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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 29, 1929, Image 13

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SPECULATIVE CURB
ISSUES IRREGULAR
Utility Stocks Are Active.
Specialty Favorites Show
Moderate Gains.
BY WILLIAM F. HEFFERNAN.
NEW YORK. January 29.—Prices
moved irregularly on the Curb Exchange
today. Trading continued active, but
there was a noticeable reluctance on the
part of the speculative element to come
in on the buying side with the reckless
abandon which accompanied operations
a week and two weeks ago.
Because of yesterday's spectacular de
velopments in the public utility groun.
this class of stocks was watched with
keep interest. The sensational Electric
Bond <fc Share securities, which record
ed a net gain of 31 points yesterday,
opened on a block of 1,500 shares at
249 12.l 2 . compared with the previous final
of 257'-. Later it rallied to above the
250 level, but subsequently dropped back
around 245.
United Gas Co. gained more than 2
points to a new high, Duke Power and
American Light & Traction continued
in demand while Electric Investors felt
the effect of heavy profit taking which
carried the price down sharply.
The oils were generally inclined toward
lower levels, influenced bv reports of
over-production in the industry. Vac
uum Oil resisted the selling, but was
one of the few' exceptions. Standard of
Indiana was freely offered at declining
prices.
Elsewhere interest centered in a num
ber of specialty favorites. Checker Cab
Manufacturing, up more than 3 points,
was responding to the highly favorable
earnings for 1928 made public today.
Special buying made its appearance in
General Bronze, while General Electric,
Ltd., receipts were heavily dealt in at
improved prices. Anchor Post Fence,
at 39 ! /2, bcld its recent gain and was
in better demand foliowring estimates
that sales for January indicated a 100
per cent improvement over the month a
year ago
Aircraft Issues were featured by
higher prices for Niles-Bement-Pond
and Universal Aviation, although others
of the group were under more or less
pressure.
SHIPPING NEWS
Arrivals at and Sailings From
New York.
ARRIVED YESTERDAY.
Aurania—Southampton January 17
Hellig Olav—Copenhagen January 16
Coamo—Santo Domingo January 22
Cristobal—Port au Prince January 20
Empress of Scotland—Southampton.
_ , „ . January 19
Porto Rico—San Juan January 23
Stuttgart —Bremerhaven January 17
Port Victoria—Bermuda January 76
Yoro—Kingston January 22
DUE TODAY.
He de Prance—Havre January 23
Roma —Genoa January 18
American Banker—London January 19
Andania—Liverpool January 19
Cedric—Liverpool January 19
Minnetonka—London January 1?
Tepo—Valparaiso January 9
Mongolia—San Francisco January 12
Orizaba—Havana January 26
Carrillo—Kingston January 23
Avon —Bermuda January 27
Aquitania—Southampton January 23
Huron—Santo Domingo January 18
DUE TOMORROW.
Western World—Buenos Aires.. .January 10
DUS THURSDAY, JANUARY 31.
Byron—Piraeus January 14
Bermuda—Bermuda January 29
Zacapa—Kingston January 24
Tachira—La Guayra January 22
Munargo—Nassau January 28
Nerissa—St. John’s January 26
.PUS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1.
President Roosevelt—Havana January 29
Carom a—Havana January 29
DUE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2.
Rotterdam—Rotterdam January 23
DUE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3.
Toloa—Port Llmon January 27
Cameronia—Glasgow January 26
Dresden—Bremerhaven January 24
Ausonia—Southampton January 24
San Jacinto—Vera Cruz January 27
Siboney—Havana January 31
Prance—Mediterranean cruise January 23
Presidents Wilson—Trieste January 19
DUE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4.
American Merchant—London ... .January 26
Asia —Constantinople January 15
Athenia —Liverpool January 26
Conte Grande—Genoa January 25
George Washington—Bremerhaven
January 26
Nova Scotia—Trinidad January 26
Polonia—Danzig January 23
San Juan—San Juan January 30
San Lorenzo—Santo Domingo... .January 29
Veendam—Rotterdam January 26
Port Victoria—Bermuda February 2
DUE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5.
Majestic—Southampton January 30
Araguaya—Nassau January 25
Doric—Liverpool ...‘ January 25
Oripsholm—Gothenburg January 26
Havana—Havana February 2
OUTGOING STEAMERS.
SAILING TODAY.
Scythia—Mediterranean cruise.
Havana—Havana.
Guayaquil—Pori au Prince and Cristobal.
Maraval —Grenada, Trinidad and Gcorgt*
town.
SAILING TOMORROW.
Transylvania—Mediterranean cruise.
Port Victoria—Bermuda.
Columbus—Cruise to the West Indies.
Slxaola —Kingston, Cristobal, Cartagena,
Puerto Colombia and Santa Marta.
America—Plymouth. Cherbourg and Bremer
haven.
Carabobo —San Juan, La Guayra. Curacao
and Maracaibo.
Yoro—Kingston.
SAILING THURSDAY. JANUARY 31.
American Shipper—London.
Providence—Madeira. Tangier*, Constanti
nople, Naples and Marseille.
Dominica—St. Thomas and Barbados.
Santa Teresa—Havana, Cristobal, Callao
and Valparaiso.
New York—Mediterranean-Orient cruise.
Stuttgart—Cobh and Bremerhaven.
Avon —Bermuda.
Mexico—Havana. Progreso and Vera Crui.
Lapland—Cruise to the West Indies.
Coamo—Santo Domingo and San Juan.
President Johnson—World cruise.
SAILING FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 1.
Aquitania—Cherbourg and Southampton,
lie de France—Plymouth and Havre.
Roma—Naples and Genoa.
Amazone—Port au Prince.
Favorita—Kingston.
Flora—La Guayra.
Munargo—Nassau.
SAILING SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2.
Andania—Cobh and Liverpool.
President Roosevelt —Havana.
Caronia—Havana.
Aurania—Plymouth, Havre and London.
Bermuda—Bermuda.
Nieuw Amsterdam—Plymouth. Boulogne and
Rotterdam.
Cleveland—Cobh, Cherbourg and Bremer
haven.
Voltaire —Barbados, Rio de Janeiro, Monte
video and Buenos Aires.
Mongolia—Havana, Panama Canal and San
Francisco.
Ulna—Havana, Cristobal and Port Llmon.
Carrillo—Santiago. Kingston. Puerto Cas
tilla. Tela and Puerto Barrios.
Oruaoa—Havana.
Minnetonka—Cherbourg and London.
Cedric- Cobh and Liverpool.
Hellig Olav—Christiansand. Oslo and Copen
hagen.
Porto Rico—San Juan.
Huron—Puerto Plata. San Pedro de Macorls
and Santo Domingo City.
Lempira—Puerto Cortez,
Rosalind—Bt. John's and Halifax.
Mayari—-Santiago.
t
DECLINE IN BILLS.
By the Associated Press/
The Federal Reserve Eoard announced
yesterday that the return flow of money
to the banks after the Christmas holi
days had resulted in a decline of $450,-
000,000 in the total of bills and secur
ities in circulation between December
26 and January 23.
The turn of the year, the board re
ported, disclosed an increase in the
total volume of loans due chiefly to
year-end financial settlements and the
temporary withdrawals of funds loaned
by corporations in the New York mar
ket. During this period deposits and
loans of member banks, however, de
clined to approximately the same level
as early in December.
* •
NEW YORK BANK CLEARINGS.
NEW YORK. January 29 (Special*.—
New York bank clearings, $1,991,000,000;
New' York bank balances. $187,000,000;
New' York Federal Reserve credit bal
ances, $156,000,000.
FINANCIAE/
I NEW YORK CURB MARKET
RsceJvad by Private Wire Direct to Tbo Star Oflca
, Following is a list of stocks and bonds
[ traded in on the New York Curb Market
today:
Sales INDUSTRIALS.
in hundreds. High. Low. Noon.
19 Acoustic Prod 14%1113 1 * 14
, 1 Allison Dr B 4% 4% 44
1 Alpha Port Cem 54 54 5i
2 Alum Co Amer 178“a 178'2 I.B'a
1 Alum Goods Mfg 324 324 324
128 Am A For Pow war.. 624 584 62
9Am Beverage 15 15 15
7Am Common* P A . 244 224 24
2Am Common* P B .. 33 32 4 324
18 Am Cyanamid B ... 654 64 4 65
BAm Cyanamid rls ... 214 214 114
12 Amer Gas A El n. .. 149 148 148
3 Amer Hawaiian S S.. 26 254 254
6 Amer Nat Gas 184 174 174
6 Amer Roll Mill 984 974 974
19 Amer Roll Mill rts.. 24 24 24
6 Amer Sol A Chem... 364 364 364
2 Amer S A C p pfd .. 524 524 524
7 Amer States Sec A.. 14 14 14
1 Amer States Sec 8.. 3 3 3
39 Amer Superp A 1184 1174 117 4
1 Amer Superp B 1244 124 4 124 4
86 Amer Superp ns .... 184 174 184
6Am Thread pfd .... 34 34 34
2 Ark Natl Gas 44 44 4 s *
1 Asso Dye A Print 25 25 2,i
29 Asso Gas AEI A 554 55 55'a
1 Asso Itayon rets pfd. 784 784 784
95 Alt Fruit A Sue 14 1 » l'a
1 Atlas Port Cem 534 534 f 34
1 Auburn Auto Co 140 140 140
6 Aviation Co of Am... 454 *5 45
2 Bahia Corn 20'* 20 204
3 Beilanca Alrc vtc 174 174 174
1 Blauners 594 59“ a 59'a
12 Bliss E W 494 49 49 > a
2 Blum S 81 Va 81* a 814
5 Boeing AAT 804 894 904
2 Bohn A1 ABr 1174 1174 1174
2 Braz Tr LAPxd... 78 78 78
3 Brillo Mfg 23 23 23
1 Brlst Myers 104 104 104
7 Brit-Celanese Ltd.... 54 54 54
4 Bklyn City R R 104 104 104
1 Budd Mfg 50 50 50
4 But NlftgAE P ... 764 76 764
3 Bus NiagAE P A... 684 68% 684
22 Bullard Co 50 49*4 494
6 Butler Bros 404 404 404
21 Can Marconi W 8 74 74
2Caterpil Tract 75 744 * 4 a
11 Colan Cor Am 454 444 45
2 Celan C Am 1 pfd... 114*2 114*2 1144
2 Celluloid Co n 49 48 48
2 Cent Pip Cor 11 11 , 11
9 Cent Pub S A 43 42 4 424
1 Cent States El war.. 25 4 25 4 254
2 Cent Sta El pfd ... 1094 109 1094
3 Cent Sta El conv pf. 1104 110 1104
18 C <> Bpring & Bump 134 13 134
5 Chain Stores Stocks. 39 4 39'* 394
55 Check Cab Mfg 73 71 4 72 4
1 City Mach & T 001... 32 32 32
1 Club Alum
2 Cohn-Hall Marx ... 41 Va 4i 41
5 Colg Palmol P 77 77 77
4 Commonwlth Edison. 258 258 258
11 Cons Auto Mer vtc.. 144 134 144
10 Consol Dairy P 474 45*2 454
78 Consol Film 244 24% 24-a
11 Consol G Balt 1024 984 1024
5 Consol Laund 184 184 18,*
16 Cons Ret Stores 384 354 364
*2 Crocker Wheeler 225 220 220
2 Crowley Milner 554 554 554
11 Curtiss Aero Exp.... 32 314 314
84 Curtis Flying Serv... 244 24 244
16 De For R C 234 234 234
4 Dixon (J) Crucible.... 170 170 170
28 Douglas Aircraft 274 27 27
1 Duke Pow 204 4 204 % 204 4
1 Durant Mot 174 174 174
1 East States Pow B. ... 494 494 49%
48 El Bond A Sh Sec Cor. 2514 243 4 248
56 El Invest Inc 1194 117 117
24 El P A L optl war 424 414 414
3EIP AL 2 pfd A 102 1014 102
31 Em Pow Cor 534 524 53
2 Eng Pub Serv opt war. 32 32_ 32
1 Evans Auto Lead 584 58'* 58-*
26 Evans Wall Lead 204 204 204
7 Fairchild Aviatn A.... 264 26 26
1 Fandango Corp A 54 54 54
4 Fansteel Prod xd.... 174 17 IJ4
7 Federal Water A 584 584 584
8 Fiat stk deb rts 144 I*4 I*4
3 Ferro Enameling A.... 694 694 694
1 Fireman Fund Ins I*3 143 143
2 Fokker Air Am 234 234 234
1 Foltis Fisher A 374 374 374
4 Ford Mot Co Can 654 6a2 654
50 Ford Mot Ltd 17., 164 164
40 Fox Theaters A 334 33 33
12 Freshman Chas Co.. 104 10 10
6 Gen Bak 94 94 94
1 Gen Bak pfd 754 *54 754
89 Gen Bronze 52 504 514
3 Gen Cable war 294 29 29%
443 Gen Elec Ltd reg ... 164 164 164
19 Gen Pub Ser 37 344 35
2 Gilbert (AC* 244 24 24
1 Glen Alden Coal .... 1324 1324 1324
> Gold Seal Elec 384 384 384
47 Goldman Sachs 129 1284 129
5 Gotham Knitbac Mach 154 154 154
5 Griffith DW A 14 14 14
3 Grigsby Grunow n.. 145 143 1*34
2 Hart Carter Conv pfd 33 4 33 33
4 Hart Parr pfd A.... 163 160i* 1604
3 Hartman Tob 2 2 2
13 Havgart Corp 49 3 4 49 49 *4
23 Hiram Walk G A W 834 834 834
2 Horn A C *34 *3 43
3 Huylers Sirs of Del. 30 294 *94
4 Hygrade Food Prod.. 35 34 4 344
4 Insur Co N A 834 834 834
14 Insur Sacur 324 314 314
1 Inti Shoe 714 714 714
22 Intern Util B 164 164 164
67 Ital Super pow A.... 184 174 184
7 Ital Superp deb rts.. 144 134 134
4 Karstadt R 214 21 21
4 Keystone Aircraft.... 444 434 434
1 Klein Henry pt pfd. 204 204 204
*3 Lakey S Fo* ncP AM..’." Jjtf |* ’
»*ai— litis 2M* »jk
6 Long Island Lt 51 50 Va 51
45 Marconi Inti Mar ... 264 25 26
5 Marc Wire Lond B .. 194 184 19
3 Marion Steam Shov n 544 544 544
6 Mavis Bottling 9 84 9
2 McGraw Hill Pub wl 474 474 474
2 Mead Johnson ...... 664 664 684
3 Merritt Chap A Scott 264 25 264
7 Mid West Util rts... 84 8% 84
1 Mid WU6s pf non-p 101 101 101
IMinne Hon Reg ..... 654 654 654
4 Moh Hud P Ist pfd.. 1074 1074 1074
4 Mohawx Hud war... 334 33 4 334
26 Montecat deb rts .. . 54 54 5/a
4 Voody inv Serv p pfd 504 504 504
5 Municipal Serv 27 264 *64
2 Nathan Straus 314 304 30,«
7 Nat Aviation 644 63% 634
36 Natl Fam 5tr5...... 37 4 37 4 374
4 Natl Fam Strs Pfd.. 33 38 39
4 Nat Rub Mach 38% 38 33
3 Nat Sug RN J n.... 554 55 55
8 Nat Trade Journal... 304 30% 30 *
2 Nelson H... • •••• 25 25 /5
>4 New Eng Pow pfd... 87 86 86
10 Newton Steel 77 754 76
10 iWois a r a shep:::: m* tl* tl*
13 Niles Bern Pnd 2094 207 4 2094
11 Norm* Elec.... 234 23 JJ/*
96 Nor Amer Aviation... If 174 17/*
15 North Eastern Pow.. 53 4 52 '* 53
3 Nor Sta P A 164%
1 Northwest Engrg.... 45 4 454 45/.
9OU Stocks Ltd A 174 174 174
3 Oil Stocks Ltd B 164 164 16
2 Pac G A E 1 pf 374 274 27,4
5 Parke Davis Co. 58 574 574
V* J C Penney ACo 400 400 400
4 Penn Ohio Ed 68V. 684 63/.
2 Peop Lt A P Corp A. 51 504 51
4 Pepperell Mfg • - 112% * 4? •
100 Petroleum Co Ist pfd 34 34 J 4
5 Pick Bar A Co pfd... 19 19 19
5 Pierce Governor 374 37 37 a
28 Pitney Bowes P. 494 474 48 «
1 Pow Corp Canada 1024 1024 102 a
4 Pratt A Lamb <4 73 4 74
2 Proct & Gamble 300 300 300
2 Pyrene Mfg ........ 84 8,. 8,.
33 Radio Corp n B pfd. 74 * 734 74
4 Rainbow Luminous ..584 57 57
14 Real Assn 8k1yn.... 500 500 500
3 Repettl Candy 14 14 1*
6 Republic Brass 524 52 524
2 Rich Rad 114 11% 114
SRoch Cent Power.... 46 46 46
6 Safe-T-Stat 254 254 254
1 Schiff Co 7o 75 75
1 Sec Gen Am 1nv.... 304 304 30 a
2 Sec Gen Am Inv pfd. 1164 1164 1164
59 Selected Indus Inc.. 284 244 26 a
19 Select Ind Inc pfd..103_4 102 * 102 4
106 Serv El Vtc 18'* 174 184
4 Serv El vtc pfd 704 ( 0 704
2 Seton Leather.. 30 30 30
11 Sikorsky Aviation... 334 334 334
5 Silica Gel ctfs 274 274 274
25 Southe P A L 814 804 814
12 Southe P & L war.. 384 37'/* 384
3 South Asbestos 44 4 44 44
1 SOU C E C pfd 244 244 244
5 Southw Strs 254 24 4 244
5 Sparks Within 1824 1794 1794
12 Stand Mot 44 4 4
2 Stand Pow A Lt 564 564 564
14 Stern Bros A 45 45 45
2 Stromb Carls Te1.... 30 4 30 304
6 Stroock Co 52 52 52
4 Stutz Mot 224 214 214
3 Swift Inti 354 35 4 354
2* a Swift A Co 137, 1364 1364
4 Syra W Mach 23 4 224 234
2 Thomps Starrett pfd. 58 58 58
4 Timken Det Axle ... 314 31 314
5 Tob A Allied Stocks. 554 554 554 I
5 Trans Am 130 4 130',* 1304
21 Transcon Air Trsp... 25“» 254 2d4 \
147 Trans Lux DLP S A 114 114 114
2 Travel Air Co 60 69 4 59 4
15 Triplex Safe G1 Ltd. 28 4 28 28
28 Tri Cont Corp 314 304 31
8 Tri Cont Corp pfd... 1064 105'* 105V*
’.Tubi Art SB 505 498 505
1 Union Am Investing. 71% 714 714
50 Uni Elec bond rts... 34 34 34
156 Uni Gas Co 39 384 384
59 Uni G Imp C 1804 178 178
94 Uni Lt A P A 38Vs 384 38%
1 Uni LA PA Pfd 99 99 99
4 U S Foil B 674 674 67',«
3 U S Freight of Del... 97 97 97
30 S Red 614 614 614
52 Universal Aviation... 244 234 24
7 Util PAL Ctf B 394 39 4 39%
9 Van Camp Pkg new. 29 4 29 4 29*
3 Van C Pkg new pfd. 284 28'a 284
233 Warner Bros Piet rts. 44 34 3%
6 West Auto Sup A 56 5,1 56
20 Wcstvaco Chlor 744 724 i 24
32 Whitenight Inc 16 104 *6
3 Wildar Food Prod . . 28 28 -8 |
ft Williams (R.C.) A Co 404 404 404 |
8 Winter B J 154 IS 154
34 Wire Wheel Corp ... 344 334 a4
4 Zonite 384 37'* 37 V*
Sales MINING STOCKS.
In hundreds. . ... ~
220 Am Con MAM Ltd .12 .11 .11
270 Ariz Globe C 29 .26 .26
7 Com Tun A Drain .. It* Ji*
11 Cons Cop Mines 15 144 144
30 Cons Nev Utah 23 .20 .20
40 Cortez Silver 32 .30 .30
4 Cresson Con Gold 11 i
250 Divide Extens 13 .10 .10
2 Dolores Esper ...... 14 14 14
3 Eng Gold M Ltd Inc. 3% 34 34
500 Falcon Lead Min 30 .23 .23
35 First Natl Copper ... .99 .86 .88
3 Hccla Min .. 174 174 174
48 Hud Bay Min A Sm. 214 214 214
6 Iron Cap Copper 44 44 44
9 Kennecott Copper n. 73 4 77 4 77 4
3 Kerr Lake 60 .60 .CO
4 Mason Val 14 14 14
8 Min Co Can 54 s's 54
6 New Cornelia 414 40 4 40'*
4 N J Zinc 315 315 315
29 Noranda 614 594 594
276 Ohio Corp 4 84 34
10 Premier Gold M 24 24 2*4
6 Roan Antelope Corp.. 484 484 434
340 San Toy 18 14 16
12 ShaLtuck Denn 22 ?IV* 22
lft Stand Silv Lead 25 25 25
lOSt Anthony Gold 66 66 66
80 Tonooah Ext 24 16 23
• Uni Verde Ext 22 4 22 22
THE EVENTS'(I STAR. WASHINGTON. T>. C.. TUESDAY. JANUARY 29. 1929.'
9 Uni Zinc Smelt 24 2*4 24
3 Unity Gold 14 14 14
34 Wendon Cop 24 2 2
•/Am Con Oilfld.v 65 62 65
8 Am Maracaibo Co 6*4 54 64
18 Barnsd deb war 154 14V* 15
53 Cities Serv n 90 4 90 90
203 Cit Ser B new rts 24 24 24
2 Colon Oil 12 13 12
1 Columbia Synd 1% 14 14
25 Creole Pete 10 94 94
8 Derby O A Ref 34 3% 34
22 Gulf Oil Pa 151 149 149
3 Homaokla Oil s'* s'* 54
4 Houston Gulf Gas 184 184 184
24 Intercont Pet 24 24 24
4 Leonard Oil 54 5 54
1 Lion Oil 31'* 31'* 314
8 Magdal Svnd 86 76 78
3 Mexico Ohio 54 54 54
30 Mo Kans Pipe Line .. 24 4 23 4 23* 4
7 Mount Gulf 14 14 14
7 Mount Prod 194 19*4 19'*
4 N Y Pete Roy 19'* 194 194
5 Pac Western Oil 20'* 20*, 204
10 Pantepec Oil 9 9 9
1 Reiter-Foster Oil .... s'* 54 54
11 Ryan Con 9’* 94 94
4 Salt Ck Prod 224 22** 224
7 Texon Oil A Land... 21'* 20 4 21
8 Tid Os O non-vt 12 104 104
9 Venezuelan Pet 4*4 4'* 4*4
13 Woodley Pet 84 84 84
4 "Y” Oil n 54 54 54
Sales in STANDARD OIL ISSUES AND FOR
units. MER SUBSIDIARIES—STOCKS.
1100 Ando Am Oil 154 154 154
100 Atl Lobos 24 2*/g 24
1800 Conti Oil 174 17'* 17'*
2300 Humble O A R 95 4 94 4 94 4
150 111 P L 304*2 3044 3944
700 Imp O Can 98 964 964
3800 Inter Pet Ltd 594 57 574
200 Ohio Oil 654 654 654
200 Penn Mex Fuel 36 4 36 4 36 4
300 South Penn O 664 654 654
100 Southern PL 16 16 16
5500 S O Ind 874 854 854
800 S O Kansas 194 19 19
1100 S O Ky n 40 4 40V* 404
100 S O Ohio 1174 1174 1174
1800 Vacuum Oil 120'/* 120'* 1204
Sales BONDS.
In thousands.
1 Abbott Dairies 6s '42 100 100 100
9 Abitibi PAP 5s A '53 87 4 86 4 864
6 Ala Pow 44s '67,... 944 944 94 %
10 Allied Pk 6s ’39 48 48 48
2 Allied Pk 8s '39 484 484 434
1 Alum Co Amer 5s 52 101-4 1014 1014
18 Am Gas A El 5s 2028 964 964 964
190 Am Int Cp 54s ’49 110 1094 1094
9Am Pw A Lt. 6s 2016 106 1054 105V*
4Am Roll Mill 5s ’4B. 964 96*4 964
1 Am Sol 64s ’36 119 119 119
6 Appal El Pw 5s '56 . 98 4 98 4 984
13 Ark P A L 5s '56... 97 4 96 4 97
131 As G A E 44s '48.. 113<* 112'* 1124
23 As O A E 54s '77.. 104 1034 1034
51 As G A E 44s '4B ww 103 4 103 103'*
lAs Sim Hd 64s ’33 864 864 864
127ATA8F 44s A '49 wi 1174 117 117
5 Atl Fruit 8s '49 21 21 21
7 Atlas Plyw 54s '43.. 98 98 98
3 Bell T Can 5s A ’55. 1024 102 102
3 Bos & Me 6s M ’33. 101% 1014 101%
3 Can Nat Ry 7s E ’35. 109 4 109 4 109 4
18 Can Nat Ry 4%s ’6B 95% 95 4 95%
24 Chi R cfs dep 5s '27 81 81 81
7 Cit Serv 5s ’66 90'/* 90 904
6 Cit Serv Gas 5%s ’42 904 90 90
5 Cit Ser Gas P 6s '43 97 4 97 4 97 4
3 Cit Serv P 54s '52. 964 96 96
3Com Larabee 6s ’41.. 88% 88% 88%
3 Cont'l GAE 5s A'sß 90 4 90 4 90%
1 Det Inti 64s ’52... 954 954 954
1 Det Inti 7s ’52 89 89 89
5 Dlx Gulf G 64s A ’37 87 87 87
3 El Paso N Gas6%s ’3B 101 100'/* 1004
8 Empire OAR 54s ’42 90 4 90 90
5 Fab Finishing 6s ’39. 100'* 100'/* 100',*
15 Fed Sug 6s ’33 95 95 95
8 Fla PAL 5s '54. . . 92% 92% 92%
10 Gen Amlnv ssAww's2 84% 8494 84%
5 Gen Vend 6s '27 82 82 82
8 Georgia Pow 5s '67... 984 98 93
6 Gulf Oil Pen 5s A ’56 100% 1004 100'/*
4 Houston Gif G645’43 80 90 90
4 Houston GU G6sA’43 904 904 904
6 Ind OU A Gas 6s ’39 .. 107 V* 107 V, 107' *
3 Indianap P AL 5s '57 99 4 99'* 094
8 Int’l Pow Sec 7s E’s7 95'* 95 954
3 Int'l Sec Am 5s '47. 90% 90% 904
7 Intersta NatG 6s'36ww 104% 104% 104%
3 Intersta Pow 5s '57. 959* 95% 9n%
5 Gen Vend 6s 527 . 82 82 82
44 Lehigh Pow 6s A 2026 105% 105'* 105'*
1 Louis P A Lt 5s ’57 n 96 96 96
5 Louts P A Y 5s '57.. 95 4 95'/* 954
10 McCord Rad 6s ’43 .. 99% 99 4 99 4
37 Nat P A L 6s A 2026. 104% 104 4 104',*
5 Nat Pub Serv 5s ’78.. 82 82 82
1 Nat Rub M 6s '43. .. 1514 1514 1514
8 Nat Trade J 6s ’33 . 97 964 96%
8N Y P A L 44s ’67. 92% 92% 92%
3 Nor Stat P M 64s ’33 103 4 103 4 103'*
8 Ohio Pow 44s D 56. 92% 92 4 92%
5 Ohio Riv Ed 5s '51.. 99% 99% 99V*
41 Pac Wn Oil 64s ’43. 98% 98 98
1 Park A Tllford 6s ’36 100 100 100
4 Penn PAL 5s D ’53.. 102 102 102
6 Phila E P 54S ’72... 10$% 1064 106%
3 Potomac Ed 5s E ’56. 97 V* 97 4 97'/,
2 Proc A Gamb 44s '47 97 97 97
2 RyesontJ.) A Sonss’43 95 95 95
5 San Ant P S 5s B ’SB 97% 96% 96%
14 St L G A Coke 6s ’47 90 90 90
10 Schulte R E 6s ’35 x. 92 92 92,,
10 Scripps E W 54* ’43 94V* 94% 94%
5 Shaw WAP 44s A ’67 93% 93% 93%
3 Sloss ShefT 6s ’29 100 100 100
7 Snider Pack 6s ’32 .. 103% 103 103,
23 Southe PAL 6s A 2025 104'* 103% 1034
6 South Cal Gss '37 .. 92% 92% 92%
3 Southw PAL Is A 2022 104'* 1044 104 V,
8 Stand P A L 6s ’57.. 99% 99 99
3 Sun Maid Ra 6'* a ’42 74 74 7*
8 Sun Oil 54s ’3B 102 101% 102
3 Texas P A L 5s 56.. 99'% 99% 99%
6 Trans Lux 64s '32 .. 119 118 119
22 Uni Am Inv 5s A '4B 110 114 114
3UnLt A Ra'l 6s A ’52 100 100 100 ,
26 Weste Pow 54s A ’57 1124.111%. 111%
8 Wheel Stl 44s B ’53. 88% 884 884
3 Wise Cent 5s ’3O 98V* 984 98V*
Sales FOREIGN BONDS.
In thousands.
10 Bolivia 7s '69 91 91 91
10 Buenos Aires 74s '47 103 102% 102%
3 Burm A Wain 6s '4O 99 % 99 99%
6Ct Bk O Sta 6s B '3l 86 86 86
6 com A Pv Bk 54s ’37 88 88 88
5 Cuba Co 6s A ’29.. 96 4 96 % 96%
5 Dan Cons 5s '53.... 96 96 98
6 Danish Cons 54s '55 101% 101% 101%
3 Ere Mr El Ms 64s ’53 97 4 97V* 97%
2Eu Mtg A Iv 7s C '67 91 91 91
9 Fin Res Mtg 6s '61.. 90 90 90
7 Frankfort 64s ’53.. 95% 95% 95V*
4 Fre St Prus 6s ’52 . 90% 90 90
10 Ger Cons Mun 7s '47 98 97% 97%
13 Ger Pv A C 64s A 'SB 88V, 88 88
5 Hanover State 6s ’3l. 95 94% 94%
6 Isarco Hyd El 7s ’52 90% 89 90%
38 Ital Superpow 6s ’63 80% 80% 80%
3 Leon T C 7V*s ’46... 159 159 159
16 Montevideo 6s A ’SO. 95% 94% 94%
3 Mor Bk Bogota 7s '47 93 Vi 93 93%
4 Mor Bk Bog 7s ’47 n 93 93 93
10 Silesia 7s ’SB 84% 83% 84%
5 Swiss Govt 54s ’29.. 100'* 100'* 100%
19 Uni Elec S 7s A '56. 121V* 1204 121*.*
xd—Ex-dividend.
s—Change in dividend rate,
wl —When issued,
n—New
ww—With warrants.
New Bond Issues
Special Dispatch to The Star.
NEW YORK, January 29.—A syn
dicate consisting of J. P. Morgan & Co.,
First National Bank. Kuhn, Loeb & Co.
and the National City Co., announce
the offering of $32,000,000 Railway Ex
press Agency, Inc., 5 per cent serial
gold bonds, series “A,” serial maturities
SBOO,OOO semi-annually March 1 and
September 1 each year from Septem
ber 1. 1929, to March 1, 1949, both
inclusive. The bonds maturing prior
to September 1, 1931, are not being
offered publicly. The remaining bonds
are offered, subject to prior sale and
under specified conditions, at 100 per
cent and accrued interest, for all ma
turities.
The Chase Securities Co., the Equi
table Trust Co., Blair & Co., Inc., and
Continental National Co. offer $10,000,-
000 Republic of Cuba Public Works,
5Vi per cent serial certificates at 100
and interest, to yield 5Vi per cent.
Halsey, Stuart & Co. offer $8,150,000
Kentucky Utilities first mortgage 5 per
cent gold bonds, series I, to be due
February 1, 1969, at 99 and Interest.
Swetsch, Heinzelmann & Co., Inc.;
Thompson Ross & Co., Inc., and J.
S. Ackerman <fe Co., offer $1,500,000
| Fabrics Finishing Corporation first
mortgage 10-year sinking fund convert
ible 6 per cent gold bonds series “A”
at 99'/2 and accrued interest, to yield
over 6.05 per cent.
RAILROAD EARNINGS.
NEW YORK. January 29 (A 3).—Ad
ditional reports of annual earnings pub
lished today by railroads showed mixed
results for 1928.
Among those reporting net operating
income for the year, as compared with
1927, were the following:
1928 1927
Cent/al of New Jersey 539.385,057 $10,383,853
Big Four 15,622.538 14.603,067
Central of Georgia 4.456.777 5,051.073
Pittsburgh A Lake Erie 7.770,829 8.005,295
Mobile A Ohio 2.647,695 2.931.071
I Chicago Great Western 2,510.393 1.962,446
i Southern Rv/y. System. 40.118.790 42.137.460
Florida East Coast 1.426.169 592,205
Pittsburgh & West Va. 2.014,939 1,714,531
1—
Consolidated Gas Report.
BALTIMORE, January 29 (Special).
-Comparative statement of the Con
solidated Gas, Electric Light & Power
Co. of Baltimore for 12 months ended
December 31, 1928, just filed with the
Public Service Commission, shows gross
operating revenue from all operations
of $26,126,194.36, an increase of $1,469,-
19’67, as compared to 1927, while net
op * ating revenue or return on prop
erty was /),785,045.37, a gain of $885,-
069.85. burplus after dividends was
$2,356,876.80, an increase of $494,394.18.
For the quarter ended December 31,
1928, gross eperating income from all
operations totaled $6,883,211.08. a gain
of $472,680.67, as compared to the 1927
quarter, and net operating revenue was
$2,341,638.27, an increase of $310,101.04.
Surplus after dividends totaled $702,-
703.34. an advance of $298,401.52, as
compared to corresponding period a
year ago.
GAIN IN INSURANCE
POLICIES IS SEEN
i
Total of Nearly Ten Billion
Forecast for First
Half Year.
BY .?. C. ROYLE.
Special Dispatch to The Stgr.
NEW YORK. January 29.—The
amount of now life insurance sold in
the first half of this year by the legal
reserve companies is expected by insur
ance men to reach a total of over $9,-
690.000,000.
Insurance experts feel that this esti
mate is conservative when it is taken ;
into consideration that the purchases of |
new life insurance for the first six j
months of 1928 totaled $9,250,000,000.
Moreover, there has never been a year
for seven years when the volume of life (
insurance business has not shown al- |
most as great an increase as they pre
dict in 1929.
This has been true even of years
where business conditions were far less
favorable than now for the saving of
money through insurance. In seven
years new business has more than dou
bled.
There can be no doubt that the tre
mendous increases in the past few years
have been due to the popularity of group
insurance, but all kinds of insurance,
ordinary industrial and group, show
gains. The Association of Life Insur
ance Presidents estimates that the bus
iness began 1929 with $95,000,000,000 of
life insurance in effect. This was spread
among some 65,000,000 policy holders,
giving each an average of $1,462. For
the entire population of the Nation the
per capita -insurance on January 1
amounted to $787.
The gain in 1928 over 1927 showed
conclusively the source of much of the
business. The sales of ordinary insur
ance in 1928 showed a gain over 1927 of
5.1 per cent. Industrial insurance rose
2.9 per cent, while group insurance sale*
gained 51.3 per cent.
The full volume of sales possibilities
for 1929 are not likely to be known until
March. Usually the first two months of
the year are somewhat slack, so far as
new insurance writings are concerned.
The peak is usually reached in May or
June, with another high level mark in
September. Despite these monthly va
riations. however, it is regarded as
doubtful if sales will fall much below
the billion-dollar mark in any one of
the next five months.
Banks are making it easier for many
applicants to take out new or additional
insurance.
Some banks are taking over the pay
ment of premiums on their clients’ in
surance when due. Under such a
scheme, the policy holders make small
regular deposits with the bank. The
bank allows the depositor 4 per cent.
On these payments from the time made
until the premium on his policy is due.
when the banks pay the premium and
the process begins over again.
The banks hold out the inducement
that this plan enables the policy holder
to take advantage of a lower rate than
when premiums are paid semi-annually,
quarterly or monthly. Undoubtedly the
banks benefit by interesting the insur
ed person to make the bank its trustee
and in the building up of savings ac
counts as a result of the regular pay
ment habit. The scheme has many of
the features of the Christmas clubs,
which seem to have benefited the banks
in the matter of new savings accounts.
Baltimore Markets
Special Dispatch to The Star.
BALTIMORE, Md., January 29.
Potatoes, white, 100 pounds, 1.00a1.25;
sweet potatoes, barrel, 1.50a3.25; bushel,
1.00a1.75: yams, barrel, 2.00a3.25; beans,
bushel, 3.25a5.50; beets, 100, 4.00a6.00;
Brussels sprouts, quart, 15a25; cabbage,
hamper, 1.50a2.50; carrots, 100, 4.00a
6.00; celery, crate, 1.50a3.25; cucum
bers, bushel, 5.00a8.00; eggplant, crate,
4.50a7.50; kale, barrel, 1.50a1.75; let
tuce, hamper, I.ooa 1.50; onions, 100
pounds, 1.50a4.50; oyster plant, 100,
2.00al0.00; peas, bushel, 2.25&2.50;
squash, crate. 3.00a5.00; parsnips, bas
ket, 50a65; Savoy cabbage, bushel. 75a
1.00; spinach, bushel, 60a90; tomatoes,
crate, 75a2.50; turnips, basket, 35a50;
apples, bushel, 75a2.00; cranberries,
half barrel, 9.50a10.50; grapefruit, box,
2.25a3.50; oranges, box, 2.50a4.50: tan
gerines, half strap, 1.25a2.50; straw
berries, quart, 35a50.
Dairy Market.
Live poultry—'Turkey, pound. 33a40;
old, 25a30; young chickens. 32a38; poor
and thin, 20; old hens, 20a28; Leghorns,
20a26; old roosters, 17al8; capons, 33a
38; ducks, 20a30: geese, 18a26; guinea
fowls, each, 40a80; pigeons, pair, 30.
Dressed poultry—Turkeys, pound, 35a
42; old, 25a30; young chickens, 25a35;
old and mixed, 25a30; old roosters, 18a
20; capons, 34a42; ducks, 25a30; geese,
20a26.
Eggs—Receipts, 1,141 cases; native
and nearby firsts, free cases, dozen, 38a
40; current receipts, 32a36.
Butter—Good to fancy creamery,
pound, 46a50; prints, 50a52; blocks, 49a
51; store packed, 28; dairy prints, 28a
32; rolls, 28a32; process butter, 41a42.
Hay and Grain Prices.
Wheat —No. 2 red Winter, garlicky,
spot, 1.34%; January delivery, 1.34%.
Corn—No. 2 export, January delivery,
1.07; No. 2 yellow, domestic, spot, 1.10;
cob corn. 5.50.
Oats—No. 2 white, domestic, spot,
61a61 u.; No. 2 white, domestic, spot,
59a60.
Rye—Nearby, 1.10a1.20.
Hay—Receipts, 13 tons. While hay is
arriving here in limited quantities only,
it is more than ample for the .demand,
which is being supplied, mostly by
truck, from nearby points, few carloads
being received. There is not enough
business passing to establish prices on
the various kinds on merit at a range
of 17.00a19.00 per ton of timothy or
clover hay.
Straw—No. 1 wheat, 11.00a12.00 per
ton; No. 1 oat, 12.00a 13.00 per ton.
ALIENIST GROUP FIND
SLAYER “IRRESPONSIBLE”
Farmhand Confesses Killing Em
ployers Because of “Sudden De
sire’’ to Get Automobile.
By the Associated Press.
CANTON, Ohio, January 29.—Ed
ward Kaltenbaugh, 21 years old, of
Grove City, Pa., farm hand, who con
fessed killing Mr. and Mrs. John Oser
while working at their dairy farm at
Canal Fulton, today was held irrespon
sible for his act by three alienists ap
pointed by the court.
The alienists, Dr. W. H. Vorbau, su
perintendent of the Lima State Hospi
tal for the Insane; Dr. William H.
Pritchard, head cf the Columbus State
Hospital, and Dr. Guy Williams, super
intendent of the State Hospital at New
burg, declared Kaltenbaugh mentally
deficient and unable to distinguish be
tween right and wrong.
The youth confessed to fatally shoot
ing Oser and beating Mrs. Oser to
death because of a "sudden desire” to
possess an automobile.
Earl Prefers Name pf Wallop.
Traveling as Mr. and Mrs. Oliver
Wallop, the Earl and Countess of Ports
mouth recently arrived in England from
New York. They will spend seven
months in Europe before returning to
their ranch in Wyoming. The earl,
who is 67, succeeded his brother in the
title in 1926, but prefers to be known
by the name of Wallop. He has spent
40 years ranching in Wyoming, where
he owns 3,000 acres. He became an
American citizen in 1906,
WHEAT IS LOWER
ON INITIAL SALES
Selling Movement Hits Market
on Bearish Reports From
Argentina.
By the Associated Press.
CHICAGO, January 29.—Fairly gen
eral selling carried wheat prices here
downward early today, owing a good
deal to lower Liverpool quotations and
to reports of increased offerings from
Argentina. Predictions were current
that wheat clearances from North
America are to dimininish and Argen
tine clearances enlarge. Opening % to
1 cent off, Chicago wheat afterward de
clined a little more and then rallied.
Corn, oats and provisions were also
easier, with com starting *4 to 1 cen t
off. but later recovering.
In addition to notice of sharpened
i rivalry of wheat offerings from Argen
j tina. wheat traders gave special heed
today to decided skepticism expressed
I in various quarters about likelihood
( of any severe damage having been done
\ to domestic Winter wheat this season.
One Chicago authority said in this
connection that 1913-14 produced the
largest wheat crop on record up to
that time, although the Winter was
very cold. Moreover, the Winter of
1918-19 was the coldest in 50 years,
but the wheat crop that time was also
of record-breaking volume.
Despite indications that extreme
wintry conditions have led to material
enlargement of farm use of corn, the
corn market today sympathized with
wheat weakness much of the time and
corn price upturns failed to hold well.
Com export demand at the Gulf of
'■WHAT ARE THE IENEFITS
STRAIGHT BATING
" unmmnnJ *,
General Motors
Trucks A r
How does the Ti , m > Ir>B(JYER Promt
THE purpose and effect of STRAIGHT RATING are With this clear advance
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capacity—the full capacity which will be most effi- ance ® on trade-ins.
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You don’t take a chance on overloading—on nullify- particular needs,
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This light duty series includes types giving 7 different basic 1
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<
TRUCK ■ 1 TRUCK TRUCK
SALES LEASES MAINTENANCE
CONTROLLED BY YELLOW TRUCK AND COACH MF6. CO..A SUBSIDIARY OF GENERAL MOTORS
Richmond Branch 30-38 M St. N.E. Norfolk Branch
107 West Canal St. 1611-13 Granby St.
nß(unu .. v ..... „ .. , CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.—Carpenter Motor Co. ROANOKE, Va.—Martin Bros.
C WINCHESTER. Va.—Eugene M. Garrett, Inc. GLOUCESTER, Va.—T. W. Turner.
1 M £ tl r - C NEWPORT NEWS. Va.—Sheffield Motor Truck Co. SUFFOLK. Va.—Highway Motors. Ine.
rnmrTnV v/' wrtrEfwntAr m LYNCHBURG. Va —J. W. FretweU. FREDERICKSBURG. Va.—GMC Sales *
PHOFRrs°vk' C ORANGE, Va.—Smith-Hood Elcar Co. AC s " v ‘ c * „ „ _
PHOEBUS, Va.—H. M. Tessler. ASHLAND, Va.—Ashland Hudson-Esoex Co.
Specializing in Commercial Transportation
Mexico appeared to be slow, with
steamship space being canceled owing
to alleged dearth of business even at
distress rates.
Public Utilities
Special Dispatch to The Star.
NEW YORK, January 29.—The Illi
nois Electric Power Co. has called for
redemption at 103*/2 and interest on
April 1, 1929, its outstanding first mort
gage sinking fund gold bonds, series A
<6 per cent, due 1943), which are out
standing in the amount of $3,264,200,
payable at the office of the trustee,
Bankers Trust Co., New York.
Statements of preliminary earnings of
subsidiaries of General Gas & Electric
Corporation indicate important gains
for the year 1928 over 1927. Increases
in net income, after deducting operating
expenses, taxe3. maintenance, deprecia
tion and fixed charges, range from 17
to 40 per cent.
NEW CONSTRUCTION.
NTTW YORK, January 29 UP).—New
construction contracted for in the week
ended January 25 totaled $106,571,800,
an increase of $1,000,000 over the pre
vious week, F. W. Dodge Corporation
reports. The total since January 1 is
$333,108,200, a daily average of $15,-
862,300, against $16,429,600 in January,
1928.
PARIS BOURSE PRICES.
PARIS, January 29 UP). —Price
changes were Irregular on the Bourse
today; 3 per cent rentes, 72 francs 75
centimes; 5 per cent loan, 98 francs
60 centimes; exchange on London, 124
francs 7 centimes. The dollar was
quoted at 25 francs 58 centimes.
COTTON PRICES FIRM
IN EARLY TRADING
Market Absorbs Selling and Main
tains Steady Undertone.
Dealings Light.
By the Associated Press.
NEW YORK. January 29.—The cot
ton market opened steady today at an
advance of 3 points to a decline of 2
points. Some overnight buying orders
around the ring were supplied by
liquidations.
Southern and local liquidation was
promoted by the relatively easy show
ing of the later Liverpool cables. Old
crop positions, which. were relatively
steady at the opening, reacted to about
yesterday’s closing quotations; the new
crop sold off a few points right after
the call. The offerings were sufficiently
well taken to give the market a steady
undertone, however, and trading was
quiet, with prices about net unchanged
to 4 points lower at the end of the first
half hour.
Private cables said that trade calling
and continental buying had been sup
plied by liquidation in Liverpool and
that the demand for cotton cloths from
India was poor, with China trade less
active.
CHICAGO DAIRY MARKET.
CHICAGO, January 29 t/P).—Butter
unchanged; receipts, 10.621 tubs; eggs
lower; receipts, 12.963 cases: extra firsts,
41; firsts, 39a40 ordinary firsts, 32a36.
Poultry, alive, steady; receipts, none:
fowls, 28; Springs, 32; roosters, 22; tur
keys, 25; ducks, 30; geese. 23.
FINANCIAL - .'
FARM PROSPECTS
FOR 1929 VIEWED
Agriculture Department Urges Ad
justment of Output to Main
tain Income.
Farmers should avoid increasing pro
duction of those products which are
no./ in ample supply and continue their
efforts to adjust production, if they are
to maintain the present level of gross
income of agriculture, the annual agri
cultural outlook report issued by the
Department of Agriculture declares.
The report says some expansion in
beef cattle may be warranted, but cau
tions farmers against too rapid expan
sion of sheep, dairy, cattle, hogs and
fruits. Some reduction is recommended
for potatoes and feed crops. Domestic
demand for farm products is expected
to be maintained during the early part
of this year, with foreign demand con
tinuing about the same as during 1928.
Higher interest rates affecting farm
ers in some sections of the country may
. result in a less favorable agriculture!
credit situation, but Lttie change, j* »x
--pected in prices of farm machinery, fe* •
tillzers and building materials. F*lrtn
wages are expected to be slightly lower
at harvest time, according to the report.
This outlook report is made from a
national viewpoint and the conclusions
must be considered in relation to local
conditions in many cases. Represents
’ tives of 45 States assisted in the prepa
-11 ration of the national report.
SILVER QUOTATIONS.
NEW YORK. January 29 (.Ft.—Bar
silver. 56" s ; Mexican dollars, 43*8.
13

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