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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, June 06, 1928, Image 3

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Sure Relief
XVfflfci '*wjky
6 Bellans
k-A I Hot water
Sure Relief
DELL-ANS
FOR INDIGESTION
25* and 754 Pkss Se ! d Everywhere
DOWNTOWI-T
WAREHOUSE
For Rent
Rear "27 I) St. X.\Y.
4-STORY fireproof
KLTaTRIC FREIGHT ELEVATOR
American sbcitutv
Hf»l F-st*tr Drrt.
iMh A Ps. Av*. N.\V, V. 4815
DENTURES
A dental plate should be kept as
perm-free as possible. Use Zonitc,
the powerful, germ-destroyi r g avli
teptic. Cannot harm the denture.
Simply place overnight in a glass
of water containing a few drops
of Zonite. Rinse the mouth with
Zorate, too. jp n j
Tgnik
At nil drug rtorc*
FURNITURE
NEWS |
FT ednrsdny* June 6. 1928
MR.
ROBERT
RUMMER
("Bob hummer)
Mr. Robert vnmnvr, for
merly with the V right
Furniture Co. for 6 years, is
now associated with the Peer
less Furirturc Co.
Mr. Kumin e r wishes to
make this announcement to
his many business and per
sonal friends and extends to
them an invitation to visit
him at his new location.
NOW WITH THE
S 7th St. N.W.
in the rapacity of
SALES MANAGER
_ SPECIAL NOTICES. __
THE ANM Al. ELE'TION OF OFFICER*
a*w3 ;tr« •*>?» of the ORIENTAL Bt
ASSOCIATION NO « >*<ls lx* hekl *t the j
f-fftee of the asete-iatton <Kmj F *t. n » «>r> ;
Tti«n*ja> Jane 7th tse.'H ttetweeti th<- hour*
of 1" a i lse-fe noon *n<J o ut
HENRV K tJE< KMAX, Secretary. .
POB» LIGHT DELIVERY TgITK MOTOR j
N‘<> 10705059. left by owtter for renal r*
w»tt tw- «<ld tor repair to3i if not ••tilled for j
wst-IMH thirty day* from date. TRIANGLE
JtnTtiß- New York are. ji.* . I
THE ANNUAL ELECTION FOR DlßEC
tor* of the Metropolis Bu.'idiu* Association i
*sii be held at the office of the association.
201 PenneOvania are s e Wednesday. !
J jne 6, 1928. betreen the hos;r* of 2 »r,d 8 i
tt clock p m EDWARD A TRIPP Becre- ‘
t* ry *
im MIMEOGRAPHED LETTERS 11 26 MUL
tiaraphiiis; Printing. Addressing- etc ACE
LETTER SHOP 203 District National Bang
B-jiWim. 1406 G F: 7143 Open 830 am.
1 VILE NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY
iSeht* other than thoae contracted by m»-
aei! WU E THIELE 1318 Md sve. n e *•
ROBERT L KI’MMEIL FOR THC PAST SIX
y*»*r a; THE V.'RIGMT CO., furniture -tore |
to? 7th tt n.w . it now associated with THE !
PEERIJISF. FUP.NITVRE CO in the rapacity
of attlea irar.ager Mr. Rummer will be glad
to meet l it btidnet* and per-oj al fr.end* at
hi* new business address THE PEERLESS
FURNITURE CO . 827-823 7th ST N V.’
I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY
oebt* contracted hr ary ore other than nit
•elf CHARLES H LANGLEY $24 10th >t
sApr 6. __ '* i
WANTED—VAN LOADS OF FURNITURE
to or from Ne* York Phlla Boston Rich- (
Blond at id points south
SMITH R TRANSFER A STORAGE CO ,
1313 You St Nonh 3343 |
This Million-Doliar
Printing Plant
—ta at your re.-vic# No order too small
to rerr ye < artful a’ tent loti
The National Capital Press
12!3-1332 D S' NW Phone Main 650
We Do Roof Repairing
••And er«ry job is a first -Claes Oh*'
Vou'SJ find our prices most moderate!
Call us up
IRONCLAD lomVanV
St.i and Avar's Bt* N E
Fhonea Hot'h 26 North 27 |
I NEVER DISAPPOINT
BYROX 5. ADAMS
PRINTING
IN A HURRY
Rich grade, but not high priced
POOFING-by Koons
SLAG RTF IF INO TINNING Ji'diF HE
RaJRs H*i*lb I'AIMIfG J • or- >n
<3* t/Pll'idf ' diVtfD VfrV i i ’
iMfc'i **<;?•#;*** Citi .¥ jp'
KOONS .’v;: .' ;
Workmen's Compensation
Insurance
P*pi» *iit • •.g ti.e ftovs ? fr-dej; *." r;or> •
fiasiy 'a.-, au’horueed company> »» offer ye .
huj aeiviies in >akiey «*»e of >our need*
pndei the worVoMth 1 * c«inpem.aitoi< la*
▼ our Intaiufa will h»v* oo ueuel cateful
ItUNUwii Standard rater and cover a«*
National capital inbup.ancl c</4-
PANV OF THE D C
>3B R# Ave, E F Teiepraoij* Lincoln 144 *
fe * f*ive You an Latin.ate on
WINDOW SCREENS
MADE T<* ORDER
V*'* can ine*e any *f/e Wieen you need
V>» *«e the fii*ef' meah wire Factory price*
KLEEBLATT tr H
B'Miif Shade* aid fpiccns f»:,oi.e L-n 879
NICKEL PLATING.
CATLINS'fINC. -
M- ■ 68. 8369 1134 f< Y A e H V
NEED OF SUFFRAGE
I IN D.C. STRESSED
Nalionrl Representation
Commerce Body Topic-Pro
motion Donation Sought.
Scoring the injustice of lack of nation
al representation for the people of the
District, President Ivan C. Weld of the
Washington Chamber of Commerce de
clared that organization "tvonld like
to have a part in correcting the situa
i tion'* after Ross P. Andrews had ap
j prared beiore the chamber’s board of
I directors, meeting in the Homer Build
! ing last night, and requested a contri
bution to the emergency fund of the
! Citterns' Joint Committee on National
Representation. On motion of M. A.
Leese. the board referred the request
to the committee on donations.
In conveving the request of the Citi
zens' Join* Committee for financial as
sistance. Mr. Andrews, a former mem
ber of the boajrd. took occasion to ex
press the opinion that "we are n«arcr
to the goal than we have ever b'rn be-
I fore."
Fxplains Committee Program.
i h« exolained the "ambitions program'
of the Citizens’ Joint Committee, which
calls for the raising of a fund of $25.-
000 a year for four years if necessary.
In the meantime an "emergency ap
propriation” of $1,250 was needed. Mr
j Andrews said, to clean up the debts
' of the committee and carry its work
over until its "ambitious program" can
be started. The sum of SSOO is being
asked of the Chamber of Commerce and
'he Board of Trade, while $250 is to i
reouested from the Merchants and
Manufacturers’ Association, the direct-
I ors were told.
Requests for contributions to several
private projects also were referred to
their donations committee by the dl
, rectors.
In accordance with a custom followed
in previous years a resolution was passed
I substituting a meeting in September
1 for the chamber's regular meeting in
June rs railed for in its constitution, j
Several other features of the constitu- ;
tion which seemed to need changing |
| were brought to the attention of the i
directors, who authorized the appoint- !
! ment of a special committee to revise j
that document and report to the board i
in September. President Weld np-1
ooint“d Walter C. Balderston. counsel of
the chamber: Robert N. Harper and
Charles J. Storkman as the committee.
Community Chest Discussed.
A brief exposition of the salient fea
tures of the community ehest idea was
given by Mr. Weld in callirfi attention
to th" efforts to establish a chest here,
but the board took no formal action on
the matter. Mr. Weld plso informed
th B directors a breakfast would be
given by the chamber to the delegates
i attending the Soroptimists convention !
; in the May Cower Hotel tomorrow morn- j
: ing.
Resolutions were oassed authorizing ;
; :he purchase of 1.000 copies of the j
'Greeters' Guide" to Washington, and
nstructing the chamber's general coun
sel to make arrangements necessarv to
) conform to the n®w workmen's com
pensation law for the employes of the I
ergs ni2a tion.
Mai. William O. Tufts, chairman of j
th° committee on schools, colleges and 1
universities, reported on the present [
i status of the "diploma mill” legisla- 1
tion. and Mr. Balderston. chairman of |
i the special committee on quarters, in
formed the directors arrangements were
being made to secure larger quarters ;
for the chamber in the same building
where its officers are now located.
24 New Members Enrolled.
The following new members were ad
mitted:
Morris Cs fritz. Charles A. Carry,
Warner M. Eaton, A. O. Edmondson.
L H. Firey, Jefferson L. Ford, jr.; J.
H. Gaszner. Joseph E. Gatti. F. C.
Heigle. C. Heurich. ir.: Hickson. Inc.;
Walter Hinton. J. W. Hunt, Hydraulic
Press Brick Co.. J. J. Johnson. Kass
Realty Co., Mendes J. Manues, DeWitt
E. McKinstry. Cuvier A. Metzler, E. H.
Perry. Carry Quinn, N. Clinton Robin.
Graeme T. Smallwood, C. R. Warde.
UNION MISSION FUND
NOW TOTALS $16,986
I |
Women Leading the Men in
Amounts Collected to Clear Cen- ;
tral Organization of Debt.
With subscriptions amounting to'
SB,IOO received yesterday toward the in
debtedness of the Central Union Mis- 1
skin, the total campaign fund for the j
first two days was reported today by
Treasurer Merritt O Chance as *16.988.
The women are leading the men In
the grand total for the two days, hav- !
ing turned in $7,894.25, as compared
with $7,790.50 for their rivals. The !
team from Mount Vernon Place M E
Church, South, reported subscript ions
amountnig to $1,033, making its grand
total $1,337.
The divisional group headed by James
A Force led the individual team groups
j yesterday with SBB3. while the group j
under Dr Viola E Reece was only $3
behind,
Harry Jones, convert cook at the Cen
tral Union Mission, who ladles out soup
to 18.000 "down-and-outers’’ a year, i
foregone attendance at th n Gris- j
fith Stadium all year. The reason came
to light vesterday. wh'-n he gave Sunt j
John S Bennett $25 irk silver and gold.
c aved from his savings, toward the I
Mission fund Inehtded in this amount 1
were three *2 50 gold pieces, which he
"*cHvf-d as, Christmas gifts for the last i
three years
Jone« *a«ed most of the $25 bv deny- !
ing himself his usual base ball games I
during the teason and occasional movie
shov: He gets 8)0 a week. A Govern- i
n*nt charwoman also gave $3 from her
last week’s pay envelope.
50,000 QUIT JOBS.
i KOBE Japan, June 6 <A*i. —Seamen,
numbered at 50.000 and involving
1300 tramp steamers have left their!
lobs as a result of the breakdown In
negotiations between the Shipowners' j
Association and the Seamen's Union
for a higher wage
Inasmuch as the Seamen’s Union i
ha* not ordered a formal strike, the 1
principal regular steamer lines are not
involved as yet
FLAT^TIRE
Spar* Tire* J'/ll Priced
Applied M ILa According
50e lo $1 00 to Distance
LEETH BROTHERS
Fr.- 764
lormrrly Main 580
BOOKS
WANTED
in any quantity
"firing ihatm in'* or
Phone Franklin 5415
BIG BOOK SHOP
1 933 G St. N,W.
THE EVEXrNO STAR. TTASHTNGTOX. T). r.. WEPXESDAY. .TT'XE 6, tf>2B
LATEST PICTURE OF FORMER KAISER
i
1
;
f i
vv. $ ■*.
! v ;
mM
t«pi
3..^
The former C.ermin Fmneror, his second wife. Trincess llermine. and her
youngest daughter. Princess llrnriette von Schnnalch-Caroiath, shown out for
a walk on the former Kaiser's magnificent estate at Doom.
PRESIDENT HIATT
LOSES HIS OFFICE
Csposeti by Citizens’ Body on
Charge of Sponsoring Non-
Resident Members.
.
Accused of sponsoring members who
were not eligible in the organization,
! J. Clinton Hiatt of 1323 Harvard street,
| newly elected president of the Colum
' bia Heights Citizens' Association, was i
j deposed last night at a meeting held
in Wilson Normal School. Eleventh and
Harvard streets, upon his refusal to
resign, and the presidency was de
clared vacant.
i A special committee report was pre-
I sented. alleging that at least seven
| members—recommended by Mr. Hiatt
i and most of them admitting they voted
■ for him for president last month—gave
I addresses within the association’s ter
| Htory who were found to have been
« living in sections of the city far re
moved from Columbia Heights.
Report by Special Committee.
The report was submitted by a spe
cial committee headed by A. M. Ed
wards, chairman, the other members
being H. G. Seboure, Mrs. Reberta van
H. Volland, C S. Easterling and Mrs.!
Vernon L. Brown. This committee was
appointed last month to investigate ;
the irregularities charged.
The original ouster resolution last
night requested that the president not
only resign his office, but also relin- i
quish membership in the association
The latter portion was stricken out
after it was stated by Frank M. Barnes
that the "punishment was too severe"
and after Fred J. Rice. Mrs. Lucy
Swanton, Charles T. Clayton and others
had declared Mr. Hiatt's value as a
citizen was not to be held too lightly
It was brought out in the discussion
j that Mr. Hiatt had been elected by a
majority of more than 60 votes.
Members D topped From Rolls.
Resolutions were adopted dropping
i the seven members in question from
the rolls and returning their momber
; ship fees and amending the constitu
tion to prevent a recurrence. Resolu
| tions also were adopted declaring va-
I rant all appointments made by the
| deposed president .
Elizabeth A. Hayden, second vice
1 president, presided over the session,
which lasted more than three hours
The first vice president, Dr. Seneca B
! Bain, will direct the activities of the
; association until the next regular elec
tion.
James O. Yaden, Joseph L. Gammell.
i W. A. Roberts and Charles I. Stengle,
5 members of the Citizens' Advisory
|| 'Wise 'Brothers m
1 Chevy Chase I
JL Dairy ll
iflfl
|| |P
No straight neck bottle demands of milk
such consistently high quality as the
"Cream Top” Bottles used exclusively by us!
Whal mort convincing <i.iily proof of milk «|tmlit \ titan
ihr bulging pecka of tin at* bottles ltll«-»l with rich cream that
iin In whipped? I tally ponied off for the roller or cereal,
or re mixed with the milk for the children
No additional charm■ f or "Cream-lop” service
telephone -fc West 18*
HWI M HIinAHI) S|'R\ ICP
i WASHINGTON'S I I'AIM NO AMI MOST PRO! iRBSSIVF l> AIN A
ELECTION FRAUDS ,
CHARGED TO JUDGE
i
I
Chicago Crime Commission
Finds Fadtied Registration
Evidence in His House.
By tlis» AMoHated Pres*.
CHICAGO, June 6.—Evidences of !
padded registration lists were found In !
the apartment house occupied by Judge j
Emanuel Eller, the Chicago Crime
Commission, which asks his removal
from criminal to civil suits because of
"pandering with crime." charged yes
terday at the investigation of the al«
j legations.
The commission petitioned the Crim
inal Court to transfer him. contending
he waived felonies to accept minor
pleas of guilt, with the Intention of
making State's Attorney Crowe’s record
appear better. The reward was Crowe's
party support, it was claimed.
Father Is Ward "Boss."
Judge Eller, on the stand, said he
thought there were seven registered
voters In his apartment building. John i
J Healy, counsel for the commission, j
then read 12 names which he said were
registered from the building.
Healy attempted to show that Eller
used his Judicial position *o advance the
interests of the Thompson-Crowe Re-
I publican faction. The judge said he
was with that group.
When Judge Eller took the stand his
father, Morris Eller, known as the
"boss” of the “bloody twentieth" ward,
sat near him It was in the twentieth
ward that Octavius Granady, negro
candidate for the ward committee
chairmanship opposed to Eller, was
murdered primary election day.
Cites Charity Work.
The ju ige said his father was sue- !
cessful .<n polling all the Republican
votes in precincts because of the charity ;
work his * organization does the year \
round.
"We help people every day, give them I
food and coal, and when we ask them
to vote they respond," he said.
Eller said, "perhaps the people ask
for directions" about marking their bal- ]
lots, adding when they get in trouble ’
"we help them."
"And they get in court trouble and
come to you, don't they?" Healy asked, j
and the judge replied: "They do not." ;
Council, were present at the Invitation
of the association, A social hour, un
der the auspices of the community
center, followed the meeting.
MUSSOLINI MAKES
GESTURE DF PEACE
| II Duce Touches on Excellent
Relations With United States
in Address.
Ry the Associatel Press.
ROME. June 6—Premier Mussolini i
presented himself before the Senate yes- !
terday as both an agrcsslve and prudent
speaker. He reviewed Italy’s relations j
with all the countries of the world, cm- j
phasized the ex- I
I ccllent relations ■ 1
with the United
States, Italy’s tra- js£77
ditional friendship /api#- M
with Eng'and. im- Mr l sg|
proved relations fWM'
with France and ''
fraternal ties with xB \
Spain. m
He cxpre ss e d m v*
hope for th- re
turn of amity
with Germany and
dwelt noon the
tl.’Hlr velat inn-; ex- Pjj|)
b " t wee n £m
Mir
Soviets. The dom
inant note of his Mussolini.
speech was that
Italy wished friendship with all other
countries, but at the same time that
she must be ready not to permit any
body to step on her toes.
The premier was unusually moderate
in examining the situation with Jugo
slavia. Indeed, he had a word of praise
for the present Jugoslav cabinet in
having the courage to face the oppo
sition in presenting to the Parliament
the Nettuno conventions for ratifica
tion and also in accepting Italy’s de^
I mand for satisfaction after the recent
| anti-Italian outbursts in that country.
The attacks on the Italian consulates
j in Jugoslav territory, as well as in
! Austria, were expected to arouse Musso-;
! lini to determined warnings, but th"
premier, while resenting the attitude of
I the nationals of these two countries,
was sparing in his words and mild in
his denunciation.
Relations With Austria.
"Our relations with Austria are diplo
| matically correct,” he said, "but it dc- I
■ pends on Austria to reach a degree of j
! greater cordiality."
Alluding to Jugoslavia, he said:
I "Since the advent, of the Fascist regime
! the Italian policy toward Jugoslavia has
, been straightforward. Italy adopted
the principle of a policy of friendship,
and followed it, consecrating it with the
treaty of 1924. This treaty was com
pleted in 1925 by the conventions of
Nettuno. which settled with reciprocal
satisfaction all the complex and im
portant matters concerning the rcla
! tions between the two states.
“For three years Italy awaited Jugo
slav ratification of that treaty. Italy
does not intend to enter into th" parlia
mentary vicissitudes of a neighboring
state, but cannot subordinate her own
foreign policy to them.
“Italy is obliged to realize that the
treaty of 1924 failed to create that
moral atmosphere whereby friendships
descend from official protocols to the;
hearts of the peoples. In certain Jugo
slav quarters preaching against Italy j
has been amp> indulged in even by
men with political responsibilities.
Declares Incident Closed.
"One may laugh and remain abso
lutely calm over all this, as did Italy
at what happened during the last few
days. But it would be a great error
not to take into account that center j
of autoexultation and incomprehension
of which the world must take cogni- ■
zance, relating to recent acts at Spalato,
Sebenico and other places.
"They were extremely grave by their
violence and destruction. They were
not provoked by the alleged non-exist
ent incidents at Zara or by the at- j
titude of Italian students, who are
perfectly disciplined, as becoming a
great people, but by the simple an- j
nouncement that Marinkovltch had de- .
tided to present before th* National j
Assembly the convention of Nettuno for
ratification, thus accomplishing an act
of good will and courage."
After telling that the Italian minister
to Belgrade had made formal demand
for satisfaction, the premier added that
reparations had been granted bv the
Jugoslav government and that the inci
dent from a diplomatic point of view
was closed.
Hautevelle House, Victor Hugo’s
home in exile, has beifa given by hS.
descendants to the City of Paris.
You Just Can't Imagine Any
thing More Refreshing
EVERYTHING you cat has more delight:
ful flavor if the beverage you drink stim-
ulatesyour palate. Look for that refresh
ing effect inyour cupof thisfragrantly flavored,
differently delicate, choicely selected
WILKINS
ORANGE PEKOE
TEA
There are a number of things in tea that give it taste,
but there is only one essence that makes the flavor in
your cup. Teocontainingthe mostof thiseasence comes
from just a few small plantations high in the moun
tains of India and on the slopes of Ceylon. Several of
these send their supply solely to Wilkins. We have
been years arranging to bring you an Orange Pekoe Tea
that you would be unable to equal. Now we say— tty
Wilkins; if it isn’t the most refreshing and delightful,
iced or hot, that you have ever had, send us the un
used part of the package and we will refund the mod
erate price you paid your grocer for the *4 lb. or ’; lb,
(Alta ta at hit In ih# ia« trial ptikia*]
' Will Rogers
Says:
■ 'v '•
BEVERLY HILLS.—When four
men in a three-motored plane, and
carrying all that gas. can fly 3,200
miles over the ocean in one hop and
keep in communication with the
; world every minute of the time, why,
aviation has really arrived.
If I went to the Fiji Islands, that's j
how I would want to land, in a
plane, and be ready to get away in
i case they looked hungry.
MIDDIES TO HEAR
SPEECH BY WILBUR
173 to Receive Graduation
Certificates at Final Acad
emy Exercises.
| Special Dispatch to The Star.
ANNAPOLIS, Md.. June fi.—Tomor
row 173 naval students will receive cer
tificates of graduation from, the Naval
Academy from the hands of Secretary
of Navy Curtiss S. Wilbur, who will
also be the principal speaker at the
ceremonies. The exercises will begin
at 10:30 am. at Dahlgren Hall. Admis
sion will be by ticket only, with the
spectators mainly Navy people or their
guests.
Vice Admiral Louis M. Nulton, super
intendent of the Academy, also will
speak, and deliver his message on the
service and what the embryo officers
can expect. The addresses will be car
ried to all corners of the big hall by
amplifiers. Admiral Nulton will leave
the Academy by the middle of the
month for the West Coast, where he
j will have charge of the Pacific fleet.
The board of visitors last month praised
his administration and recommended
that Rear Admiral Samuel S. Robison,
incoming superintendent, continue the
same policy.
Must Serve Two Years.
Most of the graduates will be sworn
in as officers following the presentation
|of diplomas. Two years of service is
| now compulsory, except when the grad
i uate is found to be physically unfit,
j Several are in this status, including
; C. M. Blackford of West Virginia, who
stands next to C. R. Watts of Ohio,
the honor graduate. Selection of the
Marine Corps has been made by 14 of
the first class men, while two others will
go into the Supply Corps.
The three lower classes will embark
for their Summer cruise on Friday
morning and will return here on Au
gust 28 for a month's leave. The grad
uates will have to return here in July 1
to take a six-week course in aviation be
fore going to sea Before that the new
class of plebes will start arriving.
Quite a few of the undergraduates
will not make the cruise this year.
Three crews are at Poughkeepsie work
ing for Olympic honors, while the la
; cross® team will remain here with the
same aim in view The cruise will be
made on the Arkansas. Florida and
' Utah. The first two ships have been
(here 10 days, but the Utah had trouble 5
'en route and was held up All three;
were used in the 1926 cruise but since j
have been converted from coal to oil- j
[ burners, much to the delight of the I
! midshipmen, who dread shoveling coal. I
Prizes Given Today.
At 5 o’clock this afternoon presenta
j tion «?f prizes will take place on Wor
' den Field. These middles, rewarded
! for outstanding work, will step forward
I individually and receive the prizes
amid the cheers of the bystanders.
Among those to receive awards are:
George Hall Moffett, son of Rear Ad
miral W. A. Moffett of 2019 Massa
'chusetts avenue. Washington: Edward
Allen Hannegan, son of Duncan Han
negan of the United States Geological
Survey. Interior Department. Washing
(ton: William Eager Howard. jr„ of 1901
i K street. Washington: Charles Robert 1
Watts of Zanesville, Ohio: David Lamar I
McDonald of Monroe, Ga : Cuthbert J j
Bruen of Cleveland. Ohio; Albert Col- '
11ns Burrows, Shawnee. Okla : Welling- j
| ton T, Hines. Bowling Green, Ky.; j
Chester Miles Blackford of Salem. W j
Va.; James Richard Lee of 1368 Euclid
I street, Washington: Raymond Oliver j
Burzvnski of Milwaukee. Wis : Kenneth*
McLtiUd Gentry of Joplin, Mo.; Rod- 1
crick Shanahan Rooney. New York 1
City: Charles Robert Gilliam, Fort
Worth. Tex.; Harold Payson, Jr.. Bris
tol. R I.; Howard Franklin Hansford >
of Eagle Gro%e, Iowa: Charles Hans
j ford Kendall of 2421 North Calvert
i street, Baltimore; Jack Clayton Renard,
Chicago, 111.; Francis Hubert Williams,
Philadelphia, Pa., and Marcel Raymond
Oerin of Cloquet. Minn.
Yesterday afternoon at dress parade
Midshipman C. H Kendall, commander
Jof the 7th Company, was presented
with the year's colors, as having the
best drilled company. The colors were
presented to Miss Ann Porter Jones of
Richmond, who in turn passed them on
i to Kendall along with the traditional
kiss. The Bth Company won second
honors, with the sth Company third,
i In the battalion competitions the 3rd
i Company, commanded by Charles
Robert Watts, the honor man. was first
Tonight the annual farewell ball will
be held The Middies in their snow
j white uniforms and the girls in their
| Going Abroad? 4
J[ You’ll need passport pictures. Jt
For 55 we will make 8 Thev are finer than any
A you've ever seen and particular people will want Jfi
A them. a
T We have a special *ty|*> of finished print—small
si/e—for the friends you’ll make abroad. Take
a few along—you’ll need them. *
S2O a dozer—prompt delivery
fi , Telephone for on appointment
| UNDERWOOD 8 UNDERWOOD j
. Portrait* of Quality
— l — mm —W—————
Chestnut Farms
CHOCOLATE
ZHaitorcd \
CVCi CD O Teases the palate 1
I and pleases the
taste. A spring
time beverage that will slip grate- ~|
fully down your throat. And it is | 1
nourishing. The Fountain Drink PJr»t
for the Home. ** * IHI
M uiSarmfjbaitw,
potomac tooo
| Valley Vista Apartments I
2032 Belmont Rd. N.W.
So. End Million-Dollar Bridge
$92.50 I
Free Current for Frigidaire
Free Radio Service
FOYF.R—Sufficiently roomy to furnish attractively with book cases, II
telephone desk, console table, etc.
BEDROOM—IO.6xI7 ft., liberal wall space, huge clothes closet,
windows facing Rock Creek Park.
BATH—Something new in beautiful colored tile, built-in fixtures,
pedestal lavatories and showers
LIVING ROOM—I2xI7 ft., with huge dressing room and Murphy
bed, wonderful wall space, radio outlet. French doors leading to H
beautiful large porch overlooking Rock Creek Park.
DINING ROOM—BxI2 feet., two exposures, bright and sunny.
KlTCHEN—Frigidaire. Electric Dishwashers, Cabinet Ranges,
Broom Closets, China Closets. ’
PORCH—7xl2 —screened—overlooking Rock Creek Park.
The apartment floors are hardwood with American Wal
nut-finish throughout. Walls beautifully finished in Zonta.
a sanitary, durable, attractive wall finish. Electrical outlets
in every' room. Incinerators on every floor.
CAFE, BEAUTY PARLOR. VALET SERVICE. DRUG STORE. 1
DELICATESSEN. 24-HOUR ELEVATOR AND
SWITCHBOARD SERVICE. ||
REASONABLE RENTS
Resident Manager
or
I WILLIAM S. PHILLIPS & CO. 1
H REALTORS M
1 1501 K St. N.W. Main 4600 I
j;zizS
Annual Sale
of 2 and 3 year old monthly blooming
Rosebushes
including the finest garden varieties
3,4 and 5 for $ 1.00
NEW ROSE FLOREX
Salmon Pink
3 for SI.OO
HARDY CHRYSANTHEMUMS
P« r OGL» 5 dozen (D 1 AA
dozen for Ip JL # V/v/
Large Assortment
Shrubbery Perennials
Peony Plants
On i«le at our greenhouse*. Good Hope Road,
Anacostia, and at our greenhouses, Frederick Pike,
near Rockville, Md.
7:30 A.M. to 7:30 P.M.
A. GUDE SONS CO., Inc.
highly colored evening gowns always
present an impressive spectacle and
for many it is their last evpnt as a
midshipman. In the gardens refresh
ments will be served.
Last night the celebrants got keyed
up to the occasion by three other
’ j dances. The graduates were entertain -
1 3d by Admiral Nulton at a garden party;
: the second class held its ring hop in
; Mahan Hall. This, as always, was a
pretty sight, and marked the first time
that the incoming first classmen could
I wear their service rings; the third
II classmen held a dance all to themselves
in Luce Hall The piebes or freshman
were treated to movies earlier in the
evening.
Switzerland’s National Council has
• refused to restore the death penalty.
3

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