j
granddaughter of the late Chief Jus
tice Thomas Ruffin of Winston-Salem,
i was married to James Gordon Hanes,
mayor of W,. n>n-Salem. last night I
;at the Ambassador Hotel. Mr. and !
i Mrs. Hanes sailed today on the steam-
I ship Paris on their wedding trip.
f W-&J-SLOANE 1 |
1508 H. STREET, N. W. (Opposite the Shoreham}
oA Special Sale j
Chinese Rugs
! i i
9x 12 8 x 10 6x9
*230 *l9O *135 |
!
i
i
gxo
I
i
(_T HEY are all of a character
-*■ fit to adorn any room —
of a quality that insures ser- I
vice for many years —at
prices which will be eagerly
welcomed by all desirous of
acquiring a genuine hand- j
woven Chinese Rug.
i
FREIGHT PAID TO ALL SHIPPING POINTS IN THE UNITED STATES
I
*
j
Sloane Endorsed tMerchandise Carries an c Assurance of Satisfaction |
FAMED CASTLE FOR RENT.
Tenant Sought for Baronial House
of Dukes of Norfolk.
LONDON. April 2.—Arundel Castle,
famous baronial dwelling of dukes
of Norrfolk, the baltlemented walls
and turrets of which crown a pic
turesque hill in Sussex, is for hire,
according to the Daily Express. The
dowager duchess. who controls the
estate during the minority of her
son, the present duke, a sixteon-year
old boy, is trying to find somebody
to rent the castle and its contents
for five years at £B.OOO per annum.
The castle was built centuries ago.
but much altered in later times. It
still contains many historic treasures,
including paintings and tapestries of
great value, as well as a famous
library. The reason for letting it is
:iot stated. The dowager duchess is
reputed to he very wealthy.
Afeat of tho dugong, or sea-cow.
tastes similar to pork, and is enjoyed
by the natives and whites of western
Australia.

fR! Porcli Floors
t have had a hard w inter. They have been
battered right and left by the winter’s snow
■ * a and sleet. But the damage done by old Jack
Frost can easily he overcome by/giving youi
Y 1 porcli Hour a coal of—
iVHI ACME QUALITY
Deck Paint
Acme Quality Deck Paint comes in live bcau-
L pyrf tiful shades that harmonize readily with any
color scheme. Acme Quality Deck Paint dries
j I with a hard glpssy finish that is absolutely !
If’ waterproof and will wear indefinitely.
One-Half Gallon Acme Quality Deck Paint, $2.50
—will paint the floor of an ordinary porch 8 feet wide and 20 ■
feet long, and the coat, including a brush to do the job, will |
only be S2.&C.
There are hundreds of other little jobs abont the bouae which |
V can be ewaily done at a cost correspondingly low.
\ N Come In and let ns util yon how to beautify and preserve your j
V home at price* exceptionally low.
Butler-Flynn Paint Co.
609 C St. N.W. Main 1751
Plenty of Parking Space
1 ' i
L—___
I BIRD’S I
1415 G Street
SEEKING NEW CUSTOMERS
ON OUR RECORD

| j
One Hundred Street and
Afternoon Frocks
sl9-50 |
Actual 524.50 and 529.50 Values
i I
Fifty Snappy Dress and
Sport Coats
$23-50
Poiret Twills, Black, Navy, Fawn
LUNATICS BREAK OUT
TO SEARCH FOR FOOD
Strike of Attendants Leaves Only
One Woman to Care for 600
Patients.
By the Associated Press.
BELFAST. April 2.—For the last
twelve 'hours the 600 inmates "f tho
Donegal Lunatic Asylum virtually
have been without food because of
the strike of the attendants, who kip
naped the one man cook on duty,
leaving only a woman to care for the
hundreds of demented sufferers.
Several dangerous lunatics, taking
advantage of the strike, have broken
through the cordon of civic guards
outside tlte building and made for the
countryside in search of food They
are being pursued by hastily formed ■
parties of farmers.
Kreo Suite soldiers , from Dublin
i have taken possession of the asylum
■ and the hospital authorities are ap
i pealing to the farmers, agricultural
laborers and others to render assist -
ance, l>ut the spring work on the
farms is absorbing most of the able
bodied men.
The strikers are actively picketing
the asylum and the situation Is re
garded as critical.
If tho earth were suddenly thrust
into the sun it would melt as quickly
as a snowflake falling on a red-hot
stove.
|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMitiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiimmHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii„, ! |iniiiiii,||,|„|||,||||,||||„| l ,|| in iK
and 1
| Satchels Jl 720-22—24 7th vt mw BOTH |
Make Your Dollar Do
\vSk Double Duty Tomorrow
I Patent Strap Pumps Sj |
for Children I Jag $ | |
Sizes 4 to 11 |
2 Pairs Pumps or $1 KK | |
Oxfords for Women X
Boudoir Slippers for tl Ijf
Women, 2 Pairs X |
2—79 c Little Tots’ $1.50 Boys’Crash $1.69 Women’s Long I
Gingham & Percale Wash Crepe Kimonos I
II SI .50 Big Girls' Costume Slips 2—«9c Crepe and |
jl \ \ Straw Hats White,black Muslin Gowns
i qualify straw. Plain and ruf- SB & Bloomers, 1
I pp! “ S “ X I
is SI.OO Boys’ Pants Waists 3—59 c Rompers 1
! | * and 59c Blouses Perfect rfsß and Creepers |
11 ! Waists! * 1! |
l| SPRING COATS SPRING DRESSES f
| /j
j= the smart new colors, including— PvJ 1 . selection of silk dresses, sea- s
Beige Tan— tuning the new spring stvles. color e
Twilight— Gray— /) \\ aml " ,ail : v ne ' v niater,als/ Splendid |
c . s D . .j to possess several new e
| Stripes rlaids frocks at a new low price.
12 Yards Dotted Voile 2 Yds - Silk & Cotton |
= Whi to dots on sheer, fine qual- xl CHINE (FH POWflp p d*B E
| i.y colored grounds. At .1.1. .p- fl “J jSS V| .. rW ‘~ LL '?■ I
Isgportun© time make your summer EH Shown in an ml- H .ti-incb Natural Color Pongee. w:.i a
l=* . , ■■§ or*. including black "“Kb Ins trow silk finish, noted for n- s:
[S dresses. Full pieces and perfect. an( j B wearing and washing dualities. ■“*
__ 5 Yds. Plisse 81x90 $1.49 Perfect 8 Yards White
Crepe <4 shects -f Longdoth -0 jm |
= 1 ...-inch This Sheer, fine qua!-Vfß | =
Vi Grope in all colors gT)* opportunity to <DH Chamois =
and white: u - supply your Y l Inches Vo | K J I
i= most extensively needs for the in yard rem- B | E
“ r for underwear- season. aMi nants ■Kas \
1 8 Yards Dress 8 Yds. Bleached 4 Yds. Black
Gingham MUSLIN Satteen I
j Fine I wide. Unu n d 600 j ards of this S
= HRf *1 Dress Gingham, jll Thread Kleach - anH Yard-wide Klack tnl =
= A assort- T ■ ed Muslin will T| Saline to be K# =
1— A JrjJaL nient of plain H make nice H . . »• \& » i
= fufr I shades. Hegu- sheets and pil- at this price, lias } =
E WP • I larty priced at 17c. BBM lowcases. ■■Mb a silk like finish, kxi fjpT j E
i 1 " *| I $1.75 GINGHAM ’ |
|p j Girk’ Dresses |j| FROCKS |
= lII]I- t' *. j-.r- M.d. ,f I ,| M tWO-t O;i , S
= sez I ;// strar-asrsii i —tvv 1 I
ranyA m | Jj j j pi«in color* and pretty 6i ig, \ Standard gmg- h =
‘I I Ck ’V^i^ U -middles I I hams. Regular I |
pr p *** am] dpw uovqlty effects. if and OXtra SIZCS.
1 Women's l.o*g' Silk .I—s#r Babies' Silk- —The Men's ' nin -ajS =
E \ Gloves TV Striped I’ndrrwbin* . ® Kl>;?k Vnlon Salta TtN |
E \ labntton, hetv.T silk- NH Double bressied a n.l SI >■ W3L A-
= stitched bock, double l>utton front, silk stripe *>l kieeptionol ai, * ,l,T T ■ =
finger tips; block, white undershirts: size one "nViz^*fr.
2 —3oc Womeo'o 2 —7fk- .Men's Worked] W°™ rn '" =
= yyy L SUk uose D-lo*> TB Vhtr1 _ Tn * mbrelln*. aM ~
= I|| HeaTT Fiber Bilk Jtß xl Bokelite ond plain xfe
1= Hno*e. b11,,k ,nd colors. Blue chambrr, handle*, and plain ml T« TjgfapQßjuSm =
11 t *f?.hto.S rt %ea«- i "titled, one pocket at- g ors- b-Ucr buy couple i
double tachcd, cpll«r. you’re about it. W J9* g
| STINNES MAY SEEK
CHESTER CONCESSIONS
| Representatives of German Mag
nate Reported Negotiating
at Angora.
: CONSTANTINOPLE, April 2.—Repre
sentatives of Hugo Riinnes. Germany’s
leading industrial magnate, are reported
to be at Angora negotiating with the
j minister of public works. Suleiman
1 Siyri Bey, for the concessions for Ana
tolian development known as the Ches-
I ter concessions.
j Various reports wer* current early in
i the year that the Angora government
had canceled the so-called Chester con
cessions. One of them said that the de
velopment privileges had been assigned
to a Swiss syndicate but this was de
nied by the Ottomau-American Develop
ment Company, the concern having th j
concessions.
On January 2S a Constantinople dis
patch reported that B. 1,. Clayton-Ken
n»d», representing the development coin
pap-* “V..< still in Angora and that the
TT ''" of public works had reconsid
ered »>♦ abrogation of the Chester cou
! cessions and would offer further facili
ties to the American group.

xml | txt