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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, December 02, 1929, Image 15

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.FINANCE MINISTER
URGES FREE TRADE
New Canadian Official Has
Record as Able Busi
ness Executive.
BY JOHN F. SINCLAIR.
Special Dispatch to The Star.
NEW YORK, December 2.—When
Mackenzie King. Canadian prime min
ister, selected Charles A. Dunning, the
Canadian minister of railways, to be
minister of finance, he chose "a free
trader from the west."
The new finance minister was born in
England 45 years ago. At 18 he work
ed on a farm at Beaverdale, Saskatche
wan. At 26 he organized the Saaket
chewan Co-operative Elevator Co. From
that time on his expanding career has
been part of the progressive farmers
movement in the western provinces.
Mr. Dunning held several cabinet po
sitions before becoming premier of the
great wheat province of Saskatchewan
in 1922. Four years he was called to
Ottawa as Canadian minister of rail
ways.
The Financial Post. Canada's out
standing business weekly, says of the
new finance minister:
"Mr. Dunning is a man of practical
Intellect, an able business executive
and a student of finance. These con
siderations are far more important than
the fact that he is a theoretical free
trader."
But to Western Canada it is a great
event, for it is the first time that a
western man has been appointed to the
important portfolio of finance in any
Canadian government.
Coffee Industry Aided.
The coffee situation in Brazil, which
has had several sinking spells lately,
has been helped by a loan of approxi
mately $10,000,000 secured last week in
Europe.
The price of coffee, which has long
been sustained at high levels by the
Brazilian valorization plan, rose from
13 cents a pound in 1922 to 22 cents a
pound in 1925. It remained the latter
figure until lately. The recent sharp
break in the New York Coffee Market
dropped prices to the lowest level since
1923. r
And why? Ten years ago, the an
nual production in Brazil was about
13.000,000 bags. Today it is about 16,-
000,000. The rest of the world 10
years ago. produced about 6,000,000
bags, today 10,000,000. But many of the
trees planted in recent years, since the
rise, are just now coming into bearing.
The world consumes about 23,000,000
bags of coffee a year. Today world
production exceeds world consumption.
More than 8,000,000 bags of coffee, un
der the control of the Sao Paulo Coffee
Institute, were carried over into the be
ginning of the present crop year. It
is now estimated that approximately
15,000,000 bags of coffee are stored at
present waiting for better prices.
Brazil, in 1819, landed her first coffee
in the United States at Salem. Mass. —
1,522 bags. Last year 10,500.000 bags
were imported into the United States,
of which 7,000.000 came from Brazil.
Until a world control of coffee produc
tion is effected—and this is impossible
at the present stage of society—stabiliz
ing the price of coffee is bound to have
a bad time. The present one is a good
example.
Reparations Bonds.
A small offering of German repara
tion bonds, issued under the divisions
of the new Young plan, will probably
be offered to the American public and
in other leading countries in February
or March of next year.
It is understood that the issue will
not be a large one. It will be merely a
‘ feeler” to iamiliarize the buying pub
lic with this new type of security, which
is sure to be with us for many years.
It is expected that the first issue will
bear a 7 per cent coupon, have a 1 per
cent amortization charge, and be sold
at about par.
Ultimately about $2,000,000,000 of
these bonds will be issued.
No one need be surprised if France
absorbs a large proportion. If the
French government takes a large amount
and agrees to exchange them for
French government bonds now in the
hands of its public, it will permit
France to reduce her own national debt
by the number of German bonds which
she exchanges. If the French people
are willing to trade their government
bonds for German reparation bonds, the
French financial situation will be
helped.
This course of procedure is expected.
Pension List Changing.
As the ranks of the Civil War vet
erans and their widows grow thinner
the places made vacant at the United
States Government Pension Office are
I quickly taken by Spanish-American
k War veterans and their widows.
For the first time the amount of
k Government pension payments to tno
f Spanish veterans exceeds those now
F made to the veterans of the Civil Wai.
This information is furnished by the
commissioner of pensions, who an
nounces that 447,912 people received
monthly checks, totaling almost $230.-
000,000, for the last Government fiscal
I year.
k Os this amount $57,095,000 was paid
W to Civil War veterans and $86,474.00u
to Civil War widows. But the Spanisn
War veterans themselves arc given $65,-
292,000, while their widows receiveo
$11,383,000.
This gives a United States per capita
pension of about S4BO, as against a
per capita of SIBO given by England.
England has 1.665.470 pensioners, who
in the last fiscal year were given
$308,000,000 in war pensions.
That's one trouble with this war
business —a nation never gets througn
paying for it. (
(Copyright, 1929. by North American News
paper Alliance.) -
CHICAGO LIVE STOCK MARKET
CHICAGO, December 2 (A*) (United
States Department of Agriculture).—
Hogs— Receipts, 62,000 head, including
32,000 direct: market mostly steady with
Friday: top, 9.50 paid for 240-290
pounds weights; mostly a 9.35 to 9.40
market for good to choice hogs over
190 pounds; butchers, medium to choice.
250-300 pounds, 9.00 to 9.50; 200-250
pounds, 9.15 to 9.50: 160-200 pounds.
9'oo to 9.45; 130-160 pounds. 8.50 to
9 35: packing sows, 8.00 to 8.60; pigs,
medium to choice 90-130 pounds, 8.25
to 9.00.
Cattle— Receipts, 13.000 head; calves,
receipts, 3.000 head; general market
- steady to 25b higher; fairly active; early
top yearlings, 16.25; lower grade steers
* sharing upturn. Slaughter classes,
st ears, good and choice, 1,300-1.500
pounds, 12.25 to 14.76; 1,100-1,300
pounds, 12.25 to 15.50; 950-1,100 pounds,
12.50 to 15.75; common and medium
850 nounds up 000 to 12.50; fed year
lings, goo' 1 «na choice, 750-950 pounds,
13.00 to *6.00; heifers, good and choice,
850 pounds down, 12.50 to 15.00; com
mon and medium, 7.25 to 12.50; cows,
good and choice, 7.25 to 10.00; common
and medium. 5.75 to 7.50; low cutter
and cutter, 4.25 to 5.75; bulls, good and
choice (beef). 8.74 to-10.00; cutter to
medium. 6.50 to 9.25; vealers (milk fed),
good and choice, 12.50 to 15.75; medium,
11.00 to 12.50; cull and common. 7.00
to 11.00: stocker and feeder steers, good
and choice, all weights, 10.25 to 1100;
common and medium, 7.75 to 10.00.
Sheep—Receipts, 30,000 head: market
opening weak to 25c lower; fat lambs,
12.50 to 12 85; a few choice, 13.00 to
13.15; fat ewes steady, a few 5.25 to
5.75; feeding lambs, quotable, steady;
lambs, good and choice, 92 pounds
down, 12.50 to 13.25: medium, 11.00 to
k 12.50: common. 9.25 to 11.00; ewes,
medium to choice. 150 pounds down,
4.50 to 6.00; cull and common, 2 25 to
4 75; feeder lambs, good and choice,
11.75 to 12.75.
Shakespeare was known to his friends
r as "Gentle Willie."
FINANCIAL.
I NEW YORK CURB MARKET sr.vr m I
■ i L %
1 | Pre* 1939-. Stock end Sales—
I Hleh Low. Dividend Rate Add 00. Open Hlih. Low Close I
• 31% 7 Aeronautical Indust. 2 9% !)% 9% 91
8% IN Aeronautic Ind war.. 4 in. 2 in. 2 I
22*4 5% Aero Sup Mfg. 8.... 9 12(4 12% 11% 12% I
, 4814 14% Aero Underwriters.. 2 17% 17% 17 17
) 43ti, 15 Agfa Aosco * 1 20)4 20% *O% 20%
57% 17 Ainsworth Mfg 12*4. 2 21 21 21 21
20% 3 Air Investors v tc... 2 3% 3% 3% 3*%
40% 12 Air Inv, Inc cv pr.... 4 12 12 12 12
64% 40 Alrstocks, Inc v t c.. 4 4214 44 «2% 44
161 110 Alabama Gt Sou 17. ,240 s 119|| 119 116% llb%
15 6 Allegheny Gas Corp. 2 6% 5% 5’4 6%
36% 15 Alles A Fisher (2)... 2 16 16 16 16
14% 3 Allied Aviation 11 2)4 2% 2%, 2%
24% 10% Allied Mills. 1nc.... 5 12 12% 12 12%
110 23 Allied Row &Lt 14 37% 37)4 36% 37
1 7% 1 Allison Drug St A... 11% 1% 1% 1%
5% % Allison Drug St 8... 11111
539% 146 Aluminum Co of Am. 1 240 240 240 240
108% 103 Alu Coo/ Am pf(6).. 1 107 107 107 107
47%* 31 Am Arch Co (3)..... 1 34% 34,« 34V. 34%
23 5 Am Br BEI fd shs... 1 11 11 11 11
153% 98 Am Cigar Co (8).... 60s 100 100 100 ,100
84% 29% Am Cit PAL A (a3).. 2 38 38 38 38
60)* 10 AmCPftLß(bin) 14 17% 17% 16% - 17%
31% 18 AmComPA (1.10 c). 20 23% 23% 23% 23%
52 22 Am Com P B (J3oc).. 4 36% 38% 35% 38%
11% 4% Am Cm with Fo war.. 3 4% 4% 4(4 4%
.72 % AmControlOllFlds.. 2 rt, iV * * I
€9% 19% Am Cyanam B (1.80) 153 29% 29% 27% 27%
114 103 AmDistT.NJ cv pf 7.75 s 110 110 110 110
33% 15 Am Equities 8 16% 16% 16% 16%
174 25% Am For Power war.. 21 61% 63% 50% 53%
224*4 71 Am Gas&Elec (tl).. 20 116% 116% 110 110
42% 5% Am Invest Inc 8..... 4 10% 10% 10 10
24)4 3 Am Investors (war). I 5% 5% 5% 5%
399 190 Am Lt & Trac (10).. 124 s 225 227 223 223
8% %Am Maracaibo 4 IT41 T 4 1% 1% 1)4
18% 5% Am Natural Gas 18% 8% 8% 8%
37 10% Am Solvents Chem.. 4 15% 15% 15% 15%
42% 25% Am Sol Ch cv pf (3). 3 30 30 * 29(4 29%
92 22 Am St Pub 5(A)1.60. 6 22% 26 22% 26
71% 15 Am Superpower 215 23% 23% 22% 23%
95% 85 Am Super Ist pf (6). 4 95% 95% 95 95
100% 82 Am Superpow pf (6) 2 90% 90% 90% ,90%
3% 3% Am Thread pf (25c). 13% 3% 3% 3%
34% 25 Am Yvette 1 19)4 19)4 19% 19)4
33% 20% Amster Trad (1 % ).. 4 22 26 22 26
25% 8 Anchor PostF (2)... 2 13% 13% 13% 13*4
17% 11 Anglo-A n v cod 35c.. 29 16% 17 16% 16%
IS 18% Anglo-Am v cod 35c. 84 16% 17 16% 16%
45% 15 Anglo Chil Nitrate. . 12 22 22% 21% 22%
39 10% Apex Electrical Mfg. 1 12% 12% 12% 12%
55% 13)4 A returns Rad Tube.. 29 13% 13% 8 11%
5 1% Argo Oil 11% 1% iv* 1%
.47 .09 Ariz Globe Copper... 37 in % %
26 3% Arkansas Nat Gas. .* 17 11%- 11% 11 11
24% 6% Arkansas Nat Gas A.W 44 10% 10% 10% 10%
8% 4 Ark NGcm pf (60c) 17% 7% 7% 7%
27% 3 Asso-Dyelng A Ptg.. 4 3% 3% 3% 3%
15% 5% Asso-Elec ind Ltd.. 45 6% 6% 6% 0%
72% 35% Asso G&E A (12.40). 28 42% 42% 41% 42%
28% 3% Asso G&E A deb rts.. 68 11% 11% 10% 11%
2% 2 Asso Laundries..... 14 3% 3% 2% 2%
35 3% Asso Rayon 15% . 5% 6% 5%
87% 30% Asso Rayon pf (6)... 18 44% 46% 40% 40%
90% 25 Atl Coast Flsh(l.2o). 2 25 25 25 25
2% % Atlantic Lobos 2 % % % %
4% 1 Atlantic Lobos pf... 11% 1% 1% 1%
25% 24% Atlas Ply wood n.... 2 24% 24% 24V* 24%
29% 15% Aut VMcvpr pt (2). 3 16 16 15% 15%
89% 20)4 Aviation Corp of Am 2 23% 23% 20% 20%
23% 12 Aviation Credit..... 1 12% 12% 12% 12%
22 1% Bahia Corp 13% 3% 3% 3V4
15 1% Bahia Corp pf 12% 2% 2% 2%
50% 46% Bancomit Corp new.. 2 48% 48% 48% 48%
100 75 Baumann (L) pf (7) .100 sBO 80 80 80
27 18 Bickford, inc 1 17% 17% 17% 17%
64 30 Blaw-Knox Co (1 %). 4 33 34% 33 34V:
67% 10 Bliss Co (E W) (1).. 1 28 28 28 28
29% 3% Blue Ridge Corp. ... 69 7% 7% 77
55% 23% Blue R Corp cv pf t 3. 33 32% 33% 32% 33%
81% 13'/*. Brazil Tr &Lt 12)... 36 41% 42V* 41% 41%
29 10 Brill Corp A (!%)... 1 10% 10% 10% 10%
12% 1% Brill Corp B 10 3% 3% 2% 2%
27% 14 Brillo Mfg (1.20).... 2 16% 16% 16% 16%
10% 4 Br Celanese Ltd rets 5 4% 4% 4% 4%
74% 55 Buckeye Pipe L (t 6) 10 68% 69% 67 68
26% 22 Bus NAE Ppf (1.60) 1 24% 24% 24% 24%
17% 7% Burco, inc 1 11 li n n
8 3% Burco, inc (war).... 2 4 4 4 4
46 38 Burco, Inc conv pf... 0 40 42 40 42
5% 3% Burma rets (31 %c).. 7 A 4 3 3
44% 14% Butler Bros (2) 7 23% 23% 23% 23%
8 4% Bwana M Kubwa.... 14% 4% 4% 4%
4% 3 Cab&WlreLtdA rets. 3 3% 3% 3% 3%
6% 1% Cab&WireLtdß rets. 10 2 2 1% 1%
6% *% CabAWlreLtdpf rets 14% 4% 4% 4%
17% % CAM Co ctfs 29 % %' % %
12% 2% Can Marconi 11 3% 3% 3% 3%
4% 1 Carlb Syndicate..... 12 1% IV* 1% i%
31% 25 Carman &Co A (2).. 1 23% 23% 23% 23%
43 30% Carnation Co 1 31% 31% 31 31
21% 5 Carnegie Metals..... 17% 7% 7% 7%
57% 20 Celanese Corp 4 28% 28% 28% 28%
85 80 Celan Cor Ist pf (7). 14 89% 90 89 89
50 12 Celluloid Corp 3 16% 16',* 16% 16%
110 82 Celluloid Corp Ist pf. 1 83 83 83 83
19% 6% Cent Atlantic Stales. 4 77 77
57% 20 Cent PSv A ta1.75). 14 34 34 33% 34
183% 12 Cen States El (J4oc> 22 22% 22% 21% 22%
13 4% Centrifug Pipe (60c) 8 6 6 5% 5%
42% 11% Chain Stors Stk(b6). 1 12% 12% 12% 12%
69 37% Ches & Ohio (new).. 3 50 50 50 50
109 97% ChiidsCo pf (7).«.. 100 s 106 106 106 106
#B% 20 Cities Service U3oc) 344 29% 29% 28% 29%
98% 84 Cities Serv pf (6)..., 3 89% 89% 89% 89%
32 10 Clev Tractor 6 19% 19% 19% jgtj,
33% 3% Club Alum Uten 3 4% 4% 4% 41^
15 4 Colon 0i1...- 6 6% 6% 6% 6%
2 % Columbia Syndicate. 3 % %
12% 2 Comwlth * Sou war. 202 3% 4 3% 3%
449% 210% Comwth Edison (8). 10s 249 249 249 249
103% 93% Comwlth Pow pf (6) 4 100 101% 100 101%
21% 12% CommuntiyWatServ. 2 14% 14% 14% 14%
18 4 Consolidated Copper 7 6 6 5% 5%
50% 12% Con Dairy Prod (12). 1 19% 19% 19 19
160 71 Con Gas Balt (3).... 6 93 93 92 92
38% 20% Con Gas Ut A (2.20). 9 23% 23% 23% 23%
35 2% Coos instrument.... 8 5% 6% 6 5
21 10 Cons Laundries 10 10% 10% 10 10%
.24 .05 Con N'evada-Utah. .. 2 % % % Vfc
39>« 11 Con Retail Strati).. 4 12 12 11% 11%
11% 2% Consol Royal (60c).. 14% 4% 4% 4%
29 10 Continental Oil 2 15 15 15 15
52% 30 Cooper Bess pfA(S).. 2 39% 39% 39% 39%
41% 12% Corroon & Reynolds. 6 16% 16% 15% 15%
123 69 Cor & Rey pf A 16).. 3 75 75 75 75
37% 10 Cord Corp 1 12 12 12 12
135 42 Cosden Oil 1 75 75 75 75
11% 6% Creole Petroleum... 11 6% 6% 6% 6%
1% % Cresson Cons (.08).. 5 Tit A A A
87% 17% Crocker Wheeler<n). 4 23% 23% 22% 22%
56 39 Cr &Bpf(3 %) ww. 1 39% 39% 39% 39%
62% 30 Crowley Milner (2).. 1 32% 32% 32V* 32%
2% % Crown Cent Petrol.. 5 % % a, * 4
13V* 3% Curtiss Airports vtc. 13% 3% 3% 3%
29% 6 Curtiss Flying Serv. 16% 6% 6% 6%
13 2% Curtiss Wright war. 5 2% 2% 2% 2%
26 6% Darby Pet (1> 78% 8% 8% g%
34% 17 Davenport Hos (2).. 2 20% 20% 20% 20%
46% 4% Dayton Air & Eng... 4 6 6 6 6
642 310 Deere ACo (6) 100 s 414% 416 414% 416
26% 5% De Forest Radio.... 26 6% 6% 6% 6%
11 2 Derby Oil A Resin... 6 5% 5% 5% 5%
17% 5% Detroit Aircraft Cor. 11 7% 7% 77%
30% 9 Dix Gas & Utilities.. 2 13 13% 13 13%
42 14% Doehler Die Casting. 1 20 20 20 20
1% A Dolores Esperanza.. 1 % A % A
# 45% 16% Douglas Aircraft .... 1 16% 16% 16% 16%
100% 50 Dow Chemical (2)... 2 68% 68% 68% 68%
20 4 Dubeller Cond&Rad. 2 9% 9% 9% 9%
324% 120 Duke Powder (5)... 660 s 169% 169% 150 164%
20 3% Durant Motors 12 5% 5% 5% 5%
7 % Duz Co.. Inc., A 3 11 1 y
12% % Earl Radio Corp 15 % % % (%
55% 21% East Gas & F Asso... 2 25 25 25 25
77% 14% East States Power B 5 23% 23% 23% 23%
32V* 10 Eisler Elec Corp.... 12 15% 16 15% 15%
189 49% HI Bond ASh (b 6).. 372 77% 78% 75% 77%
108% 100 El Bond ASh pf (6). 10 102% 102)* 102% 102%
92% 14 El Pow Associates A 12 23 23 22 22
92 15 El Pow Associates.. 18 24% 25% 24% 25
103 84% El P & L2d pt A (7). 6 99 100 99 100
61% 10% El P& L opt war.... 1 21% 21% 21% 21%
66 3% ElSharehold «$!)... 24 17 17% 14% 17
163% 45% El Sharehold pf (6). 8 78% 78% 76 78
110 95 Em G&F cum pf (8). 2 98% 98% 98 98
62 25% Empire Pwr Corp(2) 8 36 36 35 35%
31 14% Em.p Pub S.AG.BO). 1 18 18 18 18
#4% % Engineers Gold 1 % % % %
70% 42 Eureka Pipe Llne(4) 4 45 49% 45 49**
26% 4 Evans Wallow Lead. 2 5% 5% 5% 5%
34% 3 Fairchild Aviation.. 2 4 4 4 4
124% 61 Fajardo Sugar 70s 64 64 63 63
( .54 .10 Falcon Lead 17 A Tit % %
10 % Fandango Corp 6 1% 1% 1% 1%
50 9 Fedders Mfg A (2).. 1 13% 13% 13% 13%
17% 2% Flat Stk dpb rts 20 3% 3% 2% z%
29% 19% Fiat Stk deb rts rets. 14 19 19 18% 18% j
30 4)** Flnan inv N Y (b 8). 23 6% 6% 6% 6%'
41% 30 Firestone T&R new. 3 35% 36 35% 35%
67% 8 Fokker Aalrcraft... 11 18% 18% 18 18
69V* 15 Ford Motor Can A... 18 27 27% 26% 26%
1 13% 3 Ford Mot of France. 3 8 8 7% 7%
| 21% 10% Ford Motor Ltd 31 11% 11% 11% 11%
60% 20 Fourth Nat Jnv 6 31% 31% 31 31%
' 37% 10 Fox Theat Cl A 125 10% 11% 10% 10%
.. 20 4% Gen'al Alloys (80c). 5 9% 10% 9% 10%
I 30% 8% Gen Am In vest new. 12 12% 12% 11% 11%
10% 2% General Baking 40 4 4 3% 3%
79% 47% General Bak pf (6).. 9 55 65% 65 55
’ 50V* 36 Gen El Germ rets... 1 38V* 38V* 38% 38%
t 20% 7% Gen E Ltd rcte (60c) 12 11% 11% 11% 11%
44% 29% Gen Fireproof (2)... 5 30% 30% 30% 30%
j 23% 13% G4n Gti 4EI (A)... 9 16% 16% 16% 16%
, 34% 10 Gen Indus Alcohol.. 4 14% 15 14 15
27% 10% Gen Laundry Mach. 3 11 12% 11 12%
39% 10% Gen Rtty & Utilities. 13 13 13 12% 12%
! 121% 60 Gen K A Util Df (•). 13 82 82 *Bl 81
' 66% 24 Gen Theat Equip vtc 8 33 33% 33 33
• 159% 80 Glen Alden Coal (10) 2 115 115 114% 114'*
• 28 12% Globe Underwriters. 6 14% 14% 141* 14%
> 2% % Gold Coin 8 A A A A
’ 27% 3 Gold Seal El n 30 6% 5% 6 s',
12 2% Golden Center 2 4% 4% 4% 4%
1 .16 Goldfield C0n501.... 1 A A A A
5 121% 82% Goidm Sach TC *bßl 52 39 39 38% 39
82 42 Gorham Mfg vtctU) 3 42 42 42 $2
C
THE EVENING STAH, TTASHTNGTCXN* D. C., MONDAY* DECEMBER 2. 1929.
«-Prev 1929 Stock and Sales—
[ Hlkh Low Dividend Rate. Add 00 Open. Hith. Low Close
19% 1% Goth Knltbac Mach. 6 1% 2% 1% 2%
| 68% 23 Oravmur Corp 2 35% 35% 35%. 35%
l 494 162 Gr AAPT n v (6).. 70s 280% 230% 230 230
93% 48 Gt Lakes Steel cod.. 15 52% 52% 50% 52
106 50 Gt Lakes Steel pt pf. 1 59% 59% 59% 59%
17% 10 Groc Stors Prod vtc. 2 11% 11% 11% 11%
49 18 Ground Grlprctlii). 2 23 23 19% 22%
30% 24V* Guenther Law 12 27% 27% 27% 27%
209 115 Gulf Oil of Pa (1%). 8 133 133% 132% 133%
35% 16% Hall Printing! tl %). 7 24% 25 24% 25
5% 2 H’d Page ppf (19c).. - 2 2 2 2 2
6% 1% Happtness Candy..., 11 1% 1% 1% 1%
82% 27% HaygartCorp 8 36% 36% 35% 35%
70% 14% Hazeltine Corp (1).. 2 20 21 20 21
26% 3% Helena Rubensteln.. 17 7% 7% 6% 6%
' 7% 1% Homaokla Oil 11 4 4 3% 3%
22% 6 Houston Gulf Gas... 1 10% 10% 10% 10%
23 6 Hudson Bay M A S.. 17 10% 10% 10 10
128 74% Humble Oil (t 2)..... 3 88% 88% 87% 87%
82 27 Hydro Ei Serv (t 2).. 10*36% 36% 35% 36
49% 10 Hygrade Food Prod. 4 13% 13% 13V* 13%
340% 260 Illinois P L (20).... 1850*310 317% 310 317*4
41 22 ImpOll Can n (50c). 1 27% 27% 27% 27%
42% 26 Ind Pipe Line (new). 12 39% 40 38% 39%
58% 17 Ind Fin efts (bl 0%). 1 17 17 17 17
49% 5 Indian Terr Ilium... 22 18% 18% 18 18%
160 26 lnsull Util. Inv 2 54 56% 54 55%
92 62 Ins Co N A <t2%)... 7 60 62% 60 62%
33 17 Insurance Sec (1.40) 4 19% 19% 19)4 19%
32% 20 Intercoast Trad Co.. 1 21% 21% 21% 21%
2% % Intercontinent Pet n 1 % % % %
24% 6% intern Perfume (1).. -2 7% 7% 7% 7%
30% 15 lnt Petroleum 37%c. 13 21% 22% 21% 22%
14% 5 Internal Products... 5 5% 5% 5% 5%
46 11 • lnt Saf R B (t2*4 ).. 2 15% 15% 15% 15%
93% 25% lnt Superpower (J1). 6 37% 38% 37% 38%
61 28% Internatl Ut A(3%). 3 38 38% 38 38%
22% 3 Internatl Ut B 78% 9 8% 9
26% 12% Interstate Equities.. 25 14% 14% 13% 14%
50 40% Interst. Eq. cv-pf.<3) 9 41% 41% 40% 40%
9% 1 Iron Cap Copper 3 3 3 3 3
41% 14% IrvAirC (2) (1.60).. 83 14% 14% 14% 14%
35 6% Italian Superpow A.. 1 11% 11% 11% 11%
20 2% .Tonas A Naumburg.. 13% 3% 3% 3%
59 15% Jon AN cum pf (3).. 1 20% 20% 20% 20%
1% A Kerr Lake 2 % % A A
41% 24% Ivleinert Co (2%)... 2 24% 24% 24% 24%
12% 1% Kolster-Br (Am Sh). • 3 1% 1% 1% 1%
45% 30 Lackawanna Sec(4). 7 86% 36% 35% 35%
35% 8)4 Lakey KA M 02.40) 1 10% 10% 10% 10%
91% 31 Lane Bryan tine (2). 4 34 34% 34 34%
49% 19 Lazarus FA R C 0... 10 23 23 23 'ls
36 17% Lazar FAR Co cod.. 5 23 23 23 23
39 23 Lefcour Real pf (3). 6 26% 31% 26% 31%
136 63 Lehman (The) Corp. 31 72% 72% 71% 72%
49% 7% Loews Inc deb rts... 1 12.% 12% 12% 12%
6% 2 Leonard Oil 10 2% 2% 2% 2%
72% 38 Lerner Stores Corp.. 3 37% 37% 37% 37%
67% 44 Ley (F T) ACo (*).. 3 40 40 40 40
23 11% Libby McNeil A L... 6 18% 18% 18% 18%
14% 3% Louisiana Lan A Ex. 45 3% 3% 31k 3%
43,% 20% Mac Marr Stores.... 2 24% 24% 24% 24%
1% % Magdalena Syndlcat. 6 % % % %
37% 7 Marconi lnt M 62 %e. 6 10% 11 10% 11
56% 10 Marion Steam Shov. 2 15, 15 15 15
11 1 Mavis Bottling 50 1% 1% 1% 1%
101% 46% Mayflower Assn 1 51% 51% 61% 51%
67% 40 Mead John (f3)4)... 1 50 50 50 50
24 9% Memph Nat Gas Co.. 6 13% 14 13% 14
3 1% Mesabl Iron 3 1% 1% 1% 1%
23% 5 Met A Min inc (1.20. 12 9% 9% * 9% 9%
6% 2)4 Mexlco-Ohio 0i1.... 9 3 3 2% 2%
51% 18 Mid West Util (bB%) 41. 26% 26% 25% 26%
140 92 Mid W Util cv pf(6). 1 108% 108% 108% 108%
34 15 Mid Royally cv pf I. 4 19 20 19 20
123% 46 Midld Stl Prod+s 92. 1 62 62 62 62
42 8 Mo-Kan P L (b 5%). 2 16% 16% 16% 16%
110 99% Moh Hud P2d pf(7). 1 101% 101% 101 101
6% 1% Montecatlnl deb rts. 13 1% 1% 1% 1%
52% 38 Moody's pt pf f 3.75.. 1 40 40 40 40
48% 35% Morrison Elec (1)... 1 36 36 36 36
1% V* Moun A Gulf (.08)... 4 % 14 % %
22% 7 Mount Prod (1'.60>... 15 8% 11 9% 10
33V* 5% Municipal Service... 4 9% 10% 9% 10%
23(4 8 Nat AmerCo(J).... 16 9% 10% 9% 9%
88 6% Nat Aviation 23 10 10 8% 8%
75% 72)4 Nat Biscuit Co new. 1 73% 73% 73% 73)4
48%- 5 Nat Fam Stra (1.60). • 5 16 18% 16 18%
64% 10% Nat Investors (new) 1 15% 15% 15% 15%
40% 15 • Nat Mfrs A Stores.. 2 15% 15% 15% 15%
110 99% Nat Pow ALt pf (7).150s 106 107% 106 107%
44 20 Nat Pub Sv A(1 SO). 3 24% 25% 24% 25%
41% 15 Nat Rub Mach (2)... 2 21% 21% 21% 21%
36% 6 Nat Screen Serv I.SO 2 18% 18% 17% 17%
34% 5 Natl Trade Journal.. 32 6 7 6 7
25% 10% Nat Transit (tl %). . 28 22% 23% 22% 23%
42% 7 Nat Union Radio.... 4 7% 7% 7% 7%
5 2% New Brad 011 (50c). 13% 3% 3% 3%
25% 18% New Hav Clock tl %. 2 18% 18% 18 18
87% 60% New Jer Zinc n(t4).. 3 69V* 69% 69% 69%
236 89 Newmont Min (J 4).. 12 125 125 116% 116V*
52 23 Newport Co (new).. 4 29 29 29 29
24% 7% N Y Auction (1%)... 2 8 8 8 8
56V* 20 N Y Invest (1 20)... 22 25% 26 24% 24%
19% 2 NY Invest (war)... 15 3 3 3 3
24% 11% N Y Pet Royalty (1). 13 13% 16% 13% 15%
114% 111 NYTelpf (6%) 475 s 113% 113% 113% 113%
30% 12 Niagara Hud P(4oc). 197 14% 14% 11% 14%
9% 2% Niag Hud Pw A war. 37 3% 3% 3% 3%
21V* 2 Niag Hud Pw B war. 20 7 7 6% 6%
74% 12 Niagara Shars bl-40. 8, 24% 24)4 23 23
78 21% Niles Bement Pond.. 1 30% 30% 30% 30%
3% 1 Niptsslng (30c) 2 1% 1% 1% 1%
27)4 8 Noma El Cor (1.60).. 3 15% 16 15% 15%
68% 10 Noranda Mines 19 35 35 33% 34%
19% 5 North Am Aviation.. 28 6*y> 6% -6% 6%
18% 6% North Cen Tex (60c) 2 7% 7% 7% 7%
84% 35 N E Power (t1%>... 1 38% 38% 38 V* 38%
301 115% North St Pow A (8). 5 155% 156% 153 153
109% 100 North St Pow pf (7). 1 102 102 102 102
48% 17% N W Engineer (2)... 1 20% 20I*Z 20% 20%
31% 20 Novadel Agenc (2).. 3 22 22 22 22
4% % Ohio Copper 370 1% 1% 1% 1%
79% 64% Ohio OH <t2% 7 71% 71% 70% 71%
,19% 8% Ollstorks Ltd A Jsoo 6 10% 10% 10% 10%
22% 10% Outbd Mot A (1.80).. 4 12% 13% 12% 12V4
28% 24% Pae G&Ellst pf 1%. 5 26 26 25% 25%
26% 12% Pac Western 0i1.... 2 15 15 14% 14)4
10% 2% Pantepec Oil 42 3% 3% 3% 3%
43% 6 Param C Mfg (2.40). 12 13 13% 13% 13%
44% 20 Penn Mex Fuel (2).. 2 22% 22% 22% 22%
30 14% Pennroad C0rp...... 112 15% 15% 14% 15
97% 86% Penn Ohio Ed pf (6). 10s 94 94 94 94
106% 98 Penn OEd pr pf(7).. 10s 104% 104% 104% 104%
110% 106 PennPrALtpf (6).. 1 107% 107% 107% 107%
94 45 Peop Drug Strs (1).. 1 52 52 53 52
58% 25 Peo LA PA (a2.40). 2 38 39% 38 39%
4% A Philip Morris Inc... 2 M U A A
19% 10 PIck(A)BACo pf 144. 1 10 10 10 , 1 0
30 20 Pie Bak of Am A<2). 1 20 20 20 20
29% 6% Pilot R T A (1.20)... 78% 9% 8% 9%
32 8% Pitney B Pn(2oc>... 5 12% 12% 12 12
76% 50 Pittsbgh Plate G t«. 2 55 55 55 55
42% 12V* Polymet Mfg 20 17% 17% 16 16
88 35 Portland Elec Pow. . 9 79% 79% 59% 79%
86V* 14% Power Securities pf. 3 42% 42% 42 42
2Ar -1% Premier Gold (24c).. 9 1% *l% 1% 1%
14 6% Prince* Whltely.... 11 10% 10% 10 10
60% 29 PrlnceA WhKely pf S 5 34V* 35 34% 35
41% 5% Prudential Inv 32 14% 15%. 14% 15%
17% 16% Pub Util Hold war .. 19 18% 19% 18% 19%
101% 98 PugS PA Lt pf (6). 50s 99'% 99'% 99% 99%
113% 55 Rwy ALt Sec (♦<>.. 1 67 67 67 67
65 7% Rainbow Lum ProdA 8 16 17% 16 16%
20% 4% Rainbow Lum Prodß 77 7% 77%
8% 1% Reiter-Foster (10c). 2 3% 3% 3 3
29 14% Reliable Stoesbl>4.. 3 18% 18% 18% 18%
63% 12 Reliance Manage.... 4 22 22 22 22
18 4 Reynolds Bros inc... 9 5 5 4% 4%
43 18% Reynolds Met (new) 1 26% 26% 26% 26%
38% 9 Rich R cum pf (3 % ) 1 9 9 9 9
43% 30 Hike Kumler 3 30% 31 30% 31
52 22% Roan Antelope Min.. 11 29 29% 28% 29%
49% 10 Rochester Cent Pow. 6 35 35V* 35 35%
108% 45 Rnberold Co (4) 3 50 60% 50 50%
45% 30% Rudd Mfg Co 1 35 36 35 35
50 25 Ryerson (JT)(t2%). 1 32% 32% 32% 32%
47% 14% St Regie Paper
107 95 St Regis Paper pf(7) 52s 100 100 100 100
25% 9 Sail Cteek Prod (2). 16 11% 12 11% 12
79 25 Schiff (The) Co (2). 1 30 30 30 30 .
39% 10% Schulte Real Estate. 1 10% 10% 10% 10%
26 4 Schulte Un sc-|l St. 10 4% 4% 4% 4%
65% 10 Seiberling Rub (1).. 1 15% 15% 15% 15%
31% 4 Selected Industries.. 50 7% 8% 7% 7%
99 50% Sel Ind allot ofs 5%. 6 63% 63% 63 63
69% 49% Select Ind pr (6%).. 1 55% 65% 65% 65%
28% 3% Sentrv Safety Cent.. 3 5% 5% 5% 5%
68 48 Sheaffer Pen (t 3)... 3 55% 55% 54 54
28 3 Shattuck Den Min... 3 8% 8% 8% 8%
39% 6% Shndoab Corp(b6%) 22 7% 7% 7% 7%
63 14% Shenan Corp pf (3).. 33 28% 29% 28 28%
48% 15 Silica Gel ct 3 15% 15% 15% 15%
128 79% Silverdsaac pf (7).. 264 85 91 85 91
66% 10 Slsto Fin Corp 4 18%.19% 18 18
19 1% Sonora Products.... 66 1% 2% 1% 2%
30 26 So Cal Ed pf A (1%) 2 28 28 ,28 28
26% 20 So Cal Ed pf B(2%). 6 24% 24% 24% 24%
1 24% 21% So Cal Ed pf C <l%). 3 23 23 23 23
3% 1% So Am Gold A Plat.. 12 1 % 1% 1% 1%
60% 35'% South Penn Oil (2).. 9 41% 41% 41% 41%
110% 100 SEPAL pf(7) 1 105 105 105 105
21% 5% Southern Corp 4 6 6 6 6
17% 4 So Ice A Utilities 8.. 14% 4% 4% 4%
24 11% Southland Roy (1).. 4 13% 13% 13 13
25 9% s W Dairy Products. 5 16% 16% 16 16
22% 4% S W Gas Util 7 6% 6% 6 6%
6% % Standard Motors.... 11% 1% 1% 1%
93 45 Stand Oil of Ind t 2% 72 53% 53% 53% 63%
46% 29 Stand of Ky (t 2)... 5 36% 36% 36 36
38% 15 Stelni A)A Co(1.60). 2 19 19 19 19
51% 31 Starrett Corp pf(6).. 4 38 38% 38 38%
16% 7% Stlnnes (Hugo) 17% 7% 7% 7%
36% 11 Strauss (Nathan)... 2 12% 15 12% 15
35% 15 Strombg-Car t 1.12% 2 30 30 30 30
34 2% Stutz Motor Car.... 2 4 4 4 4
34% 9% Sun Inv 1 15% 15% 16% 15%
52% 32% Sun inv pf (S) 3 39% 39% 39% 39%
40 30% Superheater (til)... 2 40% 40% 40% 40%
12 4 SunrayOH 11 8% 9 8% 8%
37% 25% Swift Inti (2) 3 82% 32% 32'* 32'*
149% 121)4 Swift A Co (8) I 138% 138% 138% 138%
100% 89 Swiss-Am El pf (6). 1 92 92 92 92
26 10 Byrac Wash M Btl) 1 10 10 10 lo 1
180% 40% Tampa Electric (J2> 1 60 50 50 50
10% 4 Teck Hughes (60c).. 10 6% 5% 6% 5%
116 107 Texas PAL pt (7).. 30* 104 |lO4 104 104
ADVERTISING PLANS
TO BE MAINTAINED
Reports Indicate Original
Programs for 1930 May
Be Increased.
i ~
BY J. C. BOYLE.
Special Dispatch to The Star.
NEW YORK. December 2.—" The busl
> j ness is here and we are going to get it.”
That represents the general attitude of
producers, manufacturers, distributors,
i wholesale and retail merchants through
the country as shown by a careful sur
-1 vey in various sections. This survey
1 points out with unmistakable plainness
that the business factors involved de
' pend on advertising to accomplish their
' purpose and to prevent any slackening
' of buying.
1 The big national advertisers in scores
of instances intend to increase their
newspaper advertising appropriations for
1930. stores and local
| advertisers in various sections are fol
lowing suit.
No Cancellations Reported.
Two large advertising agencies here
, report that they have had no cancella
, tions of 1930 schedules so far as na
tional advertising is concerned, and that
, there has been no lessening of volume.
, On the other hand, they say there has
been temporary tightening up of some
of the department store accounts..
‘ One of the most eminent judges of
distribution policy in the United States
1 said today:
"The only critical factor in the ad
vertising situation is consumer support.
The promotional effort must be redou
i bled, and if this is done I cannot find
that there is any likelihood or reason
for a letdown in business. In most cases
advertising schedules are made out on
the year in advance, based on the busi
ness done during the preceding year. I
find that on this basts large advertisers
1 have not modified their schedules. I
should say that advertising is standing
up well, and there is no sign of a bad
letdown as a result of recent condi
tions.”
Other advertising agencies with de
partment store accounts reported that
there had been no curtailment among
their customers here.
Sectional Reports.
Dispatches from NeW Orleans report
that newspapers and advertising agen
cies find that local, sectional and na
tional advertising is running at about
the same volume as last year, with no
indication of any reduction in advertis
ing appropriations, but some hesitancy
still existing among retailers. On the
other hand, some of the large oil com
panies who cover the South expect to
increase their appropriations.
San Francisco reports that the ad
vertising managers of the four leading
department stores are unanimous in
saying that December advertising bud
gets would be adhered to, and there is
no reason to expect a let-down. Lead
ing Pacific Coast advertising agency ex
ecutives say indications are that na
tional advertising appropriations will
continue as they arc or be increased
slightly on the coast. The advertising
managers of leading papers in the
district say that November and Decem
ber advertising shows increases for
nearly all papers and that the outlook
Is for a further steady increase.
In the Philadelphia district advertis
ing authorities assert that any'uneasi
ness agents may have had is disaDpear
ing and that the trend of appropriations
in that section is upward. Local de
partment stores have tested buying
power in Sunday issues and were well
repaid.
One radio manufacturer in the dis
trict doubled his appropriation for 1929
and expects to maintain this increase
next year.
Hesitancy Disappearing.
Advertising has shown some slowness
in the last few weeks in the Chicago
section, but the tendency toward hesi
tancy is disappearing and a pick-up is
in prospect. Only one national schedule
has been canceled in the Atlanta sec
tion, recording to reports received here,
and this was only for the purpose of re
vision. The leading Atlanta papers ex
pect 1929 to establish an all-time high
record for advertising volume.
. From the Cleveland district come
statements that national automobile
and financial advertising has been
somewhat reduced, but that local finan
cial advertising is holding up well. Ad
vertising mediums there expect that the
national financial advertising will come
in its usual volume as soon as stock
market conditions become further sta
bilized.
Advertising specialists in New York
have issued warnings to their custom
ers declaring that a curtailment of
their advertising programs-jnight not
only render the advertising campaigns
ineffective, but might bring upon the
advertisers the very slump they a§p de
sirous of avoiding.
—* •
HUNT GIVEN UP FOR MAN
WHO LEAPED FROM SHIP
By the Associated Press.
NEW YORK. December 2.—The
Radio Marine Corporation of America
last night reported its station at
Chatham, Mass., had received messages
from the liner President Roosevelt say
ing a third-class passenger had jumped
overboard and that search for him had
been abandoned.
Two messages, it was said, were sent
from the President Roosevelt, which
left here Saturday, to the steamer Mil
waukee.
TJie first, sent at 7:40 p.m., said:
“Have lost a man overboard and are
searching for him now.” The second,
transmitted an hour later, thanked
the Milwaukee for aiding the search,
and sai<L “Have given up search for
third-class passenger who jumped over
board."
Neither message gave the identity of
the man.
TREASURY CERTIFICATES.
i Reported by J. & W. Seliftman * Co.)
Rate—Maturity. Bid. Offer.
4%s Dec. 15, 1929 100 1-32 100 2-32
C.S Dm. 15. 1929 100 2-32 100 3 32
s*»s Mar. 15, 1930 100 17-32 100 19-33
4%s June lfi. 1930 100 i'NJ ?i*2 2
3%s Mur. 15. 1932 99 12-32 99 16-32
3'aS Sept. 15, 1932 99 12-32 99 16-32
3%s Dec. 15.
—Pre». 1929 —. Stock ana Pates—
Hieh. Low Dividend Rat* Add 00. Open. Hlah. Low cioae
23 7% Texon Oil & Land. .. 2 9% 9% 9% 9%
38 19 Thermold Co < 2).... 3 21% 22% 21% 22%
85 25% Third Nat Inv (1)... 6 28 28 25% 25%
69% 18 Thomp Prod A (t2* 2 23% 23% 23% 23%
70 40 Tlsh Realty & Con.. 3 44 44 44 44
76% 40% Todd Shipyard «4).. 12 46*4 46*4 46', 48*4
67% 20% Transatner n itl 60) 27 43% 44>s 43% 44%
33% 7% Tran Con Air Tran.. 79% 9% 9% 9',
31% 5% Trans Air Trans ofs. ’ 8 5% 5% B!» 5%
24 3 Tr-Lux U L.P. S.(A) 4 5% 5% 5% 5%
104 Vi 45% Trl-Cont Allied 11 55 55% 53% 54%
57 10 Tri-Continental Cor. 19 16% 17 16% 16%
119% 75 Tri-Cont Corn pf (6) 1 80 80 80 80
33Vi 5% Triplez Safety Glass 6 B*4 B'i 8 8
60 44% Trl Utilities 3 46 46 46 46
60% 15 Trun* Fork Stores.. 1 23 23 32 23
49% 10V4 Tung-Sol Lamp *2). 2 20% £OVi 20% 20%
41% 15 Ulen&Co 16 20% 21 20% 21
86% 21% Union Amer Invest.. 2 27% 27% 27% 27%
20 % Union Tobacco 79 1% 1% 1% 1%
> 47% 8% United Corp war 22 14% 14% 13% 13%
61 Vv 29% United Ch pt pf (3).. 1 34 34 34 34
20% 6% United Dry Docks... 15 8 8 , 7% 8
* 23% 15 United Elec Ser 7
4% fl, Unit El Ser pur war. 1 % % 7* 7*
.50% 15 United Gas Co 30 20 s , 20% 20% £O%
61% 20 Unit L.&P A (60c). ( 105 24' - 24% 24% 24%
124% 85% Utd Lt &Po pf (6).. 4 9«i 4 96'* 98
21 4% tint ted Milk Prod 14 4 14
41% 22?, United Molasses I.td 2 2.5 25 25 25
45 25' Un N G Can (tl 60). 1 2 9 2 , ( 2 9
11 1% Unit Prof Sh (120).. 3 3 *3 “3 “3
9% •% |lnU Reproducers B. 1
26% 14 US Dairy B 3 20% 20 Vi 20% 20Vi
56% 20 U S Flnlnshln* (12). 1 24% 24% 24% 24%
74% 14 US Foil B(l.) 1 21% 21% 21% .^l%
NEW YORK COTTON.
NEW YORK, December 2
ton opened steady at a decline of 1 to
4 points today In response to relatively
easy Liverpool cables, but steadied up
after the call on some trade buying and
local covering.
Reports of continued unfavorable
| weather for saving late cotton in the
South may have been a factor, while
there was also buying or covering in
preparation for the private crop reports
which are expected before the publica
tion of the Government report next
Monday.
Owing to unfavorable weather during
November, some traders expect a reduc
tion in crop estimates, and this idea
may have been behind part of the early
buying. January was selling around
17.32 and March 17.62 at the end of
the first half hour, or about 2 to 3
; points net higher.
Private cables reported continental
’ liquidation in Liverpool absorbed by
1 trade covering at the decline. They
■ said that cloth buyers were operating
, cautiously and that manufacturers were
; losing ground.
.
GRAIN MARKET.
i CHICAGO, December 2 (/P).—Big
• deliveries in Chicago today on Decem
• ber wheat contracts led to much in-
I creased pressure to sell, and caused
■ material setbacks in prices at times.
The total December wheat deliveries
here announced during trading hours
were 9,081,000 bushels, an aggregate
! seldom equaled, and apparently in
■ dicating that a great many speculators
• were backing away from actual owner
; ship. There was disappointment, too,
. that the United States wheat visible
i supply decrease today, 2,388.000 bushels,
i was smaller than numerous traders had
expected.
’■ V/heat closed unsettled. Vs to 1 cent
i per bushel below Saturday’s finish.
Corn closed 1 to advanced.
• oats unchanged to r* up, and provisions
. showing 2 to 20 cents gain.
WHEAT— High. Low. Close.
I December 1.29 1.27 s * 1.28',
1 March 1.36 1.34' 135 s ,
' May 1.40 V* 1.38'* 1.39 s ,
; July 1.40'* 1.38 s ,a 1.39'*
. CORN—
-1 December .90 s * .88'* .90'*
• March .95 s , ,94'a ,95'2
[ May 97’, .96', .97 s *
; July 99'* .98 .39 s ,
t December -O'* .46'* ,47'i
- March 7SO'* .49 s * ,50V*
I May 51 s * .50’* .51'*
l RYE—
. December I.OR 1.06 1.07
March 1.09's I.oß'* 1.08 s *
May 1.09 1.07 Hr I.OBV*
LARD—
December 10 47 10.37 10 47
. January 10.95 10.00 10,90
' May 11.35 11.32 11 32
Wall Street Briefs
; By the Associated Press.
i New high records were established
■ by the Associated Gas A Electric sys
' terns, which, in a consolidated state
; ment of earnings of properties since
• dates of acquisition, shows a 92 per
i cent increase in gross earnings for the
12 months ending October 31, a jump
of 111 per cent in net earnings, and
: a balance for dividends and surplus
more than double the amount reported
for the previous 12-month period.
American National Co., Inc., and C.
P. Childs & Co.. Inc., are offering $500,-
, 000 Territory of Hawaii V 2 per cent
1 gold bonds, due 1952 to 1958, inclusive,
at prices to yield 4.30 per cent.
An offering of an issue of $4,000,000
City of Detroit, Mich., 5 Vj per cent
bonds, maturing from August 1. 1930, to
. November 15, 1933, was made today.
Orders for lumber booked by 834 lead
ing hardwood and softwood mills dur
ing the week ending November 23, as
reported to the National Lumber Manu
facturers’ Asociation, were only 77 per
cent of production, compared with 82
; per cent a week ago. The 834 mills gave
: total production as 376,690.000 feet,
while 838 mills the week before gave
production as 362,505,000 feet.
BONDS ON THE CURB
MARKET.
Sales in DOMESTIC BONDS,
thousands. High. Low. Noon.
47 Ala Pow 4'*S ’67... 95 s * 95'* 95 s *
8 Aluminum Co 5s '52 101 s * 101'* 101V*
17 Aluminum Ltd 5s ’4B 97’* 97' 4 97’*
10 Am G & E 5s ’28... 95 s * 95 s * 95 s *
5Am P A L 6s 2016 . 104' 4 104'* 104' 4
18 Appalach Pow 5s 56 97'* 97'* 97’i
21 Ark Pow & Lt 5s '56 96'* 96'* 96'*
4As Sim Hdw 6’*s ’33 86'* 86'* 86'i
7 As Tel Ut s'*s ’44 C 103 102'* 102'*
2 Bost A Me 6s m ’33 100'* 100'* 100'*
10 Can NRy Eq 7s E ’35 107'* 107' 4 107>*
6 Cent St El s'*s '54 77’* 77 77
5 Cent St El 5s '48.. 75 75 75
5 C Strs R1 s'*S A '49 79 79 79
2 Cln St Car s'*s A '52 92 92 92
1 Cities Ser 5s '66. .. 83’* 83’* 83’*
1 Cities Ser G P 6s '43 87 1 « 87' 4 87'.*
12 Comw Ed 4' *s D '57 77 77 77
3 Cons G Balt 6s A '49 72'/* 72'* 72V*
11 Cons G B 4’*s G '69 85 85 85
7 Consum Pow 4',*s 'SB 92 s * 92 s * 92 s *
1 Cont Oil s'*s '37.. 92’, 92’* 92’,
6 Cudahy P 5s '46 84 84 84
1 Dela El Pow s'is 59 94 94 94
4 Den A Salt L 6s '6O 92'* 92 s * 92 s *
1 Det C Gas 6s A '47 98 98 98
5 El P Nat G 6'*s '3B 111 110 111
29 Federal Wat s'is '54 98 97'i 98
10 Firestone T 5s '42.. 106’* 106' 4 106'i
3 Garlock Pack 6s '39 100’* 100’* 100’*
10 Gatineau P 5s '56.. 99’, 99’* 99’*
2 Gen Wat W 6s B '34 102', 102', 102'*
40 Ga & Fla 6s A '46 . 98'* 98'* 98'*
3 Georgia Pow 5s '67. 98 s * 98 5 4 98 s *
3 Goodyr TAR s'*s '3l 95’* 95’, 95’,
7 Grd Grip 6s '44... . 103'* 103'* 103'*
1 Gulf O Pa 5s '37... 103 103 103
1 Gulf St Ut 5s A '56 93’4 93', 93'4
2 Hood Rub s'*s '36... 103'* 103', 103 1 W
1 111 P A L s'*s B '54 90'* 90'* 90'*
11 Indep Oil 6s '39 102’* 102'* 102’,
lOlndn PAL 5s A '57 98’* 98'* 98'*
6 Inters PS5s D '56.. 76'* 76‘, 76',*
41 lowa-Neb LAP 5s '57 94'* 93’* 94'*
3 Manitoba P s'*s 'sl 94 94 94
1 Miss R FI 6s '44 ww 94 94 94
10 Nat F Prod 6s A '44 104 s * 104 s * 104 s *
9 Neisner Bros 6s '4B 99 99 99
1 N Y P & L 4'*s '67 95 95 95
2 Nor State P 6'*s '33 99'i 99'* 99'i
1 Ohio P 4'is D '56... 83 s * 83 s * 83 s *
5 Pac O Ac E 4'*s E '57 80 80 80
11 Pk Av B <6lo> 6s '4O 88 88 88
2 Park A Til 6s '36 . 68 68 68
20 Parmelec Trns 6s '44 94'* 94'* 94',
1 Penn Dk Ac W 6s '49 95 s , 95 s * 95 s *
113 Penn O Ed 6s 'SO xw 99'* 99 99
6Peop LAP 5s '79 ww 103’, 103'i 103'*
34 Phila El 5V»s '72... 101' , 101- 101'*
1 Phila El 5s '6O 100'* 100'i 100'*
10 Pitts Coal Co 6s '49 93 93 93
3 Oueensb O s'*S A '52 96 95 s * 96
6 Roch Cent P 5s '53 99 s , 99 s * 99 s *
ISt L Gas A C 6s '47 97 s * 97 s * 97 s *
25 Flrripps s'*s '43 90 90 90
5 Shawsheen 7s '3l. .. 89’* 89'* 89’,
3 Util PAL 5s '59 ww 85 s * 85 s * 85 s *
Sales In FOREIGN BONDS,
thousands.
16 Chile Cons 7s '60..,. 94 94 94
5 Chile Mtg Bk 6s ’3l 96'* 96'* 96'*
7 Chile Mtg Bk 6s '62 86'* 86', 86',
1 Com Prlv Bk sVis '37 84 84 84
1 El Pow Ger 6'*s '53 88 88 88
10 Euro Mtg 7s C 67.. 82'* 82'* 82'*
1 Frankfort B'*s '53 . 91'* 91', 91'*
11 Oelsertklrchen 6s '34 90'* 90 90'*
6 Ger Cons Mun 7s '47 91 s , 91 s * 91 s ,
5 Ital Sup Pow 6s '63 69'* 69'* 65.'*
3 Ruhr G C 6' *s A '53 80'* 80 s , 80'*
37 Russian 6'*r '19.... 77 7
30Rus 6' *s ctfs NC >l9 6'* 6 6 J
34 Russian s'*s '2!.... 7 6 7
2 Sttnnes 7s 36 xw... 90 90 90
as—Actual sales.
xd—Ex dividends,
xr— Ex rights,
ur—Under rule.
«'i--When issued,
n—New
ww—With warrants,
xw—Without warrants.
Prev 1929—* Stock ana Sale*— i
Htah Low. Dividend Rate. Add 0) Open. Hiah. low. Close. I
91% 36% U S Gypsum (1.60).. 1 45 45 45 45
19 14% U S Linas 1 14 14 14 14
102 59 U8&In S ctf (2%). 8 70 70% 70 70
62% 34% U S Radiator (2)... 1 43 43 43 43
18% 5 U S Shares Fin 11 8% 8% 8% 8%
30 10 United Wall Paper... 2 17 17 17 17
2% % Unity Gold 1 v, \ 4 .i 4 sj
26 11% Unit Verde Ext (4).. 1 12% 12% 12% 12%
6V« 2% Utah Apex (60c).... 2 3% 3% 3% 314,
1 -jO 13% Utll Powftr&Lt(fl).. 18 16% 16% lt> 16
90 27 Ut P& Lißctfs Ul). 2 39% 39% 39% 39%
66“.- 13 Utility &lnd 11 19% 19*. 19% 19%
64% 20 Util & Ind pf (1%).. 1* 26% 26% 26% 26%
44 10 Utility Equities 82 13% 14% 12% 13%
133% 75% Vacuum Oil (T4>4).. 15 94% 96 94% 96
38% 8% Van Camp Packing.. 5 13 13 13 13
38 11 Van Camp Ppf(l%). 7 14% 14% 13% 13%
6% 1% Venezuela Pet (29c). 72% 2% 2% 2%
18 7% Vick Fin Corp 13 8 8% 8 h
170% 35% Walgreen Co 6 55 59% 51% 55%
23 6% Walker (H)(1) 2 12 12 11% 11%
72%
14% l Watson (J W) C 0... 2 1% 1%, 1% i%
32 5% Wayne Pump 1 12 12 12 12
2% % Wenden Copper 10 ft {g % %
41% 15 Williams R C (1.40). 3 16% 16% 16 16
11% 2% Worth. Inc A.. 4 2% 2% 2 2
44% 13 Zonlte Prod 41.60).. 235 19% 23 19% 22%
RIGHTS. Expire.
% % Trans Corp. Jan. 4 1 .29 .29 .29 .29
Dlvldrnd rates tn dollars based on last quarterly or arml
annual payment.
•Ex-divldend tPsr-ly extra. tPlus extra In stock, a Payable In
cash or stock. b Payable in stock, d Payable In prslsrrsd stock.
PAY ROLLS SHOW GAIN
IN SOME INDUSTRIES
By the Associated Press.
Industries engaged in making ma
chine tools show the largest relative
increase in pay roll totals since 1926.
Department of Commerce compila
tions for October record an increase of
46.5 per cent for this group, using 1926:
as a base. Manufacturers of electrical
equipment follow, .with a rise of 30.6
per cent.
Other industries showing a substan
tial increase are woman’s clothing,
hosiery and knit goods, printing and
newspapers, flour, confectionery, struc
tural iron, agricultural implements, pa
per boxes and furniture.
Industries showing the largest de
creases arc those producing pianos and
organs, cast iron pipes, bricks, tile and
terracotta.
In general, pay rolls were 2.3 per
; cent higher than in 1926 and 6.4 per
, cent above October of last year.
DENIES BANKS TRIED
TO HALT STOCK DROP
Special Dlspr.tch to The Star.
YORK, December 2.—That the
bankers’ pool formed in the office of
J. P. Morgan & Co. on the second day
of the recent market slump had no
intention of attempting to stop the
decline of prices is disclosed in the
monthly review of the National City
Bank, whlcn will be mailed to stock
holders and depositors today. Its pur
pose.‘according to the publication, was
to make the decline an orderly one, and
to insure that a buyer at some price
would be ready for every offer of sale
in the pivotal issues. The operations
of the pool are described as a “rear
guard action necessary to protect the
retreat." ,
The description of the formation and
objectives of the pool, as told- in the
i publication, is regarded as authoritative,
' because Charles E. Mitchell, chairman
! of the bank, was active in the forma
tion and guidance of it. While the
| pool has not yet been liquidated, the
, publication says, its losses, if any. will
> be small, and at no time was it found
, necessary to employ half of the fund
. which had been subscribed to “allay
' the excitement of the moment, re
store normal conditions in the market,
i stop the needless sacrifice of values and
1 prevent the injury to all business which
usually results from a major crisis.”
Baltimore Markets
Special Dispatch to The Star.
BALTIMORE, Md., December 2.
Poultry, alive—Turkeys, pound, 33a35;
old and crooked breasts, 25; young
chickens, 24a28; Leghorns, 22; old hens,
22a27; Leghorns, 18al9; poor and thin
fowls, 17al8; old roosters, 18a20; ducks,
16a25; geese, 16a22; guinea fowls, each,
40a50; pigeons, pair, 25.
Eggs—Receipts, 1,208 cases; native
and nearby hennery, dozen, 53a54;
firsts, 50; pullets, 40a45; current re
ceipts, 43a45; culls and dirty, 25a30.
Butter—Creamery, good to choice,
pound, 41a46; ladles, 35a36; rolls, 31a32;
store packed, 21; process butter, 40a42.
Vegetable Prices.
Potatoes, white, barrel. 1.50a4.00;
1 100-pound sacks, 1.75a2.50;' sweet
potatoes, baVrel, 1.50a2.25; bQshel, 75a
1 1.25; yams, barrel, 1.50a2.25; beans,
bushel, 2.50a4.00; beets, 100, 3.00a4.00;
Brussel sprouts, quart. 15a25; cabbage,
basket, 40a60; carrots. 100, 2.00a4.00;
| cauliflower, crate, 2.25a3.00; celery,
’ crate, 2.00a3.00; cucumbers, hamper,
. 5.00a6.00; eggplants, crate, 1.25a3.00;
lettuce, crate, 4.00a5.50; onions. 100
! pounds, 1.50a1,75; parsnips, basket, 40a
50; peppers, crate, 6.50a7.00: pumpkins,
100, 3.00al0.00; spinach, basket, 30a60;
squash, crate, 2.00a3.00; tomatoes, crate,
2.50a3.50: turnips, hamper, 25a35;
apples, bushel. 75a2.75; cranberries, box,
3.00a4.25; grapefruit, box, 3.25a5.00;
oranges, box, 3.00a4.50; tangerines, box,
2.25a3.25.
Live Stock Market.
Cattle—Receipts, 500 head; fair sup
ply; market active and stronger.
Steers—Choice to prime, none: good
to choice. 12.00 to 12.35; medium to
good, 11.00 to 12.00; fair to medium,
10.00 to 11.00; plain to fair. 9.00 to 10.00;
common to plain, 8.00 to 9.00.
Bulls —Choice to prime, none; good to
choice, none; medium to good, 7.50 to
8.50: fair to medium, 7.00 to 7.50; plain
to fair, 6.00 to 7.00; common to plain,
5.00 to 6.00.
Cows —Choice to prime, nene; good to
choice, 7.50 to 8.00; medium to good.
3.50 to 7.50; fair to medium, 5.50 to 6.50:
plain to fair, 4.50 to 5.50; common to
plain. 3.75 to 4.50.
Heifers—Choice to prime, none; good
to choice, none; medium to good, 9.00 to
10.00; fair to medium, 8.00 to 9.00; plain
to fair, 7.00 to 8.00; common to plain,
6.00 to 7.00.
Fresh cows and springers, 60.00 to
150.00.
Sheep and lambs—Receipts, 2.200
head; moderate supply; market higher.
Sheep, 2.00 to 6.00; lambs, 6.50 to 14.00.
Hogs—Receipts, 4.600 head: fair sup
ply; market stronger. Lights, 9.90 to
10.15; heavies, 10.00 to 10.30; medium,
10.00 to 10.30: roughs, 7.40 to 9.00; light
pigs, 9.50 to 9.80; pigs. 9.75 to 10.00.
Calves —Receipts, 450 head; moder
ate supply; market higher. Calves, 7.00
to 17.00
Hay and Grain Prices.
Wheat —No. 2 red Winter, spot, 1.32;
No. 2 red Winter, garlicky, spot, 1.28*4;
December, 1.28*/4; January, 1.30*2; No.
3, garlicky, 1.24%.
Com —No. 2 domestic, yellow, I.oßa
1.09; cob corn, new, 4.50.
Oats—No. 2 white domestic, spot, 56a
56*2; No. 3 white domestic, spot, 55a
55*,.
Hay—Recepits,. none. Season for
old hay Is about over. A little new
crop is arriving, but hardly enough
upon which to establish quotations by
grades. Where in good order new hay
sells at from 14.00 to 17.00 per ton, ac
cording to its quality and condition,
receipts by truck taking care of most
requirements.
Straw—Little demand for straw. Re
ceipts generally ample. Wheat straw,
J No. 1, per ton. 9.00al0.00; oat straw,
No. 1, per ton, 9.00a10.00.
Theater Construction.
NEW YORK, December 2 UP). —Con-
struction of 24 theaters on the Pacific
Coast at a cost of $15,000,000 is planned
by Fox Theaters as part of its 1930 ex
pansion program.
FINANCIAL.
CURB ISSUES EASE
IN MIXED MARKET
| Oils, Pipe Lines and Few
Others Stand Out Against
Trend.
BY JOHN A. CRONE.
Special Dispatch to The Star.
NEW YORK, December 2.—Opening
with a mixed trend, after the longest
trading suspension since the World
War, curb stocks, on active trading,
cased oft in today's session. The oils,
pipe lines, natural gas stocks and a
few specific Issues like the Ford group,
Roan Antelope and Crocker Wheeler /
stood out against the general trend.
Responding to the opening of the
American Petroleum Institute meeting
at Chicago today and reports of with
drawals from Seminole storage tanks,
oils were higher early in the session.
Continued uncertainty about red metal
price trends created irregularity in
mining shares. Specific mine develop
ments enabled Roan Antelope to move
against the trend.
A block of 18,100 shares of Anglo-
American Oil. the only large block to
appear In early trading, came out at
17, unchanged. London merger rumors
and reports of passing of control creat
ed a short-lived bulge In General Elec
tric, Ltd.
Pipe lines continued the upward trend
of the previous session. Part of the
present buying in this group is based
on the advice of a national statistical
service, which finds the problem of
transporting oil more important just
now than petroleum production. Pos
sibilities that some of the abandoned
oil lines will be used to transport nat
ural gas and recent capital distribu
tions also are being used to bid up pipe
line shares.
Natural gas stocks, likewise respond
ing to the advice of statistical services
brisk early demand. The early
upswing of Ford Motor shares was
brought about by further details of
the new model.
One of the features of the trading
was the Introduction of Pennsylvania
Railroad rights to the Curb. They
opened in a block of 15,000 at 3*i and
moved within a fractional range. Penn
road Corporation, as well as Pennsyl
vania shares on the big board, were
slightly lower as a result of the rights
issue.
Fox Th Uters A was one of the weak
est spots in the industrial list, selling
off in sympathy with Fox Film on the
big board.
FILES TAX SUIT.
BALTIMORE, December 2 (Special).
—The Western Maryland Railway Co.
has filed suit in Federal Court for the
refund of $315,000 in Federal taxes paid
between 1920 and 1924.
The late Joshua W. Miles, collector
of tmernal revenue In 1920, is named
defendant in a claim for $15,000, whiled
the other claims are directed against’
L. Tait, collector since then.
The sum asked includes accumulated
interest on the alleged overcharges,
which attorneys for the railroad point
out in their petition grew out of refusal
to allow deductions on the discount
values of mortgage bonds. Claims for
refunds have been refused, the attor
neys said, and the court now will be
asked to pass on them.
CHICAGO DAIRY MARKET.
CHICAGO, December 2 (JP).—Butter
Firm, receipts, 8,206 tubs; creamery,
standards, 40: extra firsts,
40 to 41; firsts, 37 to 38 V 2; seconds, 35
to
Eggs—Firm; receipts, 1.545 cases
prices unchanged; extra firsts, 51 to
o 3; graded firsts, 48 to 49; current
firsts, 40 to 43; ordinary first, 37 to 39;
refrigerator extras, 38 to 38 *i; refrig
erator firsts, 37*2.
■ - - i
FOREIGN EXCHANGE.
(Quotations furnished by W. B. Hibbs St Co.i
Nominal fold Selling checks
. _ . , value (orpart. today.
London, pound 14.8685 »4.87»«
Pans, franc jb3 (ml 1 ;.
Brussels, belga 139 *1398’ a
Berlin, mark 2382 .2393
Rome. lira 193 . 0523V*
Zurich, lranc. 193 ,1941’a
Athens, drachma 193
Madrid, peseta 193 .iili"
Vienna, schilling 14069 .1414
Budapest, pengo 1749
Prague, crown (liom.) 6298'*
Warsaw, sloty 1122
Copenhagen, mown .268 iiigO’*
Oslo, crown 268 .2879*2
Stockholm, crown 268 .2691
Money to Loan
Secured by flrst deed nt trust on real eatatg.
Prevailing Interest and commission.
Joseph I. Weller 420 l a Trait
Real Estate Investments
JAMES y. PENNEBAKER
Nat. 5291 1529 K St. N.W.
Oldest National Bank In
the District of Columbia
This Bank
‘Takes Care’ of
Its Customers
’ —not only in times of
“easy money,“ but
also in times of de
pression.
•J This policy has
been steadfartlv
maintained through
out the 115 years of
The Metropolitans
existence.
3 c o on Savings
National
Metropolitan
H 5 0 1 H 5
Years JJanR Vfars .
15th St. opp. U. S, Treasury
a
15

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