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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 16, 1924, Image 5

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POTOMAC RETURNS
TO NORMAL STAGE;
Victims of Flood Removing Debris
and Seeking to Replace Chaos
With Order.
DAMAGE HERE IS $200,000
Cost of Repairing Canal Set at Less
Than $50,000.
With the Potomac River back to Its
riormal stage again today, no se- !
Pious trouble is expected to result j
from the heavy rains of last night,.!
it was announced at the weather bu- j
rrau. Officials there declare it would j
take three or four days of extremely I
heavy downpours to bring the river j
up to a flood stage again.
Most of the Chesapeake and Ohio |
Canal has been entirely released from I
the flood waters, although several i
sections in lowlands remained inun- (
dated today by water the receding |
flood left behind. It is expected that j
these will he drained before night, j
and an accurate estimate of the dam- !
age will then be possible.
Canid He pairs to Cost *50.4400.
From a hasty survey of the damage j
done to the canal between Cumber- j
land and Washington, it is said that j
the cost of repairing the waterway i
will fall considerably under S 50.000.
ft will not. however, be possible to
out the canal in its former condition j
for several years, officials' said, al
though it will be ju.-t a; serviceable j
as it was before the washout.
To repair the Georgetown level, of- ;
ficials said, will cost only about j
$4,000. Work on this section was ;
started yesterday and will be pushed ,
to completion. Additional contracts j
for mending the breaks above Chain .
Bridge and in the vicinity of Great |
Falls are to he let immediately. In \
many of the places that officials ex- ■
pected to find the greatest damage j
the least harm was done, and the |
cost of repairing those places will be i
negligible.
All of the families whose homes )
were not washed away while the j
flood was at its height were busy 1
with shovels and water today, dig- }
ging and washing from their parlors
and living rooms a foot or more of
stickv vellow silt the muddy waters
Ijft behind. Nearly all were obliged
to throw away the furniture that had
been left in the lower floors, the
water and mud having ruined it be
yond repair.
Scopes Salvaging Property.
Wherever the Potomac leaped over ;
Us banks corps of men and women j
were hard at work salvaging their |
property as best they could today. |
Several wagon loads of logs and ■
debris deposited on the well kept |
lawns of Potomac Park had been re- I
moved before noon and there was i
almost as much left, strewn in dis- |
order along the banks of the river |
and the Washington channel for |
three or four blocks.
Although an accurate estimate of
the damage done here cannot be ob- j
tained for many days, when engineers ■
have completed their survey of the )
flood area, it is not believed the cost
will go far beyond *200,000. exclusive
of the repairs to he made on the Ches
apeake and Ohio Canal. On the other
hand, reports from the upper valley
show that toe loss above Washington
exceeded early estimates and the cost j
will run into many millions of dol- !
lars.
Car Conductor Robbed of $55.
Lawrence C. Witt, conductor, on j
the Columbia line of the Washington |
Railway and Electric Company, was j
robbed last night of $55 in hills He j
told the police his pocket was picked j
while the car was going from the (
Treasury to Kenilworth.
Where the June Bride
Will Store Her Silver
A bride always gets many pieces of silver be
sides her flatware. Certainly she will
want her buffet to be as beautiful as
the silver it will store.
Here, at The Lifetime Furniture Store, the
bride-to-be will find an assortment of
dining room suites that she would
well be proud to put in her home that
will open with the roses of June.
Expensive? Not at all. Why, you should see
the ten-piece Grand Rapids made
Suite in Tudor Walnut at $350 with
66-inch Buffet and dozens of other
fine suites on display.
Lifc ti m c Fnr nit nr c Is More Than a Na m c
MAYER &■ CO.
\ Seventh Street Between D& E
||||
ASK JUDGE BAKER PROBE.
1 ■
j House Committee Members Recom
mend Investigation.
Congressional investigation of
charges against Federal Judge Baker
of the northern West Virginia district
1 was recommended today by House j
committee which conducted a pre
' Uminary inquiry.
The object of the investigation, if
i authorized by the House, would be
jto determine whether there are
i grounds for impeachment of Judge
i Baker as requested by District At-
I torney Brown of the northern West
1 Virginia district, who preferred the
j charges.
PROTEST TEACHING LIMIT
Night School Officials Object to
Four-Year Rule.
j A delegation of officers of the pub
! lie. night schools lodged a protest
t with the appeals, committee of the
j board of education yesterday after
noon against a rule which limits teach
ers to four consecutive years of serv
| ice in either the night or summer
| schools if they teach in the day
1 schools. • They told the committee
j that the rule is handicapping the
schools and is unnecessary as a
| measure to guard against the teach
ers’- health. When the rule was put
j into effect one of its principal objects
I was to conserve the energy of the
i teachers.
j The night school officers pointed
j out that it is becoming more difficult
jto secure competent night school
i teachers and that the rule tended to
, dismiss the oldest and best equipped
■ members of their staff. The school
board is expected to take some action
|on the protest at its meeting next
I Wednesday.
Offers Engraving Bureau Bill.
Representative Edward J. King of
j Illinois, on whose resolution a special
j House committee was directed to
| investigate charges of alleged irregu
larities at the bureau of engraving
i and printing, introduced a bill yes
terday. which is supposed to have the
| support of this special committee,
| which seeks to prohibit the destruc-
I tion of any of the bonds in question
! or to curtail comparison or recording ,
of such bonds.
Today electricity provides over 70
, per cent of the power used for manu-
I facturing in the United States. fn
1019 the percentage of manufacturing
done with electricity was 55 and in
1914 slightly under 40 percent.
“Nature Shapes” at 8.00
You can estimate the Burt in-
Alienee on prices when you con
trast the actual value in these
Men's Shoes with the 8.00 at
which they are sold.
\ And they afford “Nature
Shape" comfort, too.
There are “Nature Shapes’’ available also
for the Boys and (jirls and Children.
Arthur Burt Co. 1343 F Street
N
Caring: for feet is better than curing them
THE EVENING STAR, WASHINGTON, D. C„ FRIDAY, MAY IC, 1024.
PRESBYTERIAN BODY
TO GET 71 OVERTURES
Session at San Antonio May De
cide Question of Women
on Committees.
WHALING NEW MODERATOR
Rev. H. W. McLaughlin of Vir
ginia Synod One of Two Defeated.
I*7 th** Associated Press.
KAN ANTONIO, Texas. May 16
Seventy-one overtures, including sev
eral requesting the rescinding of the
action of the last assembly in ap
pointing three women on each of
four legislative committees, will be
presented to the General Assembly of
the Presbyterian Church in the Fnited
States here today.
A heated debate at the last general
assembly occurred when the question
of making women eligible for ap
pointment on the committees was
voted upon and if the question is re
opened another debate is expected.
The Rev. Dr. Thornton Whaling, a
member of the faculty of Kentucky
Theological Seminary, at Louisville,
yesterday was elected moderator.
Dr. Whaling won on the second
ballot over the Rev. J. B. Hutton of
Centiai Presbytery. Synod of Mis
sissippi. and the Rev. H. W. Mc-
Liugtilin of Ijexington Presbytery,
Synod of Virginia. The new modera
tor is a member of the Presbytery of
Alabama.
Kcv, J. I». Leslie lie-elected.
Rev. J. D. Leslie of Dallas, Texas,
was re-elected stated clerk of the
assembly f..r a period of three years.
Other elections were Rev. E. L. Siler
of Maxton. N. C., as assistant clerk:
Rev. C. R. Lacy of Abingdon, Va., and
TWO-DAY SALE~
SATURDAY—SUNDAY
Sale of Delicious. Refreshing
Fussell's Ice Cream—All Flavors
Pint, 25c; QU 50c; GaL, $1,90
At Cherrydale Light Lunch, J, F.
and H. Held. Jr„ 77 l.re Highway,
Cherry dale, Va. Phone Clarendon 757.
No delivery.
Rev. W. F. Galbraith of Dallas, Texas,
as temporary clerks, and Rev. J. W.
Carpenter of Williamson, W. Va., as
reading clerk.
The ballot on moderator brought
no election, and the name of Dr. Me-
Laughlin was dropped. On the next
ballot Dr. Whaling received 183 votes
to 100 for Dr. Hutton and was de
clared elected.
The new moderator was escorted to
the chair by Rev. J. S. Lyons of At
lanta, Oa., who placed him In nomi
nation, and Rev. E. D. McDougall of
Jackson, Tenn., who seconded the
nomination.
byuod of Kentucky.
Announcement was made by the
stated clerk that the Synod of Ken
tucky, at Its last meeting, had united
the presbyteries of Paducah and Muh
lenburg under the name of the latter
presbytery. He also announced that
the Synod of North Carolina had re
arranged the boundaries of presbyte
ries and added the number by fcwo.
The report of the women's auxil
iary in its financial summary shows
that during the past year the women
identified with this’organization con
tributed to the benevolent causes of
the church a total of *1,141,608, this
being an increase of *174,561 over the
amount contributed the previous
year. The auxiliary apportioned this
money as follows;
To foreign missions, *274.392; to
home missions. *127.856; to Christian
education and ministerial relief, *46.-
443; to publication and Sabbath
school extension. *11,981. It was
shown In the report that the average
per capita for the more than 100,000
women who are members of the aux
iliary - was *l4.
22(45 Classes Organized.
During the past year there, have
been 2.345 organized classes for the
•study of foreign missions and 2,274
for the study of home missions; the
total membership of all study classes
was 14,964, an increase of 420 over the
membership of the classes reported a
year ago. The summer school of mis
sion. which is held each year at Mon
treal. N. C.. had an attendance of
more than 800 women last summer.
A large part of the annual report
fLAFLIN
Have Best
Quality, Only
Claflin Optical Co. C ioci.> 1
'•Oro/r^ Me AVENUE at NINTEIT*
-/ > - | - <-'■•'• .’'l
( "'■ -V', ±?,W\ • t' •' ■ *« . • !
M- -V'. • \\ \ ' /]/ >■• i r
,
. $I '■■• A ■ >—^
" Personality is a word that should be taken
seriously this year—when you buy your new
straw hat.
At T w o-EA ghty -Five.
.. Parker - Bridget have :
an a^ S ° rtl ” ent m ° St e *
der your hat.)
Illustrated Ecua- Thpv
donan Panama, Bat- L Hey CXprCSS ported Ecuadorian
tleskip shape. lias alitV genuine Panama with
™l* f dge, priced. - ’ even woven edge, un
it? 75. < Ms, $775' to $15.00.
Split and improved Sen
nit straws. Straws with
the Bon-Ton Ivy sweat
bleached natural*
with full flexible rims. k Illustrated-Fancy
illustrated-Hand- And $2.85 includes fit- r ™? h bra,d *»«£•
made, white bleached. . “ . high crown and zoide
flat-foot sennit. We ting VOU With 3. hat US brim. Hatband is
will sell a lot of these , , " 11 . hr own, to match.
this season t $ 5.00 . vvell as selling you one. $4 .00.
Clearance of 71 Prep Suits
The stock chart below tells its own story. it A
The suits are of serge and unfinished j
worsted —blues, grays and browns. P-B S ■ *
Quality, but last year’s styles. J I I
For boys 15 yrs. [l6 yra 117 yrs. I 18. yrs. 119 yra. ( I M
Now marked $16.50. 1 | 2 j I H J
Now marked $22.50. 1 9 17 12 111 ■ W
Now marked $25.00. 10 | 6 | I I H
Now marked $30.00. 2 13 t 14 I 2 I x I H
The Avenue at Ninth
INOWN STORE*/
uu riJroJ jLscLaJiiJbcs-si.it LB WMva-i.v a v utt b
MRS.COOLIDGE GREETS
METHODIST WOMEN
Missionary Society Reports $35,-
000 Collected in Year—Meets
in Staunton.
Delegates to the eleventh annual
meeting of the Woman’s Missionary
Society of the Baltimore Conference
of the M. E. Church were received by
Mrs. Coolldge at the White House
today.
They then convened in the final
session of the four-day conference
at the Mount Vernon Place M. E.
Church South. It was reported at the
meeting today that *35,000 had been
raised by the conference In the last
year, and that it would endeavor to
raise *4,000 more during the re
mainder of this year.
The conference embraces the states
of Virginia, West Virginia and Mary
land.
Prizes for the best posters were
For a Wonderful Vacation —'s
California
n ai n CrnUe to California
ODC £L n the largest ocean liners to the AMA
Pacific Coaar, with a atop for sight* wttv
seeing at Havana and the Panama
Canal and back by rail with a choice
ytW HV of lines for
* Round Trip <3ls vw&y
VSffhCAW Including first cabin accommoda- __
TT AlwS tions, meals on ship. Entertain
ment, dancing, smooth sailing for A••••
restful fortnight.
Panama Baciric Line
1208 F E Street™?W S .’ Wsskington < 'C* '
awarded to the West Knd section of
Roanoke, Va,, in the adult class; to
the Belmont section of Roanoke, In
the young people’s class, and to the
junior section of Roanoke. The
young people's section includes mem
bers of the society between the ages
of fourteen and twenty-two years,
while the junior class includes those
under fourteen,
Meet Next in Staunton.
It was decided to hold next year's
meeting in Staunton. Va.. in May. the
date to be decided later. A report
of the resolutions committee will con
stitute the final business to be con
sidered by the conference.
At the session yesterday reports were
AUTOMOBILES
OVERHAULED
Painting and Trimming
Bodies Built to Order
24-Hour Service
Central Auto Works and Garage
Wm. Rrarhert, Prop.
449-51 Eye St. N.W.
Prank lin 0805
read by the secretaries of the differ
ent branches. These included; Mrs.
J. G. Cockey, - Alexandria; Mrs. C. H.
Kirk, Baltimore; Mrs. W. J. Veager,
Bouisburg; Mrs. J. H. Bight. Moore
fleld; Mrs. O. O. Homan. Hoanoke;
Mrs. H. S. Dwyer. Rockingham: Miss
Nellie K. Clark, Washington, and Miss
Edith Miller, Winchester. Included
1 ** . i.— i
——
v ®orL"tf l e‘ Second
Boys’ Suits Are Reduced
Every One With Extra Pair of Trousers
Purposely low priced
because we don’t want
/] t° carry them over —
iiiiiilk we’d rather you carry
A them out.
'v'-dl Suits that sold for $25.00
'iSSr, $19.50
Suits that sold for $22.50
Wm $18.50
y Suits that sold for $20.00
SM $16.50
Suits that sold for SIB.OO
> v $14.50
■ Suits that sold for $15.00
512.00
Cheviots, cassimeres and tweeds.
Plain and belted models tor boys 8 to 18
years. All with two pairs of trousers —
altho some have one pair of trousers and
one pair of golf knickers.
Boys’ Coaster Wagons, *
The P. B. Coaster is built for just the
sort of service it is bound to get. Simply
constructed as well as sturdily made. 32-
inch size, equipped with 10-inch steel or
rubber-tire ball-bearing- disc wheels.
v > '
Roller Broke ij. fijoClf I Steel Gears
Ball Bearings ■■>' |ir Hold-fast Hub
Six holts set it /ZBBff W Caps
White Ash Bed
Official Headquarters jor Boy Scout Equipment
And a Barber Bill Shop—where Kiddies enjoy a Haircut
Double
Breasted, Palm
Beach Suits. A
style idea. A
cool thought.
An economical
invention.
t
They keep
their shape.
Patterns that
look like wors
teds. s l7 50 at
The Hecht Co.
7th at F.
< >
*
5
also was an addrer.s on Korea by Mrs.
C. T. Collyer; a Bible hour conducted
by Miss Daisy Davies; worship led bj
Mrs. W. J. H. Robinson, and an- ad
dress by Rev. D. B. Blakemore. Others
who took part in the program wen
Miss Emma V. Peppier. Rev. Dr. E. V.
Rege.ster and Rev. Dr. A. Bambeth.

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