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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, December 22, 1929, Image 27

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1929-12-22/ed-1/seq-27/

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18 HOURS W
WASHINGTON TO
FLORIDA
VIA " |
The Miamian Gulf Coast Ltd.
U. 3:05 pm. Lt. 3;05p.®.
Other Fast Through Trains Daily
Magnolia Limited 10:55 a.m.
2o7Miamian (Eg. Jan. I7) 3:05 p.m.
Palmatto Limited 7:25 p.m.
Havana Special....... *12:10 a.m.
'Sleeper* Ready 10:00 p.m.
' ' The Double-Trad Sea-Level Rout*
Atlantic Coast Line
T%a Standard Railroad of tho Saatk
Tickets, reservations. Information from
_ GEO. P. JAMES, G. P. A.
X4IS "H" St., N. W., Washington, D. C. j
National 7835
for "Trop.ca^ Trip, j
DANDRUFF
HBA AND FALLING HAIR ■>
® Mdlion* u»e Lock? Tl»er for *ealp
trouble* and Whyte-Fox for
RrW iPfll ** tin ailment*. Both sold
V jfJmXMt under Monev-Back Guar,
n t antee. Barber* or drußCflt*
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THOUSANDS ARE NOW USING !
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The New Two-Way Treatment fbr
I HEAD COLDS AND SKIN HtMTATIONS
■ Omtalni 14 AGtlv# ingredient* of well-known j
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i »iilr years’ teat. Sold everywhera ,
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C ii tie ura
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The finishing touch to the dainti
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delightfully perfumed and medi
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delicate and distinctive fragrance
and leaves the skin sweet and
wholesome.
Talcum 23c. So*p 25c. Ointment 25c.,30c.
Proprietor' . Potter Drug St Chemical
Corporation, Malden. Massachusetts
JUT*
inDHAM’C 1239—Gat 13th
JUl\l/nll J 2926 14th N.W.
Will deliver your radio
for $ 1 Tape
XX/ No Inconveniences
Balance on Jordan’s Budget Plan
Majestic
Victor
Atwater Kent
Philco
Many Floor Samples and
Exchanged Sets Will Be Sold
At Nearly Half Their Price
Both Stores Open Evenings
Arthur Jordan
PIAAO COMPANY
1239 GSSfSOTat 13th
STAGE STAR QUITS
| TO PRACTICE LAW
Miss Mary Rehan, Former
“Leading Lady,” Admitted
as Member of Bar.
How the glamour of the footlights and
a brilliant etage career were renounced
for the serious dignity of a court room
and the technicalities of the law was
i disclosed last week In the announce*
ment of the admission to the bar of the
United States Court of Customs and
Patent Appeals on December 12 of Miss
Mary Rehan of New York, a member
of the New York firm Os Barnes, Mc-
Kenna St Halstead.
Miss Rehan was In Washington for
one day only, having come to this city
on official business before the Court of
Customs and Patent Appeals. A few
years ago Miss Rehan was seen and
known to hundreds of Washingtonians
by her appearance on the stage as
leading lady to the late William Faver
' sham in the play “The Prince and the
Pauper.” Previous to that time she had
played with success in numbers of
i other plays. Including “Little Women.”
! “The Bluebird” and Walter Hampden’s
i great stage success, "The Wayfarer."
Listed as University Graduate.
i It was during the year following hen
appearance in “The Prince and the
Pauper,” in 1921, that Miss Rehan defi
nitely decided to give up her stage
| career to study law'. As a young girl
' she had graduated from the University
of Wisconsin, from where she received
a degree of bachelor of arts, so upon
her decision to study law she was ad
mitted without difficulty to the Brook
lyn Law School, where for three years
she applied herself with all the dili
gence and concentration which she had
acquired through her years of stage
training, With its intensive memory
work.
Her Experience Invaluable.
“My experience on the stage has
been invaluable to me in my profession
as a lawyer,” Mias Rehan Said in the
office of the Court of Customs Appeals,
where she remained irt Consultation
after her formal admission to the bar.
It was evident that the quiet poise and
the well modulated voice of the former
actress, resulting from many years of
experience in a profession where suc
cess or failure depended so greatly upon
these qualjties. should prove tremen
dous assets in her present calling. “It
is natural for me to place my voice In
speaking, so that it can retch to the
ends of the room and be heard by all
present, and that, you know,” Miss Re
han added, "is quite necessary lfi a
crowded court room.”
Entered Profession Two Years Ago.
Miss Rehan was admitted to the New
York State bar two years ago and the
is the only woman who has ever prac
ticed before the United States Customs
Court located In New York City. Al
though specialising in tariff and cus
toms cases. MisS Rehan also carries on
a general law practice.
Only two weeks ago ah invitation was
received by Miss Rehan to return to the
THE SUNDAY STAR. WASHINGTON. P. C„ DECEMBER 22. 1929 BART ONE.
Lawyer
■■ . WHMP
11| v
:: JlP.j
MISS MARY REHAN.
—Star Staff Photo.
stage, but lt was gently and quite firmly
declined. Asked if she preferred the
law to the stage, she replied. “One can’t
compare the two professions both
mean so much in different ways. 1
loved the theater and my memories and
associations of that time Will always be
cherished by me. but I am equally Inter
ested In my work as a lawyer, especial
ly In the customs cases.”
Described as Capable Attorney.
James R. Ryan, special United
States attorney. Department of Jus
tice, customs division, accompanied
Miss Rehan from New York and In
reply to a question as to whether the
Purchases Made Tomorrow. II
lere are only two days lift! However, the
te Tuesday!
actress-lawyer lady had ever opposed
him In the court room, he said:
“It has been my fortune to meet
Miss Rehan across the counsel table
and to oppose her in court. 1 have
found her a most capable attorney,
fair and courteous, but withal a most
formidable opponent.”
Miss Rehan is a member of the New
York State Bar Association, the New
York County Lawyers' Association and
the Actors’ Equity Association.
RULES GOVERNING D. C.
CARS EFFECTIVE IAN. 1
Code Prohibits Use for Private
Purposes, and Designates Use
of Chauffeurs.
A new code of rules governing Dis
triettowned automobiles has been drawn
up by the District Commisisoners, to be
come effective January 1 next. The
rules prohibit use of the automobiles for
private purposes, and provide that they
be kept in municipally-owned garages.
For the following officers, no chauf
feurs will be allowed, unless specifically
authorised by the Commissioners: In
spector of buildings, superintendent of
street cleaning, inspector of claims, su
perintendent of Oallinger Hospital, con-
I struetlon engineer and foremen of the
■ Engineering Department, superintendent
of street*, engineer of highways, superin
tendent of repairs. Cuts, and street im
provements; master plumber, superin
tendent of trees and parkings, and in
[ spector of plumbing.
‘ PLAN FAIR BUILDINGS.
i *
* CHICAGO, December 21 (4*l.—The
■ first group of buildings for the 1933
■ Chicago World's Fair will impose their
majestic beauty along the shores of
Lake Michigan between Sixteenth and
Thirty-ninth streets, the architectural
1 commission has announced.
Construction of the Travel and Trans-
I portatlon Building and the Administra
i tion Hall will begin on this site next
i Spring, the commission said.
1 D. C. VOTE ADVOCATES
WIN DEBATE HONORS
Woodward School Boys’ Contest
Marks Suspension of Activities
for Holiday Season.
BOSS of the Woodward School of the
Y. M. C. A., believe cltiaena of the
District of Columbia ahould be. given
the right to vote for representatives in
Congress and for President.
In debating the subject Friday a
Here’s wishing you a • • •
Colorful
Christmas
What would Christmas be without color?
Who can imagine sombre toys * . . Santa
Claus sans his flaming red suit ... or a tree
minus its dazzling ornaments?
“Mureo” Paint Products are in har
mony with the season. Use them to
put your home in tune with Yuletido
festivities. Easy to use, quick to dry.
There's time enough yet for those
odd painting jobs . . . come in this
week for your supply of “Mureo”
Magic.
£rJ.Murt>hu&
INCORPORATED
710 12th St. N. W.
National 2477
team of youthful orator* upholding the
affirmative side of the question was
declared winner. The contest marked
the close of the school for the holidays.
The winning team included Julius
Hopkins, Prank Maniscalco. Irwin
Goebel, Conley Robinson and James
Meyers. The losers were Robert Wal
lace, Robert Caraway, Charles Goetllng,
Julius Covert and William Meyer*.
Rebuttal speakers were Maniscalco and
Wallace.
Faculty members, as Judges, voted
ft to 2 in favor of tne affirmative team.
Selections by the school orchestra and
a trumpet solo by Oltn MeKnight eom
nleted the program.
Cadet Loses Buttons.
HUTCHINSON, Kan*.. December 21
(JP). —Perhaps some of the girls are
wearing West Point brass buttons as
souvenirs. The correspondent of the
I s ' WRIST WATCH *4
| I
IP Jewelry Store jS
m Wri«t Watch ■ n Price %
J K ■ BUY NOW %
r gus-ss*?® FOR XMAS fc?
LADIES’ WRIST WATCH
In the popular rectangular shape* ■ shock-proof Ol 1 "IfZ kFV
& movements, guaranteed 25 year*. Regular s2# value. * 1 1 • * 9 'jw
Elgin Strap Watch Men’i Strap Watches
U A standard make d*l E7E The newest style (Q 7E -*fft
r at a treat satin* «plO./0 eases with shock- /O rTV
M *■* Cnstalrs Jewelry Store. proof motements. An unnsnally simi
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‘ The Upstairs Jewelry Store 3^
ft BUT NOW FOR UCHTBR SETS, VANITT CASES,
CLOCKS. BELT AND BtCKLE SET^.
M - 20% to 40% REDUCED %
f PHILIP FRANKS ft
fOPEN EVENINGS
£ 812 F St. N.W. °"' L F p li * h '
New York Herald-Tribune wired his
paper that when the Army foot hall
squad. #n route to the West Coast, took
« a workout here, one player tossed his
; overcoat on a fence. When he came
■ back for it the buttons had vanished.
27

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