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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, August 30, 1924, Image 3

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CLAIM BOY ADMITS
THREEROBBERIES
Police Say Youth Held in Gas
Station Burglary Was
No Novice.
Ralph Paul White', 4 9 years old. of
3417 Monroe street admitted partici
pation in other robberies, it was said
by police today, following- his arrest
yesterday by Sergt. Sidney J. Marks
in connection with the robbery of the
gasoline station of the Standard Oil
Company, Harrison street and Con
necticut avenue. Those confessions
■were made, it is said, before Detec
tives B. W. Thompson and R. H.
Mansfield.
According to the police. White, *a
former employe of Norman W. Oys
ter. cafeteria proprietor, admitted
having stolen a 150-pound safe con
taining less than SIOO from the lat
ter’s place of business at 3316 Four
teenth street.
Antomobile Recovered.
It is further asserted that White
admitted participation in the robbery
of the home of Capt. John S. McKay,
U. S. A., 3821 Jenifer street, stealing
wearing apparel and a pistol. The
automobile found in possession of
White and his accomplices yesterday
morning belonged to Walter Gib
son. Victoria apartments, who re
ported it stolen July 29.
Manley Marquis Harris. Oak Hill,
Va., arrested yesterday by the pre
cinct police, also is said to have ad
mitted participation in the cafeteria
robbery, both prisoners telling of how
the robbery was planned and exe
cuted.
In addition to the foregoing rob
beries, White is said to have admit
ted participation in the attempted
liquor theft in the home of G. W.
Foraberg, 4907 Fourteenth street,
more than two months ago. Much
expensive liquor had been prepared
for removal from the premises, and
Policeman Guy Rone and a com
panion were arrested on the premises.
It was charged that they were there
to caxt away the liquor.
Suspended From Force.
Rone’s explanation of his presence
on the premises was that he was
there in line of duty, having learned
that burglars were to remove the
liquor from the premises that night.
Ho was off duty and out of his pre
cinct, however, and was arrested for
a grand jury investigation and sus
pended from the force.
Walter Richard Metz, 17, 1714 Cres
cent place, Takoma Park, Md„ who
was arrested in the vicinity of the
gasoline station yesterday morning
and alleged to have been a member
of the trio implicated in the robbery,
is not alleged to have had any con
nection with White in the other rob
beries. The third member of the trio
has not been caught.
Mixed Up His English.
From the Pathfinder.
Julius Fritz tells about an old Ger
man friend so his who got badly tan
gled with the English language re
cently. It seems that the. old German
owns a factory and he learned that
his foreman was not getting down to
work very early, so he thought he
would catch him. He got up early
one morning and went to the plant.
The foreman, who had received a tip
as to what the old man was up to,
was down early himself that morn
ing. When the old German espied
him he remarked: "Ah. I see you’re
early of late. You used to be behind
before, but now you're first at last."
What Pa Said.
from the Philadelphia ledger.
"So you have got twins at your
house,” said Mrs. Besumbe to little
Tommy.
“Yes, ma'am, two of ’em.”
"What are you going to call them?"
"Thunder and Lightning."
”W T hy, those are strange names to
cell children.”
“Well, that’s what Pa called them
aa soon as he heard they were in the
house.”
SPECIAL NOTICES.
DISSOLUTION OK PARTNERSHIP.—TAKE
notice that the partnership of llartzell i- Em
ery. formerly engaged in the manufacture and
Kale of doughnutK, and located at 801 O st.
n.w., Washington, I). C., was dissolved on Au
gust 26. 1924. Therefore my obligations ter
mlnate on this date. G. K. HAKTZELL. 30*
PIANO REPAIRING. SPECIAL SUMMER
prices. Eat. free. Geo. M. M. Walker. Col.
4796. 710 Morton st. n.w., formerly head tuner
for Percy 8. roster and Knabe Co.
1 WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE - FOR - ANT
debts incurred by any other than myself after
this date, August 28, 1924. D. J. PLASS 323
g »L B-e. S 0«
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ver. N. J.. and Richmond. Va.. to Washing-
SMITH’S TRANSKER & STORAGE CO.
AMERICAN PAPERHANGERS & PAINTERS
Will
Beautify your home bo you can enjoy It
at very reasonable rates.
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FLOORS
« craped, cleaned, finished, waxed by electric
machine. R. E. Nash. 2371 9th st. Ceil. 4231.
Maximum Results
Are always obtained when dealing with
08. Phone MAIN 14 for roofers.
TRONn AD Roofla * UM sth n.w.
v Company Phone Main 14
Need Printing II
U TOD DO, CONSULT CS.
HIGH GRADE, BDT NOT HIGH PRICED.
BYRON S. ADAMS,
Good Roof Work
Every dollar paid ua for repairs Is re
turned with thorough work and best ma
terials. If you need a roofer you need a
GOOD roofer. Cali us up!
TCOONS BOOKING Phone Main 935.
rkVAJiIJ COMPANY 119 3d St. a. W.
Just Phone Us
—when you need printing. We’ll gladly
estimate. The MUllon-Dollar Printing
Plant.
The National Capital Press
1210-1212 D St. N.W.
FLOORS
Old floors scraped like new; new floors laid,
, *craped and finished. ACME FLOORING CO .
1318 H at. n.w. M. 989. !•
A person 60 years of age has spent approzb
mately 1-3 of it. or
20 YEARS IN BED
Make your mattresses and box springs feel
comfortable by using our
RENOVATION SERVICE.
Bedell Manufacturing
Company
filfi 1& Bt. N.W. Phone M. 3<Bl.
Closed All Day Labor Day
Palmer Brand Beverages
! 1*
You'll Avoid Delays •
—on the road by having us
Overhaul Your Car before
your Fall auto trip begins.
R. Mcßeynolds & Son
CpeclalUfa In Fainting, Slip Covert tad Tom.
1123-1125 L £>X. N.W. Main 1228.
Calf Arrested
For Violating
Traffic Rules
A calf, destined for slaughter,
and Policeman Milton D. Smith of
No. 4 precinct, president of the
Policemen’s Association, mixed up
in a traffic jam near the Auth Pro
vision Co., on D between Sixth and
Seventh streets southwest, yester
day afternoon, which attracted a
crowd of several hundred highly
amused spectators.
President Smith is an expert
traffic officer, and, when at head
quarters yesterday afternoon a
hurry call came from the Auth
Provision Co. for assistance, ho
, rushed to the spot, discovering the
calf had. as he charged, broken the
traffic regulations by navigating
on the wrong side of the street.
Using his best traffic-regulating
form the association president
finally persuaded the animal,
which, he said, seemed to have
highly erroneous ideas about the
city regulations, to come to a tem
porary halt up against a building.
There is was roped by an Auth Co.
employe and led back to the
slaughter pen.
marveTsmTree
EXISTENCE IN CITY
Superintendent of Parking, in
Annual Report, Tells of Ob
stacles to Be Overcome.
Outlining the tremendous handi
caps under which Washington's beau
i tiful shade trees must not only live
i but to bear out such traditions as
“The City Beautiful" and "The City
I of Trees." Clifford Lanham, superln
j tendent of trees and parkings, in his
! annual report submitted to the Com
missioners todav_ pointed out that it
is remarkable that they live at all.
"The condition of the shade trees
of Washington is, generally speaking,
the best that can be expected when
the adverse circumstances attending
their growth, health and life are con
sidered,” said Mr. Lanham. "For in
stance, the city tree is deprived of
the natural seepage under which Its
country fellow thrives. It depends
on its miniature and unnatural park
ing for rain water. Contrast this
alone with the country tree that has
acres of surface seepage and then
marvel that the city tree, hemmed In
by miles and miles of concrete, its
roots writhing about leaky gas mains,
blocked by electric conduits and wa
ter pipes, livtti at all. Add to these
auuarently insurmountable obstacles
salt water from ice cream freezers,
oil from roadways and motor vehicles,
the indifference, of the curbsetter,
the conduit layer, the lineman, the
plumber and the hardihood and beau
ty of our trees present one of those
superb feats of adjustment that in
my opinion should rank well up in
Darwin’s theory of survival and a
natural adjustment.
Autos Damage Trees.
"Latterly another menace has
; arisen. Consider the thousands of
automobiles that pass any given point
downtown in a single day. Now con
sider the hundreds of thousands of
cubic feet of poisonous gases that are
discharged by these automobiles and
that must be neutralized by the life
forces of the city tree. Consider this
and then do not ask why a tree is
apparently failing but rather why it
lives at all.”
Mr. Lanham reported that 1.034
young trees were planted in their
permanent positions during the last
fiscal year, a net increase of 976 over
the previous year. The majority were
l planted for the purpose of filling va
cancies in existing rows.
The report shows that 1,552 trees
were removed during the year for
various reasons, 9,610 were sprayed
for the extermination of leaf-eating
insects, and 10;884 were trimmed.
There are now a total of 104.294 curb
trees in the District, a decrease of
299 under the preceding year.
It has been impossible to plant
trees along the recently improved
streets. Mr. lanham told the Commis
sioners, because of inadequate appro
priations and the loss of two nursery
sites.
CINCINNATI POLICE
SPURRED TO COURTESY
Safety Director Wants Them Gen
tle Except to Hard-Boiled
' Motorists.
CINCINNATI, Ohio, August 30
Harsh adjectives which many traffic
policemen use on tourists have been
officially replaced in Cincinnati by
courtesy. The city's traffic police
men have become polite salesmen,
"selling the city” to strangers.
Each guardian of a Cincinnati
street corner has been given a letter
from William Tudor, safety director,
which stresses the point that courtesy
is something that costs nothing. He
urges traffic officers to he prepared
to give a soft word of caution to
the motorist who has unintentionally
violated a traffic ordinance. He
points out that slight violations of
traffic laws are often caused by a
mind obsessed with cares collected
during a day's activity, and adds:
"The average driver will appreciate
the situation.”
Mast Acoept Proffers.
To for the driver who does
not accept suggestions of the traffic
policemen in good faith, Safety Di
rector Tudor says: “By no means do
I want traffic men to stand for abuse.
If a driver becomes ’hard’ or defiant,
argument accomplishes nothing. A
citation will end the incident and the !
court will settle the dispute.”
Tourists and automobile visitors or
auto transients should find the wel
come sign hung on every policeman.
Safety Director Tudor says. A
stranger should be given every con
sideration, for “a stranger within
our gates always remembers kind
treatment and never forgets rough
treatment. With a little considera
tion on our part the stranger will
sing the praises of our city to others
in his own community or wherever
he may go,” the letter concludes.
Chicken-Catching Eel Canght.
Near Deposit, N. Y., farmers have
been missing their chickens for many
weeks and she marauder could not
be apprehended regardless of how
careful the watch. Recently, S. D.
Peters caught a 4-pound eel and when
It was dressed it was found to con
tain two young chickens which had
been gulped down whole.
Caterpillar Is Strong.
A goat-moth caterpillar, found In
the London Zoo, has become the ob
ject of study on the part of natural
ists because of its great strength.
This caterpillar was placed in a glass
Jar covered with a heavy leaden lid
In which holes had been punched to
admit air. Over night the caterpillar
had chewed away enough of the lead
from around one of the holes to
escape. Another caterpillar of the
same type was housed In a cigar box,
but chewed Its way out, ate a hole in
the top of a piano and was later
found wandering among the works.
THE EVENING STAR, WASHINGTON. D. C„ SATURDAY, AUGUST 30. 1924.
5.
ASSURES •MtMER THiS IH- ER. SCCON O
TOPS AS GOOD AS OUT AND STZ2LE BY A UTTLE ID HIS BASEMAN DID NT GET THAT - WHETHER THAT WASN’T NEAR
HOT TO WORRY; OLD KID. LEFT CANT HE o*/0? ANY MORE ER TO EDDIE THAN TO HIM -
HE'S GOT THE WHOLE TEAM GROUND THAN A PANSY WHATS WEIL THEY MUST BE CRCfiS
BEHIND HtM tc MATTER WTO HIM ANW« EYED. THAT'S ALL
MUTTERS SOMETHING ABOUT r D RONS IN GENERAL DIRECT
BEING EXPtrttDTD COWER AND DEMANDS DID EVEW- IN SHOUTING 'MINE! ” ION OP FIRST BASE AN
WHOLE DIAMOND AND IMMED- BODY SEE THE CRA2V BOUNCE AS BATTER SENDS UP NOUNCING LOUDLY THAT
WELY LETS AN EASY ONE THAT BALLTOOK - PIQITO. ROU- TOP PLY HE'S GOT IT
DRIBBIT THROUGH HIS LESS l£R THAN A QUARRY .. „ _
.§ McOurc Newspaper Syndicate
STOPS SUDDENLY SHOUT- DEMANDS IS THE FIRST BASE* RETURNS TO POSITION OPTO- GRADUALLY 6115 BACK ID NORM
ING'TWCE. IT" «WST _hAN GLUED TO HIS BAG OR INf, to TAKE on First EASE al and tehs pitches not to wor-
AS. BALL PLOPS TO WE WHAT - DIDKT HE HEAR HIM MAH OR ANYONE ELSE RY- MAKE HIM HIT IT Hi CANT GET
ground boiler to take it- good Night after the game it PAST THIS INFIELD, old KID-now
WHAT A BUNCH OP BONE HEADS THEN EVERYBODY PLAY BALL
c ‘ . .
Snapshots of a Junior League Shortstop.
SPANIARDS FACING
STRONGOPPOSITION
Critical Situation in Morocco
Is Revealed in Official
Statement.
Bj the Afisociited Press.
MADRID, August 30. —The serious
ness of the situation in Morocco,
where Spanish troops are engaged In a
struggle against the rebels. Is brought
home to the people in an official state
ment today.
"The Invasion by Riffians and Go
mans,” it says, "haa caused a general
uprising in the western zone (Tetuan)
and creates a situation necessitating
intensive protection of the Xauen-
Tetuan road by two strong columns,
who are engaged in constant fighting
in a mountainous region against an
almost invisible enemy along the Lau
River.
“The Spanish forces are compelled
to fight for every Inch in their at
tempt to bring relief to besieged po
sitions, but they do not spar so much
the fire of the enemy as the difficult
terrain in which these beleaguered
positions are situated. To this is
added the fact that water must be
carried from their base, as the water
ing places along the front are too
dangerous to be utilized.
Casualties Are Reported.
“Some of the besieged positions
have lost their heliographic com
munication, and those who still can
use it report casualties from fighting
and illness.
“Raisull (former bandit chief) is
doing everything in ht» power to aid
and fight on our side near Xauen.
"The Spanish government in this
statement has tried to tell the whole
truth which the people can and irtust
know as regards the actual state of
affairs in Morocco without being In
discreet and revealing secrets or mili
tary plans which the government and
the general staff have worked out to
bring about a successful ending to
the warfare against the rebellious
Moors.”
Hamon’s Widow Wins Divorce.
ARDMORE, Okla., August 30.—Mrs.
Georgia Hamon Rohrer, widow of the
late Jake L. Hamon, Republican na
tional committeeman from Oklahoma,
was granted a divorce today from
William Li. Rohrer, Chicago art col
lector, by District Judge A. E.
Waldon. She charged cruelty and
non-support.
Abe Martin Says:
Splurgin’ around on borrowed
money is bad enough, but men
acin’ life an’ property in a bor
rowed car is jest awful.
Wherever there’s knickers
there’s alius some snickers. v
We alius feel like we wuz in a
losin’ game when a p’litical ora
tor tells us our Gover’ment is a
gigantic business enterprise, an’
we are all stockholders an’ part
ners in it.
Lase Bud, who’s bein’ sued for
$122 rent, remains unmoved.
Jake Bentley has traded his
seven-passenger car fer a one
seated roadster, so some o’ th’
family ’ll be left t’ run th’ farm.
If you want t’ make your wife
mad, don’t notice that her hair’s
bobbed.
(Copyright. John F. Dili* Oo.)
On a street oar in a small Ohio city
was the sign, "All children 42 Inches
or over must pay.”
Coolidge Backs
Rights of U. S. in
Gun Elevations
President Coolidge made It
known yesterday he would assert
all rights given this country under
the treaties of the arms limita
tion conference in regard to the
elevation of naval guns.
The President. however, Is
loath to make any move in this
regard which would stimulate
further competition in armament
between nations, feeling that
foreign countries should pay their
debts to this nation before spend
ing additional money on arma
ments.
RUM PUEET INFESTS
SHORES OF CANADA
Liquor Smugglers Reported
Constantly Flocking to
Cape Breton Caves.
By ConMOlidated Prr»*.
LONDON, August 30. Woman's
The whole world knows of the anti-Vol
stead squadron that lubricates New
York by means of submarines, hydro
planes and high-powered motor boats.
The whole world does not know that
Canada also has an Atlantic rum
fleet.
Many great waves beat on the
rugged coasts of Cape Breton, but
no wild nor’easter as wild and law
lessness as the waves of rum. The
writer has recently stood on the very
crest of these rum breakers and
watched them foam shoreward into
hundreds of smugglers’ coves.
A glance at a map will show at
once that Cape Breton is ideally
adapted to pluck bottles from the
sea. It is the hand of which the
rest of Nova Scotia is the arm and
the Straits of Canso the wrist. It
runs out to sea in Innumerable long
headlands like eager beckoning
fingers. Or perhaps it would be bet
ter to say that Cape Breton. Cape
Percy, Point Aconie, Cape Smoky and
Gape North are tongues—quivering
and thirsty tongues.
Vessels OIT Every Headland.
Off every headland is some vessel
of the fleet. It needs little magic
to summon spirits from the vast deep.
The rustle of bills at the three-mile
limit is all that is required to lure
kegs and cases from the holds of the
rum boats into the holds of the rum
•runners.
To serve as barriers against this
tidal wave, the dominion government
has three revenue cutters, the largest
of which is the Sagamore, command
ed by Capt Peters. These watch dogs
of the customs, If they took their
eyes or their telescopes from the
land, would realize In a moment that
they are not dykes but sieves. The
customs officials cannot watch so
great an expanse of sea on a coast
as wrinkled as a human brain.
At its full strength the fleet
amounts to 40 sails, 15 off Cape Bre
ton and the rest off Halifax. Lunen
burg, and Yarmouth. And they are
really “sails." They ride at anchor
with sails up to serve as a sea mark
to customers and to steady them, the
boats. Into the wind. Only a few are
steamers or have auxiliary engines.
Some of them are just one masted,
almost one cask, fishing sloops.
They do not need to be as large as
the vessels in the sea caravan that
serves the great American Sahara.
They supply not half a continent, but
only three small provinces. Being able
to anchor 3 miles offshore and not 12.
they do not need to be so seaworthy.
Their source of supply Is St. Pierre
Miquelon, only a hundred miles dis
tant from the extreme north of Capt
Breton, while the “home waters" of
the American fleet are In the Bermudas
and the Bahamas.
It should rejoice the hearts of pro
tectionists to learn that this Canadian
fleet has no truck nor trade with the
Yankee fleet. It occupies the extreme
tip of the great marine horn or cornu
copia which so copiously bedews the
Volstead coast, but it Is not In direct
contact with It. Between Maine and
New Brunswick, where the 12-mile
limit ends and the 3-mlle begins, there
Is a gap. One rum fleet Is, as It were,
"In the air.” But It prospers as a
strictly Canadian enterprise, limited to
a Canadian market. It was estimated
by a Sydney newspaper man that Capo
Breton alone buys in one year J2.000,-
000 worth of liquor from the sea.
The ships are mostly owned by
Canadians and belong to Canadian
ports. They laugh at American com
petition and occasionally dump goods
on the American market In spite of
Republican anti-dumping laws. Many
a Nova Scotian liquor carrier makes a
dash into American waters as though
on a Highland foray into the Lowlands
and trades headaches for dollars.
Ships of the rum fleet. It seems, are
like the whales. In rough weather
they keep well out to avoid being
blown on shore. When the weather
is fine they come in and bask in the
sunshine on the 3-mile limit. The
rum fleet never does do a brisk busi
ness where there is a brisk breese.
—By GLUYAS WILLIAM
EVANS DENIES KLAN
BAN ON JEWS LIFTED
Wizard Declares Only Native-
Born White Gentile Protestants
May Be Members.
By the Associated Press.
NKW YORK. August 30 —The Jew
ish Telegraph Agency in this city to
day made public a letter received
from H. W. Evans, imperial wizard
of the Ku Klux Klan, in which he
said the prerequisites for member
ship in the Klan had not been
changed.
The telegraph agency had written
Mr. Evans inquiring if current re
ports were correct to the effect that
the Klan had modified its policy with
regard to Jews who had served in the
American Army, making it possible
for them to join the order.
Mr. Evans’ reply said, in part: “Our
organisation is founded upon the
Christian religion and as a prereq
uisite for membership therein we
require that applicants be native
born. white Gentile Protestant Ameri
can citizens of good moral character.
“We recognize the right of all men
to associate themselves together. The
particular group which we are en
deavoring to associate, come under
the prerequisites heretofore given in
this letter.”
WOMEN ARE RECRUITED
FOR SCOTLAND YARD
British Police Hope to Outwit
Criminals With Fair
Detectives.
By the Associated Pres*.
SYDNEY. Nova Scotia, August 30.
wiles, wit and charms versus criminal
craftiness is a possibility of the future,
and the outcome is expected by Scot
land Yard to rope in more crime per
petrators than has been the case
recently.
Recruiting for the new women’s
police force is opening shortly, and,
from the many applicants the crim
inal investigation department hopes
to get some bobbed haired, daintily
gowned detectives who will prove
more than the equals of the wily
jewel thieves • and dope traffickers
who have hitherto eluded attempts
of mere man detectives to track them
down.
The authorities are satisfied that
many of the present crimes and rob
beries are engineered by a new set
of smart criminals who can only be
countered by detectives of the same
outward smartness and equal wit.
By dressing up to the part, these
future sleuths will be able to move
leisurely about the West End without
attracting as much suspicion as male
plain clothes detectives and they will
be able, by their personal charms
and manner, to disarm suspicion.
Invite Trinkle to Speak.
RICHMOND, Va., August 30;—Gov.
E. Leo Trinkle has been invited to
speak at the Lafayette-Marne exer
cises at Baltimore on September 6.
If unable to go the governor will
send a representative.
*■
Branch Office
DISTRICT
NATIONAL BANK
Conn. Ave. and K Street
No Parking Reatrictions
“Park Your Car at the Door”
TIGER! TIGER!!
None Better!!!
Do You Want a Home
In Chevy Chase?
QUINTER, THOMAS & CO.
Main 8416
FLAT TIRE ?
MAIN 500
LEETH BROTHERS
Service Charge Never Over 01.00
|| NORDACSI
CIGARS
Made in Tampa
Ask for them
At All Smoke Shops
10c—2 for 25c—15c Strt.
MILLIONS TO HEAR
FLYERS GREETED
WCAP and WEAF to Broad
cast Patrick Congratulations
on Return to America.
Special Dispatch to The Star.
NEW YORK, August 30.—Millions
or radio fans will listen in on a
historic occasion when the American
round-the-world flyers, soon after
landing at Ice Tickle, Labrador, don
headphones and receive greetings
and congratulations spoken by their
chief, MaJ. Gen. M. M. Patrick, whose
voice will be broadcast on 'the air
from Washington on the evening of
the Labrador landing. Secretary of
War Weeks, if in Washington, may
precede Gen. Patrick with a spoken
greeting.
Admiral Magruder, Capt. Lyman
Gotten and officers of the United
States cruiser Richmond will be among
the party listening at headphones in
the ward room of the Richmond
awaiting the greeting. Gen. Patrick
will speak into a microphone at sta
tion WCAP in Washington. His voice
will be relayed by wire to station
WEAF of the American Telephone
and Telegraph Co., New York. The
broadcasting will take place at or
about 9 p.m. eastern daylight saving
time.
According to advices received today
by the North American Newspaper Al
liance, all shore stations. Navy ships,
other ship and the radio beacon at
Battle Harbor. Labrador, will be si
lent for at least five minutes at this
time, thus insuring the uninterrupted
reception of the greeting on board
the ship.
The safe arrival of Lleuts. Lovell
Smith and Erik Nelson at Indian
Harbor will, in the opinion of avia
tion experts, mark the virtual com
pletion of their historic world gird
ling tour, as the remainder of the
flight presents no exceptional dif
ficulties. The greeting by radio from
the chief of the Air Service . on this
occasion of the flyers' return to the
American contineut thus assumes the
nature of a historic event.
(Copyright, 1924. Cnited Slates, Canada
and tireat Britain by North American News
paper Alliance. All right reserved.)
Scientific Whaling.
Prom the Philadelphia Inquirer.
Whaling has now been established
on a scientific basis by the Norwegian
industry. After years of extravagant
killing, when nothing but the blubber
was utilized, whales are now being
1 utilized completely, boneless whale
1 meat being an important product.
! Fresh whale meat compares favor
ably with other meats, according to
1 scientific tests conducted by Chris
tiania University.
,
BEFORE I
| SELECTING |
—YOUR HOME FOR
THE WINTER. IN
SPECT OUR APART
MENTS. AT THIS
TIME THERE ARE
AVAILABLE SEV
ERAL VERY AT
-5 TRACTIVE TWO.
THREE AND FOUR
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RECEPTION HALL
AND BATH APART- |
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AND T W E N T Y
FOUR-HOUR SERV
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THE
I ARGONNE !
16th & Col. Rd. I
I ■ I
v ■ *
®it££kmg,siep‘' I
roe corner-sroue ©i*
PP/uess is iuHEM
YOO LAy VOOItF/RSr (
BRICK ON THE FGOWOWOW
When we supply the
material to build your
home, we are as proud of
that home as you, because
we know it ha# a tangible
value and one that will
last. Our hobby is qual
ity, prompt service and ma
terial that will stand the
test of time. Consult us.
W.TGalliher&Bra tm
I 30 tK and K Sts K.W I
• Wets t 2370 ■* I
RUMELY ASKS PARDON;
WOULD RESTORE RIGHTS
By the Associated Press.
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., August 30 -
Dr. Edward E. Rumely, formerly pub
lisher of the New York Evening
Mail, and one of his Nor
vln R. Llndheim, whose sentences for
conspiracy against the government
were commuted last Spring by Presi
dent Cooiidge, have appi.ed for full
pardons which will restore their civil
rights. This became known today |
when Officials at the Eastview peni- ■
tentlary received requests from the
Department of Justice that the men’s
records be sent to Washington for
examination.
Rumely, Lindheim and S. Walter
Kauffmann, another attorney associ
ated with Rumely, had served a
month of a year’s term in the East
view penitentiary when the commu
tation was announced. The three
were released April 18.
- - ■ ~~
B —>>
I A BRAND-NEW HOUSE WITH I
A GARAGE FOR
|, , i
paved thm nrn paved r
I I STREET $/,DOU ALLEY k
| 645 MORRIS STREET N.E. |
T (Between flth and 7th, F and G St». > 9
SAMPLE HOUSE
| Open Daily and Sunday for Inspection Until 9 P.M. |
/ Constructed House, Beautifully Finished”
|l N. L SANSBURY CO., Inc. !
y 1418 Eye St. N.W. Phones Main 5903-4 '•
I Members Washington Real Estate Board |
Money Immediately Available
For
FIRST TRUST LOANS
On
Improved Property
Current Interest Rates—Reasonable Commissions
LET US HAVE YOUR APPLICATION
We have also a limited amount of money to loan at 5%%.
Desirable loan applications for amounts from $25,000 to $200,000
will receive prompt action.
-;-M c KEEVERandGOSg..,.
IT|1 T | I aJ
Lorn Department
1415 K St. N.W. M. 4752 i
General Agents of the Globe Indemnity Company
W. H. WEST COMPANY
Announce that
ROBERT B. CUMMINGS
Has Become a
Member of This Finn
—and will be in charge of the Loans, Investment and
Bonding business of the organization.
W. H. WEST COMPANY
WM. L. F. KING, President EDWARD G. PERRY, Vice President
ROBERT B. CUMMINGS, Secretary and Treasurer
916 15th Street N.W. Main 2474
General Agents of the Globe Indemnity Company
I NEW HOMES*
Inspect Today
Sunday or Labor Day
SSOO CASH
212 to 232 15th St. N.E.
Just N.E. of Lincoln Park
OR
1327 to 1337 E St. S.E.
Just North Pa. Ave. S.E.
Easy Monthly Payments
Large Lots to Paved Alley
Room for Garage
. Hot-Water Heat
Electric Lights
Sleeping Porches, Large Front Lawns
Open Evenings and Sunday
H.R.HowfeflSTElti (5-
■ incorporated mmv
1311 H STREET NORTHWEST
Sssss=ss=ssssssßaßssasaaß=sass=ss=s==--aM---p--*K>
3
U.S. SEEKS TO MAKE
PEACE IN HONDURAS
American Charge Instructed
to Use Friendly Offices. '■
Other Countries Aid.
I
Stokeley W. Morgan, American
charge d’affaires at Tegucigalpa, ha »
been instructed by the Washington
Government to use his good offices in
a friendly effort to bring about an
agreement between revolutionary
factions in Honduras. He will be as
sisted by representatives of several
Central American governments, which
have agreed to act.

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