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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 19, 1929, Image 3

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| ; AWT URGED
Aviation Meeting at Foundry
Church Advocates Model
' v Municipal Equipment.
Construction of a model municipal
airport on the Gravelly Point site was
approved by the Men’s Club of Foundry
Methodist Episcopal Church in a reso
lution adopted at an aviation night
meeting last night. The resolution was
adopted following addresses by Lieut.
Walter Hinton, U. S. N., retired, and
Harry H. Blee, director of airports of
the Department of Commerce.
Lieut. Hinton, regarded as one of
the country’s foremost pilots, pointed
out the advantages to be obtained at
the Gravelly Point site, which he ex
plained could be established as a com
bined airport and seaplane port and
which could be expanded almost indefi
nitely by filling in of the flats along the
Virginia shore of the Potomac south of
the railroad bridge toward Alexandria.
Says Washington Is Lagging.
Many American cities and towns
have gone far beyond the National
Capital in the establishment of air
ports and providing for the growing air
transportation of the country. Lieut.
Hinton said. He called upon Washing
ton citizens to urge upon Congress the
passage of the Gravelly Point bill at
once with an amendment calling for
the completion of the airport within
! two years after it is authorized.
Lieut. Hinton also told of his notable
flying experiences. He Was pilot of
the NC-4, the first airplane to cross
the Atlantic Ocean, and also took part
in an airplane exploration of the Ama
zon River Valley in South America and
in a balloon race in which his party
was lost in the wilds of the Hudson
Bay country.
Mr. Blee outlined the recent progress,
present status and future possibilities
of commercial aviation, illustrating his
talk with lantern slides showing model
airports, airport and airway equipment
and the various types of commercial
airplanes, including several giant pas-
Benger planes now under construction.
The club was given a demonstration
of indoor model airplane flying by
Ernest Stout and Lloyd Fish, who rep
resented the District of Columbia in
the national model airplane contests in
Atlantic City last Summer.
MUSICAL PROGRAM GIVEN
BY SOCIETY OF NATIVES
Quartet and Reading Are Featured.
Annual Banquet to Be
Held April 15.
A program of music featured a meet
ing of the Society of Natives of the
District of Columbia in the Wash
ington Club, Seventeenth and K streets,
last night.
Mrs. Ella C. Robinson was in charge
of the entertainment program in which
the quartet of the First Baptist
Church was featured. The members
of the quartet, are Mrs. Edna G. Em
brey, Mrs. Helen Lancaster, Horatio
Rench and Charles W. Moore. Ray
mond E. Rapp, organist at the First
Baptist Church, accompanied at the
piano. A reading was given by Miss
Lena G. Parks.
The society voted to hold its annual
banquet at the Mayflower Hotel April
35. Resolutions eulogizing the members
of the society who died past were, were
adopted. Lee D. Latimer, president
of the society, presided.
VICTIM OF STRAY SHOT.
John M. Credille, 49 years old, 825
Vermont avenue, was mysteriously shot
through the top of his foot shortly be
fore noon today by a stray bullet which
apparently came from above him as he
was walking along.the street.
Credille. employed at the Southern
Railway, was walking past the Cosmos
Club on his way to work when he heard
the shot. Taking another step he felt
the wound in his foot.
He was taken to Garfield Hospital,
Where the bullet, a .22 caliber shot, was
extracted. He was later sent home.
The case has been reported to police,
Who are making an investigation.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
SFhE WASHINGTON TITLE INSURANCE
COMPANY, OF THF DISTRICT OF CO
LUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT.
Washington D. C.. January 17th. 1929.
The undersigned president and a majority
of the board of directors of the Washington
Title Insurance Company do hereby certify
that the capital stock of said company is
one hundred thousand dollars < $100,000.00*
and is fullv paid, and that there are no
debts ol said company except current ex
penses.
A. G. BISHOP,
President.
GEORGE H O’CONNOR,
W. M. HALLAM.
ERNEST L. SMITH,
GEORGE P, HANE.
CLARENCE F. NORMENT.
B F. SAUL.
LEE BARROI.L.
W. T GALLIHER,
FRED McICEE,
Directors.
I. HARRY M PACKARD, secretary of the
Washington Title Insurance Company, do
•wear that the facts stated in the above
certificate are true.
HARRY M. PACKARD.
Secretary.
Subscribed and sw<.rn to before me this
18th day of January. A.D. 1929.
R. J. VIERBUCHEN.
Notary Public. D. C.
•THE DISTRICT TITLE INSURANCE COM
PANY, OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUM
BIA ANNUAL REPORT.
Washington D C., January 17th. 1929.
The undersigned president and a matoritv
of the board of directors of the District
Title Insurance Company do hereby certify
that the capital stock of the said company
is one hundred and fifty thousand dollars
■ t 150,000.00> and is fully paid, and that
there arc no debts of said company except
current expenses.
A. G. BISHOP.
President.
C. G. ALLEN,
J P STORY.
ALFRED H. LAWSON,
JOSHUA W. CARR.
SIDNEY T. THOMAS,
EUGENE A SMITH.
H. L. RUST. Jr.,
Directors.
T. HARRY M. PACKARD, secretary of the
District Title Insurance Company, do swear
that the facts stated in the above certifi
cate are true.
HARRY M. PACKARD,
, , Secretary.
Subscribed and sworn to before me this
18th day of January. A D. 1929.
R. J. VIERBUCHEN.
Notary Public, C.
MOVING
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I Five ‘^pouiffe

State Legislature.
Five Additional Charges Re
main to Be Disposed
of Monday.
By the Associated Press.
OKLAHOMA CITY. January 19.
Gov. Henry S. Johnston today awaited
action of the State Senate on five
charges of impeachment voted against
him by members of the State Legisla
ture in a night session that lasted until
early today, and climaxed a hectic week
of political battling.
Five additional charges brought before
the House of Representatives by its
Investigating committee, remain to be
acted upon when the House reconvenes
at 1:30 p.m. Monday.
The Senate, the constituted court of
impeachment, likewise was in adjourn
ment today until Monday afternoon,
making impossible before then action
on the House committee's request that
Gov. Johnston be immediately suspend
ed from office.
The articles of impeachment voted by
the House are based on the issuance of
deficiency certificates to the State
Banking Department and the State
Issues Commission where no appropria
tions were made by the last Legislature,
and upon the alleged diversion and mis
appropriation of funds paid to Buck
Eldridge. special agent for the governor.
All carry the charge that the gov
ernor “became, was and is guilty of
willful neglect of duty, malfeasance,
incompetency, corruption in office, and
offenses involving moral turpitude com
mitted by him while in office, contrary
to the constitution and laws of the
State of Oklahoma.”
The question involving the employ
ment, of Eldridge drew the bitterest Are
MUSIC
CESAR FRANCK PROGRAM.
The first of three concerts celebrat
ing a Franco-Belgian festival, under
the patronage of the Belgian Ambas
sador and Princess de Ligne, was given
last evening at the Hotel Willard by
the Societe des Concerts intimes, un
der the direction of Elena de Sayn.
The program was made up of works
by Cesar Franck, consisting of a sonata
for violin and piano, a group of song#
and a quartet for two violins, viola and
cello.
Cesar-Auguste Franck, born at Liege,
Belgium, in 1822, was not a composer to
quibble with traditions, or fear to dis
turb them, nor one inclined to com
promise with technical requirements of
a very exacting standard. One of the
genuinely important figures in nine
teenth century music (and that was a
century which produced many). Franck,
before he had reached 20, had shown
the technical and classical equipment to
do whatever he subsequently required of
any one eise in his own compositions.
One thinks of him as a spiritually
idealized man, as one thinks of Chopin
as romantically idealized. The record
of Franck's life (his efforts enjoyed little
contemporary popularity) explains the
quality of transcendent dignity, the
separateness from and indifference to
mere “crowd” appreciation, the feeling
of a reflective temperament above, be
yond and through the mechanical lim
itations of even his own rare syn
thesis.
Thus, one seeking to “interpret” or
to “render” the Franck idiom, compli
cated actually by nuances of all spirit
ual expression, may readily be under
stood for falling short of a complete and
uniform presentation of the technical
and emotional qualities of the music.
The composer’s demand upon technical
equipment, his unrelenting call for vir
tuosity, causes him to lend himself
rather easily to academic translation,
the result of stress upon the correct
ness of the score, its faithful rendition.
The musician studies the score, plays
it consummately well as to technique—
and finds not infrequently that he has
succeeded in imparting only the ob-
SPECIAL NOTICES.
FURNITURE REPAIRING AND UPHOLBTER-
Ini: at your home. Address UPHOLSTERER.
Box 74, Ballston. Va. 19* _
I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY
debts other than those contracted by myself.
RAYMOND H. CROSS. 450 N st. s.w. 19-
ARE YOU MOVING ELSEWHERE ? OUR
transportation system will serve you better.
Large fleet of vans constantly operating be
tween all Eastern cities. Call Main 9220.
DAVIDSON TRANSFER k STORAGE CO.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE
Rosslyn Steel & Cement Co. first mortgage
bonds. Nos* 35. 61. 127. 134. 138. 161. 168.
181. 187, 213. 226, 281, 289, 326. 349 will be
redeemed at 105 at the Federal-American
National Bank, Washington, D. C., on Feb
ruary l. 1929. from which time Interest on
said bonds will cease.
MOVING TO SOME OTHER CITY?
Get our return-load rates. Full and part
load shipments to Philadelphia. New York.
Boston, Pittsburgh. Richmond and way
Doints. Special rates. Phone Main 1460.
NATIONAL DELIVERY ASSOCIATION. Inc.
OFFICE OF THE MUTUAL FIRE INBUR
ance Company of the District of Columbia.
Washington. January 19. 1929. The annual
meeting of the MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE
COMPANY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUM
BIA will be held on the first Monday in
February <the 4th proximo* at the office
of the company, 1301 H street northwest,
commencing at 10 o'clock a.m By the
charter cf the company the election qf
seven managers to conduct the affairs of
the company is required to be held at the
above meeting. By the sixth article of the
by-laws of the company it Is provided: “At
the annual meeting of the company, the
first business In order shall be the appoint
ment of a chairman, aho shall conduct the
meeting and election in accordance with
the act of incorporation, between the hours
of 10 o'clock a m. and 5 p.m.”
Amount of premium notes ....53,221,822.17
Amount of cash on hand ' 24.135.25
Securities 223,400.00
Real estate 63,040.80
Office furniture and fixtures 500.00
Losses by fire, adjusted and paid
in 1928 7.760.20
The annual statement will be ready for
distribution at the office of the company
about February 2. 1929.
By order of the board of managers.
* L. PIERCE BOTELER. Secretary.
NOTICE. IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT CER
tifieate of the capital stock of the WASH
INGTON GAS LIGHT COMPANY of Wash
ington, D. C.. No. 33584 for seven <7> shares
issued July 26. 1918. in the name of John
Henry Polkinhorn. has been lost, stolen or
destroyed. Application has been made to
the said Washington Gas Light Company by
John Henry Polkinhorn for the issuance of
a duplicate certificate of stock in lieu of
the onp lost. Any person having or coming
into possession of said original certificate of
stock is hereby warned to return sani" to
the said John Henry Polkinhorn, 1639 Har
vard st. n.w., Washington. D. C. *
THF L *WYFRS’ TITLE INSURANCE COM
PANY. OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUM
BIA ANNUAL REPORT.
Washington D. C., January 17th. 1929.
The undersigned president and a majority
of the board of directors of the Lawyers’
Title Insurance Company do hereby certify
that, the capital stock of said company is
one hundred and fifty thousand dollars
tsisn.ooo 00 1 and is fullv paid, and that
there are no debts of said company except
current expenses.
A. G. BISHOP.
President.
CHARLES W. STETSON,
J N SAUNDERS.
CHAB. H. KINDLE.
CHAS. H. BAUMAN.
CLARENCE F. DONOHOE,
JAMES McD. SHEA.
GEORGE M. EMMERICH,
EUGENE A. SMITH.
Directors.
I. HARRY M. PACKARD, secretary of the
Lawyers' Title- Insurance Company, do swear
that the facts stated In the above certifi
cate ere true.
HARRY M. PACKARD.
Secretary.
Subscribed and sworn to before me this
18th day ol January. A.D 1929
R. J VIERBUCHEN.
Notary Public. D. C.
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. •THEr:ECT!gXG
GOV. HENRY s. JOHNSTON.
in debate as the session dragged to a
’ close at 1:10 a.m. today. This article
■ charged that the governor had given
, Eldridge “a position of profit in pay
i ment of and compensation for personal
: and political debts and obligations” by
naming him as special investigator and
having put him on the payroll of the
State Bureau of Identification and
Investigation.
Eldridge was proprietor of the Yellow
Dog saloon, at Perry, the governor’s
home town, in territorial days.
Gov. Johnston, who has defended his
employment of Eldridge, last night
charged House members with insincerity
in voting the charges against him.
“Not a one of them thinks that I am
guilty,” he said. “Some men voted for
the impeachment articles who know
better. That may be the way to play
politics, but it is a type of politics with
w’hich I never have become familiar,
and do not intend to learn.”
He declared he would not resign from
office, and said he had not formed any
plan for retaining defense counsel.
jective side: that that remainder which
must somehow flow of itself is unre
lcascd from the notes.
In this latter category this reviewer
is inclined to place most of the work
on last evening’s program. From the
first clear attack on the allegretto ben
moderato of the sonata for violin and
piano, played by Elena de Sayn and
Miksa Merson, the movement which
sets the rather sweet, familiar theme,
the instrumental numbers were played
with a keen eye to technical demands.
One does not mean to say that this
should not be so, nor is it intended to
indicate that the real warmth and
beauty of the composer was not felt
in many passages. A slight undue pre
dominance of the piano in some of
the earlier passages and an occasional
unsureness of bowing were overcome,
and in the allegro movement a full
warmth and sympathy between the
players and their score was marked
throughout. Miss de Sayn's fingering
was impeccable always, the bowing at
times only drawing forth what struck
this listener as an overstrong tone,
tending to hardness.
A group of songs by Josef Barbecot
followed, with Mrs. Roberts an un
usually fine accompanist. The “Panis
Angelicus" was given with a deep sense
of dignity and dramatic stress. Mr.
Barbecot is a musician of taste and
poise. His voice displays a good range
and sound placement. His “Nocturne,”
a thing of tender and exquisite feeling,
was finely done, the tone swelling, when
required, without effort. The third
number. “Le Marriage de Roses,” was so
well received as to call for two encores.
The first was “La Vie Anterieure," by
Henri Duparc, a pupil of Cesar Franck’s,
who went Insane and destroyed all of
his work save 12 melodies; the second
encore was ‘Les Illusions." by Broussan.
Mr. Barbecot, an attache of the
French embassy here, is an amateur
who has been studying voice only since
he came to Washington. His recep
tion last evening left no doubt of his
artistry.
The quartet, played by Elena de Sayn,
first violin; A. G. Zanoff, second violin;
Lydia Brewer, viola, and Watson
Baumert, cello, presented the evening's
most effective instrumental work. A
confident and careful playing of the
first movement’s unconventional har
monies was maintained through the
scherzo’s difficult bowing (by far the
best rendered movement of the four),
through the smooth and passionless
largetto, and into the finale, as near
an approach to gusto as any movement
of the program, but notably a “good”
finale.
A MORNING OF FOLK SONGS.
An unusual • program of vocal and
piano music, nicely balanced and with
selections that are in large part new to
Washington concert audiences, kas pre
sented, as arranged by Mrs. Frank How
ard. before the members of the Friday
Morning Music Club, yesterday. The
quartet of singers included four well
known soloists—Mrs. Walter K. Wilson,
Mrs. Howard. Dorothy Wilson Halbach
and Mary Apple, with Mrs. Paul Bley
den as accompanist. Katharine Floecker
Cullen gave the piano group.
Folk songs of many lands provided
the basic material for this program. In
every case the songs were given ex
ceptionally clever arrangements—two
groups by Deems Taylor and other sin
gle songs by Ferrari. Rees and Kramer.
Many of the melodies were well known
in their simpler, native form. The
singers showed marked skill in the trios
and quartets of the arrangements with
solo voices ever so often in short pas
sages. For folk songs arrangements,
these were delightful. However, such
arrangements, even at their best, cannot
possess potency in intrinsic appeal, hav
ing neither the genuine simplicity of
the real folk song nor the inspirational:
beauty of an original musicianly com
position. In this respect they resemble
the Negro spirituals which have been
enjoying such a vogue for the past
couple of seasons and which are, jn a
way. folk music given musicianly adorn
ment.
Mrs. Cullen won most enthusiastic
applause for her group of piano selec
tions which included Percy Grainger's
"Country Gardens"—quite in key to the
folk song arrangements, being one for
piano—Debussy’s "En Bateau,” Mosz
kowski’s “Etude in A Flat Major” and
the Paganini-Liszt “Caprice in A Mi
nor.” H. F.
MAN AND WIFE ARE SLAIN
BY TWO IN OHIO FEUD
Assailants, Who Forced Way Into
Home of Victims, Declared
Identified.
By the Associated Press.
RAVENNA, Ohio, January 19.—Two
men forced their way into the home of
Peter Gullo late last night, killed Gullo,
fatally wounded his wife, fired three
shots at Joseph Rinto and fled.
Police in Akron. Cleveland and near
by towns were seeking the men today.
Gullo, 37, was proprietor of a whole
sale grocery house. He was shot six
times. Mrs. Leno Gullo, 39, died in
a hospital. Rinto, an employe of the
Gullos, was unharmed.
Mrs. Gullo was said to have named
the two assailants in a statement be
fore she died and to have blamed the
shooting on a feud of long standing.
TRAINMAN DIES IN WRECK.
HAMILTON, Ontario, January 19 OP).
—An express train on the Toronto,
Hamilton & Buffalo Railroad was
wrecked last night when it ran into a
washout on a mountainsidg near here.
The fireman was killed and the en
gineer nnd a #con of .passengers Injured.
•" i" .. ' ,
• » *' » w ■ ■ ~
Power Probers Grill Profes
sor at Wisconsin Univer
sity Over Book.
By the Associated Press.
Three witnesses appeared yesterday
in the power utilities investigation be
ing conducted by the Federal Trade
Commission, each t*> testify regarding
subjects previously touched upon.
Martin G. Glaeser. professor of eco
nomics at the University of Wisconsin,
was examined regarding his text book.
“Outlines of Public Utility Economics,”
which had been mentioned in the cor
respondence of some utility representa
tives previously introduced, as favorable
to the points of view held by those
connected with the industry.
He said no payments had been re
ceived by him from utility interests or
any other source for writing the book
except the regular compensation for
his work with the institute of research
in land economics and public utilities,
located at Northwestern University,
which sponsored the publication. This
was said by him to have received some
support from the National Electric
Light Association since 1925.
Prof. Richard T. Ely of Northwestern,
director of the institute, was named by
Glaeser as one of several to whom the
book had been submitted in manu
script form for critical suggestions.
Among others were Edwin Gruhl and
F. W. Doolittle of the North American
Co., who, he said, were old acquaint
ances. Changes proposed by them were
of a minor nature in general, he added,
and he had judged them all on their
merits.
Glaeser said the material had been
examined prior to publication by a rep
resentative of the N. E. L. A., following
which a paragraph in the preface was
eliminated by request. This paragraph,
put into evidence by Robert E. Healy,
commission counsel, acknowledged a
debt by the Institute to the N. E. L. A.
for co-operation, and to Gen. George H.
Harries, as one of a committee appoint
ed by the N. E. L. A. to encourage
preparation of utility textbooks.
After work on the book was about
completed, Glaeser said he had been ap
proached to accept as a co-author of
the book, first by a utility executive and
then Dr. Ely. He turned both proposals
down, he continued, as well as one for
the N. E. L. A. to purchase numerous
copies of the book to be issued as a
special edition.
TWO WHITE HOUSE
CALLS BY HOOVER;
SILENT ON TOPICS
(Continited From First, Page.)
plained that, like many other affairs
of t ie same nature which the President
has held for the past few years, it was
merely for social purposes. Hot cakes
and sausage featured the menu as usual,
and it was apparent as the company
was leaving the White House that they
had fully enjoyed themselves.
After the departure of these guests,
the President lost little time in getting
to his desk in the executive office. He
was soon absorbed in a pile of papers
on his desk when Secretary of State
Kellogg arrived for a brief conference.
It was understood that the latter
brought advices to the President to the
effect that the latest indications from
abroad are that the 14 other signatory
nations to the treaty renouncing war
have indicated that they will follow the
example set by the American Govern
ment and ratify this treaty without
delay.
Dawes Also Calls.
Later in the morning. Vice President
Dawes called at the White House and
held a brief conference with the Presi
dent. Before departing Mr. Dawes said
he had invited the President to present
the gold medal, authorized by Con
gress, to Lincoln Ellsworth for the lat
ter’s accomplishment in flying over the
North Pole in Amundsen’s airship, the
Norge. Mr. Coolidge accepted the in
vitation, Mr. Dawes said, and will make
the presentation at a time to be desig
nated later.
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* - (*t**v~' f•• * v*— r
- Energy-Falls : in' '•'& '
Exhaustion. ?
Physicians Say Savant Fail
ed to Eat for One
Week.
After 11 years of study in Washing
ton libraries, in an effort to prove his
theory on the source of life-giving en
ergy, Benjamin W. Sands, 62 years old,
456 K street, felt his own strength wane
under the privation of his arduous but
unprofitable pursuit. Yesterday after
noon he collapsed.
An Emergency Hospital staff physi
cian, hastily summoned, found him to
be suffering from starvation.
Sands had entered the jewelry es
tablishment of J. F. Oldman, 1110 F
street, presumably irf quest of work.
He was seen to stumble and slump to
the floor. Dr. I. Rutkoski, after an ex
amination, declared it must have been
a week at least since Sands had had a
good meal, although the elderly man
insisted he enjoyed a "fine breakfast
only the previous day.
Reviving quickly enough over a meal
provided by sympathetic bystanders,
Sands launched at once into an ex
planation of his theory, apparently
more concerned with the outcome of
his researches than over his plight as
a penniless man without a paying vo
cation. . .
Sands, quite deaf, but eagerly re
sponsive to written questions given him,
said he had made “every financial sac
rifice” in the furtherance of his theory,
picking up a meager living through
part-time employment at various jew
elers’ shops here.
“As soon as I get a few dollars
ahead.” he confessed, "I go back to my
experiments. I have a boy and girl in
Kansas. They would help me. I am
sure, but 'i never have asked them, and
don’t want to start now.
Sands came here from Montana in
order to avail himself, he said, of the
splendid library facilities of the Na
tional Capital.
A jeweler by profession Sands said he
became imbued 33 years ago with the
desire to determine the nature and re
lations of the various sources of energy
existing on the earth, and that liis sub
sequent career of research had been
beset with hardships at every turn.
"But I stuck to it,” he declared, his
dark eyes beaming from behind horn
rimmed spectacles, “and the time is not
far distant when I shall have my re
ward.”
Byway of explanation he produced a
thumb-marked card from the Swedish
Royal Academy of Science at Stock
holm, acknowledging receipt of a
treatise Sands had submitted for con
sideration. Sands also said he had a
similar paper before the Franklin Uni
versity at Philadelphia.
Queried with regard to his plans for
the future, he talked excitedly of ulti
'Whether qcu rent
er whether qcu fcuq,
You paif for the home
qcu cccupq/'
-Warren
DELIGHTFUL APARTMENTS
in
Davenport Terrace
4800 Block Connecticut Ave.
w NOW READY FOR OCCUPANCY
1 Rm., Kit., with furnished Dinette; $45.00
1 Rm., Rec. Room, Kit., with furnished
Dinette; Bath *
%
2 Rms., Rec. Hall, Kit., with furnished S6O 00
Dinette; Bath *
3 Rms., Rec. Hall, Kit., with furnished &QQ
Dinette; Bath ... . . .
Frigidairc on House Current
Situated on the highest point along Connec
ticut Ave., this group of detached buildings with _
their spacious lawns makes for an environment
impossible to find any other place in Washington.
WARDMAN MANAGEMENT
Cleveland 1912
Burieith
The Many Ideal Conveniences You Have
Wanted in Your Dream Home-
Yon Will Find in BCRLEITH
3603 R
NOW Street N.W.
IS THE TIME COLONIAL Architecture
~ delightful surroundings,
TO BUY near Western High School.
This home contains 6 fine
rooms—3 are bedrooms—a tiled
bath—an open fireplace, double
* rear porches, a Colonial mail
s' Or umy tel, hardwood floors through*
out, and a large basement with
One Remains laundry tub,, •
Completely equipped kitchen
• —hot-water heating system,
automatic hot - water heater
Inspect This and beautifully designed in
terior woodwork and decoration
Unutual HeU> jjjwa* ,hl « a»,ll-
Home on Sunday STS
scaped lot.
ESPECIALLY REASONABLY PRICED
[Shannon • &• luchS]
Members of the Operative Builders * Ans’n of the D. C. .
BENJAMIN W. SANDS.
—Star Staff Photo.
mate recognition, and appeared little
concerned over a prospect of more
months of hardship.
Will Rogers
Says:
NEW YORK, N. Y— Say. A1 Smith
landed a job in a bank here Thurs
day and he leaves on his vacation
to Florida tomorrow.
Mr. Hoover was conferred with
about everybody there is in regard
to work but Sandino and Peggy
Joyce. He leaves for Florida Mon
day to draw straws for his cabinet.
If California can’t land Mr. Cool
idge after March 4, why we will
just have to console ourselves with
Aimee and Ben Turpin.
- »
The 300 delegates at the interfra
temity conference in New York repre
sented 500,000 members of 66 college
fraternities. Twenty-three deans were
delegates.
I 200116th St. N.W. I
Exceptionally attractive
apartments of three out
side rooms, reception
hall, bath and large
kitchen.
Reasonable Rentals
WANTED
INSURANCE MAN
For Fire & Casualty
Insurance Dept.
Os Old Established
Real Estate Office
Experienced man to hapdle
and increase present business.
Give experience and refer
ences. Replies confidential.
Address Box 410-V
Star Office
:
rial).—lnfluenza ' and 'pntymonte.**of
4whtoh- she hats been -ill about ’a^wt«kr
' resulted dfetfth ’.the 'Methodist
Home for the Aged. of
Miss-Kate-Land, 73.- of Cumberland, Md.
The .funeral took place this iifterriooh
from the home, burial being in Forest
Oak Cemetery, Gaithersburg.
The deposits in the 12 national and
State banks of Montgomery County
totaled $12,106,680.97 at the close of
business December 31, which was an
increase of $764,265.71 during the year.
All of the banks, excepting one or two.
showed substantial increases in deposits
over December 31, 1927.
The semi-annual meeting of the
Woman’s Democratic Club of Mont
gomery County will be held in the
county building at Bethesda on Mon
day beginning at 11 a.m. Officers will
be chosen.
At a recent meeting of the Woman's
Guild of Grace Episcopal Church,
Woodside, officers were chosen as fol
lows: President, Mrs. Ralph Lee; vice
president, Miss Alice M. Jones; secre
tary, Mrs. J. R. McQueen: treasurer,
Mrs. Martha Blundon; auditor, Miss
Grace Barnes.
The woman's board of the Mont
gomery County General Hospital, Sandy
Spring, met at the Sandy Spring Com
munity House early in the week and
selected July 30 as the date for the
annual supper for the benefit of the
hospital.
Mrs. Geraldine Driver De Stefain, 22,
and George Henry Miles, 25, both of
Brooklyn, N. Y„ were married in Rock
ville Thursday evening by Rev. Bertram
M. Osgood of the Baptist Church, at
the home of the minister.
Licenses have been issued by the clerk
of the Circuit Court here for the mar
riage of Frederick L. Chaimson, 21. and
Miss Elizabeth M. Grubbs. 18. both of
Washington, and Robert E. Hotze. 56.
and Miss Willette Slaughter, 34, both of
Richmond, Va.
LA SALLE
APARTMENTS
Conn. Ave. & L St. N.W.
Now Being Completed
Washington's newest and most
modern, up-to-date building.
Located within walking dis-
I tance of all Gov't Departments,
financial districts and theaters.
1 Room and Bath... S4O
1 Room, Kitchen
and Bath $47.50
3 Rooms, Kitchen
and Bath S9O
4 Rooms, Kitchen
and 2 Baths $135
All apartments are equipped
with Frigidaire refrigerators at
no additional cost.
Renting Offices on Premises
Phone Franklin 2161
Wardman Management
UH)jSisjgigiMSlSls(S/SiSiSMSIMSISJSiSI3iSJSISISISJSISISMSISJSISfMSISJSMSIBJSiS{SiSISISISJSIc@
I Start the New Year Right I
“BUY A HOME”
INVEST YOUR XMAS SAVINGS
FUND CHECK IN A NEW HOME
SIOO CASH
Monthly Payments 8
Sample Homes Open Today 1
1731 Upshur St. N.W., just west of 16th St.
1204 Hemlock St. N.W., near 16th St.
1018 Third St. N.E., just north K
1926 4th St. N.E., cars pass door
1212 Owen St. N.E., north Fla. Ave.
317 You St. N.E., cars at corner
813 Ky. Ave. S.E., just north Pa. Ave. cars.
INSPECT TONIGHT J
i lAIHQfcBSy S §
| |
I H. R. HOWENSTEIN CO., 1311 H St. N.W. 1
™ ini==lE
WASHINGTON’S MOST LIVABLE APARTMENT HOME
I Every Modern !
Convenience
TOWERS is
Features one of Washington’s
Each apart- nezucst fireproof apart- L
□ Th e ower h ani ments conveniently located E
*uied “bathroom, in Columbia Heights. At- T
Tenazzo- floor- tractive lobby decorations
fihffidaire, tei- —designed, and executed
&T SS& by Walter Ballard —w e 1-
U come you to a bright interi- L
□ beds.'radio at- or j n which beauty is the C
brass hardware. keynote. Rents are so ex
tremely low that you’ll be
surprised. See Trinity
Towers.
Q Open All Day Sunday 1
J tErinttp tEotoersi |
3023 Fourteenth Street
Between Columbia Road and Irving Street
W. H. WEST COMPANY
“ Rental Agents
3 1519 K Street N.W. Main 9900 □
Representative on the Premises
W——Tirnr -ini —'inr=. .rl
3
4% BATTERY -
Mum, DEAD?
FR. 764
Formerly Main 500
LEETH BROS.
'S, Open Daily Sunday
gPk BA.M.-11P.51. 9A.M.-SP.M.
The Brighton I
2123 California St. N.W.
1
Several very desirable j
apartments, in perfect con
dition, available furnished
or unfurnished, in this
exclusive apartment hotel.
Rentals. with complete
hotel service.
1 room and bath, $60.00
2 rooms & bath, 85.00
3 rooms & bath, 140.00
Wardman Management
North 3494
j !
I 3000 Connecticut Aye. |
| Cathedral Mansions j
Suites Now Available
| in Center and North 1
Buildings
Twenty-Four-Hour Service |
1 Valet Shop, Garage. Dining Room 4
Other Shops in Direct
Connection
P Facing Beautiful Rock Creak |
Park
, One room and bath S4O mo.
j One room, kitchen and -
m bath $45 mo. jj
I Two rooms, kitchen and
• bath $55 to SBO mo. |
jj Also larger apts. ranging in size |
a 3 r.jk k., b., to 5 r. dc k. & 2 b.
Furnished II Desired
3 We Invite You to Inepect
Theue Unuaual Suitee
% Office: 3000 Connecticut |
Ave. N.W.
| Telephone Adams 4800
I Wardman Management ]
Ir?";;- :y»\ uti'v-iapi PCTiiiim r re/raal

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