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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, June 18, 1924, Image 32

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1924-06-18/ed-1/seq-32/

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32
CODE OF ETHICS PLAN
MAKES BIG PROGRESS
* -
Thirty-Six Trade and Professional
Groups Adopt Rales During
Past Year.
>
ROTARIANS HEAR REPORTS
International Convention Meets in
Toronto, Canada.
Uy the Associated Press.
TORONTO, June 18.—Thirty-six na
tional. international and state or
provincial trade and professional or
ganizations have adopted codes of
standard ethical practices for their
members during the past year,
Rotarians were told by Raymond M.
Havens of Kansas City during the
course of the second day’s session of
their international convention here
today. There are fifty-three national
trade and professional organizations
now operating with ethical codes
binding their members to discard the
old "Let the buyer beware!” and
"Business is business!” idea and adopt
ing the idea that a business is only
truly productive of profit to its owner
as it gives service to the community
in which it is established.
As chairman of the international
committee on business methods. Mr.
Havens, former international presiden, I
of Rotary, told his fellow members
from all over the world of the prog
ress that had been made with the
Rotary idea of unselfish service in
business. Reports were presented
from England, New Zealand, Japan,
Cuba ami others sections of the world.
Tn England business ethics formed
the basis of a course of lectures at
one of its great universities and in
this country members of the facul
ties of both Harvard and Yale have
interested themselves in the matter.
Schools Adopt Codes.
High schools in different sections of
the country have encouraged students
to adopt codes of ethics and a study i
•of business practices, the convention |
was told.
This is "the Rotary idea” day at the I
•convention and the entire program I
is designed to show the progress that
has been made in developing ethical I
practices in the business and pro
. i.#'i I ml\Jakf
Priced a dollar jg yi Iglg {5 fck f§
jfj||n| K Pennsylvania Avenue Seventh. Street
-/folteU m W.«b| ||, -.r, v, n*Vr&>
j \\_ . TMTjORKD^
j ]'\ * ' What’s What, When It’s Hot *
llwlf genuine Palm Beach suits.
\ sjeirel 1 What’s the use of stiff, heavy, binding clothes in hot and muggy
June? C,othes that hang around you like a stray dog?
It’s been well said that coolness is not only a condition of body, '
but a state G s mind—To look cool is the first step towards feeling
cool. You can’t keep out of the heat, but you can keep the heat out. Today, the
vogue of light-weight suits of the genuine Palm Beach cloth is so well established
that they are as much a part of the wardrobe as the dress suit. Patterned effects
and pin stripes as well as the conservative plain colors tumble the heat out of a
hot one. Another reason is they are no longer half bag, half rag—but are tailored
with all the thorough-going sty le of woolen fabrics.
■ .
A Palm Beach suit puts the muzzle ./-dK Popular shades and colors—
,l bn “the Dog Days” of summer swelter. k Blues, Tans, Browns, Pencil Stripe in
Saks & Company tailored Palm Beach blue and black, Sand shades, plain silver
■> Suits feature the loose fronts, charac- gray and dark gray.
■i teristic of the finest made light-weight TmBRKSV For Men, whether long, short, slim
summer clothes. stout — Sizes 33 to 52.
fessional world. John R. 'Williams
of Hong Beach. Calif., chairman of
the international committee on
Rotary education, told the cnnven-i
tion of the work of his committee in
developing an understanding of the
Rotary idea of service in individual
Rotarians so that they could best act
as missionaries to their business and
professional associates.
Called Cross-Section.
Harry Bert Craddlck of Minneapolis,
chairman of the committee on classi
fications, told of the work of classi
fying professions and businesses so
that each individual member of
Rotary would have a clear-cut classi
fication in his club. He said a Rotary
Club is really a cross-section of the
business and professional community
with but one man from each business
or profession who is selected solely as
being representative of his clissilica
tion and to represent Rotary to his
classification. Edward J. Cattell of
Philadelphia. Pa., made a stirring ad
dress on friendship and Rotary’s idea
in developing it.
This afternoon three special as
semblies are being held to discuss
club administrative problems and to
night the annual reception and ball
by the international president will be
given.
The Only Way.
From the Boston Globe.
Lady (unsuccessfully trying to get
feet into small-size shoes) —Good-
ness! I don’t think I'll ever get them
on until I've worn them a couple
of times!
Niagara Falls
Special 16-Day Excursions
ROUND $
gjo TRIP I
JUNE 20
Similar Excursions July 11, 25; Aug. 8, 22; Sept. 5, 19; Oct. 3
THROUGH SPECIAL TRAIN
(Coaches. Parlor Cars, Dining Car)
Lv. Washington 7:30 A.M.
Ar. Niagara Kalis 10:00 P.M.
For Further Details and Booklet, Ask Ticket Agent
Baltimore & Ohio
’Prg.r’WXTOTEgPTT." JUCT TB,~TO2g>
LEAGUE MAY SUPERVISE
ALL EUROPE’S PROBLEMS
Action by Council Anticipates
Transformation Due to Advent
of New French Government.
By the Associated Press.
GENEVA, June 18.—Definite action
taken by the council of the league
of nations yesterday will mark a
new orientation in the political af
fairs of the old world as tending to
throw all the European problems into
the hands of the league for super
vision and settlement. This trans
formation is explained as the im
mediate consequence of the advent of
a new government in France. The
session broke up in the liveliest spirit
of optimism over the day's develop
ments.
While the league council was
R EO
Dual Foot Control —
Have you tried it?
THE TREW MOTOR CO.
reaching these important decisions,
the international labor conference
was naming the members of the sub
commissions. It was voted to refuse
places to the Italian workman dele
gates on the ground that they are
Fascists and were not freely chosen
by the workers of Italy. The sub
commissions are composed of repre
sentatives of the governments, em
ployers and workers, each group hav
ing the sol© right to designate its
delegates.
Dr. Souza Dantas of Brazil, as
chairman of the subcommittee han
dling the long-standing problem aris
ing from the expropriation of the
property of German settlers by Po
land, announced that the Poles had
agreed to pay the lump sum of 3,000,-
000 gold francs compensation.
Mercantile Marine Company
S *lw , 23 C0 December fourth Is the sailing-dste
Back inNewYork of thc Red Star Liner Belgenland. /
cIHBeSS jJ" April 16,1925 All your high hopes for adventure.
“HHuTMII 28,liOmifecruiir Your hunger for a glimpse of strange
sQrSBI: *" 14 lands * ff * them aII crystalize in this
. one golden importunity to see the
: teT’.kte w°rid
p »■>* guidance of You enjoy the gayatmoaphere and perfect
Z vP the American Ex- service of this moat delightful of linen. The
* A Z preaa Company. pleasant variety of her aLa carte culaine. The
a .4BS „ , comfort other luxurious cabins and spacious
sßwStti rooa “- : .
■flElCnks Mor Line, X, Sailing westward in December you reach the
m ito» f St, A'. there. This also makes possible a stopover
is g-KTPt 5 H'.; .tat, Exi>, in Europe for the Spring and early Summer.
M'M Sear Limes?
M’jfnWßad larmaaarivsAk MiaaaxTua. SUstna Cearaay
IB aMI I i W B i kvß Os ill nIT a #
oomp*»u. to cooptntito with
p AMERICAN EXPRESS COMPANY
ship to circk ibe globe
FIND OLD MONSTER’S
100-FOOT-LONG FRAME
Utah Professors Dig Up Skeleton
of Beast Which Weighed
Twenty Tons.
By the Associated Press.
SALT LAKE CITY. June 18.—The
perfect skeleton of a brontosaurus,
said to be the first ever found which
was not minus the skull, has been
unearthed by University of Utah ex
cavators in the region near Jensen,
Utah, long: famed fer Its fossil re
mains.
Prof. P. J. Pack and Dr. Karl Doug
las of the Institution declare the
brontosaurus was probably the larg
est animal which ever existed, and
they estimate the remains to be about
5,000,000 years old.
The brontosaurus was lizardllke In
appearance, with a long tail, back 1
Wednesday is Dollar Day
Throughout the Housefurnishings Department
Window Screens Tablecloths Bath Mats
$1 $1 $1
Natural hardwood TT , . , Heavy Turkish cloth,
and metal frames with dam as k in pink or blue. Wall
extension to 30x37 to cloths, 54 inches square. of Tro d flora ,
36x45. Covered with S . everal » ttract ’ ve d '- terns,
black Japanned wire. signs.
Bath Towels
Cretonne Overdrapes 7“T" 2 for $1
$1 Dollar Sale! Extra size bath, owe!..
Bright color, 2j4-yard RllfiJS dR d RtinnCrS with heavy double
drapes with scalloped & . loops. Size 27x54.
center valance to Jap Grass Rugs, 36
match. x 72. blue brown or Sash Panels
green, 2 for sl. g |
Seamless Sheets, $ I Jap Grass Rugs, 27 Plain white brise bise
Snow white, smooth "° T ssa s h pan ? s ' Loops
finished sheets with " reen ' 3 ,or sl ' at «°P for rod
deep hems in sizes Gay Rag Rugs 27x
81x90 or 72x90. 54, in hit or miss de- Summer Curtains
signs, sl. $1
Pillowcases Rattania Runners, A P air ° { ™ffled or
5 tor U 27 or 24 inches wide. straight marquisette
Smooth white muslin Good colors, $1 yard. curtains. Edged with
pillowcases with deep , _ _ checked gingham,
hems. Sizes 42x36. da P Grass Rugs, 18
x 36, green only, 8 for Chair Cushions
Turkish Towels $1
4 for $1 Jap Grass Runners Cretonne Bar Harbor
Medium size, heavy 27 or 24 inches wide. cushions filled with soft
towels, all white or Pretty colors. 4 yards, K a pock and firmly
with colored borders. tufted.
Size 18x36. . Fourth Floor -
Huck Towels Window Shades
8 for $1 Linen Scarfs ( irregular>
Absorbent, buck $1 Oil finished shades,
weave towels, all white . 36x69 inches. Green,
or with colored bor- , Plam I,n . en color or olive, blue, ecru and
ders. Size 16x30. white scarfs with linen white
First Floor. lace edges. Sizes 16x48. First Floor.
7th at F
t
IYooUTind a Defightful Display of
' Good-Looking Couch
Hammocks j
r At~Very Attractive Trices
I Heteeat* Mayer's this week yoo*B iind^most
delightful showing of attractive coach
hammocks at prices modest indeed. ji
' Quoted below are a few. of the many.
Comfortable Coach Hammock in khaki, |i
side pockets $12.95
- -A Conch Hammock in gray dock with
adjustable bead rest. $16.56 .... I
GrayGooch Hammock with upholstered
back, roll edge, side $24.75 I
|l Englander Conchita mmock^iphAUtered
:: back, gray or khaki, side pockets.. $3420 i
I Attractive-Conch Hammock, .withgreen
anchred stripe, tufted scat and back, $39.75
*'»- Comfortable Condi Hammock with one
i pillow with beautiful upholstery, ■
- rrv green predominating. $4420 *!
v * 1
Englander Condi Hammock with’blue
and’gray stripe upholstery tufted, '
If very comfortable $49.75
Lifetime Furniture Is More Than A Name
| MAYER & CO.
SEVENTH STREET
and neck. The weight of the crea
ture is thought to have been about
twenty tons, and it was about 100
feet long. The top of its back stood
about twenty feet and the belly about
twelve feet from the ground. It is
believed to have fed upon vegetable
matter and to have lived partly in
STUDEBAKER
Just Drive It; Thafs All

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