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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, July 11, 1924, Image 5

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HIGHER RANK GIVEN
TOGEN.HUTCHESON
Commander of Schofield Gar
rison, Hawaii, Soon in Grade
of Major General.
PROMOTION IS DUE JULY 19
Col. Le Roy Eltinge Designated to
Be Brigadier General Same Date,
Vice Hutcheson.
Brig. Gen. Grote Hutcheson,' com
manding the 11th Field Artillery
Brig-ade at Schofield barracks. Ha
waii, will be promoted to the grade
of major general July 19 to fill the
vacancy occurring on that date by
the statutory retirement on account
of age of Maj. Gen. Charles H. Muir,
commanding the sth Corps area, with
headquarters at Baltimore.
Col. Le Hoy Eltinge. assistant chief
of staff in charge of the war plans
division of the War Department gen
eral staff, will be promoted to the
grade of brigadier general on the
same date, vice Gen. Hutcheson, pro
moted. These prospective promotions
were announced at the War Depart
ment today.
Horn in Cincinnati in ISiJS.
Gen. Hutcheson was born at Cin
cinnati April 1. 1862, and was gradu
ated from the Military Academy in
ISB4 and assigned to the cavalry. He
reached the grade of colonel in that
arm in July. 1916. He served in the
Philippine insurrection, the Boxer
relief expedition in China and in the
world war and was decorated for cx
< optionally meritorious and conspicu
out conduct in those campaigns.
During the world war he was a ma
jor general in the National Army. At
first he commanded the port of em
barkation at Newport News and aft
< rward commanded the 14th Division
at Camp Custer, Mich.
Since the signing of the armistice
he has been in command of Camp
Brigade, at Schofield barracks. Ha-
Jfea(de. Md.. and of Schofield barracks,
decorations, he was made a member
of the French Legion of Honor for
his world war services.
Col. Kltingr a New Vorker.
Col. Eltinge is from New York and
« graduate of the Military Academy
< lass of 1896. Most of bis regular
service was in the cavalry. He was
wounded in the Philippine insurrec
tion and was bre vetted for dis
tinguished conduct in action. In
August. 1917. he was appointed
colonel of infantry. National Army,
and served in France in the opera
tions section of the general staff of
Cue American expeditionary forces.
He was promoted to the grade of
brigadier general. National Army, and
swarded the distinguished service
medal, the croix de guerre, the British
Order of the Bath, the Belgian Order
<'■ the Crown, the Italian Order of
l ie Crown and the Panama medal la
solidaridad. Since the armistice he
has served at Fort Leavenworth, in
ihe Philippines and at the War De
partment.
win doll’contest.
Miss Violet McKinley Among Win
ners at Local Playgrounds.
Miss Violet McKinley, 1725 33d
street, was awarded first honors for
the best doll out of fifty-two entrants
8t a doll show at the Georgetown
Playgrounds, 33d street and Volta
place, yesterday afternoon. Hon
orable mention was given Miss Eliza
beth Thomas, Miss Thelma Hazel and
Miss Marjory McKinley.
Besides the prize for the one best
doll, there were also prizes for the
best big doll and best little doll, re
spectively. Miss Reba Collins, 3342
Q street, was awarded the decision
for the best big doll, while Miss
Frances Sebastian, 338 Volta place,
won first place for the best little
doll.. Mrs. Frank Holt and Mrs. C.
Haneke were the judges for the con
test. Miss Abbie Green, playground
directress, was in charge of the
show*.
Steam Boilers Like Cannon.
From the Kansas City Times.
The power station which the Edi
son Electric Illuminating Company of
Boston is erecting at Weymouth,
Mass., will operate boilers working
under a pressure of 1,200 pounds to
the square inch. This is five times
the pressure of the most powerful
locomotives and three times that ever
before used in a commercial power
station.
Parts of the boiler must have the
strength of a cannon. The boiler
drum will be thirty-four feet long,
with walls of solid steel four inches
thick, and is being forged in the ord
nance shops of the Midvale Steel
I’ompany, famous for their great
guns. The original unit of the plant
will be 60,000-horsepower, but the
plans involve 400,000-horsepower, with
boilers and turbo-generators housed
in a building 145x800 feet, 125
feet high. The stacks will far over
top Bunker Hill Monument, and their
interior diameter will be so great
that a street car could be lowered
from top to bottom without touching
the sides.
The Edison company lighted the
first incandescent lamps in Boston
thirty-eight years ago, when the old
Bijou Theater was illuminated "by
those new electric lamps that burn
in glass bulbs,” and Thomas A. Edi
son himself was at the switchboard
that night, while ‘Tolanthe” was
being sung for the first time in the
Hub.
GETS SIX MONTHS IN JAIL.
Lorenzo Richardson, colored, charged
with chasing his wife, Bettie Richardson,
with a pistol, was convicted in the
United States branch of Police Court to
day by Judge McMahon and sentenced to
serve six months in jail.
Strongly Circumstantial.
From the Candy Factory Magazine.
A certain man had the habit of
leaving his umbrellas at the office.
One morning as he was going to
business he sat next to a young
woman in the trolley car. As he rose
to get out he absentmindedly picked
up her umbrella. She said, “Pardon
me. but this is mine."
He was quite embarrassed. That
night he decided to take all of his
umbrellas home with him.
When he got into the car there sat
this same young woman. She leaned
forward as he passed and said in a
low tone. “I see you did pretty well
today, after all.”
Trick Not So Easy.
From Mefgendorfer-Blatter, Munich.
The Magician—Now, then, young
man. let me have your watch. First
T will make it disappear, and then I
will bring it back to you again.
The Victim —It disappeared three
months ago, professor, so all you need
to do is to make it come back. ,
Bandage Had Slipped.
Prom the American Legion Weekly.
The inquisitive old lady was bend
ing over the bed of a wounded sol
dier whose head was swathed with
cotton and linen.
“Were you wounded in the head,
my boy?” she asked.
“No’m,” replied a faint voice. “I
was shot in the foot, and the ban
dage has-slipped up.”
Retires July 19
MAJ. LEV CHARLES 11. MUR.
CONTEMPT IS CHARGED.
Proceedings in Court Against Sec
retary Mellon and Others.
Contempt proceedings were insti
tuted today in the District Supreme
Court against Andrew \V. Mellon.
Secretary of the Treasury; David H.
Blair, commissioner of intern 1 rev
enue. and Roy A. Haynes, prohibition
commissioner. through a petition
filed by Earle Parella of Brooklyn,
N. Y., trading as Le Gloria Products
Company, who uses denatured alcohol
in his business. Parella claims that
the official* disregarded an injunction
order of the court, passed July I. and
took away his permit to withdraw
alcohol.
Through Attorneys Cantrel & Friel
the plaintiff states that a hearing
was had June 12. 1924, at which he
was commanded to show cause why
his permit should not be revoked.
The hearing was by unauthorized
persons, he says, and upon their re
port his permit was revoked by the
prohibition unit. The court then
signed an injunction forbidding in
terference by the Treasury officais
with the business of Parella until
the permit had been lawfully revoked.
This injunction, he claims, has been
violated by the taking away of his
permit.
RUNAWAY GIRLS HELD.
Message to Mother Said Maiden
Had Tired of Washington.
“Am tired of Washington. Have
gone to Cumberland. Will he hack
some time.” was the message Hilda
Bcalle, fourteen, 1017 I street, le f t
for her mother. Mrs. George Bealle,
before starting on a trip to the Mary
land city yesterday afternoon.
It developed that Blanche Clise,
also fourteen, school chum, daughter
of Charles Clise, 1330 10th street, had
gone with Hilda, Police were asked to
take a hand in returning the girls to
their families, and their arrest in
Cumberland was reported later in the
night.
“Holding them* for their parents,”
was the message received from the
Cumberland police.
The girls had discussed their pro
spective trip to Cumberland, Mrs.
Bealle being told they were going
with the parents of the Clise girl to
day, and was surprised when she
found the message her daughter had
left. One of the girls said they had
$5 between them and that they would
go as far as they could on a train and
hike the' remainder of the way to
Cumberland.
CASE UNDER ADVISEMENT.
Bad Check Charge Against Boy
Goes to Probation Officer.
Wade S. Davis, a young white man
of the Octavia apartments, charged in
six cases of violation of the had
check law, was arraigned before
Judge John P. McMahon, in the
United States branch of Police Court
today. He admitted having received
small sums of money on the checks.
The evidence showed that the hoy
was eighteen years old, an orphan,
his mother having died when he was
an infant; that he was out of work
with no means and hungry and that he
had no police record. For a short
time he worked for a drug store that
operates a line of stores in this city.
He told the court that the checks
had been cashed for small amounts
by newly made friends and that he
had used the money thus raised to
buy food. The case was referred to
the probation officer for report.
WIFE CHARGES THREATS.
G. Washington has filed
suit in the District Supreme Court for
a limited divorce from George R. L.
Washington, an employe of the Post
Office Department. She charges cruelty
and threats. Attorneys Hawken &
Havell appear for the wife.
Absolute divorce is asked in a suit
filed by Clarence B. Blackmon against
Etta M. Blackmon. They were mar
ried November 20. 1920. Misconduct
is alleged in the petition filed through
Attorney's Marshall & Marshall.
Snapshots of a Man Opening a Small Bottle. —By GLUYAS WILLIAMS.
SftVS IT MAKE’S HIM TAKES BOTTLE AND mT QiAMIKICS WRAPPER. REPEATS HE RfALLV
NERVOUS WATCHING, EXAMINES CORK A JTHE CORKSCREW' TO SEE IP THERE ARE Ol)f>HT TO HAVE A UHl£
HER TRVIN6 TO OPEN PROM ALL POINTS OP WOULD BE JUST THE TH/Nfe- ANV DIRECTIONS POR CORKSCREW - AND
THAT BOTTLE op THROAT COMPASS I6MT THERE ONE AROUND OPENING BOTTLE,UN- WHO’S SOT HIS BEN
GARGLE-BETTER LET THE HOUSE SOMEWHERE DL REMINDED IT WAS KNIFE °
HIM do ir TO NIGHT SHE WANTED
to use rr
ttnps ■PEN KNiPE Glares round de tinally achieves wipes his hands and
rn OTHER POCKET AND TiANTiy AS CORK BREAKS STRAINED SILENCE SUCCESS BY PUSH • EXPLAINS 3HE CAN MAKE
AFTER TRYING OUT AIL IN HALF AND LETS IT BROKEN BY OCCAS- IN6 CORK IN AND A PAPER STOPPER FOR
THE BLADES GETS BE KNOWN THAT HE tONAL WIFELY QUER- MOST OP THE THE BOTTLE AND OUST
TO WORK CONSIDERS rr AN OUT- its WOULDN’T HE THROAT GARGLE BE CAREFUL NOT TO
RAGE TO MAKE LIKE HER TO TRY OUT SWAU.OW ANY OP THE
bottles this wav now Bits op cork, when
WujaNS • McClutf Newspaper Syndicate SHE GARGLES
-■ ■ ■ -
THE EVENING STAR, WASHINGTON. D. C„ FRIDAY, JULY 11, 1924.
FRED LEWIS DIES
IN 15-FOOT FALL
Well Known Carpenter Had
Worked Here Forty Years
Without Accident.
SCAFFOLD PLANK BREAKS
Daughter, Unaware of Death, Is
Hurrying Back From
Visit.
Fop approximately forty years, Fred
Lewis, one of the pioneer residents
of Northeast Washington, worked in
precarious places on partially com
pleted buildings, as he plied his trade
of carpenter, and during all that
time he never had an accident. Al
though he recently passed his sixty
fifth birthday anniversary, his vigor
was umliminished, and he sluek to
the work he loved.
Yesterday, while engaged on one
of the easiest Jobs in his long and
active career—completing a hack
l>or< h on a new home at 751 Ken
tucky avenue southeast —a plank of
the scaffold on which he £tood sud
denly gave way, and he fell to a
pile of lumber scarcely fifteen feet
below. His easiest job was his last.
Today Northeast Washington is
mourning the passing of the man
whose father and grandfather helped
transform the northeast Florida ave
nue section front a wooded country
side, split by a shady stream, into the
eloseiy-built-up home community it
now is, and who himself saw the
section grow from a sparsely pop
ulated suburb into a city division.
Lived With Daughter.
William Frederick Lewis he was
christened when he came into being
sixty-five years ago. in a little house
at 13th and I streets northeasts hut
everybody knew him as Fred. His
wife died six years ago. and since
that time be had lived with his only
daughter, Stelle, and an orphaned
granddaughter, Margaret Inez Clore.
Miss Stelle Lewis, although totally
blind for eighteen years, is an adept
housekeeper, and without aid she
easily got all meals, diq household
chores efficiently and generally man
aged the home at 1103 Florida avenue
nurt heast.
Miss Lewis is out of town on a
visit to relatives and does not know
tier father is dead. A telegram last
night informed her that he was in
jured in a fall, and she is expected
to arrive here some time this eve
ning. She and the granddaughter
will live with one of Mr. lewis’ two
sons, F. E. Lewis and K. C. Lewis, it
is understood.
The fall broke Mr. Lewis' collar
bone and two ribs. He was rushed
to Casualty Hospital, where he died
about 4 o’clock this morning from the
injuries and shock,
Mr. Lewis was a member of the
Union Order of the Golden Cross and
of the Carpenters’ Union.
Funeral services will he held prob
ably Monday at his late home. Inter
ment wMI be in Congressional ceme
tery. .
BRUSILOFF GETS PENSION
Russian General. Retired. Has
$l5O Monthly.
LENINGRAD. July 11.—Gen. Bru
siloff. who commanded the Russian
army against the Germans during
the world war. has been granted a
pension of $l5O a month “on account
of the meritorious service rendered
to the soviet union, and also oti ac
count of advancing age.”
Brusiloff is now over seventy-five
years of age. He took an active pan
in the creation of the Bolshevik cav
alry and, until his retirement, was
technical advisor to the red army.
Railroad's Value Fixed.
The Interstate Commerce Commis
sion today fixed the tentative value
of the International and Great North
ern Railway Company of Texas at
$38,178,650 as of June 30, 1917. The
West Coast Railway Company, as of
June 30, 1917, was valued at $260,000,
and the Louisiana and Arkansas Rail
wav Company, as ‘of June 30. 1917,
$7,528,150.
Generalship Is Topic.
Maj. Gen. Eli Helmick, inspector
general of the Army, told of the qual
ities which go to make good general
ship in a talk yesterday before mem
bers of the Military Order of the
World War. at the La Fayette Hotel.
Maj. C. Luxford presided at the meet
ing.
South Sea Flappers.
The bobbed-haired miss with henna
hued curls is not an exclusively mod
ern ptoduct. On the Samoan Islands,
according to Popular Science Month
ly for August, the women for years
have been cutting their hair short and
bleaching it an auburn tint with a
wash that is compounded from the
leaves of a wild plant. These South
Sea flappers also wear beauty patches
of a phosphorescent ungus.
CHILDREN OF DEMOCRATIC V. P. NOMINEE
/^■* s ‘ "
Slla* !H, Hr? an anti Mr*. W. K. HnniNhcrgfr, *on and dnuulrier of Gov,
harle* \V. Hr} an of NrliniNkn, the IN*imu-ratle nomine** for \ lee President,
r*. liurnMberßrer’* home i* in A*hinnd, Nieb., while Slln* Ur.win is a practic*-
iK lawyer in Minneapolis*.
CALLES BELIEVED EASY
WINNER OF PRESIDENCY
5 to 1 Advantage Shown in Partial
Returns—Doheny Is
Expected.
Uy Cable to The Star and Chicago Daily
News, ('upright. lII2C
MEXICO CITY, Mexico. July 11.—
Official computation of the voles cast
at last Sunday’s election, at least in
the districts included in Mexico City,
indicates a sweeping victory for Plu
tarco Elias Calles, candidate for the
presidency. In the districts canvassed
Calles polled 41,500 votes, against
B.COO for Angel Flores.
The newspaper Kxcelsior claims to
have learned from a reliable source
that an influential group of American
oil men, headed by K. L. IXoheny and
Walter Clark Teazle, president of the
Standard Oil Company, will come to
Mexico before the end of July for a
conference with ITesident Obregon in
relation to changes in the laws under
which they now work the petroleum
fields in Mexico.
EPINARD REACHES U. S.
Famous French Horse to Occupy
Papyrus' Former Stall.
NEW YORK. July 11. —Pierre Wer
theinien s Lpinard. famous French
thoroughbred, and his stable mate.
Satin Slipper, arrived on the Beren
garia today and were taken imme
diately to Belmont Park to shake off
their sea legs. Epinard will occupy the
stall that housed Papyrus last year.
The thoroughbreds will remain at
Belmont Park for at least a week,
when they will be taken to Saratoga,
where arrangements have already
been made for their care and training,
preparatory to their appearance on
American tracks later.
CALL RESERVE OFFICERS.
Nine Men Summoned to Aberdeen
for Ordnance Training.
Nine members of the Ordnance Offi
cers' Reserve Corps residing in this
city have been placed on temporary ac
tive duty in the Army am- ordered to
the proving ground, Aberdeen, Md ,
for a course of training. They are
Col. Christian G. Storm, Majs. Henry
Erwin, Samuel c. Green and C#in K
Mcßae; Capts. Maxwell F. Barnes.
James C. Karnes and Amos T. Payter.
and First Lieuts. William L. Allison
and Herbert K. Cummings.
First Lieut. Arthur H. Langenberg,
Ordnance Reserve Corps, of Alexan
dria, Va„ has been ordered to similar
duty.
D. C. EMPLOYES WIN OUT.
New Salary Ratings Granted Those
Who Appealed.
A number of District employes
scattered through the various depart
ments who appealed from the ratings
given them last September in the re
classification of salaries have been
granted higher ratings by the per
sonnel board and officials are now
trying to figure out whether they can
be paid immediately on the new
ratings.
It is understood the auditor's office
is awaiting some pronouncement from
the controller of the Treasury on the
question. The question rises because
the appropriations for this year were
made while the old ratings were in
effect. Included in the group are a
number of employes of the Public
Library.
BATHING BAN HOLDS.
No Rock Creek Swimming' Until
Sewer Is Completed.
The ban on bathing in Rock Creek
will' remain in force until the sewer
main which will relieve the water
Lorn pollution is completed, it was
learned today from the office of Lieut.
Col. C. O. Sherrill, in charge of public
buildings and grounds.
Both federal and District author
ities are in agreement in the belief
that the polluted water carries ty
phoid germs, which imperil the health
of any one entering the creek. Analy
sis of the water, at the instance of
The Evening Star, a year ago, showed
this condition to exist. It is not be
lieved to have changed.
Towns in Maryland empty sewage
into the creek ar.d this made the ban
necessary. An intercepting sewer is
under construction by the District to
take up drainage t orn Maryland, hut
additional appropriations of approxi
mately $75,000 will he required to
complete the sew eft's
American Ship Seized.
GALVESTON. Tex.. July 11—The
-American steamer Olga, suspected of
being involved in a conspiracy to
land liquor on the coast near Port
and then running it inland to
San Antonio, was seized at Port
La vara yesterday by United States
coast guards, coast guard district
headquarters announce today
D. C. Auto Tags Chosen.
The District of Columbia automo
bile tags for 1925 will he white
numerals on a field of navy blue.
This was agreed upon by the Com
missioners today, in order that the
lag to be issued in December may
be manufactured on time
♦- ,
One or the Other.
From th*» Boston Traiwript.
Caller—Your daughter is an eques
trienne. isn't she?
Proud Mother—Either that or a
valedictorian. These classe affairs
are so confusing, don't you know?
His Own Entertainer.
f rom Life.
Tourist—Don't you ever get lone
some up here?
Mountaineer—Oh, yes. but I have a
couple of good joio-s I tell myself
Just the Difference.
From Genfrf Colonel.
If she wouldn't wash dishes for SSO
a week, that's pride; if she does it
for nothing, that's, matrimony.
A Persistent Cuss.
from Ixniion I’a*sins Show.
Mother—Mary, you let Reggie stay
too late last night. It was 1 o'clock
when he went.
Daughter—But you told me 1 must
give him time to propose.
“Y"es. i»ut five hours’.”
“Well, mother, you know he stut
ters."
ill
V
M
A*
Salt
W For V our 1
f Convenience gj
I Open V
I Tomorrow I
I Until 1
I 2P. M. I
■ Shaft Early Jl
V and Often M
i i ill
LENIENCY QF B. & 0.
SAVES U. S. HOTELS
Rent Unpaid, Railroad Re
frains From Evicting 1,200
at Plaza Quarters.
Between 1,200 and 1,300 woman em
ployes of the government are resid
ing in the government hotels only
through suffrance of the Baltimore
and Ohio railroad, owner of the prop
erty on which the hotels stand. The
United States government, owner of
the structures, which are operated by
the United States Housing Corpora
tion, has failed to make provision for
the annual rental of $74,315 on the
land, part of which was due July 1.
The housing corporation has no
money with which to pay for its
lease of the pronertv, not being au
thorized to spend its own income to
the lessor unh-ss specifically author
ized to do so hy Congress. The lat
ter body failed to make specific au
thorization for payment of the land
rent» I.
Robert Watson, director of the
United States Housing Corporation
said today he had no word from the
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, since
a meeting of the executive board of
the road scheduled to have been held
nearly two weeks ago. He does not
know what course the railroad will
take, whether it will start eviction
proceedings against the housing cor
poration or whether it will take the
word of the United Slates that the
money will he paid.'
In the meantime the 1,200 occupants
of the government hotels—they are
not full up to capacity this summer
—reside at the hostelries, uncon
scious of the bomb that may be ex
ploded under them.
OPPOSES WAR SUIT.
U. S. Attorney Asks Dismissal of
Action for Seized Stock.
United States Attorney Cordon has
asked the District Supreme Court to
dismiss the suit brought against
Thomas W. Miller, alien property
custodian, and Frank White, treas
urer of the United States, hy Jak
Roht Sigg-Kehr, Rudolph <l.
Bauman-Kienast and Edmund Cams,
a copartnership of capitalists of
Zurich. Switzerland, for the return
of stock in the hncomotive Super
heater Company of New York, valued
at $4.000 00(1. The property was seiz
ed hy the alien property custodian
under the trading with the enemy
act.
The government claims that the
plaintiffs acted as "straw-men" for
the Schmidt'sche Heissdampf Cesell
schaft of Cassel. Cermany. and that
the sale was not a genuine business
transaction. The alleged sale was
made, according to the officials, to
avoid inconvenience which might
otherwise have resulted from a state
of war and that the parties intended
to leave the beneficial ownership in
the German corporation.
CHARGED WITH MURDER.
Two Taxi Drivers Held in Con
nection With Youth's Death.
FREEHOLD, N. J. July 31
Michael Flaherty and James Downey,
taxi drivers, yesterday were formally
charged with murder of seventeen
year-old George Silberman. who was
shot last night when he attempted to
flee soma deserted bungalow, to
which he had been lur#d by a letter
over the signlure of a woman, as
part of a "joke."
Keansburg police say Flaherty and
Downey admitted firing at the lad
as he ran from the shack but denied
any intention of killing him.
W. R. E. Co. Sued for Damages.
The Washington Railway and Elec
tric Company was sued today for
SIO,OOO damages in the District Su
preme Court by Willie E. Meyers for
alleged personal injuries Meyers was
driving a truck along Missouri ave
nue northwest near I'.th street. July
16 last, when it is alleged a car of
the company collided with the truck
and injured Meyers. Attorney Foster
Wood appears for the plaintiff.
AVENUE at NINTH•
tkpkjil
, , 1 . There are almost as
’ ' many kinds of sunimer
> J.J weight fabrics as there
are degrees °f summer
\ temperature.
/]~y\ \ ?/ uJ But three-piece Trop-
ical Worsted Suits will
v V continue to occupy a lop
rung in the P°P ular ity
\|j / ladder because they not
’ k vl only give a good appear
r ] L \1 ance —but keep it.
x vi
Because it is a wor
sted fabric—a tine, cool
texture.
Made from the same
patterns as your heavier
woolen suits.
Priced thirty-five
dollars.
WORSTED
The Avenue at Ninth
"iNATIONALLY KNOWN STORE*
WORLD LAUDS U. S.'
AIR MAIL SERVICE
Delegates to Postal Congress
Pay Tribute to Success
of Flyers Here.
J!.t Cable to The Star and Chicago Daily
Neu*. C’np.vr ght. 19J4.
STOCKHOLM. July 11.—The United
States leads the world in air mail
service. This fact Is ungrudgingly
conceded hy all delegates who are
here attending the postal congress,
and the American delegates have
been universally congratulated on the
"seven twentieth century world won
der," the New York-San Francisco
service.
Fpcclal Assistant to the Postmaster
General Joseph Stewart heads the
United States delegation. He will
present a film showing the air mail
service in operation. Among the most
active delegations is that of Soviet
Russia hut its ambition Is rot. as
one might suppose, for free postal
service for the whole world. On the
contrary, the Russians are rooting for
higher transit rates; and although
Russia's principal asset in this direc
tion-—the Transsiberian railroad—is
still in a condition of complete dis
organization. the Russians have it
figured out on pap< r jusl how mam
gold rubles it should receive from all
other countries for carrying their
mails across Liberia.
One of the most interesting ques
tions which will he threshed out at
this congress is strongly reminiscent
of the early days of the league of
nations. The question is “how many
votes are countries with colonies and
dependencies entitled to?” The United
States has three, including the Philip
pines, hut th- liritish Umpire has
seven. This incongruity has given
rise to the same objections as caused
antagonism toward the league of na
tions.
Another subject under discussion
is general reduction of international
postal rates to the prewar standard,
the United States being almost the
only country which has retained a
5-cent rate.
INMATE, HUNGRY, BACK.
Patient from St Elizabeth's Went
on Jaunt in Woods.
Charles Frederick, forty-one. re
ported to have escaped from St.
Elizabeth Hospital yesterday morn
ing. answered roll call this morning
as if nothing out of the ordinary had
happened. He told of having passed
from the building in which he was a
patient while the attendants were
not looking and gone to the woods
on the reservation.
It was when the pangs of hunger
were felt that the patient stroPefl
lei purely through the woods and re
turned to one of the big buildings.
Physicians at the hospital said the
report to the police that Frederick
was a dangerous patient was an
error.
Hat Worried Pat.
Fmm I apper'R Weekly.
The doctors had operated on Pat.
Coming out from under the ether he
exclaimed. "Thank God, that's over!”
"Don't be too sure.’’ said the man
in the next bed. "They left a sponge
in me and had to cut me open again."
And the patient on the other side
said, "They had to open nle. too, to
find one of their instruments.”
Just then the surgeon who had
operated on the Irishman stuck his
heard in the door and yelled, ‘Has
anybody seen my hat!" . -
Pat fainted.
Felt Safe in Graveyard.
From the Pathfinder.
A colored man. passing a grave
yard shortly after daylight. saw
another colored brother emerging from
the grounds, putting on his coal and
giving evidence of having slept in the
cemetery the previous night.
"My Lawd! Jake.” he greeted him.
“Wasn't you skeered to sleep in de
graveyard all night?”
“Yas." admitted Jake. "But de ol’
woman was on a rampage and the
graveyard is de onliest place she's
skeered to toller me.”
Windsor Castle is built on land
which William I acquired from the
Abbott of Westminster.
5
Didn't Stay Cured.
From Everybody's Magazine.
A negro entered the general store
of a small town and complained to
the storekeeper that a ham that hf 1
had purchased a few days before had
proved not to be -good.
“The ham is all right, Sam.” insist
ed the storekeeper.
”No, it ain’t, boss,” insisted the
°lner. “Dat ham's sure bad.”
"How can that he,” continued tn*-
storekeeper, “when it was cured oniv
last week?”
Sam reflected solemnly a moment
ami then suggested:
“Maybe it's done had a relapse.”
Definition of ‘ Myth."
Fmm the Pittsburgh Chronicle-Telegraph.
The teacher was about to give her
class a lesson on some or tite most
famous myths and legends of the
past. Before beginning, however, she
thought she would ask the scholars
a question or two to see what ideas
they had, if any, about the subject.
"Now. can anyone tc-ll me what a
myth is?' she asked.
A solitary hand was raised and a
voice exc’.limed; “Please, miss, u’» a
female troth."
-y~ ~ i, - Jt ,
* >f»n v Me W ENI E of N! Nr M •
Going
Away?
*
1 he P.-B. store is open
from 8:30 to 2 P.M. every
Saturday in July and
August—hut that’s plenty
of time to tret last
minute vacation needs.
*
Palm Beach Knickers
$5.00
Linen Knickers, plain
colors $5.00
Linen Knickers, plaids
$6.00
Light-weight Golf Hose
51.65
Light Wool Caps. . . .$2.50
/Oh
Mercerized Pongee Shirts
$2.50
Gray Flannel Shirts. $3.50
Foulard Scarfs SI.OO
Duck and Khaki Camp
ing Trousers $2.50
Flannel Trousers . . , 59.00
Bathing Suits, new
stripe effects SB.OO
Beach Robes, of Terry
cloth $6.00
For Women
<•
Bathing Suits
$5.75 to $12,50
Flannel Sports Skirts
$12.50 and $15.00
Sport Blouses
$4.75 to $10.50
Linen Knickers .... $4.50
Straw Sport Hats,
V*3 to Yn off
Patent Leather Hat and
Utility Bags
$4.25 to $5.50
P.-B. Sports Shop—Second Floor,
The Avenue at Ninth
STORE

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