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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, June 20, 1924, Image 19

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D. C. NAVAL RESERVES
REACH PHILADELPHIA
TJ. S. S. Eagle No. 56, With District
, Battalion, Docks at League
f Island.
DRILLS HELD INCESSANTLY
Will Proceed to “Cape May Sunday
for Shoi;t Stay.
Ry » Staff C'orresponrtpnt.
PHILADELPHIA. June 20.—After a
two-day cruise at sea the United
States Naval Reserves, District of Co
lumbia aßttalion, arrived here yester
day aboard the U. S. S. Eagle. No. 56,
Capt. H. J. Nichols commanding, and
* docked at the League Island navy
yard.
Having been aboard ship since
Tuesday, the men were anxious to get
ashore for sight-seeing in the Quaker
City. Capt. Nichols said he was much
pleased with the spirit shown by the
crew, and they have "shaken down"
, v eil in their stations. During the
'time they have been at sea they have
been drilled incessantly, and the
drills will be continued daily while
the vessel remains.
The 'Eagle made a quick run up the
coast Wednesday, having left its an--
chorage in Lynn Haven Roads at 4
o'clock that morning, after having
spent the entire day cruising in the
lower Chesapeake Bay to determine
compass errors, under the direction
cf Lieut. B. A. Sullivan. Soon after the
ship was anchored inside the Dela
ware breakwaters, off Lewes, a
heavy blow came up. making it im
, possible to lower a motor sailor to
send liberty parties ashore.
The ship will remain here until
Sunday, going then to Cape May, N.
J., where it will dock at the naval
air station. After a short stay there
it will head south for Quantico, where
rifle practice will be held on the Ma
rine Corps range. However, while
off the coast target practice will be
held. . ,
All of the crew are in the best ot
health. Mail for the crew sjjpuld be
addressed care the postmaster. Cape
May, N. J.
DAKOTA TORNADO TOLL
MOUNTS TO FOUR DEAD
Property Loss in Storm Placed at
$500.000 —Twenty Freight Cars
Blown From Track.
By the Associated Press.
FARGO. N. D., June 20.—Bearing
the brunt of one of the most severe
• W ind, hail and electric storms in this
state, late Wednesday afternoon and
night, western North Dakota today
counted the toll —four lives lost, an es
timated property damage of more than
$500,000 and unestimated damage to
telephone and telegraph wires and rail
road lines. Fears that the storm,
which assumed tornadic proportions
In the citv of Dickinson, extending
for a radius of about twenty miles,
may have caused additional deaths
were expressed late yesterday when re
ports increased the former death toll
t)f two to four. ,
While efforts were hemp: made to
determine any additional loss or life
In the vicinity of Dickinson, railroad
workers were working to clear the
wreckage of twenty Northern 1 acihc
MS ;■*,£■. ■x.'sa B.Ta.sg
MARINES OFFER BLOOD.
Thirty Willing to Aid Woman
Who Needs Transfusion.
PHILADELPHIA. June 20.—A radio
appeal for volunteers to giveL, bl ”® d
to save the life of Mrs MatJ Mc-
Millan, a patient in the Howard Hos
pital. brought thirty marines t.om
the Philadelphia navy yard yoster
offering to submit to transfusion.
The afpoaf said that Mrs. McMillan
was too poor to pay for the blood
and that unless some one volunteered
her life could not be saved.
The message was picked up at the
raw vard and thirty robust marines
lespotided. includjng Walter fepeese.
who already had given a pint of his
blood to Mrs. McMillan. Joseph T.
Murray was selected for this trans
fusion.
Gov. Smith Hunts for His Dog.
NEW YORK. Jtme 20.—Gov. Smith
Interrupted political activity for a
short time .last night to search for
Teddie. a collie given him by his
mother just before she died. The
collie disappeared yesterday, after
noon from the home of the gover
nor’s sister. Mrs. John A- Glynn, on
Coney Island.
The governor, his own search in
vain, asked the police to take up the
hunt.
R7 E O
Genuine balloon i ires standard
equipment on passenger cars.
the trew MOTOR CO.
The Same Delicate
Aroma
\in Brown Bottles
jfjCflSrV The Drink
That Made Milwaukee famous.
Order a Case for
YOUR HOME
Telephone—Frank. 4726
Schlitz Dist. Co.
1320 Ist St. N.E.
Beauty and Permanency
are BUILT INTO'
.^9dES^.
BUILT OF STEEL
P. A. Roberts Constr. Co.
Inc.
Munsey Bldg. Main 1776
6 00
U a Prescription (or
Colds, Grippe, Dengue Fever,
Constipation, Bilious Head*
aches sand Ma? ar| *l Fever.
Woman Knocks Out
Doorman Who Said
“No Parking Here ”
By the Associated Press.
NEW YORK. June 20.—Mrs. Ada
Viola, short and stocky, yesterday
landed a solid right on the jaw of
Max Saunders, six-foot doorman of
a Brooklyn hotel, and saw him re
moved unconscious to the Coney
Island Hospital, as she was es
corted to court by three policemen.
Hospital attendants said that
Saunders, whom Mrs. Viola ac
cused of insulting htr, was suf
fering from a broken jaw and a
possible fracture of the skull. The
woman was held in jII.OOO bail,
charged with felonious assault.
Witnesses to the encounter stated
Saunders said "No parking here"
when Mrs. Viola and her husband
drove up in front of the hotel.
KIWANIANS PICK LEADER.
DENVER, June 20. —Victor John
son of Rockford, 111., yesterday was
elected president of the Kiwanis Club
International at the final session of
the eighth annual convention here.
St. Paul. Minn., was chosen as the
1925 convention city.
International trustees elected for
the two-year term included Thomas
E. Babb. Worcester. Mass., and Lewis
Mitchell. Buffalo. N. Y. >
We Are headquarters YoU
for foreign exchanges Vahs*
at LOWEST rates . .* • lOUT
ZISBBS3SSS Daily
2% 3% 4%
lnterest on cheek -interest on ordi- —interest ""
ing arrou nts on nary sartngs ae- savings rer ,, ®£* tc »
daily balances—coin- recounts —compound- compounded scmi-an
pounded monthly. cd quirtcrly. Dually.
Every Day le Interest Day "VHRRllfffi
The Munsey Trust Co.
Munsey Building ejg Stpß
Pa. Ave.. Bet. 13th & 14th Sts. N.W. 'HSSHS
GOOD BUYS-for good-bye days 1
i Jfafm %sGCi£if sSzz'L j
I Shoes for C / Shoes for lead a dog's life from 11 11
I A proud It pots pep into any man’s step to —for I
i Lather 1 "' «« A,/). |l wear this dassy-looking Toney leathers. All colors. I
| Patent Leather SS.9S \
l wear—that KSIF BRIMMING VALUE A man’s bet wh™ he wants Women’s Silk HoSB l |
H Patent Leather, White Kidskin, HHI DI7AI TXTF>r\7TTMT to look his very best vet avoids Clear, Thread Silk Hosiery—guaranteed per
|| Black Satin—costs only.. ..$535 t —with a stop stitch that prevents runs! And
> *-' ■ ■ * AT TT yj" ___ T-T 110 17 mr " * .pn every summer shade, Values that made us want ||
H /Alilx 1 LI three times as many as we could get. Don't miss
I VARlETY—means “GOOD \ them!
| * ( BUYS" —then this great sea- M |
I • ture line ***** offered S jn/j I
A ' more .striking shoe economy ** M
|i For Country Club or Boardwalk r 1 17 A. Mm B Ww
| —nothing better than this new lOr man Or Woman! Every- No mans vacation is complete W ||
| “Hahn Special” pump. White Kid , . without white oxfords Here s a V
|| or Patent Leather $5.95 thing you want in your vaca- *> f a va,ue - Whlt^^
tion-time footwear all at v^§3>
| one modest price—only $5.95 - M I
| the pair! Cor. 7th & K Sts. |
| . Jr 4i4 9th St. |
I perThave
|= at its best—at the best of all prices . n * , * Shoes are necessary—whether you ITI « 9T* Do A,~* QP 1
for you , $5.95 variety at City Club play or not. Mighty good at $535 lt)iO vj Ot. ZOO ra. /\ve. D.E. |p.
THE EVENING ‘ BTXH, ~ WSSHTNGTtW.' U V..' ERXDAT. TUNE 20. 1921.
GIRL, 7, RINGS FALSE
ALARMS, POLICE FIND
"Liked to See Fire Engines,"
Child Explains, After Sousing
City-Wide Action.
By the Associated Press.
SYRACUSE. N. Y., June 20. An
, epidemic of false alarms of fire in
Syracuse within the past few weeks
is charged by police against a seven
year-old girl who "liked to see the
Are engines.” The girl was identified
by school teachers yesterday after
she had refused, for more than twelve
hours, to answer all questions put by
the police, other than to admit she
turned in a “lot of fire alarms.”
So many false alarms were turned
in daily before the girl was appre
hended that a special detail of de
tectives was ordered to investigate,
and they were given order to shoot on
sight any person caught sounding a
talse alarm. Even this failed to stop
the practice, and each night several
false alarms kept firemen on the
jump. The boxes were in such close
proximity each time that it was ap
parent one person or group was re
sponsible.
The girl was arrested Wednesday
night by a patrolman, who saw her
pull an alarm and run to hiding be
tween two houses.
•She will be arraigned In children s
court on Saturday, charged with in
corrigibility.
MORSES LOSE FIGHT.
Court Quashes Habeas Corpus in
Mail Fraud Case.
NEW YORK, June 20.—The fight of
Harry F. and Benjamin W. Morse,
sons of Charles W. Morse, to be freed
of charges here by the federal gov
ernment of using the mails to de
fraud received another setback yes
terday.
Federal Judge Winslow dismissed
the habeas corpus proceedings
brought on behalf of the Morse
brothers.
In their petition they contended
that their arrest while they were on
a train bound for Washington to be
tried on charges of defrauding the
federal government was illegal, be
cause they were on their way to ap
pear before another court. Judge
Light and Airy—
With very little on!
SOUNDS risque! But weVe refer
ring to summer shoe modes —at
Hahn's. Simple, tailored elegance.
Beauty unadorned —but ready to
adorn your feet with trim, refined dis
tinction.
“Plymouth, 99 $lO
Simply lovely—in white kidskin, patent
leather, or tan calf. Low or military heel.
The “City Club Sko£” of
Also at 7th and 9th Street Stores
Winslow ruled against them. He
further found that their plea that the
indictment against them here was
based on insufficient evidence could
not be decided in a habeas corpus
proceeding.
TWO HURT IN CRASH.
Passenger Train, Running Slow
ly, Strikes Open Switch.
DENVER, Col., June 20.—The third
section of Union Pacific train No. 21,
known as -the Pacific Coast Limited,
carrying Pacific coast delegates to
the international Kiwanis Club con
vention here back to their homes, ran
into an open switch at La Salle, fifty
miles from here, late last night. Two
dining car porters received slight in-
juries and were removed to a hospital
here.
The engineer, Sohner Moore, did
not know the train was on a side
track until It struck three freight
cars, which were thrown from the
track. The train was running slowly
through the little town, but the im
pact put the engine out of commis
sion. Another engine was obtained
after a delay of half an hour and the
train then proceeded.
The Hotter it Gets
The More You Need a Leonard

IF you arc using an old refrigerator
that does not keep ice very long
this hot weather and spoils
, costly foods, it's a sure sign you
w f ======= need a Leonard. !
93 In the hottest weather Leonard keeps
costly foods sweet and pure and
8 keeps ice longer. The secret
lies in ten walls of scientific in
-11 I sulation and scientific construc
i ; tion throughout,
Jr* Well be delighted to show you all
styles of Leonards, There's a
one-friece White Porcelain-lined
Leonard Cleanahle Refrigerator
here for $62.50, and other
Leonards for as low as $13.50,
Lifetime Furniture Is More Than a Name
.
! MAYER 6? CO.
|| /
Seventh Street Between D & E
LADNIS AND M’NIDER HURT
Base Bali Commissioner and For
mer Legion Head Injured in Auto.
OSAGE, lowa, June 19.—Kenesaw
Mountain I.andis, commissioner of
base ball, and Hanford MacNlder, Ma
son City. lowa, former national com
mander of the American Legion, were
slightly injured In an automobile ac
cident near here yesterday. An auto
mobile driven by MacNider collided
with another machine. MacNider's
car was hurled into a ditch, but the
occupants escaped serious injury.
We have spent more than $50,000,-
000 on means to control the boll
weevil.
19

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